Search results for 'mental language' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  46
    Eric W. Hagedorn (2015). Ockham's Scientia Argument for Mental Language. Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 3:145-168.
    William Ockham held that, in addition to written and spoken language, there exists a mental language, a structured representational system common to all thinking beings. Here I present and evaluate an argument found in several places across Ockham's corpus, wherein he argues that positing a mental language is necessary for the nominalist to meet certain ontological constraints imposed by Aristotle’s account of scientific demonstration.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Claude Panaccio (2007). Mental Language and Tradition Encounters in Medieval Philosophy: Anselm, Albert and Ockham. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):269-282.
    Medieval philosophy is often presented as the outcome of a large scale encounter between the Christian tradition and the Greek philosophical one. This picture, however, inappropriately tends to leave out the active role played by the medieval authors themselves and their institutional contexts. The theme of the mental language provides us with an interesting case study in such matters. The paper first introduces a few technical notions—'theme', 'tradition', 'textual chain' and 'textual borrowing'—, and then focuses on precise passages (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  41
    J. Christopher Maloney (1984). The Mundane Mental Language: How to Do Words with Things. Synthese 59 (June):251-294.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  6
    J. Christopher Maloney (1989). The Mundane Matter of the Mental Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Offering an explanation of the fundamental nature of thought, this book posits the idea that thinking involves the processing of mental representations that take the form of sentences in a covert language encoded in the mind. The theory relies on traditional categories of psychology, including such notions as belief and desire. It also draws upon and thus inherits some of the problems of artificial intelligence which it attempts to answer, including what bestows meaning or content upon a thought (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  5. David J. Chalmers (1999). Is There Synonymy in Ockham's Mental Language. In P. V. Spade (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ockham. Cambridge 76.
    William of Ockham's semantic theory was founded on the idea that thought takes place in a language not unlike the languages in which spoken and written communication occur. This mental language was held to have a number of features in common with everyday languages. For example, mental language has simple terms, not unlike words, out of which complex expressions can be constructed. As with words, each of these terms has some meaning, or signification; in fact (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  41
    Peter King (2007). Abelard on Mental Language. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (2):169-187.
    I argue that Abelard was the author of the first theory of mental language in the Middle Ages, devising a “language of thought” to provide the semanticsfor ordinary languages, based on the idea that thoughts have linguistic character. I examine Abelard’s semantic framework with special attention to his principleof compositionality (the meaning of a whole is a function of the meanings of the parts); the results are then applied to Abelard’s distinction between complete andincomplete expressions, as well (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.) (1995). Mental Simulation: Evaluations and Applications - Reading in Mind and Language. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Many philosophers and psychologists argue that out everyday ability to predict and explain the actions and mental states of others is grounded in out possession of a primitive 'folk' psychological theory. Recently however, this theory has come under challenge from the simulation alternative. This alternative view says that human beings are able to predict and explain each other's actions by using the resources of their own minds to simulate the psychological aetiology of the actions of the others. This book (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  8.  25
    Deborah J. Brown (1996). The Puzzle of Names in Ockham's Theory of Mental Language. Review of Metaphysics 50 (1):79 - 99.
    There is a tension within Ockham's theory of mental language between its claim to being a semantics for conventional languages and its claim to being a model of concept acquisition and thought. In particular, the commitment to a redundancy-free mental language which serves to explain important semantic relations such as synonymy and ambiguity conflicts, _prima facie, with the possibility of opaque belief contexts. I argue that it is preferable to treat the theory of mental (...) as an idealized theory of cognitive competence than to forfeit, as Jerry Fodor does, the commitment to conceptual parsimony. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  44
    Paul Vincent Spade (1980). Synonymy and Equivocation in Ockham's Mental Language. Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (1):9-22.
    A textual and philosophical study of the claim that according to ockham there is no synonymy or equivocation in mental language. It is argued that ockham is committed to both claims, Either explicitly or in virtue of other features of his doctrine. Nevertheless, Both claims lead to difficulties for ockham's theory.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  64
    Mikko Yrjönsuuri (1997). Supposition and Truth in Ockham's Mental Language. Topoi 16 (1):15-25.
    In this paper, Ockham's theory of an ideal language of thought is used to illuminate problems of interpretation of his theory of truth. The twentieth century idea of logical form is used for finding out what kinds of atomic sentences there are in OckhamÕs mental language. It turns out that not only the theory of modes of supposition, but also the theory of supposition in general is insufficient as a full theory of truth. Rather, the theory of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  35
    Gyula Klima, Semantic Complexity and Syntactic Simplicity in Ockham's Mental Language.
    In these comments I am going to argue that Yiwei Zheng's paper, by postulating an imaginary mental language in a proposed new interpretation of Ockham's conception of mental language, provides us with an imaginary solution to what turns out to be an imaginary problem. Having said this, however, I hasten to add that the paper has undeniable merits in pointing us in the right direction for revealing the imaginary character of the problem.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  10
    Catarina Dutilh Novaes (2012). Ockham on Supposition Theory, Mental Language, and Angelic Communication. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):415-434.
    In my previous work on Ockham’s theory of supposition, I have argued that it is best understood as a theory of sentential meaning, i.e., as an apparatus for the interpretation of sentences. In this paper, I address the challenge posed to this interpretation of Ockham’s theory by the existence of different kinds of supposition in mental language through the lenses of Ockham’s theory of angelic communication. I identify two potentially problematic implications of Ockham’s account of mental (...) as allowing for different kinds of supposition: the existence of non-significative supposition in mental language; and the possibility of ambiguous mental sentences. I then turn to angelic communication and examine these two issues from that point of view, concluding that there cannot be non-significative supposition in mental language, but also that there may still be room for sentential ambiguity in mental language. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Hester Goodenough Gelber (1984). I Cannot Tell a Lie. Hugh Lawton's Critique of Ockham on Mental Language. Franciscan Studies 44:141-179.
    The article describes the evolution of Ockham's theory of mental language and its impact on three of his dominican contemporaries at oxford: Hugh Lawton, William Crathorn and Robert Holcot, and its impact at Paris on the works of Gregory of Rimini and Pierre d'Ailly. Hugh Lawton's critical response to Ockham relied on a liar-like paradox to show that mental language would preclude the ability to lie. Crathorn devised an alternative to Ockham's theory in reaction, whereas Holcot (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. J. Christopher Maloney (1989). The Mundane Matter of the Mental Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Christopher Maloney offers an explanation of the fundamental nature of thought. He posits the idea that thinking involves the processing of mental representations that take the form of sentences in a covert language encoded in the mind. The theory relies upon traditional categories of psychology, including such notions as belief and desire. It also draws upon and thus inherits some of the problems of artificial intelligence which it attempts to answer, including what bestows meaning or content upon a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Michael A. Simon (1970). Materialism, Mental Language, and the Mind-Body Identity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 30 (June):514-32.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  24
    Calvin Normore (2009). The End of Mental Language. In J. Biard (ed.), Le Langage Mental du Moyen Âge à l'Âge Classique. Peeters Publishers 293--306.
  17.  51
    Claude Panaccio (1992). From Mental Word to Mental Language. Philosophical Topics 20 (2):125-147.
    This paper studies the doctrinal and historical relations between the augustinian theme of the inner word as it was understood in Thirteenth-century thought --especially by Thomas Aquinas -- and William of Ockham's idea of mental discourse. The differences are shown to be deeply significant and are replaced in the context of a crucial shift that occurred in the decades between Aquinas and Ockham: the shift from theology to logic as providing the main inputs and stimulations for the development, on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  60
    Adèle Mercier (1993). Normativism and the Mental: A Problem of Language Individuation. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 72 (1):71-88.
    My aim in this paper is two?fold. I start by contrasting three versions of externalist arguments based on etiological considerations, whose differences are not often appreciated. My purpose in doing so is to isolate one of these versions of externalism as most supportive of current anti?individualist attitudes toward the mental. My second aim is to show that this version, which I call (for reasons soon to be clear) Dialectal Etiology , is marred to a greater extent than the other (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  2
    Shaun Nichols (1991). The Mundane Matter of the Mental Language. Mind and Language 6 (4):386-389.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Simo Knuutttla (2009). Ockham on Fallacies and Mental Language. In J. Biard (ed.), Le Langage Mental du Moyen Âge à l'Âge Classique. Peeters Publishers 50--135.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Alfonso Maierù (2004). Mental Language and Italian Scholasticism in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries. In Russell L. Friedman & Sten Ebbesen (eds.), John Buridan and Beyond: Topics in the Language Sciences, 1300-1700. Commission Agent, C.A. Reitzel 89--33.
  22.  13
    Claude Panaccio (1999). And Mental Language. In P. V. Spade (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ockham. Cambridge 53.
  23.  82
    Calvin G. Normore (1997). Material Supposition and the Mental Language of Ockham's Summa Logicae. Topoi 16 (1):27-33.
  24.  56
    E. J. Ashworth (1982). The Structure of Mental Language: Some Problems Discussed by Early Sixteenth Century Logicians. Vivarium 20 (1):59-83.
  25.  17
    Laird Addis (1990). The Mundane Matter of the Mental Language. Review of Metaphysics 44 (2):426-427.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  7
    E. J. Ashworth (1981). Mental Language and the Unity of Propositions: A Semantic Problem Discussed by Early Sixteenth Century Logicians. Franciscan Studies 41 (1):61-96.
  27.  7
    Hester G. Gelber (1984). I Cannot Tell a Lie: Hugh of Lawton's Critique of William of Ockham on Mental Language. Franciscan Studies 44 (1):141-179.
  28.  10
    Yiwei Zheng (1998). Metaphysical Simplicity and Semantical Complexity of Connotative Terms in Ockham's Mental Language. Modern Schoolman 75 (4):253-264.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  3
    Aurélien Robert, William Crathorn on Predication and Mental Language.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  7
    Lilly-Marlene Russow (1992). The Mundane Matter of the Mental Language J. Christopher Maloney New York: Cambridge University Press, 1989, Xxvii + 274 P., US$39.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 31 (01):150-.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Claude Albert (2007). Mental Language and Tradition Encounters in Medieval Philosophy : Anselm, Albert and Ockham. In John Marenbon (ed.), The Many Roots of Medieval Logic: The Aristotelian and the Non-Aristotelian Traditions: Special Offprint of Vivarium 45, 2-3 (2007). Brill
  32. Rastislav Nemec (2013). On Some Problems of Mental Language in Ockham and Fodor. Filozofia 68 (6):470-480.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Claude Panaccio (1999). Semantics and Mental Language. In P. V. Spade (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ockham. Cambridge 53--75.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. D. Perler (2004). The Systematicity of Thought-On Ockham's Theory of Mental Language. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 111 (2):291-311.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Lilly-Marlene Russow (1992). "The Mundane Matter of the Mental Language", by J. Christopher Maloney. [REVIEW] Dialogue 31:150.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  62
    Gilles Fauconnier (1994). Mental Spaces: Aspects of Meaning Construction in Natural Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Mental Spaces is the classic introduction to the study of mental spaces and conceptual projection, as revealed through the structure and use of language. It examines in detail the dynamic construction of connected domains as discourse unfolds. The discovery of mental space organization has modified our conception of language and thought: powerful and uniform accounts of superficially disparate phenomena have become available in the areas of reference, presupposition projection, counterfactual and analogical reasoning, metaphor and metonymy, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  37.  7
    Lisa S. Pearl & Igii Enverga (2014). Can You Read My Mindprint?: Automatically Identifying Mental States From Language Text Using Deeper Linguistic Features. Interaction Studies 15 (3):359-387.
    Humans routinely transmit and interpret subtle information about their mental states through the language they use, even when only the language text is available. This suggests humans can utilize the linguistic signature of a mental state, comprised of features in the text. Once the relevant features are identified, mindprints can be used to automatically identify mental states communicated via language. We focus on the mindprints of eight mental states resulting from intentions, attitudes, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38.  30
    Francesco Ferretti & Erica Cosentino (2013). Time, Language and Flexibility of the Mind: The Role of Mental Time Travel in Linguistic Comprehension and Production. Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):24-46.
    According to Chomsky, creativity is a critical property of human language, particularly the aspect of ?the creative use of language? concerning the appropriateness to a situation. How language can be creative but appropriate to a situation is an unsolvable mystery from the Chomskyan point of view. We propose that language appropriateness can be explained by considering the role of the human capacity for Mental Time Travel at its foundation, together with social and ecological intelligences within (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  63
    Kristin Andrews, Confronting Language, Representation, and Belief: A Limited Defense of Mental Continuity.
    According to the mental continuity claim (MCC), human mental faculties are physical and beneficial to human survival, so they must have evolved gradually from ancestral forms and we should expect to see their precursors across species. Materialism of mind coupled with Darwin’s evolutionary theory leads directly to such claims and even today arguments for animal mental properties are often presented with the MCC as a premise. However, the MCC has been often challenged among contemporary scholars. It is (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  43
    Humberto Maturana, Brain, Language and the Origin of Human Mental Functions.
    We propose that to understand the biological and neurophysiological processes that give rise to human mental phenomena it is necessary to consider them as behavioral relational phenomena. In particular, we propose that: a) these phenomena take place in the relational manner of living that human language constitutes, and b) that they arise as recursive operations in such behavioral domain. Accordingly, we maintain that these phenomena do not take place in the brain, nor are they the result of a (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Stephen N. Laurence (1993). Naturalism and Language: A Study of the Nature of Linguistic Kinds and Mental Representation. Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    In this dissertation I argue for a broadly Chomskian account of all natural language linguistic properties, including semantic properties. But the dissertation is as much concerned with methodological issues as with this substantive question. ;In chapter one, I argue that the standard motivation for Naturalistic accounts of language and mind is misguided. Rather such accounts should be motivated by the potential explanatory gains afforded by successful Naturalistic accounts. Accordingly, we should seek accounts that increase the science's evidentiary basis (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Wilhelm Humboldt (1999). On Language: On the Diversity of Human Language Construction and its Influence on the Mental Development of the Human Species. Cambridge University Press.
    Wilhelm von Humboldt's classic study of human language was first published in 1836, as a general introduction to his three-volume treatise on the Kawi language of Java. It is the final statement of his lifelong study of the nature of language, exploring its universal structures and its relation to mind and culture. Empirically wide-ranging - Humboldt goes far beyond the Indo-European family of languages - it remains one of the most interesting and important attempts to draw philosophical (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  43.  77
    Neil Campbell Manson (2002). What Does Language Tell Us About Consciousness? First-Person Mental Discourse and Higher-Order Thought Theories of Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 15 (3):221 – 238.
    The fact that we can engage in first-person discourse about our own mental states seems, intuitively, to be bound up with consciousness. David Rosenthal draws upon this intuition in arguing for his higher-order thought theory of consciousness. Rosenthal's argument relies upon the assumption that the truth-conditions for "p" and "I think that p" differ. It is argued here that the truth-conditional schema debars "I think" from playing one of its roles and thus is not a good test for what (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44. Wilhelm Humboldt (1988). On Language: The Diversity of Human Language-Structure and its Influence on the Mental Development of Mankind. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an entirely new translation of one of the fundamental works in the development of the study of language. Published in 1836, it formed the general introduction to Wilhelm von Humboldt's three-volume treatise on the Kawi language of Java. It is the final statement of his lifelong study of the nature of language, and presents a survey of a great many languages, exploring ways in which their various grammatical structures make them more or less suitable as (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45. Michael Losonsky & Peter Heath (eds.) (1999). Wilhelm von Humboldt on Language : On the Diversity of Human Language Construction and its Influence on the Mental Development of the Human Species. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Wilhelm von Humboldt's classic study of human language was first published in 1836, as a general introduction to his three-volume treatise on the Kawi language of Java. It is the final statement of his lifelong study of the nature of language, exploring its universal structures and its relation to mind and culture. Empirically wide-ranging - Humboldt goes far beyond the Indo-European family of languages - it remains one of the most interesting and important attempts to draw philosophical (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  55
    John Sutton (1994). History, Language, and Mind’. Review of Graham Richards, Mental Machinery: The Origins and Consequences of Psychological Ideas, Part 1:1600-1850. [REVIEW] Metascience 5:147-150.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  20
    Benjamin Bergen (2005). Mental Simulation in Literal and Figurative Language Understanding. In Seana Coulson & Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk (eds.), The Literal and Nonliteral in Language and Thought. Peter Lang 255--280.
  48.  11
    Gerry Altmann & Yuki Kamide (2009). Discourse-Mediation of the Mapping Between Language and the Visual World: Eye Movements and Mental Representation. Cognition 111 (1):55-71.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  49.  18
    Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe (2009). Jerónimo Pardo on the Unity of Mental Propositions. In J. Biard (ed.), Le langage mental du Moyen Âge à l'Âge Classique. Peeters Publishers
    Originally motivated by a sophism, Pardo's discussion about the unity of mental propositions allows him to elaborate on his ideas about the nature of propositions. His option for a non-composite character of mental propositions is grounded in an original view about syncategorems: propositions have a syncategorematic signification, which allows them to signify aliquid aliqualiter, just by virtue of the mental copula, without the need of any added categorematic element. Pardo's general claim about the simplicity of mental (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  95
    Juan Pascual-Leone (2006). Mental Attention, Not Language, May Explain Evolutionary Growth of Human Intelligence and Brain Size. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):19-20.
    Using neoPiagetian theory of mental attention (or working memory), I task-analyze two complex performances of great apes and one symbolic performance (funeral burials) of early Homo sapiens. Relating results to brain size growth data, I derive estimates of mental attention for great apes, Homo erectus, Neanderthals, and modern Homo sapiens, and use children's cognitive development as reference. This heuristic model seems consistent with research.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000