Results for 'medical practitioners'

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  1.  30
    Opinions of Private Medical Practitioners in Bloemfontein, South Africa, Regarding Euthanasia of Terminally Ill Patients.L. Brits, L. Human, L. Pieterse, P. Sonnekus & G. Joubert - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):180-182.
    The aim of this study was to determine the opinions of private medical practitioners in Bloemfontein, South Africa, regarding euthanasia of terminally ill patients. This descriptive study was performed amongst a simple random sample of 100 of 230 private medical practitioners in Bloemfontein. Information was obtained through anonymous self-administered questionnaires. Written informed consent was obtained. 68 of the doctors selected completed the questionnaire. Only three refused participation because they were opposed to euthanasia. Respondents were mainly male (...)
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  2.  39
    Inequity in Health Care Delivery in India: The Problem of Rural Medical Practitioners[REVIEW]Rashmi Kumar, Vijay Jaiswal, Sandeep Tripathi, Akshay Kumar & M. Z. Idris - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (3):223-233.
    A considerable section of the population in India accesses the services of individual private medical practitioners (PMPs) for primary level care. In rural areas, these providers include MBBS doctors, practitioners of alternative systems of medicine, herbalists, indigenous and folk practitioners, compounders and others. This paper describes the profile, knowledge and some practices of the rural doctor in India and then discusses the reasons for lack of equity in health care access in rural areas and possible solutions (...)
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  3.  83
    Management of Death, Dying and Euthanasia: Attitudes and Practices of Medical Practitioners in South Australia.C. A. Stevens & R. Hassan - 1994 - Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):41-46.
    This article presents the first results of a study of the decisions made by health professionals in South Australia concerning the management of death, dying, and euthanasia, and focuses on the findings concerning the attitudes and practices of medical practitioners. Mail-back, self-administered questionnaires were posted in August 1991 to a ten per cent sample of 494 medical practitioners in South Australia randomly selected from the list published by the Medical Board of South Australia. A total (...)
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  4.  16
    Variations in the Ability of General Medical Practitioners to Apply Two Methods of Clinical Audit: A Five‐Year Study of Assessment by Peer Review.John McKay, Paul Bowie & Murray Lough - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (6):622-629.
  5.  4
    Ethical Position of Medical Practitioners Who Refuse to Treat Unvaccinated Children.Melanie Forster - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (8):552-555.
    Recent reports in Australia have suggested that some medical practitioners are refusing to treat children who have not been vaccinated, a practice that has been observed in the USA and parts of Europe for some years. This behaviour, if it is indeed occurring in Australia, has not been supported by the Australian Medical Association, although there is broad support for medical practitioners in general having the right to conscientious objection. This paper examines the ethical underpinnings (...)
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  6.  57
    Moral Intuition, Good Deaths and Ordinary Medical Practitioners.M. Parker - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (1):28-34.
    Debate continues over the acts/omissions doctrine, and over the concepts of duty and charity. Such issues inform the debate over the moral permissibility of euthanasia. Recent papers have emphasised moral sensitivity, medical intuitions, and sub-standard palliative care as some of the factors which should persuade us to regard euthanasia as morally unacceptable. I argue that these lines of argument are conceptually misdirected and have no bearing on the bare permissibility of voluntary euthanasia. Further, some of the familiar slippery slope (...)
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  7.  14
    Criminal Corruption of Contracted Medical Practitioners and Ethics.Rainer Erices, Andreas Frewer & Antje Gumz - 2013 - Ethik in der Medizin 25 (2):103-113.
    ZusammenfassungFragen der Korruption von Vertragsärzten sind seit längerer Zeit höchst umstritten: Nach dem so genannten „Herzklappenskandal“ sind in den vergangenen Jahren wiederholt Pharma-Konzerne mit dem Vorwurf der Bestechung von Ärzten in die Schlagzeilen geraten. Das Thema wirft nicht nur juristische oder sozialpolitische, sondern auch ethische Fragen auf. Bislang gab es dazu in Deutschland jedoch nur wenig Reflexion. Bewertungen wurden von der Ärzteschaft vor allem Politikern und Juristen überlassen. Dabei bleibt die Frage der strafbaren Bestechlichkeit im Kern ein Problem, das Ärzteschaft (...)
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  8.  11
    Doctors, Nurses, and Medical Practitioners: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook. Lois N. Magner.Arleen Marcia Tuchman - 1998 - Isis 89 (4):775-776.
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  9.  14
    Attitudes to Medical Ethics Among British Muslim Medical Practitioners.A. Molloy - 1980 - Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (3):139-144.
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  10.  36
    Strafbare Bestechlichkeit von Vertragsärzten Und EthikCriminal Corruption of Contracted Medical Practitioners and Ethics.Rainer Erices, Andreas Frewer & Antje Gumz - 2013 - Ethik in der Medizin 25 (2):103-113.
    Fragen der Korruption von Vertragsärzten sind seit längerer Zeit höchst umstritten: Nach dem so genannten „Herzklappenskandal“ sind in den vergangenen Jahren wiederholt Pharma-Konzerne mit dem Vorwurf der Bestechung von Ärzten in die Schlagzeilen geraten. Das Thema wirft nicht nur juristische oder sozialpolitische, sondern auch ethische Fragen auf. Bislang gab es dazu in Deutschland jedoch nur wenig Reflexion. Bewertungen wurden von der Ärzteschaft vor allem Politikern und Juristen überlassen. Dabei bleibt die Frage der strafbaren Bestechlichkeit im Kern ein Problem, das Ärzteschaft (...)
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  11.  10
    Awareness of Oral Medicine Among Medical Practitioners, Evidence of the Unbridged Interdisciplinary Gap.Mohammad S. Alrashdan, Azmi M. G. Darwazeh, Yazan Hassona, Dima H. Bader & Yousef S. Khader - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (1):142-147.
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  12.  4
    John, John, the Doctors' SonsThe Medical Practitioners in Medieval England: A Biographical Register. C. H. Talbot, E. A. Hammond. [REVIEW]Vern L. Bullough - 1966 - Isis 57 (3):396-397.
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  13.  2
    Contraceptive Technique: A Handbook for Medical Practitioners and Senior Students.Rachel Conrad - 1951 - The Eugenics Review 43 (3):148.
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  14.  4
    Promoting Organ Donation Registration with the Priority Incentive: Israeli Transplantation Surgeons' and Other Medical Practitioners' Views and Ethical Concerns.Nurit Guttman, Gil Siegal, Naama Appel-Doron & Gitit Bar‐On - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (5):527-541.
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  15.  13
    A Barrier to Medical Treatment? British Medical Practitioners, Medical Appliances and the Patent Controversy, 1870–1920.Claire L. Jones - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Science 49 (4):601-625.
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  16.  5
    "Collegialiteit Moet Hier Ons Wachtwoord Zijn": De Geschiedenis van de Onderlinge Verzekering-Maatschappij van Geneeskundigen Tegen de Geldelijke Gevolgen van Invaliditeit. "Artsen-Onderlinge," 1896-1996. ["Collegiality Must Be Our Watchword Here": The History of the Mutual Insurance Company of Medical Practitioners Against the Financial Consequences of Disablement, "Doctors' Mutual," 1896-1996.]. M. J. Van Lieburg. [REVIEW]Nanny Wiegman - 1997 - Isis 88 (2):368-369.
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  17.  12
    Knowledge and Attitudes of Medical and Nursing Practitioners Regarding Non-Beneficial Futile Care in the Intensive Care Units of Trinidad and Tobago.Sridhar Polakala, Seetharaman Hariharan & Deryk Chen - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (2):95-101.
    Objective To determine the knowledge and attitudes of healthcare personnel regarding the provision of non-beneficial futile care in the intensive care units at the major public hospitals in Trinidad and Tobago. Method Prospective data collection was done using a questionnaire administered to the medical and nursing staff of the intensive care units. The questionnaire was designed to capture the opinions regarding the futile care offered to terminally ill patients at the intensive care units. The responses were based on a (...)
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  18.  3
    Margaret Pelling. Medical Conflicts in Early Modern London: Patronage, Physicians, and Irregular Practitioners, 1550–1640. With, Frances White. Xvi + 410 Pp., Figs., Tables, Apps., Bibl., Index. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2003. $95. [REVIEW]Harold J. Cook - 2004 - Isis 95 (3):492-493.
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  19.  7
    Book Review: Issues in Medical Research Ethics: A Workbook for Practitioners and Students. [REVIEW]M. Lorentzon - 2004 - Nursing Ethics 11 (3):323-324.
  20.  23
    The Doctor and the Market: About the Influence of Market Reforms on the Professional Medical Ethics of Surgeons and General Practitioners in The Netherlands. [REVIEW]Jolanda Dwarswaard, Medard Hilhorst & Margo Trappenburg - 2011 - Health Care Analysis 19 (4):388-402.
    To explore whether market reforms in a health care system affect medical professional ethics of hospital-based specialists on the one hand and physicians in independent practices on the other. Qualitative interviews with 27 surgeons and 28 general practitioners in The Netherlands, held 2–3 years after a major overhaul of the Dutch health care system involving several market reforms. Surgeons now regularly advertise their work (while this was forbidden in the past) and pay more attention to patients with relatively (...)
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  21.  4
    Swedish in Name Only: The International Education of Nineteenth—Century Swedish Medical Students and Practitioners.Stephan Curtis - 2012 - History of Science 50 (3):257-288.
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  22.  28
    The Medical Humanities Today: Humane Health Care or Tool of Governance? [REVIEW]Alan Petersen, Alan Bleakley, Rainer Brömer & Rob Marshall - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):1-4.
    The medical humanities have been presented as a panacea for medical reductionism; a means for ‘humanizing’ medicine. However, there is a lack of consensus about the appropriate contributing disciplines and how curricula should be taught and assessed. This special issue critically examines the role of the medical humanities in medical education and their potential to serve, inadvertently or otherwise, as a tool of governance. The contributors, who include medical educators and medical practitioners, employ (...)
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  23. Medical Paternalism – Part 2.Daniel Groll - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? In Medical Paternalism Part 1, I answered the first question. (...)
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  24. Epistemic Humility and Medical Practice: Translating Epistemic Categories Into Ethical Obligations.A. Schwab - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (1):28-48.
    Physicians and other medical practitioners make untold numbers of judgments about patient care on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis. These judgments fall along a number of spectrums, from the mundane to the tragic, from the obvious to the challenging. Under the rubric of evidence-based medicine, these judgments will be informed by the robust conclusions of medical research. In the ideal circumstance, medical research makes the best decision obvious to the trained professional. Even when practice approximates (...)
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  25.  66
    Mandatory Disclosure and Medical Paternalism.Emma Bullock - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (2):409-424.
    Medical practitioners are duty-bound to tell their patients the truth about their medical conditions, along with the risks and benefits of proposed treatments. Some patients, however, would rather not receive medical information. A recent response to this tension has been to argue that that the disclosure of medical information is not optional. As such, patients do not have permission to refuse medical information. In this paper I argue that, depending on the context, the disclosure (...)
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  26.  20
    Are General Practitioners Prepared to End Life on Request in a Country Where Euthanasia is Legalised?: Table 1.M. Sercu, P. Pype, T. Christiaens, M. Grypdonck, A. Derese & M. Deveugele - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):274-280.
    Background In 2002, Belgium set a legal framework for euthanasia, whereby granting and performing euthanasia is entrusted entirely to physicians, and—as advised by Belgian Medical Deontology—in the context of a trusted patient–physician relationship. Euthanasia is, however, rarely practiced, so the average physician will not attain routine in this matter. Aim To explore how general practitioners in Flanders (Belgium) deal with euthanasia. This was performed via qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with 52 general practitioners (GPs). Results Although GPs (...)
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  27.  68
    Empirical Ethics and the Special Status of Practitioners' Judgements.Albert W. Musschenga - 2010 - Ethical Perspectives 17 (2):203-230.
    According to some proponents of an empirical medical ethics, medical ethics should take the experience, insights, and arguments of doctors and other medical practitioners as their point of departure. Medical practitioners are supposed to have ‘moral wisdom.’ In this view, the moral beliefs of medical practitioners have a special status. In sections I-IV, I discuss two possible defences of such a status. The first defence is based on the special status of the (...)
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  28.  16
    Medical Assistance in Dying at a Paediatric Hospital.Carey DeMichelis, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Adam Rapoport - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):60-67.
    This article explores the ethical challenges of providing Medical Assistance in Dying in a paediatric setting. More specifically, we focus on the theoretical questions that came to light when we were asked to develop a policy for responding to MAID requests at our tertiary paediatric institution. We illuminate a central point of conceptual confusion about the nature of MAID that emerges at the level of practice, and explore the various entailments for clinicians and patients that would flow from different (...)
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  29.  39
    Medical Error and Moral Luck.Dieneke Hubbeling - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (3):229-243.
    This paper addresses the concept of moral luck. Moral luck is discussed in the context of medical error, especially an error of omission that occurs frequently, but only rarely has adverse consequences. As an example, a failure to compare the label on a syringe with the drug chart results in the wrong medication being administered and the patient dies. However, this error may have previously occurred many times with no tragic consequences. Discussions on moral luck can highlight conflicting intuitions. (...)
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  30. Medical Humanities: An Introduction.Thomas R. Cole, Nathan S. Carlin & Ronald A. Carson - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    This textbook brings the humanities to students in order to evoke the humanity of students. It helps to form individuals who take charge of their own minds, who are free from narrow and unreflective forms of thought, and who act compassionately in their public and professional worlds. Using concepts and methods of the humanities, the book addresses undergraduate and premed students, medical students, and students in other health professions, as well as physicians and other healthcare practitioners. It encourages (...)
     
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  31.  22
    Medical Learning Curves and the Kantian Ideal.Pierre le Morvan - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (9):513-518.
    A hitherto unexamined problem for the ‘‘Kantian ideal’’ that one should always treat patients as ends in themselves, and never only as a means to other ends, is explored in this paper. The problem consists of a prima facie conflict between this Kantian ideal and the reality of medical practice. This conflict arises because, at least presently, medical practitioners can only acquire certain skills and abilities by practising on live, human patients, and given the inevitability and ubiquity (...)
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  32. Medical Paternalism - Part 1.Daniel Groll - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? -/- This paper deals with the first question, with a special (...)
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  33.  9
    Understanding General Practitioners' Conflicts of Interests and the Paramountcy Principle in Safeguarding Children.P. Wainwright & A. Gallagher - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):302-305.
    As family physicians, general practitioners play a key role in safeguarding children. Should they suspect child abuse or neglect they may experience a conflict between responding to the needs and interests of the child and those of an adult patient. English law insists on the paramountcy of the interests of the child, but in family practice many other interests may be at stake. The authors argue that uncritical adoption of the paramountcy principle is too simplistic and can lead, paradoxically, (...)
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  34.  15
    Meaning and Value in Medical School Curricula.Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Miles Little, Jill Gordon & Pippa Markham - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1027-1035.
    Rationale, aims and objectives: Bioethics and professionalism are standard subjects in medical training programmes, and these curricula reflect particular representations of meaning and practice. It is important that these curricula cohere with the actual concerns of practicing clinicians so that students are prepared for real-world practice. We aimed to identify ethical and professional concerns that do not appear to be adequately addressed in standard curricula by comparing ethics curricula with themes that emerged from a qualitative study of medical (...)
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  35.  71
    Medical Ethics Research Between Theory and Practice.Henk Amj ten Have & Annique Lelie - 1998 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (3):263-276.
    The main object of criticism of present-day medical ethics is the standard view of the relationship between theory and practice. Medical ethics is more than the application of moral theories and principles, and health care is more than the domain of application of moral theories. Moral theories and principles are necessarily abstract, and therefore fail to take account of the sometimes idiosyncratic reality of clinical work and the actual experiences of practitioners. Suggestions to remedy the illnesses of (...)
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  36.  38
    Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis?Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and (...)
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  37.  25
    Are Medical Ethicists Out of Touch? Practitioner Attitudes in the US and UK Towards Decisions at the End of Life.D. L. Dickenson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):254-260.
    Objectives—To assess whether UK and US health care professionals share the views of medical ethicists about medical futility, withdrawing/withholding treatment, ordinary/extraordinary interventions, and the doctrine of double effectDesign, subjects and setting–A 138-item attitudinal questionnaire completed by 469 UK nurses studying the Open University course on “Death and Dying” was compared with a similar questionnaire administered to 759 US nurses and 687 US doctors taking the Hastings Center course on “Decisions near the End of Life”.Results–Practitioners accept the relevance (...)
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  38.  22
    Pressure in Dealing with Requests for Euthanasia or Assisted Suicide. Experiences of General Practitioners.Marike E. De Boer, Marja F. I. A. Depla, Marjolein den Breejen, Pauline Slottje, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & Cees M. P. M. Hertogh - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (7):425-429.
    The majority of Dutch physicians feel pressure when dealing with a request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. This study aimed to explore the content of this pressure as experienced by general practitioners. We conducted semistructured in-depth interviews with 15 Dutch GPs, focusing on actual cases. The interviews were transcribed and analysed with use of the framework method. Six categories of pressure GPs experienced in dealing with EAS requests were revealed: emotional blackmail, control and direction by others, doubts about fulfilling (...)
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  39.  2
    Portraits, Patients and Practitioners.Ludmilla Jordanova - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (1):2-3.
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  40.  19
    Judging the Quality of Clinical Audit by General Practitioners: A Pilot Study Comparing the Assessments of Medical Peers and NHS Audit Specialists.Paul Bowie, John McKay, Lilian Murray & Murray Lough - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (6):1038-1043.
  41.  14
    Culture, Health and Illness. By C. Helman. 2nd Edn. Pp. 344.(Butterworth Scientific, Guildford, 1990.)£ 12.95 (Paperback). This is a Fascinating, Though Not Flawless Book. Dr Helman's Aim is to Convey the Relevance of Medical Anthropology to Health Practitioners, in the Hope That They Might Use Such Knowledge to Improve Their Delivery of Health Care. To This End He. [REVIEW]Bernard Ineichen - forthcoming - Journal of Biosocial Science.
  42. Boomgaarden J, Louhiala P, Wiesing U, Eds., Issues in Medical Research Ethics; a Workbook for Practitioners and Students (Teaching Ethics: Material for Practitioner Education, Vol 3).M. Lorentzon - 2004 - Nursing Ethics 11 (3):324-324.
     
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  43. Are Medical Ethicists Out of Touch? Practitioner Attitudes in the US and UK Towards Decisions at the End of Life.Donna Dickenson - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):254-260.
    To assess whether UK and US health care professionals share the views of medical ethicists about medical futility, withdrawing/withholding treatment, ordinary/extraordinary interventions, and the doctrine of double effect. A 138-item attitudinal questionnaire completed by 469 UK nurses studying the Open University course on "Death and Dying" was compared with a similar questionnaire administered to 759 US nurses and 687 US doctors taking the Hastings Center course on "Decisions near the End of Life". Practitioners accept the relevance of (...)
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  44.  14
    The Ethics of Medical Practitioner Migration From Low-Resourced Countries to the Developed World: A Call for Action by Health Systems and Individual Doctors.Charles Mpofu, Tarun Sen Gupta & Richard Hays - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (3):395-406.
    Medical migration appears to be an increasing global phenomenon, with complex contributing factors. Although it is acknowledged that such movements are inevitable, given the current globalized economy, the movement of health professionals from their country of training raises questions about equity of access and quality of care. Concerns arise if migration occurs from low- and middle-income countries to high-income countries. The actions of HICs receiving medical practitioners from LMICs are examined through the global justice theories of John (...)
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  45. Ethical Dilemmas in Medical Humanitarian Practice: Cases for Reflection From Medecins Sans Frontieres.Julian Sheather & Tejshri Shah - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):162-165.
    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is an independent medical humanitarian organisation working in over 70 countries. It has provided medical assistance for over 35 years to populations vulnerable through conflict, disease and inadequate health systems. Medical ethics define the starting point of the relationship between medical staff and patients. The ethics of humanitarian interventions and of research in conflict settings are much debated. However, less is known about the ethical dilemmas faced by medical humanitarian staff in (...)
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  46.  5
    Nazis, Teleology, and the Freedom of Conscience: In Response to Gamble and Pruski’s ‘Medical Acts and Conscientious Objection: What Can a Physician Be Compelled to Do?’.Marcus Wischik - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (4):359-373.
    Medical practitioners of all specialisms are identified by their professional titles. Their function is determined by their regulators, and subject to voluntary employment contracts....
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  47.  22
    Medical Ethics Versus Bioethics (Aka Principlism).Patrick Guinan - 2006 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 6 (4):651-660.
    The Hippocratic ethic, or medical ethics, has guided medical practitioners for 2,500 years. More recently it has been displaced by bioethics. Traditional medicalethics is a covenant between a competent physician and a sick patient, the purpose of which is to effect healing. Bioethics is a civil consensual ethic regulating health-care delivery. It is not personal by nature.Medical ethics is a deontological, virtue-based ethic. Bioethics, particularly as expressed in principlism, its most prominent school in the United States, (...)
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  48.  14
    Do Family Practitioners in Lithuania Inform Their Patients About Adverse Effects of Common Medications?I. Liseckiene, Z. Liubarskiene, R. Jacobsen, L. Valius & M. Norup - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):137-140.
    Objectives: To investigate the extent to which family physicians in Lithuania inform their patients about possible side-effects when a common treatment is proposed. To examine the relation between physicians’ estimation of the severity and frequency of these side-effects and their willingness to inform patients. To identify the reasons for informing or not informing the patients.Methods: A questionnaire, presenting three hypothetical cases involving decisions about ordinary medical treatments and a series of general questions about information about side-effects, was distributed to (...)
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  49.  10
    General Practitioners’ Ethical Decision-Making: Does Being a Patient Themselves Make a Difference?Katherine Helen Hall, Jessica Michael, Chrystal Jaye & Jessica Young - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (4):199-208.
    There is very little literature on the actual decision-making frameworks used by general practitioners with respect to ethical issues and virtually none on the impact of personal experiences of illness on this. This study aimed to investigate what these frameworks might be and if and how they were altered by doctors’ own illness experience. Twenty general practitioners were recruited, 10 having had a previous serious medical illness and 10 having no such history. They participated in a semi-structured (...)
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  50.  13
    Continuing Medical Education: A Cross Sectional Study on a Developing Country’s Perspective.Syed Arsalan Ali, Shaikh Hamiz ul Fawwad, Gulrayz Ahmed, Sumayya Naz, Syeda Aimen Waqar & Anam Hareem - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (1):251-260.
    To determine the attitude of general practitioners towards continuing medical education and reasons motivating or hindering them from attending CME procedures, we conducted a cross-sectional survey from November 2013 to April 2014 in Karachi. Three hundred general practitioners who possessed a medical license for practice in Pakistan filled a pre-designed questionnaire consisting of questions pertaining to attitudes towards CME. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS v16.0. 70.3% of the participants were males. Mean age was 47.75 (...)
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