Results for 'mental illness'

998 found
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  1.  92
    Creating Mental Illness.Allan V. Horwitz - 2002 - University of Chicago Press.
    In this surprising book, Allan V. Horwitz argues that our current conceptions of mental illness as a disease fit only a small number of serious psychological conditions and that most conditions currently regarded as mental illness are cultural constructions, normal reactions to stressful social circumstances, or simply forms of deviant behavior.
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  2. Mental Illness and Psychology.Michel Foucault & Hubert Dreyfus - 1987 - University of California Press.
    This seminal early work of Foucault is indispensable to understanding his development as a thinker. Written in 1954 and revised in 1962, _Mental Illness and Psychology _delineates the shift that occurred in Foucault's thought during this period. The first iteration reflects the philosopher's early interest in and respect for Freud and the psychoanalytic tradition. The second part, rewritten in 1962, marks a dramatic change in Foucault's thinking. Examining the history of madness as a social and cultural construct, he moves (...)
     
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  3. Mental Illness is Indeed a Myth.Hanna Pickard - 2009 - In Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (eds.), Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter offers a novel defence of Szasz’s claim that mental illness is a myth by bringing to bear a standard type of thought experiment used in philosophical discussions of the meaning of natural kind concepts. This makes it possible to accept Szasz’s conclusion that mental illness involves problems of living, some of which may be moral in nature, while bypassing the debate about the meaning of the concept of illness. The chapter then considers the (...)
     
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  4.  75
    Mental Illness, Human Function, and Values.Christopher Megone - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (1):45-65.
    The present paper constitutes a development of the position that illness, whether bodily or mental, should be analyzed as an incapacitating failure of bodily or mental capacities, respectively, to realize their functions. The paper undertakes this development by responding to two critics. It addresses first Szasz’s continued claims that (1) physical illness is the paradigm concept of illness and (2) a philosophical analysis of mental illness does not shed any light on the social (...)
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  5.  59
    The Myth of Mental Illness: Foundations of a Theory of Personal Conduct.Thomas Stephen Szasz - 1962 - New York: Harper & Row.
  6.  18
    Assessing Mental Illness Stigma: A Complex Issue.Stefania Mannarini & Alessandro Rossi - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  7.  42
    Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility.Abigail Gosselin - 2018 - Social Philosophy Today 34:77-94.
    In this paper I explore the way that mental illness stigma impacts epistemic credibility in people who have mental illness. While any kind of stigma has the potential to discredit a person’s epistemic agency, in the case of mental illness the basis for discrediting is in some cases and to some extent justifiable, for impairments in rationality, control, and reality perception can indeed be obstacles to participating appropriately in epistemic activities such as normal conversation (...)
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  8.  14
    Uncivilizing “Mental Illness”: Contextualizing Diverse Mental States and Posthuman Emotional Ecologies within The Icarus Project.Erica Hua Fletcher - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (1):29-43.
    This article argues humans should not be defined strictly at their physical boundaries with clear distinctions between anatomical bodies, mental states, and the rest of the world. Rather, diverse mental states, which are often diagnosed as “mental illness,” take shape within greater environmental forces and flows, including those that are constructed online. Drawing from a multi-sited ethnography of The Icarus Project, a radical mental health community, the author situates online narratives written by two of its (...)
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  9. Mental Illness as Mental: A Defence of Psychological Realism.Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti - 2009 - Humana Mente 3 (11):25-44.
    This paper argues for psychological realism in the conception of psychiatric disorders. We review the following contemporary ways of understanding the future of psychiatry: (1) psychiatric classification cannot be successfully reduced to neurobiology, and thus psychiatric disorders should not be conceived of as biological kinds; (2) psychiatric classification can be successfully reduced to neurobiology, and thus psychiatric disorders should be conceived of as biological kinds. Position (1) can lead either to instrumentalism or to eliminativism about psychiatry, depending on whether psychiatric (...)
     
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  10. Mental Illness: Psychiatry's Phlogiston.Thomas Szasz - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):297-301.
    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris (...)
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  11.  34
    Mental Illness, Natural Death, and Non-Voluntary Passive Euthanasia.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (3):635-648.
    When it is considered to be in their best interests, withholding and withdrawing life-supporting treatment from non-competent physically ill or injured patients – non-voluntary passive euthanasia, as it has been called – is generally accepted. A central reason in support of the procedures relates to the perceived manner of death they involve: in non-voluntary passive euthanasia death is seen to come about naturally. When a non-competent psychiatric patient attempts to kill herself, the mental health care providers treating her are (...)
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  12.  43
    Mental Illness.Christian Perring - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  13. Mental Illness, Natural Death, and Non-Voluntary Passive Euthanasia.Jukka Varelius - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    When it is considered to be in their best interests, withholding and withdrawing life-supporting treatment from non-competent physically ill or injured patients – non-voluntary passive euthanasia, as it has been called – is generally accepted. A central reason in support of the procedures relates to the perceived manner of death they involve: in non-voluntary passive euthanasia death is seen to come about naturally. When a non-competent psychiatric patient attempts to kill herself, the mental health care providers treating her are (...)
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  14.  48
    Mental Illness and Reductionism: Can Functions Be Naturalized?Tim Thornton - 2000 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 9 (1):229-253.
    There has been considerable recent philo- sophical work on the nature of mental illness. Two..
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  15.  79
    The Myth of Mental Illness.Thomas S. Szasz - 2004 - In Arthur Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), Ethics. Georgetown University Press. pp. 43--50.
  16. Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness: A Call for Nuance.Matt King & Joshua May - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (1):11-22.
    Does having a mental disorder, in general, affect whether someone is morally responsible for an action? Many people seem to think so, holding that mental disorders nearly always mitigate responsibility. Against this Naïve view, we argue for a Nuanced account. The problem is not just that different theories of responsibility yield different verdicts about particular cases. Even when all reasonable theories agree about what's relevant to responsibility, the ways mental illness can affect behavior are so varied (...)
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  17. The Metaphor of Mental Illness.Neil Pickering - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : the existence of mental illness -- The likeness argument -- The categorical argument -- Metaphor -- Two metaphors from physical medicine -- The metaphor of mental illness -- Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, social construction, and metaphor -- Metaphors and models.
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  18. Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness: A Case Study.Matthew R. Broome, Lisa Bortolotti & Matteo Mameli - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (2):179-187.
    Various authors have argued that progress in the neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric sciences might threaten the commonsense understanding of how the mind generates behavior, and, as a consequence, it might also threaten the commonsense ways of attributing moral responsibility, if not the very notion of moral responsibility. In the case of actions that result in undesirable outcomes, the commonsense conception—which is reflected in sophisticated ways in the legal conception—tells us that there are circumstances in which the agent is entirely and fully (...)
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  19. Mental Illness and its Limits.Carl Elliott - 2004 - In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 426.
     
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  20.  23
    The Myth of Mental Illness.Thomas S. Szasz - 1963 - Ethics 73 (2):145-147.
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  21. The Disordered Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Mental Illness.George Graham - 2010 - Routledge.
    _The Disordered Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Mental Illness, second edition_ examines and explains, from a philosophical standpoint, what mental disorder is: its reality, causes, consequences, and more. It is also an outstanding introduction to philosophy of mind from the perspective of mental disorder. Revised and updated throughout, this _second edition_ includes new discussions of grief and psychopathy, the problems of the psychophysical basis of disorder, the nature of selfhood, and clarification of the (...)
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  22.  21
    Mental Illness From the Perspective of Theoretical Neuroscience.Paul Thagard - 2008 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (3):335-352.
  23.  26
    Studying Mental Illness in Context: Local, Global, or Universal?Byron J. Good - 1997 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 25 (2):230-248.
  24.  96
    What is Mental Illness?Derek Bolton - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 434.
    The question "What is mental illness?" raises many issues in many contexts, personal, social, legal, and scientific. This chapter reviews mental health problems as they appear to the person with the problems, and to family and friends-before the person attends the clinic and is given a diagnosis-a time in which whether there really is a problem, as opposed to life's normal troubles and variations, is undecided, as also the nature of the problem, if such it be, and (...)
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  25.  47
    Mental Illness, Metaphysics, Facts and Values.Chris Megone - 2007 - Philosophical Papers 36 (3):399-426.
    A number of prominent writers on the concept of mental illness/disease are committed to accounts which involve rejecting certain plausible widely held beliefs, namely: that it is part of the meaning of illness that it is bad for its possessor, so the concept of illness is essentially evaluative; that if a person has a mental illness, that is a fact about him; and that the same concept of illness is applicable in the case (...)
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  26.  6
    The Myth of Mental Illness: Foundations of a Theory of Personal Conduct.J. D. Uytman - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (58):89-90.
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  27.  69
    Mental Illness, Motivation and Moral Commitment.John Russell Roberts - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):41-59.
    I present a dilemma which depressive behavioral pathology poses for both Humean and non-Humean theories of motivation and value. Although the dilemma shows that neither theory can be considered adequate in its standard form, I argue that if the Humean theory is modified so as to embrace a richer notion of satisfaction than it currently does, it can solve the problem which depression poses for it and, thus, the dilemma can be avoided. Embracing a richer notion of satisfaction not only (...)
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  28. Mental Illness and the Mind-Brain Problem: Delusion, Belief and Searle's Theory of Intentionality.K. W. M. Fulford - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (2).
    Until recently there has been little contact between the mind-brain debate in philosophy and the debate in psychiatry about the nature of mental illness. In this paper some of the analogies and disanalogies between the two debates are explored. It is noted in particular that the emphasis in modern philosophy of mind on the importance of the concept of action has been matched by a recent shift in the debate about mental illness from analyses of disease (...)
     
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  29. Mental Illness, the Medical Model, and Psychiatry.Gerald L. Klerman - 1977 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 2 (3):220-243.
  30.  7
    Studying Mental Illness in Context: Local, Global, or Universal?Byron J. Good - 1997 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 25 (2):230-248.
  31.  40
    Chronic Mental Illness and the Limits of the Biopsychosocial Model.Dirk Richter - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):21-30.
    Twenty years ago, the biopsychosocial model was proposed by George Engel to be the new paradigm for medicine and psychiatry. The model assumed a hierarchical structure of the biological, psychological and social system and simple interactions between the participating systems. This article holds the thesis that the original biopsychosocial model cannot depict psychiatry's reality and problems. The clinical validity of the biopsychosocial model has to be questioned. It is argued that psychiatric interventions can only stimulate but not determine their target (...)
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  32.  61
    Cognitive Theories of Mental Illness.Brendan A. Maher, A. W. Young, Philip Gerrans, John Campbell, Kai Vogeley, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Owen Flanagan, Robert L. Woolfolk, Barry Smith & Joëlle Proust - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
    For years a debate has raged within the various literatures of philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology over whether, and to what degree, the concepts that characterize psychopathology are social constructions that reflect cultural values. While the majority position among philosophers has been normativist, i.e., that the conception of a mental disorder is value-laden, a vocal and cogent minority have argued that psychopathology results from malfunctions that can be described by terminology that is objective and scientific. Scientists and clinicians have tended (...)
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  33.  28
    Competence in Chronic Mental Illness: The Relevance of Practical Wisdom.Guy A. M. Widdershoven, Andrea Ruissen, Anton J. L. M. van Balkom & Gerben Meynen - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (6):374-378.
  34.  35
    Disordered Existentiality: Mental Illness and Heidegger’s Philosophy of Dasein.Schmid Jelscha - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):485-502.
    In this paper, I propose an existentialist-phenomenological model that conceives of mental illness through the terminology of Heidegger’s Being and Time. In particular, the concepts of existentiality, disturbance and the relation between ‘being-with’ and ‘the one’, will be implemented in order to reconstruct the experience of mental illness. The proposed model understands mental illness as a disturbance of a person’s existentiality. More precisely, mental illness is conceptualized as the disturbance of a person’s (...)
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  35.  51
    Stigma of Mental Illness-1: Clinical Reflections.Amresh Shrivastava, Megan Johnston & Yves Bureau - 2012 - Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):70.
    Although the quality and effectiveness of mental health treatments and services have improved greatly over the past 50 years, therapeutic revolutions in psychiatry have not yet been able to reduce stigma. Stigma is a risk factor leading to negative mental health outcomes. It is responsible for treatment seeking delays and reduces the likelihood that a mentally ill patient will receive adequate care. It is evident that delay due to stigma can have devastating consequences. This review will discuss the (...)
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  36.  36
    Mental Illness and Cultural Issues in West African Films: Implications for Orthodox Psychiatric Practice.O. F. Aina - 2004 - Medical Humanities 30 (1):23-26.
    The portrayal of psychiatry and of the activities of supernatural forces in indigenous films produced in West Africa was critically examined in this study. Most often the content of these films is centred on African culture, African mythical stories, or real life events. Over a three year period, 163 such films were studied. Twenty five of them contained scenes of psychiatric illness. In 24 of these, there were “cases of psychoses”; and the remaining one was that of “deliberate self (...)
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  37.  36
    Mental Illness and the Conciousness of Freedom: The Phenomenology of Psychiatric Labelling.Bruce Bradfield - 2002 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 2 (1):1-14.
    Paradigmatically led by existential phenomenological premises, as formulated by Jean-Paul Sartre and Edmund Husserl specifically, this paper aims at a deconstruction of the value of psychiatric labelling in terms of the implications of such labelling for the labelled individual’s experience of freedom as a conscious imperative. This work has as its intention the destabilisation of labelling as a stubborn and inexorable mechanism for social propriety and regularity, which in its unyielding classificatory brandings is Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology , Volume 2, (...)
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  38. Malfunction and Mental Illness.Robert L. Woolfolk - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
    For years a debate has raged within the various literatures of philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology over whether, and to what degree, the concepts that characterize psychopathology are social constructions that reflect cultural values. While the majority position among philosophers has been normativist, i.e., that the conception of a mental disorder is value-laden, a vocal and cogent minority have argued that psychopathology results from malfunctions that can be described by terminology that is objective and scientific. Scientists and clinicians have tended (...)
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  39.  6
    Psychopathologies of Time: Defining Mental Illness in Early 20th-Century Psychiatry.Allegra R. P. Fryxell - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (2):3-31.
    This article examines the role of time as a methodological tool and pathological focus of clinical psychiatry and psychology in the first half of the 20th century. Contextualizing ‘psychopathologies of time’ developed by practitioners in Europe and North America with reference to the temporal theories implicit in Freudian psychoanalysis and Henri Bergson’s philosophy of durée, it illuminates how depression, schizophrenia, and other mental disorders such as obsessive-compulsive behaviours and aphasia were understood to be symptomatic of an altered or disturbed (...)
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  40.  22
    Genetic Discrimination and Mental Illness: A Case Report.J. G. Wong - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):393-397.
    With advances in genetic technology, there are increasing concerns about the way in which genetic information may be abused, particularly in people at increased genetic risk of developing certain disorders. In a recent case in Hong Kong, the court ruled that it was unlawful for the civil service to discriminate in employment, for the sake of public safety, against people with a family history of mental illness. The plaintiffs showed no signs of any mental health problems and (...)
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  41. Mental Illness, Philosophy Of.Erick Ramirez - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Philosophy of Mental Illness The Philosophy of Mental Illness is an interdisciplinary field of study that combines views and methods from the philosophy of mind, psychology, neuroscience, and moral philosophy in order to analyze the nature of mental illness. Philosophers of mental illness are concerned with examining the ontological, epistemological, and normative issues arising from […].
     
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  42. The Reality of Mental Illness.Martin Roth - 1986 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is psychiatry's reply to the diverse group of antipsychiatrists, including Laing, Foucault, Goffman, Szasz and Bassaglia, that has made fashionable the view that mental illness is merely socially deviant behaviour and that psychiatrists are agents of the capitalist society seeking to repress such behaviour. It establishes, by the use of evidence from historical and transcultural studies, that mental illness has been recognised in all cultures since the beginning of history and goes on to explore (...)
     
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  43. Mental Health and Mental Illness: Some Problems of Definition and Concept Formation.Ruth Macklin - 1972 - Philosophy of Science 39 (3):341-365.
  44.  8
    Mental Illness and thelebensweltA Discussion of Maurice Natanson (Ed.),Psychiatry and Philosophy∗.Alastair Hannay - 1972 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 15 (1-4):208-230.
  45.  31
    Recovery of People with Mental Illness: Philosophical and Related Perspectives.Abraham Rudnick (ed.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    It is only in the past 20 years that the concept of 'recovery' from mental health has been more widely considered and researched. This book is unique in addressing philosophical issues - including conceptual challenges and opportunities - raised by the notion of recovery of people with mental illness.
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  46.  73
    Lived Autonomy and Chronic Mental Illness: A Phenomenological Approach.Jann E. Schlimme - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):387-404.
    In this paper, I develop a phenomenological description of lived autonomy and describe possible alterations of lived autonomy associated with chronic depression as they relate to specific psychopathological symptoms. I will distinguish between two types of lived autonomy, a pre-reflective type and a reflective type, which differ with respect to the explicitness of the action that is willed into existence; and I will relate these types to the classical distinction between freedom of intentional action and freedom of the will. I (...)
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  47.  29
    Diagnostic Liquidity: Mental Illness and the Global Trade in DNA. [REVIEW]Andrew Lakoff - 2005 - Theory and Society 34 (1):63-92.
  48. Vrijednosti u psihijatriji i pojam mentalne bolesti (Eng. Values in psychiatry and the concept of mental illness).Luca Malatesti & Marko Jurjako - 2016 - In Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Luca Malatesti & Elvio Baccarini (eds.), Moralni, Politički I Društveni Odgovori Na Društvene Devijacije (Eng. Moral, Political, and Social Responses to Antisocial Deviation). Rijeka: University of Rijeka. pp. 153-181.
    The crucial problem in the philosophy of psychiatry is to determine under which conditions certain behaviors, mental states, and personality traits should be regarded as symptoms of mental illnesses. Participants in the debate can be placed on a continuum of positions. On the one side of the continuum, there are naturalists who maintain that the concept of mental illness can be explained by relying on the conceptual apparatus of the natural sciences, such as biology and neuroscience. (...)
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  49.  59
    Some Myths About 'Mental Illness'.Michael S. Moore - 1975 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):233 – 265.
    Radical psychiatrists and others assert that mental illness is a myth. The opening and closing portions of the paper deal with the impact such argument has had in law and psychiatry. The body of the paper discusses the five versions of the myth argument prevalent in radical psychiatry: (A) that there is no such thing as mental illness; (B) that those called ?mentally ill? are really as rational as everyone else, only with different aims; that the (...)
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  50.  1
    Is ‘Gender Disappointment’ a Unique Mental Illness?Tereza Hendl & Tamara Kayali Browne - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):281-294.
    ‘Gender disappointment’ is the feeling of sadness when a parent’s strong desire for a child of a certain sex is not realised. It is frequently mentioned as a reason behind parents’ pursuit of sex selection for social reasons. It also tends to be framed as a mental disorder on a range of platforms including the media, sex selection forums and among parents who have been interviewed about sex selection. Our aim in this paper is to investigate whether ‘gender disappointment’ (...)
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