Results for 'mental disorders'

999 found
Order:
  1.  62
    Classifying Madness: A Philosophical Examination of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.Rachel Cooper - unknown
    Classifying Madness (Springer, 2005) concerns philosophical problems with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, more commonly known as the D.S.M. The D.S.M. is published by the American Psychiatric Association and aims to list and describe all mental disorders. The first half of Classifying Madness asks whether the project of constructing a classification of mental disorders that reflects natural distinctions makes sense. Chapters examine the nature of mental illness, and also consider whether (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  2.  85
    Resolving the Paradox of Common, Harmful, Heritable Mental Disorders: Which Evolutionary Genetic Models Work Best?Matthew C. Keller & Geoffrey Miller - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):385-404.
    Given that natural selection is so powerful at optimizing complex adaptations, why does it seem unable to eliminate genes (susceptibility alleles) that predispose to common, harmful, heritable mental disorders, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder? We assess three leading explanations for this apparent paradox from evolutionary genetic theory: (1) ancestral neutrality (susceptibility alleles were not harmful among ancestors), (2) balancing selection (susceptibility alleles sometimes increased fitness), and (3) polygenic mutation-selection balance (mental disorders reflect the inevitable mutational (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  3.  46
    Vulnerability of Individuals With Mental Disorders to Epistemic Injustice in Both Clinical and Social Domains.Rena Kurs & Alexander Grinshpoon - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (4):336-346.
    Many individuals who have mental disorders often report negative experiences of a distinctively epistemic sort, such as not being listened to, not being taken seriously, or not being considered credible because of their psychiatric conditions. In an attempt to articulate and interpret these reports we present Fricker’s concepts of epistemic injustice and then focus on testimonial injustice and hermeneutic injustice as it applies to individuals with mental disorders. The clinical impact of these concepts on quality of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  70
    A Brief Historicity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Issues and Implications for the Future of Psychiatric Canon and Practice. [REVIEW]Shadia Kawa & James Giordano - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:1-9.
    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, currently in its fourth edition and considered the reference for the characterization and diagnosis of mental disorders, has undergone various developments since its inception in the mid-twentieth century. With the fifth edition of the DSM presently in field trials for release in 2013, there is renewed discussion and debate over the extent of its relative successes - and shortcomings - at iteratively incorporating scientific evidence on the often (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  5.  24
    Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.Rachel Cooper - 2014 - Karnac.
    Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Karnac, 2014) evaluates the latest edition of the D.S.M.The publication of D.S.M-5 in 2013 brought many changes. Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders asks whether the D.S.M.-5 classifies the right people in the right way. It is aimed at patients, mental health professionals, and academics with an interest in mental health. Issues addressed include: How is the D.S.M. affected by financial links with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  71
    Lalumera, E. 2016. Saving the DSM-5? Descriptive Conceptions and Theoretical Concepts of Mental Disorders.Lalumera Elisabetta - forthcoming - Medicina E Storia 9.
    At present, psychiatric disorders are characterized descriptively, as the standard within the scientific community for communication and, to a certain extent, for diagnosis, is the DSM, now at its fifth edition. The main reasons for descriptivism are the aim of achieving reliability of diagnosis and improving communication in a situation of theoretical disagreement, and the Ignorance argument, which starts with acknowledgment of the relative failure of the project of finding biomarkers for most mental disorders. Descriptivism has also (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  10
    Brain Space and Time in Mental Disorders: Paradigm Shift in Biological Psychiatry.Andrew And Alexander Fingelkurts - 2019 - International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine 54 (1):53-63.
    Contemporary psychiatry faces serious challenges because it has failed to incorporate accumulated knowledge from basic neuroscience, neurophilosophy, and brain–mind relation studies. As a consequence, it has limited explanatory power, and effective treatment options are hard to come by. A new conceptual framework for understanding mental health based on underlying neurobiological spatial-temporal mechanisms of mental disorders (already gained by the experimental studies) is beginning to emerge.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Stabilizing Mental Disorders: Prospects and Problems.Jacqueline Anne Sullivan - 2014 - In Harold Kincaid & Jacqueline Sullivan (eds.), Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds. MIT Press. pp. 257-281.
    In this chapter I investigate the kinds of changes that psychiatric kinds undergo when they become explanatory targets of areas of sciences that are not “mature” and are in the early stages of discovering mechanisms. The two areas of science that are the targets of my analysis are cognitive neuroscience and cognitive neurobiology.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  9.  40
    How Do Practising Clinicians and Students Apply Newly Learned Causal Information About Mental Disorders?Leontien de Kwaadsteniet, Nancy S. Kim & Jennelle E. Yopchick - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (1):112-117.
  10. Enactivism, Other Minds, and Mental Disorders.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - Synthese:1-25.
    Although enactive approaches to cognition vary in terms of their character and scope, all endorse several core claims. The first is that cognition is tied to action. The second is that cognition is composed of more than just in-the-head processes; cognitive activities are (at least partially) externalized via features of our embodiment and in our ecological dealings with the people and things around us. I appeal to these two enactive claims to consider a view called "direct social perception" (DSP): the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  70
    Saving the DSM-5? Descriptive Conceptions and Theoretical Concepts of Mental Disorders. MEDICINA & STORIA, 109-128.Elisabetta Lalumera - 2016 - Medicina E Storia (9-10):109-129.
    Abstract: At present, psychiatric disorders are characterized descriptively, as the standard within the scientific community for communication and, to a cer- tain extent, for diagnosis, is the DSM, now at its fifth edition. The main rea- sons for descriptivism are the aim of achieving reliability of diagnosis and improving communication in a situation of theoretical disagreement, and the Ignorance argument, which starts with acknowledgment of the relative fail- ure of the project of finding biomarkers for most mental (...). Descrip- tivism has also the advantage of capturing the phenomenology of mental dis- orders, which appears to be essential for diagnosis, though not exhaustive of the nature of the disease. I argue that if we rely on the distinction between conceptions (procedures of identification) and concepts (reference-fixing representations), which was introduced in the philosophical debate on the nature of concepts, we may understand a limited but valid role for descrip- tive characterizations, and reply to common objections addressed by those who advocate a theoretically informed approach to nosology. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The Reality and Classification of Mental Disorders.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2008 - Dissertation, University of Chicago
    This dissertation examines psychiatry from a philosophy of science perspective, focusing on issues of realism and classification. Questions addressed in the dissertation include: What evidence is there for the reality of mental disorders? Are any mental disorders natural kinds? When are disease explanations of abnormality warranted? How should mental disorders be classified? -/- In addressing issues concerning the reality of mental disorders, I draw on the accounts of realism defended by Ian Hacking (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  13
    Pharmacological Interventions and the Neurobiological Basis of Mental Disorders.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2017 - In Ioan Opris & Manuel F. Casanova (eds.), The Physics of the Mind and Brain Disorders: Integrated Neural Circuits Supporting the Emergence of Mind. Cham: Springer. pp. 613-628.
    In psychiatry, pharmacological research has played a crucial role in the formulation, revision, and refinement of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. Besides being utilized as potential treatments for various mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play an important epistemic role as experimental instruments that help scientists uncover the neurobiological underpinnings of mental disorders (Tsou, 2012). Interventions with psychiatric patients using pharmacological drugs provide researchers with information about the neurobiological causes of mental disorders that cannot be obtained in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Intervention, Causal Reasoning, and the Neurobiology of Mental Disorders: Pharmacological Drugs as Experimental Instruments.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):542-551.
    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15.  36
    Are Mental Disorders Natural Kinds?: A Plea for a New Approach to Intervention in Psychiatry.Şerife Tekin - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (2):147-163.
    Mental disorder is an urgent and growing public health problem.1 Scientific investigation of this problem has the pragmatic goals of identifying the causes of mental disorders and developing strategies to effectively treat them. Philosophers of psychiatry have participated in the inquiry into the empirical examination of mental disorders, predominantly by debating whether psychopathology is a legitimate target of scientific inquiry and, if so, how mental disorders should be explained, predicted, and intervened on. However, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16. How It is Not "Just Like Diabetes": Mental Disorders and the Moral Psychologist.Nomy Arpaly - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):282–298.
    Many psychiatrists tell their clients that any mental disorder is ‘‘a disease, just like diabetes’’. This slogan appears to suggest that mental states and behavior that are classified ‘‘mental disorders’’ are somehow radically different from other mental states and behaviors—both when it comes to simply understanding people and when it comes to moral assessments of mental states and of actions. After all, mental illness is just like diabetes, while other human conditions are not. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17. Why We Essentialize Mental Disorders.P. R. Adriaens & A. De Block - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):107-127.
    Essentialism is one of the most pervasive problems in mental health research. Many psychiatrists still hold the view that their nosologies will enable them, sooner or later, to carve nature at its joints and to identify and chart the essence of mental disorders. Moreover, according to recent research in social psychology, some laypeople tend to think along similar essentialist lines. The main aim of this article is to highlight a number of processes that possibly explain the persistent (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  24
    The Contribution of Existential Phenomenology in the Recovery-Oriented Care of Patients with Severe Mental Disorders.Philippe Huguelet - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (4):346-367.
    Promoting recovery has become more and more important in the care of patients with severe mental disorders such as psychosis. Recovery is a personal process of growth involving hope, self-identity, meaning in life, and responsibility. Obviously, these components pertain, at least in part, to a psychotherapeutic care perspective. Yet, up to now, recovery has mainly been taken into account in transforming health services and as a general framework for supportive therapy. Existential phenomenology abdicates a theoretical stance and considers (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. What Psychiatry Left Out of the Dsm-5: Historical Mental Disorders Today.Edward Shorter - 2015 - Routledge.
    _Choice Recommended Read_ _What Psychiatry Left Out of the DSM-5: Historical Mental Disorders Today_ covers the diagnoses that the _Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders_ failed to include, along with diagnoses that should not have been included, but were. Psychiatry as a field is over two centuries old and over that time has gathered great wisdom about mental illnesses. Today, much of that knowledge has been ignored and we have diagnoses such as "schizophrenia" and "bipolar (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  52
    Why Mental Disorders Are Just Mental Dysfunctions (and Nothing More): Some Darwinian Arguments.Andreas De Block - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 39 (3):338-346.
    Mental disorders are often thought to be harmful dysfunctions. Jerome Wakefield has argued that such dysfunctions should be understood as failures of naturally selected functions. This suggests, implicitly, that evolutionary biology and other Darwinian disciplines hold important information for anyone working on answering the philosophical question, ‘what is a mental disorder?’. In this article, the author argues that Darwinian theory is not only relevant to the understanding of the disrupted functions, but it also sheds light on the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  59
    Mental Disorders, Evolution, and Inclusive Fitness.Preti Antonio & Miotto Paola - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):419-420.
    Grouping severe mental disorders into a global category is likely to lead to a “theory of everything” which forcefully explains everything and nothing. Speculation even at the phenotypic level of the single disorder cannot be fruitful, unless specific and testable models are proposed. Inclusive fitness must be incorporated in such models. (Published Online November 9 2006).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  58
    Are Common, Harmful, Heritable Mental Disorders Common Relative to Other Such Non-Mental Disorders, and Does Their Frequency Require a Special Explanation?Mayo Oliver & Leach Carolyn - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):415-416.
    Keller & Miller's (K&M's) conclusion appears to be correct; namely, that common, harmful, heritable mental disorders are largely maintained at present frequencies by mutation-selection balance at many different loci. However, their “paradox” is questionable. (Published Online November 9 2006).
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Mental Disorders and the "System of Judgmental Responsibility".Anita Allen - 2010 - Boston University Law Review 90:621-640.
    Thesis: Those affected by mental disorders whose actions are episodically influenced by their disorder are often overlooked by philosophers of moral and ethical responsibility. Allen gives us reasons for thinking it is inappropriate to either: a) “summarily exclude people with mental problems out of the universe of moral agents, reducing them to the status of rocks, trees, animals, and infants” b) “include the group on the false assumption that their moral lives are precisely like the paradigmatic moral (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  16
    Complex Realities Require Complex Theories: Refining and Extending the Network Approach to Mental Disorders.Angélique Oj Cramer, Lourens J. Waldorp, Han Lj van der Maas & Denny Borsboom - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):178-193.
    The majority of commentators agree on one thing: Our network approach might be the prime candidate for offering a new perspective on the origins of mental disorders. In our response, we elaborate on refinements (e.g., cognitive and genetic levels) and extensions (e.g., to Axis II disorders) of the network model, as well as discuss ways to test its validity.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  15
    Reduction Without Elimination: Mental Disorders as Causally Efficacious Properties.Gottfried Vosgerau & Patrice Soom - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (2):311-330.
    We argue that any account of mental disorders that meets the desideratum of assigning causal efficacy to mental disorders faces the so-called “causal exclusion problem”. We argue that fully reductive accounts solve this problem but run into the problem of multiple realizability. Recently advocated symptom-network approaches avoid the problem of multiple realizability, but they also run into the causal exclusion problem. Based on a critical analysis of these accounts, we will present our own account according to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  19
    Mental Disorders, Brain Disorders, Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Challenges for the Philosophy of Psychopathology After DSM-5.Michael Pitman - 2014 - South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):131-144.
    The publication of DSM-5 has been accompanied by a fair amount of controversy. Amongst DSM’s most vocal ‘insider’ critics has been Thomas Insel, Director of the US National Institute of Mental Health. Insel has publicly criticised DSM’s adherence to a symptom-based classification of mental disorder, and used the weight of the NIMH to back a rival research strategy aimed at a more biology-based diagnostic classification. This strategy is part of Insel’s vision of a future, more preventative psychiatry in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  24
    Heritable Mental Disorders: You Can't Choose Your Relatives, but It is They Who May Really Count.I. Klimkeit Ester & L. Bradshaw John - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):415.
    Keller & Miller (K&M) briefly mention and promptly dismiss the idea that genes for harmful mental disorders may confer certain advantages to affected individuals. However, the authors fail to consider that the same genes (in low doses or reduced penetrance) may be adaptive for relatives, and that this may in part explain why they are retained in the gene pool. (Published Online November 9 2006).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  50
    Anthropological and Evolutionary Concepts of Mental Disorders.Andreas Heinz & Ulrike Kluge - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (3):292-307.
    Patients suffering from mental disorders are often not treated on an equal basis with patients suffering from organic diseases. In Germany, for example, alcohol-dependent patients will be detoxified on a clinical ward to ensure that they survive acute alcohol withdrawal; however, medical insurances often do not cover treatment costs for a therapy for the addictive behavior that underlies the acute alcohol problem. While patients suffering from diabetes mellitus can also display personally harmful choices and, for example, consume sugar (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  16
    The Certificate of Confidentiality at the National Institute of Mental Health: Discretionary Considerations in its Applicability in Research on Child and Adolescent Mental Disorders.Kimberly Hoagwood - 1994 - Ethics and Behavior 4 (2):123 – 131.
    Child and adolescent researchers must balance increasingly complex sets of ethical, legal, and scientific standards when investigating child and adolescent mental disorders. Few guidelines are available. One mechanism that provides the investigator immunity from legally compelled disclosure of research records is described. However, discretion must be exercised in its use, especially with regard to abuse reporting, voluntary disclosure of abuse, and protection of research data. Examples of discretionary issues in the use of the certificate of confidentiality are provided.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  27
    The Epistemic Function of Narratives and the Globalization of Mental Disorders.Abigail Gosselin - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):46-67.
    Mental disorders are assessed globally using the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases Classification of Mentaland Behavioural Disorders (ICD), which is largely modeled after (though it also influences) the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) used in the United States. Situated within the scientific narrative of American psychiatry, disorders are typically viewed by practitioners who use the DSM and ICD as essential categories of human experience, with internal, purely descriptive, value-free conditions. Criteria identified (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  38
    An Evolutionary Framework for Mental Disorders: Integrating Adaptationist and Evolutionary Genetic Models.Matthew C. Keller & Geoffrey Miller - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):429-441.
    This response (a) integrates non-equilibrium evolutionary genetic models, such as coevolutionary arms-races and recent selective sweeps, into a framework for understanding common, harmful, heritable mental disorders; (b) discusses the forms of ancestral neutrality or balancing selection that may explain some portion of mental disorder risk; and (c) emphasizes that normally functioning psychological adaptations work against a backdrop of mutational and environmental noise. (Published Online November 9 2006).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  30
    Clinicians' Folk Taxonomies of Mental Disorders.Elizabeth H. Flanagan Roger K. Blashfield - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):pp. 249-269.
    Using methods from anthropology and cognitive psychology, this study investigated the relationship between clinicians’ folk taxonomies of mental disorder and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Expert and novice psychologists were given sixty-seven DSM-IV diagnoses, asked to discard unfamiliar diagnoses, put the remaining diagnoses into groups that had “similar treatments” using hierarchical (making more inclusive and less inclusive groups) and dimensional (placing groups in a two-dimensional space) methodologies, and give names to the groups in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Psychopathology at School: Theorizing Mental Disorders in Education.Valerie Harwood & Julie Allan - 2016 - Routledge.
    _Psychopathology at School_ provides a timely response to concerns about the rising numbers of children whose behaviour is recognised and understood as a medicalised condition, rather than simply as poor behaviour caused by other factors. It is the first scholarly analysis of psychopathology which draws on the philosophers Foucault, Deleuze, Guattari and Arendt to examine the processes whereby children’s behaviour is pathologised. The heightened attention to mental disorders is contrasted with education practices in the early and mid-to-late twentieth (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  26
    Understanding Mental Disorders: A Philosophical Approach to the Medicine of the Mind.Daniel Lafleur, Christopher Mole & Holly Onclin - 2019 - Routledge.
    Understanding Mental Disorders aims to help current and future psychiatrists, and those who work with them, to think critically about the ethical, conceptual, and methodological questions that are raised by the theory and practice of psychiatry. It considers questions that concern the mind’s relationship to the brain, the origins of our norms for thinking and behavior, and the place of psychiatry in medicine, and in society more generally. With a focus on the current debates around psychiatry’s diagnostic categories, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Making Us Crazy. DSM: The Psychiatric Bible and the Creation of Mental Disorders[REVIEW]Duff Waring - 1998 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 19 (4):437-446.
    The Malleus Maleficarum was a detailed manual for Dominican witch-hunters. It codified specific criteria for identifying witches and guidelines for their application. It elaborated a system of symptoms that indicated illness caused by witchcraft . These symptoms were seen as the visible projections of a vast and complex organization of behavior. Since the existence of witches was presupposed by those who used the manual, its criteria were confirmed repeatedly during the Inquisition. Once the Malleus was published, its diagnostic system acquired (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  31
    Mental Disorders Are Not a Homogeneous Construct.Polimeni Joseph - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):419.
    The only commonality between the various psychiatric disorders is that they reflect contemporary problematic behaviors. Some psychiatric disorders have a substantial genetic component, whereas others are essentially shaped by prevailing environmental factors. Because psychiatric ailments are so heterogeneous, any universal explanation of mental illness is not likely to have any clinical or theoretical utility. (Published Online November 9 2006).
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  12
    Some Mental Disorders Are Based on Networks, Others on Latent Variables.Don Ross - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):166-167.
    Cramer et al. persuasively conceptualize major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) as network disorders, rejecting latent variable accounts. But how does their radical picture generalize across the suite of mental and personality disorders? Addictions are Axis I disorders that may be better characterized by latent variables. Their comorbidity relationships could be captured by inserting them as nodes in a super-network of Axis I conditions.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  20
    Ca2+ -Dependent Hyperpolarization Pathways in Sleep Homeostasis and Mental Disorders.Shoi Shi & Hiroki R. Ueda - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (1):1700105.
    Although we are beginning to understand the neuronal and biochemical nature of sleep regulation, questions remain about how sleep is homeostatically regulated. Beyond its importance in basic physiology, understanding sleep may also shed light on psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders. Recent genetic studies in mammals revealed several non-secretory proteins that determine sleep duration. Interestingly, genes identified in these studies are closely related to psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, suggesting that the sleep-wake cycle shares some common mechanisms with these disorders. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. What's Wrong with 'Mental' Disorders?Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti - 2010 - Psychological Medicine.
    Commentary on the editorial by D Stein et al.'s "What is a Mental/Psychiatric Disorder? From DSM-IV to DSM-V".
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  10
    Indeterminacy of Definitions and Criteria in Mental Health: Case Study of Emotional Disorders.George Nikolaidis - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):531-536.
  41.  81
    Complex Mental Disorders: Representation, Stability and Explanation.Dominic Murphy - 2010 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 6 (1):28-42.
    This paper discusses the representation and explanation of relationships between phenomena that are important in psychiatric contexts. After a general discussion of complexity in the philosophy of science, I distinguish zooming-out approaches from zooming-in approaches. Zooming-out has to do with seeing complex mental illnesses as abstract models for the purposes of both explanation and reduction. Zooming-in involves breaking complex mental illnesses into simple components and trying to explain those components independently in terms of specific causes. Connections between existing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  54
    Mental Disorders as Lacks of Mental Capacities.Alfredo Gaete - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):345-347.
    This is a reply to Gipps' commentary on my 'The Concept of Mental Disorder'.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  16
    The Effectiveness of Adhering to Clinical‐Practice Guidelines for Anxiety Disorders in Secondary Mental Health Care: The Results of a Cohort Study in the Netherlands.Maarten K. van Dijk, Desiree B. Oosterbaan, Marc J. P. M. Verbraak & Anton J. L. M. van Balkom - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):791-797.
  44.  22
    Mental Disorders Are Not Brain Disorders.Natalie F. Banner - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):509-513.
  45.  11
    The Implications of Genetic and Other Biological Explanations for Thinking About Mental Disorders.Matthew S. Lebowitz - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (S1):S82-S87.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  17
    Vice and Mental Disorders.John Z. Sadler - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 451.
    The concept of vice-wrongful or criminal conduct-poses a metaphysical clash with the non-moral values of impairment, injury, and incapacity that drive illness/disorder concepts. Nevertheless, vice and disorder concepts have interpenetrated psychiatry past and present through practical social-service interactions between the mental health, adult and juvenile criminal justice, and intellectual disability systems. This chapter will unpack and briefly review the philosophical issues, including considerations of moral and legal responsibility, diagnostic constructs, and the medicalization of vice in contemporary psychiatry.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  27
    Sex, Immorality, and Mental Disorders.B. Gert & C. M. Culver - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (5):487-495.
    Although the definition of a mental disorder has remained essentially the same from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, Third Edition, Revised (DSM-III-R) through DSM-IV to DSM-IV-TR, the account of the paraphilias has changed continually. Although the definition in all the DSMs explicitly rules out deviant sexual behavior as sufficient for labeling someone as having a mental disorder, deviant sexual behavior counts as sufficient for all the paraphilias in DSM-III-R. In DSM-IV, the account of all the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  41
    Digit Ratio (2d:4d) as a Marker for Mental Disorders: Low (Masculinized) 2d:4d in Autism-Spectrum Disorders, High (Feminized) 2d:4d in Schizophrenic-Spectrum Disorders[REVIEW]Martin Voracek - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):283-284.
    Augmenting and supplementing the arguments of Crespi & Badcock (C&B), I show that digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative marker of prenatal androgen action, indeed appears differentially altered in autism-spectrum disorders (lower/masculinized) versus schizophrenic-spectrum disorders (higher/feminized). Consistent with C&B's framework, some evidence (substantial heritability, assortative mating, sex-specific familial transmission) points to possible sex chromosome and imprinted genes effects on 2D:4D expression.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  34
    Classification and Diagnosis of Organic Mental Disorders.Göran Lindqvist & Helge Malmgren - 1993 - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplement 88:5-17.
    A new diagnostic system for organic psychiatry is presented. We first define "organic psychiatry", and then give the theoretical basis for conceiving organic psychiatric disorders in terms of hypothetical psychopathogenetic processes, HPP:s. Such hypothetical disorders are not strictly identical to the clusters of symptoms in which they typically manifest themselves, since the symptoms may be concealed or modified by intervening factors in non typical circumstances and/or in the simultaneous presence of several disorders. The six basic disorders (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  23
    China's Importation of Western Psychiatry: Cultural Relativity and Mental Disorders.Deborah Woo - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (1).
    As one aspect of China's modernization, the importation of Western psychiatric ideas poses a mystery. How are such ideas integrated with traditional assumptions? The apparently wholesale adoption of Western psychiatric categories runs counter to the fact that the Chinese have been generally reluctant to define problems in highly individualized psychiatric terms. Our lack of knowledge as to how the Chinese and Western medical models interface raises questions about the cross-cultural applicability of psychiatric theory. Ironically, the very conceptual categories intended to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 999