Results for 'meaning generation'

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  1.  2
    Meaning‐Generating Propositions of Reality by Media.Martin Gertler - 2013 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 11 (1):4-18.
    PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to pose questions about quality indicators, describe the fields of reference of communicators and the instruments currently being used in quality assurance of journalism, especially in Germany.Design/methodology/approachDue to their relevance to the questions being posed in media ethics, the paper deals with the meaning‐conferring functions of media offerings and with reasonable expectations toward media courses that prepare young communicators for their field of occupation.FindingsThis paper reveals that a more in‐depth involvement with constructivist epistemologies (...)
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  2.  1
    Cultivating New Movements and Circles of Meaning Generation: Upholding Our World, Regenerating Our Earth and the Calling of a Planetary Lokasamgraha.Ananta Kumar Giri - 2019 - Journal of Human Values 26 (2):146-166.
    Meaning is a key foundation of human life. We yearn to make our life meaningful and have a proper understanding of the meaning of words and worlds, which help us in blossoming of life rather than being trapped in labyrinths of confusion and annihilated in varieties of killing and destruction. But this fundamental yearning for meaning has always been under stress in different periods and epochs of human history. In our contemporary world, we are also going through (...)
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  3. Chapter Ten Art Constructs as Generators of the Meaning of the Work of Art Viktor F. Petrenko and Olga N. Sapsoleva.Art Constructs as Generators - 2007 - In L. I͡A Dorfman, Colin Martindale & Vladimir Petrov (eds.), Aesthetics and Innovation. Cambridge Scholars Press.
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  4.  25
    Generating Cooperative Question-Responses by Means of Erotetic Search Senarios.Paweł Łupkowskim & Dorota Leszczyńska-Jasion - 2014 - Logic and Logical Philosophy 24 (1):61-78.
    The concept of cooperative question-responses as an extension of cooperative behaviours used by interfaces for databases and information systems is proposed. A procedure to generate question-responses based on question dependency and erotetic search scenarios is presented. The procedure is implemented in Prolog.
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  5.  30
    Mean Spirits: The Politics of Contempt Between Feminist Generations.Madelyn Detloff - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (3):76-99.
    Current models for individuation in academe exacerbate generational tensions between second and third wave feminists. Feminist pedagogues must be wary of getting caught in the "vicious circle of contempt," where students are expected to compensate for a teacher's past narcissistic wounds. Instead, we must be willing to mourn the wounds we have received at the hands of a contemptuous culture and to acknowledge same-gender attachments that are disavowed in dialectical models of subject production.
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  6. What It Means to Live in a Virtual World Generated by Our Brain.Jan Westerhoff - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (3):507-528.
    Recent discussions in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind have defended a theory according to which we live in a virtual world akin to a computer simulation, generated by our brain. It is argued that our brain creates a model world from a variety of stimuli; this model is perceived as if it was external and perception-independent, even though it is neither of the two. The view of the mind, brain, and world, entailed by this theory has some peculiar (...)
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  7. Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction; 1. Identity of Meaning / Adrian Poole; 2. Identity and the Law / Lionel Bently; 3. Species-Identity / Peter Crane; 4. Mathematical Identity / Marcus Du Sautoy; 5. Immunological Identity / Philippa Marrack; 6. Visualizing Identity / Ludmilla Jordanova; 7. Musical Identity / Christopher Hogwood; 8. Identity and the Mind. [REVIEW]Raymond Tallis - 2010 - In Giselle Walker & E. S. Leedham-Green (eds.), Identity. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  8.  28
    Automatic Proof Generation in an Axiomatic System for $\mathsf{CPL}$ by Means of the Method of Socratic Proofs.Aleksandra Grzelak & Dorota Leszczyńska-Jasion - 2018 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 26 (1):109-148.
  9.  83
    Ventromedial Prefrontal-Subcortical Systems and the Generation of Affective Meaning.Mathieu Roy, Daphna Shohamy & Tor D. Wager - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (3):147-156.
  10.  5
    Meaning.David Edward Cooper - 2003 - Carleton University Press.
    Philosophers have traditionally approached questions of meaning as part of the philosophy of language. In this book David Cooper broadens the analysis beyond linguistic meaning to offer a an account of meaning in general. He shows that not only words, sentences, and utterances in the linguistic domain can be described as meaningful but also items in such domains as art, ceremony, social action, and bodily gesture. Unlike much of the recent work in the philosophy of meaning, (...)
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  11.  20
    The Consequences of Encoding Information on the Maintenance of Internally Generated Images and Thoughts: The Role of Meaning Complexes.Jonathan Smallwood, Rory C. O’Connor, Megan V. Sudberry, Crystal Haskell & Carrie Ballantyne - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):789-820.
    Three experiments investigated the hypothesis that internally generated images and thoughts were driven by meaning complexes, a construct which reflects a synthesis of semantic meaning and personal salience . Experiments 1 and 2 contrasted the mutual inhibition between encoding words and non-words on: the frequency that thoughts and images unrelated to the task were experienced and on the intensity of images generated from long-term memory and maintained under dual task conditions, which whilst familiar were not of particular personal (...)
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  12. The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding.Mark Johnson - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    In _The Meaning of the Body_, Mark Johnson continues his pioneering work on the exciting connections between cognitive science, language, and meaning first begun in the classic _Metaphors We Live By_. Johnson uses recent research into infant psychology to show how the body generates meaning even before self-consciousness has fully developed. From there he turns to cognitive neuroscience to further explore the bodily origins of meaning, thought, and language and examines the many dimensions of meaning—including (...)
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  13.  46
    Heritability and Heterogeneity: The Irrelevance of Heritability in Explaining Differences Between Means for Different Human Groups or Generations.Peter Taylor - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (4):392-401.
    Many psychometricians and behavioral geneticists believe that high heritability of IQ test scores within racial groups coupled with environmental hypotheses failing to account for the differences between the mean scores for groups lends plausibility to explanations of mean differences in terms of genetic factors. This two-component argument cannot be sustained when viewed in the light of the conceptual and methodological themes introduced in Taylor . These themes concern the difficulties of moving from the statistical analysis of variance of observed traits (...)
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  14.  43
    Religious Metaphors: Mediators Between Biological and Cultural Evolution That Generate Transcendent Meaning.Earl R. MacCormac - 1983 - Zygon 18 (1):45-65.
    . Humans can be described as existing somewhere on a descriptive continuum between the poles expressed by the metaphors “humans are machines” and “humans are animals.” Arguments for these metaphors are examined, and the metaphors are rejected as absolute descriptions of humans. After a brief examination of the nature of metaphor, all metaphors are discovered to mediate between biological and cultural evolution. Contrary to the reductionist program of sociobiologists, religious metaphors that generate transcendent meaning offer a legitimate description of (...)
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  15. Future Generations: A Prioritarian View.Matthew Adler - 2009 - George Washington Law Review 77:1478-1520.
    Should we remain neutral between our interests and those of future generations? Or are we ethically permitted or even required to depart from neutrality and engage in some measure of intergenerational discounting? This Article addresses the problem of intergenerational discounting by drawing on two different intellectual traditions: the social welfare function (“SWF”) tradition in welfare economics, and scholarship on “prioritarianism” in moral philosophy. Unlike utilitarians, prioritarians are sensitive to the distribution of well-being. They give greater weight to well-being changes affecting (...)
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  16.  26
    Generational Differences in Definitions of Meaningful Work: A Mixed Methods Study.Kelly Pledger Weeks & Caitlin Schaffert - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (4):1045-1061.
    The search for meaningful work has been of interest to researchers from a variety of disciplines for decades and seems to have grown even more recently. Much of the literature assumes that employees share a sense of what is meaningful in work and there isn’t much attention given to how and why meanings might differ. Researchers have not only called for more research studying demographic differences in definitions of meaning :77–90, 2014), but also more research utilizing mixed methods to (...)
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  17. Meaning, Expression, and Evidence.Ray Buchanan - 2012 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):152-157.
    Grice's (1957) analysis of non-natural meaning generated a huge industry, where new analyses were put forward to respond to successively more complex counterexamples. Davis (2003) offers a novel and refreshingly simple analysis of meaning in terms of the expression of belief, where (roughly) an agent expresses the belief that p just in case she performs a publicly observable action with the intention that it be an indication that she occurrently believes that p. I argue that Davis's analysis fails (...)
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  18.  3
    Meanings as Species.Mark Richard - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    Mark Richard presents an original theory of meaning, as the collection of assumptions speakers make in using it and expect their hearers to recognize as being made. Meaning is spread across a population, inherited by each new generation of speakers from the last, and evolving through the interactions of speakers with their environment.
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  19. The Meanings of "Imagine" Part I: Constructive Imagination.Neil Van Leeuwen - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (3):220-230.
    In this article , I first engage in some conceptual clarification of what the words "imagine," "imagining," and "imagination" can mean. Each has a constructive sense, an attitudinal sense, and an imagistic sense. Keeping the senses straight in the course of cognitive theorizing is important for both psychology and philosophy. I then discuss the roles that perceptual memories, beliefs, and genre truth attitudes play in constructive imagination, or the capacity to generate novel representations that go well beyond what's prompted by (...)
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  20.  62
    Finitely Generated Free Heyting Algebras.Fabio Bellissima - 1986 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (1):152-165.
    The aim of this paper is to give, using the Kripke semantics for intuitionism, a representation of finitely generated free Heyting algebras. By means of the representation we determine in a constructive way some set of "special elements" of such algebras. Furthermore, we show that many algebraic properties which are satisfied by the free algebra on one generator are not satisfied by free algebras on more than one generator.
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  21. Who Am I? Searching for Purpose and Meaning From Indian Perspectives to Modern Generation.Kuruvilla Pandikattu - 2019 - Vidyankur: Journal of Philosophical and Theological Studies 21 (2).
    Review article on the inspiring book, Shubhrangshu.. Zara's Witness: A soul journey into the nature of being, highlights the philosophical quest for meaning and fulfilment from Indian traditions. It is a never ending novel where a teenage girl is the heroin, who searches for truth, permanence and values.
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  22.  23
    Mimesis and Metaphor: The Biosemiotic Generation of Meaning in Cassirer and Uexküll.Andreas Weber - 2004 - Sign Systems Studies 32 (1-2):297-307.
    In this paper I pursue the influences of Jakob von Uexküll’s biosemiotics on the anthropology of Ernst Cassirer. I propose that Cassirer in his Philosophy of the Symbolic Forms has written a cultural semiotics which in certain core ideas is grounded on biosemiotic presuppositions, some explicit (as the “emotive basic ground” of experience), some more implicit. I try to trace the connecting lines to a biosemiotic approach with the goal of formulating a comprehensive semiotic anthropology which understands man as embodied (...)
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  23.  75
    Lexical Meaning.M. Lynne Murphy - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. Meaning and the Lexicon: 1. The lexicon - some preliminaries; 2. What do we mean by meaning?; 3. Components and prototypes; 4. Modern componential approaches - and some alternatives; Part II. Relations Among Words and Senses: 5. Meaning variation: polysemy, homonymy and vagueness; 6. Lexical and semantic relations; Part III. Word Classes and Semantic Types: 7. Ontological categories and word classes; 8. Nouns and countability; 9. Predication: verbs, events, and states; 10. (...)
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  24.  12
    Meaning and Proscription in Formal Logic: Variations on the Propositional Logic of William T. Parry.Thomas Macaulay Ferguson - 2017 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag.
    This book aids in the rehabilitation of the wrongfully deprecated work of William Parry, and is the only full-length investigation into Parry-type propositional logics. A central tenet of the monograph is that the sheer diversity of the contexts in which the mereological analogy emerges – its effervescence with respect to fields ranging from metaphysics to computer programming – provides compelling evidence that the study of logics of analytic implication can be instrumental in identifying connections between topics that would otherwise remain (...)
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  25.  17
    Language, Tradition, and the Self in the Generation of Meaning.R. M. Burns - 2002 - History of European Ideas 28 (1-2):51-75.
    An analysis of Mark Bevir's account of the role of language and tradition on the one hand, and the individual on the other in the generation of ideas, and proposal of an alternative account It endorses Bevir's project of finding a middle way between individualism and collectivism, but finds that Bevir exaggerates the role of the individual. It argues that human selves always remains dependent on language even to articulate their own intentions to themselves. Whilst they have a capacity (...)
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  26. Meaning and Formal Semantics in Generative Grammar.Stephen Schiffer - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):61-87.
    A generative grammar for a language L generates one or more syntactic structures for each sentence of L and interprets those structures both phonologically and semantically. A widely accepted assumption in generative linguistics dating from the mid-60s, the Generative Grammar Hypothesis , is that the ability of a speaker to understand sentences of her language requires her to have tacit knowledge of a generative grammar of it, and the task of linguistic semantics in those early days was taken to be (...)
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  27.  33
    Minimally Generated Abstract Logics.Steffen Lewitzka & Andreas B. M. Brunner - 2009 - Logica Universalis 3 (2):219-241.
    In this paper we study an alternative approach to the concept of abstract logic and to connectives in abstract logics. The notion of abstract logic was introduced by Brown and Suszko —nevertheless, similar concepts have been investigated by various authors. Considering abstract logics as intersection structures we extend several notions to their κ -versions, introduce a hierarchy of κ -prime theories, which is important for our treatment of infinite connectives, and study different concepts of κ -compactness. We are particularly interested (...)
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  28.  22
    The Maturation of the Self and the Refinement of Things: The Generation of the World of Meaning.Yang Guorong - 2012 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 43 (4):51-85.
  29. The Meanings of “Imagine” Part II: Attitude and Action.Neil Van Leeuwen - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (11):791-802.
    In this Part II, I investigate different approaches to the question of what makes imagining different from belief. I find that the sentiment-based approach of David Hume falls short, as does the teleological approach, once advocated by David Velleman. I then consider whether the inferential properties of beliefs and imaginings may differ. Beliefs, I claim, exhibit an anti-symmetric inferential governance over imaginings: they are the background that makes inference from one imagining to the other possible; the reverse is not true, (...)
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  30.  85
    Emotive Meaning in Political Argumentation.Fabrizio Macagno & Douglas Walton - 2019 - Informal Logic 39 (3):229-261.
    Donald Trump’s speeches and messages are characterized by terms that are commonly referred to as “thick” or “emotive,” meaning that they are characterized by a tendency to be used to generate emotive reactions. This paper investigates how emotive meaning is related to emotions, and how it is generated or manipulated. Emotive meaning is analyzed as an evaluative conclusion that results from inferences triggered by the use of a term, which can be represented and assessed using argumentation schemes. (...)
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  31.  14
    McKinsey J. C. C.. On the Generation of the Functions Cpq and Np of Lukasiewicz and Tarski by Means of a Single Binary Operation. Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, Vol. 42 , Pp. 849–851. [REVIEW]W. V. Quine - 1937 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 2 (1):59-59.
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  32.  40
    A First Class Constraint Generates Not a Gauge Transformation, But a Bad Physical Change: The Case of Electromagnetism.J. Brian Pitts - unknown
    In Dirac-Bergmann constrained dynamics, a first-class constraint typically does not _alone_ generate a gauge transformation. By direct calculation it is found that each first-class constraint in Maxwell's theory generates a change in the electric field E by an arbitrary gradient, spoiling Gauss's law. The secondary first-class constraint p^i,_i=0 still holds, but being a function of derivatives of momenta, it is not directly about E. Only a special combination of the two first-class constraints, the Anderson-Bergmann -Castellani gauge generator G, leaves E (...)
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  33. Meaning and Anti-Meaning in Life and What Happens After We Die.Sven Nyholm - 2021 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 90:11-31.
    The absence of meaningfulness in life is meaninglessness. But what is the polar opposite of meaningfulness? In recent and ongoing work together with Stephen Campbell and Marcello di Paola respectively, I have explored what we dub ‘anti-meaning’: the negative counterpart of positive meaning in life. Here, I relate this idea of ‘anti-meaningful’ actions, activities, and projects to the topic of death, and in particular the deaths or suffering of those who will live after our own deaths. Connecting this (...)
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  34.  10
    Meaning and Analysis: New Essays on Grice.Klaus Petrus (ed.) - 2010 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements -- Notes on Contributors -- Introduction--K.Petrus -- H. Paul Grice's Defense of the Analytic/Synthetic Distinction and Its Unintended Historical Consequences in Twentieth Century Analytical Philosophy--J.Atlas -- Paul Grice and the Philosopher of Ordinary Language--S.Chapman -- Some Aspects on Reasons and Retionality--J.Baker -- The Total Content of What a Speaker Means--A.Martinich -- Showing and Meaning--M.Green -- Communicative Acts - With and Without Understanding--C.Plunze -- Perillocutionary Acts. A Gricean Approach--K.Petrus -- William James + 40: Issues in (...)
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  35.  76
    Generating and Interpreting Metaphors with NETMET.Eric Steinhart - 2005 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Computers 4 (2).
    The structural theory of metaphor (STM) uses techniques from possible worlds semantics to generate and interpret metaphors. STM is presented in detail in The Logic of Metaphor: Analogous Parts of Possible Worlds (Steinhart, 2001). STM is based on Kittay’s semantic field theory of metaphor (1987) and ultimately on Black’s interactionist theory (1962, 1979). STM uses an intensional calculus to specify truth-conditions for many grammatical forms of metaphor. The truth-conditional analysis in STM is inspired in part by Miller (1979) and Hintikka (...)
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  36. The Significance of Future Generations.Roman Altshuler - 2021 - In Michael Cholbi & Travis Timmerman (eds.), Exploring the Philosophy of Death and Dying: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives. Routledge. pp. 191-199.
    We find meaning and value in our lives by engaging in everyday projects. But, according to a recent argument by Samuel Scheffler, this value doesn’t depend merely on what the projects are about. In many cases, it depends also on the future generations that will replace us. By imagining the imminent extinction of humanity soon after our own deaths, we can recognize both that much of our current valuing depends on a background confidence in the ongoing survival of humanity (...)
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  37.  90
    Narrative, Meaning, Interpretation: An Enactivist Approach. [REVIEW]Marco Caracciolo - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):367-384.
    After establishing its roots in basic forms of sensorimotor coupling between an organism and its environment, the new wave in cognitive science known as “enactivism” has turned to higher-level cognition, in an attempt to prove that even socioculturally mediated meaning-making processes can be accounted for in enactivist terms. My article tries to bolster this case by focusing on how the production and interpretation of stories can shape the value landscape of those who engage with them. First, it builds on (...)
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  38.  64
    The Meaning of Things: Domestic Symbols and the Self.Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi & Eugene Halton - 1981 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    The Meaning of Things explores the meanings of household possessions for three generation families in the Chicago area, and the place of materialism in American culture. Now regarded as a keystone in material culture studies, Halton's first book is based on his dissertation and coauthored with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. First published by Cambridge University Press in 1981, it has been translated into German, Italian, Japanese, and Hungarian. The Meaning of Things is a study of the significance of material (...)
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  39.  2
    Generation as a Life World: The Tradition of Phenomenological Research in Generative Problems.Julia Aleksandrovna Chernomazova - 2022 - Kant 42 (2):181-185.
    The purpose of the study is to identify the heuristic potential of phenomenological research for philosophical understanding of generational issues. Scientific novelty. The possibilities of the phenomenological analysis of a generation as a life world with its own sense-making, value orientations, and, therefore, peculiar rules of socio-cultural activity are characterized. A comparative analysis of generational problems in the phenomenological research of E. Husserl, M. Heidegger and A. Schutz is made. The author substantiates the conditionality of phenomenological presentations of generational (...)
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  40. Ultrafilters Generated by a Closed Set of Functions.Greg Bishop - 1995 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 60 (2):415-430.
    Let κ and λ be infinite cardinals, F a filter on κ, and G a set of functions from κ to κ. The filter F is generated by G if F consists of those subsets of κ which contain the range of some element of G. The set G is $ -closed if it is closed in the $ -topology on κ κ. (In general, the $ -topology on IA has basic open sets all Π i∈ I U i such (...)
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  41.  16
    RFID: Human Agency and Meaning in Information-Intensive Environments.N. Katherine Hayles - 2009 - Theory, Culture and Society 26 (2-3):47-72.
    RFID tags, small microchips no bigger than grains of rice, are currently being embedded in product labels, clothing, credit cards, and the environment, among other sites. Activated by the appropriate receiver, they transmit information ranging from product information such as manufacturing date, delivery route, and location where the item was purchased to the name, address, and credit history of the person holding the card. Active RFIDs have the capacity to transmit data without having to be activated by a receiver; they (...)
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  42. What Logics Mean: From Proof Theory to Model-Theoretic Semantics.James W. Garson - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    What do the rules of logic say about the meanings of the symbols they govern? In this book, James W. Garson examines the inferential behaviour of logical connectives, whose behaviour is defined by strict rules, and proves definitive results concerning exactly what those rules express about connective truth conditions. He explores the ways in which, depending on circumstances, a system of rules may provide no interpretation of a connective at all, or the interpretation we ordinarily expect for it, or an (...)
     
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  43.  23
    Digital Generation: Between Myth and Reality.R. V. Ershova - 2019 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 62 (2):96-108.
    The article is devoted to the actively discussed question of the uniqueness of Net generation. The digital natives have been credited with the ability to multitask and high-speed information processing, greater efficiency in online work. According to many researchers, the high technological skills of digital generation require an educational approach radically different from that of previous generations. According to S. Benett and K. Maton, these appeals for revolutionary changes in educational policy and practice turn into “moral panic.” The (...)
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  44.  10
    Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning.William P. Alston - 2000 - Cornell University Press.
    What is it for a sentence to have a certain meaning? This is the question that the distinguished analytic philosopher William P. Alston addresses in this major contribution to the philosophy of language. His answer focuses on the given sentence's potential to play the role that its speaker had in mind, what he terms the usability of the sentence to perform the illocutionary act intended by its speaker. Alston defines an illocutionary act as an act of saying something with (...)
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  45.  23
    Meaning and Formal Semantics in Generative Grammar.Anna Kollenberg & Alex Burri - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):61-87.
    A generative grammar for a language L generates one or more syntactic structures for each sentence of L and interprets those structures both phonologically and semantically. A widely accepted assumption in generative linguistics dating from the mid-60s, the Generative Grammar Hypothesis, is that the ability of a speaker to understand sentences of her language requires her to have tacit knowledge of a generative grammar of it, and the task of linguistic semantics in those early days was taken to be that (...)
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  46.  18
    Meaning Making by Managers: Corporate Discourse on Environment and Sustainability in India.Prithi Nambiar & Naren Chitty - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):493-511.
    The globally generated concepts of environment and sustainability are fast gaining currency in international business discourse. Sustainability concerns are concurrently becoming significant to business planning around corporate social responsibility and integral to organizational strategies toward enhancing shareholder value. The mindset of corporate managers is a key factor in determining company approaches to sustainability. But what do corporate managers understand by sustainability? Our study explores discursive meaning negotiation surrounding the concepts of environment and sustainability within business discourse. The study is (...)
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  47.  63
    Utility and Language Generation: The Case of Vagueness.Kees van Deemter - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (6):607 - 632.
    This paper asks why information should ever be expressed vaguely, re-assessing some previously proposed answers to this question and suggesting some new ones. Particular attention is paid to the benefits that vague expressions can have in situations where agreement over the meaning of an expression cannot be taken for granted. A distinction between two different versions of the above-mentioned question is advocated. The first asks why human languages contain vague expressions, the second question asks when and why a speaker (...)
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  48.  22
    Meaning and Learning in a World of Instability and Multiplicity.Gunther Kress - 2008 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (4):253-266.
    Globalization impacts on education everywhere; it is impossible to consider issues of curriculum or pedagogy without bearing in mind the effects of globalization. Here I consider to what extent it is possible to imagine curricula and pedagogies which could function at a global level? I do so from an anglo-phone perspective, from within the UK in the early part of the 21st century. The challenge is to develop means of analysis which allow distanced reflection on local issues and at the (...)
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  49. Generating Sense: Schizophrenia and Phenomenological Praxis.Bryan Smyth - 2011 - Schutzian Research 3:121-132.
    The aim of phenomenology is to provide a critical account of the origins and genesis of the world. This implies that the standpoint of the phenomenologicalreduction is properly extramundane. But it remains an outstanding task to formulate a credible account of the reduction that would be adequate to this seemingly impossible methodological condition. This paper contributes to rethinking the reduction accordingly. Building on efforts to thematize its intersubjective and corporeal aspects, the reduction is approached as a kind of transcendental practice (...)
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  50.  23
    Natural Language Generation of Biomedical Argumentation for Lay Audiences.Nancy Green, Rachael Dwight, Kanyamas Navoraphan & Brian Stadler - 2011 - Argument and Computation 2 (1):23 - 50.
    This article presents an architecture for natural language generation of biomedical argumentation. The goal is to reconstruct the normative arguments that a domain expert would provide, in a manner that is transparent to a lay audience. Transparency means that an argument's structure and functional components are accessible to its audience. Transparency is necessary before an audience can fully comprehend, evaluate or challenge an argument, or re-evaluate it in light of new findings about the case or changes in scientific knowledge. (...)
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