Results for 'mindfulness'

477 found
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  1. Mindfulness Changes Construal Level: An Experimental Investigation.Eugene Y. Chan & Yitong Wang - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (9):1656-1664.
    Mindfulness involves paying attention to the present moment and accepting any thoughts or feelings that might arise without judgment. Mindfulness can influence a number of outcomes. Currently, we are interested if it influences people’s level of mental construal. Two central dimensions of mindfulness (focusing on the present, and Openness to Experience) can lead to diverging predictions. While focusing on the present may produce a concrete construal level, openness to experience may facilitate an abstract construal level instead. We (...)
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  2.  95
    Compassion - Toward an Ethics of Mindfulness.Finn Janning - 2018 - Compassion and Mindfulness 1 (3):25-46.
    This work is guided by two hypotheses with one overall objective of establishing an ethics of mindfulness . The first hypothesis is the concept of moral motivator or in- tentional moral. Both Western philosophy and mindfulness operate with an intention influenced by their moral beliefs. The second hypothesis is the relationship between moral reasoning and wisdom. That is, our reasoning is affected by our moral belief . To combine those two theses, I introduce the concept compassion from (...) and the ethics based on the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. Hereby, I suggest that by practicing mindfulness, one can develop his or her capacity for compassion, but also – this practice – is a «way of life» that can help protect the planet: an ethical practice. (shrink)
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  3.  97
    In the Moment: The Effect of Mindfulness on Ethical Decision Making. [REVIEW]Nicole E. Ruedy & Maurice E. Schweitzer - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):73 - 87.
    Many unethical decisions stem from a lack of awareness. In this article, we consider how mindfulness, an individual's awareness of his or her present experience, impacts ethical decision making. In our first study, we demonstrate that compared to individuals low in mindfulness, individuals high in mindfulness report that they are more likely to act ethically, are more likely to value upholding ethical standards (self-importance of moral identity, SMI), and are more likely to use a principled approach to (...)
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  4. The Limits of Mindfulness: Emerging Issues for Education.Terry Hyland - 2016 - British Journal of Educational Studies 64 (1):97-117.
    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are being actively implemented in a wide range of fields – psychology, mind/body health care and education at all levels – and there is growing evidence of their effectiveness in aiding present-moment focus, fostering emotional stability, and enhancing general mind/body well-being. However, as often happens with popular innovations, the burgeoning interest in and appeal of mindfulness practice has led to a reductionism and commodification – popularly labelled ‘McMindfulness’ – of the underpinning principles and ethical foundations (...)
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  5.  55
    Role Conflict, Mindfulness, and Organizational Ethics in an Education-Based Healthcare Institution.Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin & Philip E. Varca - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):455 - 469.
    Role conflict occurs when a job possesses inconsistent expectations incongruent with individual beliefs, a situation that precipitates considerable frustration and other negative work outcomes. Increasing interest in processes that reduce role conflict is, therefore, witnessed. With the help of information collected from a large sample of individuals employed at an education-based healthcare institution, this study identified several factors that might decrease role conflict, namely mindfulness and organizational ethics. In particular, the results indicated that mindfulness was associated with decreased (...)
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  6.  40
    Mindfulness Training: Can It Create Superheroes?Patrick Jones - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    With the emergence of the science of heroism there now exists both theoretical and empirical literature on the characteristics of our everyday hero. We seek to expand this inquiry and ask what could be the causes and conditions of a superhero. To address this we investigate the origins of mindfulness, Buddhist psychology and the assertion that its practitioners who have attained expertise in mindfulness practices can develop supernormal capabilities. Examining first their foundational eight “jhana” states (levels of attention) (...)
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  7. Forgetting Ourselves: Epistemic Costs and Ethical Concerns in Mindfulness Exercises.Sahanika Ratnayake & David Merry - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (8):567-574.
    Mindfulness exercises are presented as being compatible with almost any spiritual, religious or philosophical beliefs. In this paper, we argue that they in fact involve imagining and conceptualising rather striking and controversial claims about the self, and the self’s relationship to thoughts and feelings. For this reason, practising mindfulness exercises is likely to be in tension with many people’s core beliefs and values, a tension that should be treated as a downside of therapeutic interventions involving mindfulness exercises, (...)
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  8.  88
    Mindfulness as a Pedagogical Tool: Kuchipudi Indian Classical Hindu Dance.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2015 - Arts in Religious and Theological Studies (ARTS) Journal 1 (27):33-39.
    Contemplative pedagogy is necessary in the dance world because it can be a very dangerous place without it. Dance students who aim to sustain the so-called “right”body image too often develop a physical obsession that leads to dangers like bulimia and anorexia. Moreover, the stresses of performing on stage, combined with other pressures of daily life, may overwhelm dancers to the point where they might feel depressed or even suicidal. Thus, it is vital to develop a pedagogy that thinks about (...)
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  9.  4
    The Ethics of Mindfulness-Based Interventions: A Population- Level Perspective.Andreas T. Schmidt & Lovro Savic - 2019 - The Oxford Handbook of Psychotherapy Ethics.
    When applied in population-level contexts, such as schools or business, mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) find themselves in a crossfire between two different kinds of criticisms. On one side, some worry that MBIs’ normative commitments might be “too thick,” worrying that MBIs might come with a particular conception of the good, and significant ethical and religious commitments. On the other side, some worry that contemporary MBIs are ethically “too thin,” as they shed too many of their original Buddhist ethical and soteriological (...)
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  10. Yogic Mindfulness: Hariharānanda Āraṇya’s Quasi-Buddhistic Interpretation of Smṛti in Patañjali’s Yogasūtra I.20.Ayon Maharaj - 2013 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (1):57-78.
    This paper examines Swami Hariharānanda Āraṇya’s unique interpretation of smṛti as “mindfulness” (samanaskatā) in Patañjali’s Yogasūtra I.20. Focusing on his extended commentary on Yogasūtra I.20 in his Bengali magnum opus, the Pātañjaljogdarśan (1911), I argue that his interpretation of smṛti is quasi-Buddhistic. On the one hand, Hariharānanda’s conception of smṛti as mindfulness resonates strongly with some of the views on smṛti advanced in classic Buddhist texts such as the Satipaṭṭhānasutta and Buddaghośa’s Papañcasūdanī. On the other hand, he also (...)
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  11.  29
    The Ethics and Politics of Mindfulness-Based Interventions.Andreas T. Schmidt - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (7):450-454.
    Recently, there has been a lot of enthusiasm for mindfulness practice and its use in healthcare, businesses and schools. An increasing number of studies give us ground for cautious optimism about the potential of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) to improve people's lives across a number of dimensions. This paper identifies and addresses some of the main ethical and political questions for larger-scale MBIs. First, how far are MBIs compatible with liberal neutrality given the great diversity of lifestyles and conceptions (...)
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  12.  8
    The Moderating Effect of Mindfulness on the Mediated Relation Between Critical Thinking and Psychological Distress Via Cognitive Distortions Among Adolescents.Michael Ronald Su & Kathy Kar-man Shum - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Critical thinking has been widely regarded as an indispensable cognitive skill in the 21st century. However, its associations with the affective aspects of psychological functioning are not well understood. This study explored the interrelations between trait mindfulness, critical thinking, cognitive distortions, and psychological distress using a moderated mediation model. The sample comprised 287 senior secondary school students (57% male and 43% female) aged 14–19 from a local secondary school in Hong Kong. The results revealed that high critical thinking was (...)
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  13.  50
    Becoming a Seer: Thoughts on Deleuze, Mindfulness and Feminism.Finn Janning - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Life 7 (2):377-390.
    This essay circles around two ideas. First, I try to answer the ethical question “What is the right thing to do?” through the application of the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze’s affirmative philosophy. Second, I relate Deleuze’s philosophy to mindfulness. I do not wish to suggest that they are identical. They are not. Yet, mixing mindfulness with Deleuze leads to a philosophy of mindfulness. That is a philosophy that makes us less blind to our experiences, but also ethically (...)
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  14.  21
    The Impact of Positive and Negative Spiritual Experiences on Distress and the Moderating Role of Mindfulness.Niko Kohls, Harald Walach & George Lewith - 2009 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (3):357-374.
    Both spiritual experiences and mindfulness as a psychological variable have been identified as components of wellbeing and health. As there is uncertainty about their relationship, we have investigated the impact of spiritual experiences and mindfulness as well as their interaction on distress in chronically ill patients. The unidimensional Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale , the multidimensional Exceptional Experiences Questionnaire , the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory , and the Brief Symptom Inventory were administered to 109 chronically ill patients. Fifty-eight patients (...)
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  15.  17
    The Postsecular Turn in Education: Lessons From the Mindfulness Movement and the Revival of Confucian Academies.Jinting Wu & Mario Wenning - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (6):551-571.
    It is part of a global trend today that new relationships are being forged between religion and society, between spirituality and materiality, giving rise to announcements that we live in a ‘postsecular’ or ‘desecularized’ world. Taking up two educational movements, the mindfulness movement in the West and the revival of Confucian education in China, this paper examines what and how postsecular orientations and sensibilities penetrate educational discourses and practices in different cultural contexts. We compare the two movements to reveal (...)
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  16.  27
    Mindfulness and Trauma: Some Striking Similarities.Yochai Ataria - 2018 - Anthropology of Consciousness 29 (1):44-56.
    The traumatic experience and the meditative experience differ in many respects. For instance, it is possible to suggest that while a sense of helplessness is the most important feature of the traumatic experience, meditation does not involve a similar sense of helplessness. Furthermore, while trauma is shocking and horrifying, meditation is considered to be constructive and efficient in reducing stress and improving welfare. Yet, with this in mind, by comparing interviews with twelve senior meditators on the one hand and interviews (...)
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  17.  11
    Empirical Mindfulness: Traditional Chinese Medicine and Mental Health in the Science and Religion Dialogue.William L. Atkins - 2018 - Zygon 53 (2):392-408.
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  18.  36
    Mysticism and Self-Determination in Iran: Multidimensional Complexity of Relationships with Basic Need Satisfaction and Mindfulness.Nima Ghorbani & P. J. Watson - 2009 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (1):75-90.
    In this study, the self-reported mystical experience of Muslims was correlated with constructs relevant to positive psychology. Iranian university students responded to the Extrovertive, Introvertive, and Religious Interpretation factors of the Mysticism Scale; to the Basic Need Satisfaction and Mindfulness measures associated with Self-Determination Theory; and to instruments recording Attributional Complexity, Obsessiveness, and Quest religiosity. Religious Interpretation and Extrovertive factors correlated positively whereas the Introvertive factor correlated negatively with the Self-Determination and adaptive functioning that are emphases of positive psychology. (...)
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  19.  92
    Mindfulness Meditation Improves Cognition: Evidence of Brief Mental Training☆.Fadel Zeidan, Susan K. Johnson, Bruce J. Diamond, Zhanna David & Paula Goolkasian - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):597-605.
    Although research has found that long-term mindfulness meditation practice promotes executive functioning and the ability to sustain attention, the effects of brief mindfulness meditation training have not been fully explored. We examined whether brief meditation training affects cognition and mood when compared to an active control group. After four sessions of either meditation training or listening to a recorded book, participants with no prior meditation experience were assessed with measures of mood, verbal fluency, visual coding, and working memory. (...)
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  20. Meditation, Mindfulness and Cognitive Flexibility.Adam Moore & Peter Malinowski - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):176--186.
    This study investigated the link between meditation, self-reported mindfulness and cognitive flexibility as well as other attentional functions. It compared a group of meditators experienced in mindfulness meditation with a meditation-naïve control group on measures of Stroop interference and the “d2-concentration and endurance test”. Overall the results suggest that attentional performance and cognitive flexibility are positively related to meditation practice and levels of mindfulness. Meditators performed significantly better than non-meditators on all measures of attention. Furthermore, self-reported (...) was higher in meditators than non-meditators and correlations with all attention measures were of moderate to high strength. This pattern of results suggests that mindfulness is intimately linked to improvements of attentional functions and cognitive flexibility. The relevance of these findings for mental balance and well-being are discussed. (shrink)
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  21.  15
    Addressing Unintended Ethical Challenges of Workplace Mindfulness: A Four-Stage Mindfulness Development Model.David Rooney & Jane Qiu - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (3):715-730.
    This study focuses on mindfulness programs in the corporate world, which are receiving increasing attention from business practitioners and organizational scholars. The workplace mindfulness literature is rapidly evolving, but most studies are oriented toward demonstrating the positive impacts of mindfulness as a state of mind. This study adopts a critical perspective to evaluate workplace mindfulness practice as a developmental process, with a focus on its potential risks that have ethical implications and are currently neglected by both (...)
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  22. Is Mindfulness Present-Centred and Non-Judgmental? A Discussion of the Cognitive Dimensions of Mindfulness.Georges Dreyfus - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):41--54.
    This essay critiques the standard characterization of mindfulness as present-centred non-judgmental awareness, arguing that this account misses some of the central features of mindfulness as described by classical Buddhist accounts, which present mindfulness as being relevant to the past as well as to the present. I show that for these sources the central feature of mindfulness is not its present focus but its capacity to hold its object and thus allow for sustained attention, regardless of whether (...)
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  23.  12
    Leader Mindfulness and Employee Performance: A Sequential Mediation Model of LMX Quality, Interpersonal Justice, and Employee Stress.Jochen Reb, Sankalp Chaturvedi, Jayanth Narayanan & Ravi S. Kudesia - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):745-763.
    In the present research, we examine the relation between leader mindfulness and employee performance through the lenses of organizational justice and leader-member relations. We hypothesize that employees of more mindful leaders view their relations as being of higher leader-member exchange quality. We further hypothesize two mediating mechanisms of this relation: increased interpersonal justice and reduced employee stress. In other words, we posit that employees of more mindful leaders feel treated with greater respect and experience less stress. Finally, we predict (...)
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  24. What Does Mindfulness Really Mean? A Canonical Perspective.Bhikkhu Bodhi - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):19--39.
    The purpose of this paper is to determine the meaning and function of mindfulness meditation using as the source of inquiry the P?li Canon, the oldest complete collection of Buddhist texts to survive intact. Mindfulness is the chief factor in the practice of satipa h?na, the best known system of Buddhist meditation. In descriptions of satipa h?na two terms constantly recur: mindfulness (sati) and clear comprehension (sampajañña). An understanding of these terms based on the canonical texts is (...)
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  25.  13
    How Can Mindfulness Enhance Moral Reasoning? An Examination Using Business School Students.Ashish Pandey, Rajesh Chandwani & Ajinkya Navare - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (1):56-71.
    Given the comprehensive influence of mindfulness on human thought and behavior, and the importance of moral reasoning in business decisions, we examine the role of mindfulness as an antecedent to moral reasoning through two studies. In Study 1, we propose and test a theoretically derived model that links mindfulness and moral reasoning, mediated by compassion and egocentric bias using a survey design. In Study 2, we examine whether mindfulness training enhances moral reasoning using an experimental design (...)
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  26.  50
    Mindfulness, by Any Other Name…: Trials and Tribulations of Sati in Western Psychology and Science.Paul Grossman & Nicholas T. Van Dam - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):219-239.
    The Buddhist construct of mindfulness is a central element of mindfulness-based interventions and derives from a systematic phenomenological programme developed over several millennia to investigate subjective experience. Enthusiasm for ?mindfulness? in Western psychological and other science has resulted in proliferation of definitions, operationalizations and self-report inventories that purport to measure mindful awareness as a trait. This paper addresses a number of seemingly intractable issues regarding current attempts to characterize mindfulness and also highlights a number of vulnerabilities (...)
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  27.  99
    On Some Definitions of Mindfulness.Rupert Gethin - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):263--279.
    The Buddhist technical term was first translated as ?mindfulness? by T.W. Rhys Davids in 1881. Since then various authors, including Rhys Davids, have attempted definitions of what precisely is meant by mindfulness. Initially these were based on readings and interpretations of ancient Buddhist texts. Beginning in the 1950s some definitions of mindfulness became more informed by the actual practice of meditation. In particular, Nyanaponika's definition appears to have had significant influence on the definition of mindfulness adopted (...)
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  28.  94
    Toward an Understanding of Non-Dual Mindfulness.John Dunne - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):71--88.
    The aim of this article is to explore an approach to ?mindfulness? that lies outside of the usual Buddhist mainstream. This approach adopts a ?non-dual? stance to meditation practice, and based on my limited experience and training in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, this non-dual notion of ?mindfulness? seems an especially appropriate point of comparison between Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction and Buddhism. That comparison itself will not be the focus here?given my own inexpertise and lack of clinical (...)
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  29.  15
    The Interpersonal Benefits of Leader Mindfulness: A Serial Mediation Model Linking Leader Mindfulness, Leader Procedural Justice Enactment, and Employee Exhaustion and Performance.Sebastian C. Schuh, Michelle Xue Zheng, Katherine R. Xin & Juan Antonio Fernandez - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (4):1007-1025.
    Although it is an increasingly popular assumption that leader mindfulness may positively affect leader behaviors and, in turn, employee outcomes, to date, little empirical evidence supports this view. Against this backdrop, the present research seeks to develop and test a serial mediation model of leader mindfulness. Specifically, we propose that leader mindfulness enhances employee performance and that this relationship is explained by increased leader procedural justice enactment and, subsequently, reduced employees’ emotional exhaustion. We conducted three studies to (...)
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  30. Mindfulness: Diverse Perspectives on its Meaning, Origins, and Multiple Applications at the Intersection of Science and Dharma.J. Mark G. Williams & Jon Kabat-Zinn - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):1-18.
    (2011). Mindfulness: diverse perspectives on its meaning, origins, and multiple applications at the intersection of science and dharma. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 12, Mindfulness: diverse perspectives on its meaning, origins, and multiple applications at the intersection of science and dharma, pp. 1-18. doi: 10.1080/14639947.2011.564811.
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  31. Developing Attention and Decreasing Affective Bias: Towards a Cross-Cultural Cognitive Science of Mindfulness.Jake H. Davis & Evan Thompson - 2015 - In John D. Creswell Kirk W. Brown (ed.), Handbook of Mindfulness: Theory and Research,. Guilford Press.
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  32.  25
    Contemplative Pedagogy and Mindfulness: Developing Creative Attention in an Age of Distraction.Aislinn O'Donnell - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (2):187-202.
    Over the last decade, there has been a considerable expansion of mindfulness programmes into a number of different domains of contemporary life, such as corporations, schools, hospitals and even the military. Understanding the reasons for this phenomenon involves, I argue, reflecting upon the nature of contemporary capitalism and mapping the complexity of navigating new digital technologies that make multiple and accelerated solicitations upon attention and our affective lives. Whilst acknowledging the benefits of mindfulness practice, this article argues that (...)
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  33.  32
    Mindfulness Meditation Counteracts Self-Control Depletion.Malte Friese, Claude Messner & Yves Schaffner - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1016-1022.
    Mindfulness meditation describes a set of different mental techniques to train attention and awareness. Trait mindfulness and extended mindfulness interventions can benefit self-control. The present study investigated the short-term consequences of mindfulness meditation under conditions of limited self-control resources. Specifically, we hypothesized that a brief period of mindfulness meditation would counteract the deleterious effect that the exertion of self-control has on subsequent self-control performance. Participants who had been depleted of self-control resources by an emotion suppression (...)
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  34.  15
    Interpreting the Virtues of Mindfulness and Compassion: Contemplative Practices and Virtue-Oriented Business Ethics.Kevin T. Jackson - 2018 - Humanistic Management Journal 3 (1):47-69.
    The article aims to provide a standpoint from which to critically address two broad concerns. The first concern surrounds a naïve view of mindfulness, which takes it as a given that it is a good thing to cultivate mindfulness and attendant qualities like compassion because these virtues are key to improving the quality of life and bettering effective decisionmaking within business. Yet the virtue of mindfulness has roots in religious and spiritual traditions, and the virtue of compassion (...)
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  35.  71
    Mindfulness and De-Automatization.Yoona Kang, June Gruber & Jeremy R. Gray - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):1754073912451629.
    Some maladaptive thought processes are characterized by reflexive and habitual patterns of cognitive and emotional reactivity. We review theoretical and empirical work suggesting that mindfulness—a state of nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment—can facilitate the discontinuation of such automatic mental operations. We propose a framework that suggests a series of more specific mechanisms supporting the de-automatizing function of mindfulness. Four related but distinct elements of mindfulness (awareness, attention, focus on the present, and acceptance) can each contribute to (...)
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  36.  26
    The Deeper Teachings of Mindfulness‐Based ‘Interventions’ as a Reconstruction of ‘Education’.Oren Ergas - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (2):203-220.
    While contemplative practices have emerged from wisdom-traditions, the rhetoric surrounding their justification in contemporary public educational settings has been substantially undergirded by the scientific evidence-based approach. This article finds the practice and construct of ‘attention’ to be the bridge between this peculiar encounter of science and wisdom traditions, and a vantage point from which we can re-examine the scope and practice of ‘education’. The article develops an educational typology based on ‘attention’ as a curricular deliberation point. Every pedagogical act rides (...)
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  37.  20
    On the Contemporary Applications of Mindfulness: Some Implications for Education.Terry Hyland - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (2):170-186.
    Interest in the Buddhist concept of mindfulness has burgeoned over the last few decades as a result of its application as a therapeutic strategy in mind-body medicine, psychotherapy, psychiatry, education, leadership and management, and a wide range of other theoretical and practical domains. Although many commentators welcome this extension of the range and application of mindfulness—drawing parallels between ancient contemplative traditions and modern secular interpretations—there has been very little analysis of either the philosophical underpinnings of this phenomenon or (...)
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  38.  26
    Mindfulness and Learning: Celebrating the Affective Dimension of Education.Terry Hyland - 2011 - Springer Verlag.
    The result is a one-dimensional, economistic and bleakly utilitarian conception of the educational task.In Mindfulness and Learning: Celebrating the Affective Dimension of Education, Terry Hyland advances the thesis that education stands in ...
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  39.  40
    The Effect of Mindfulness Meditation on Time Perception.Robin Ss Kramer, Ulrich W. Weger & Dinkar Sharma - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):846-852.
    Research has increasingly focussed on the benefits of meditation in everyday life and performance. Mindfulness in particular improves attention, working memory capacity, and reading comprehension. Given its emphasis on moment-to-moment awareness, we hypothesised that mindfulness meditation would alter time perception. Using a within-subjects design, participants carried out a temporal bisection task, where several probe durations are compared to “short” and “long” standards. Following this, participants either listened to an audiobook or a meditation that focussed on the movement of (...)
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  40.  18
    Effect of Mindfulness Meditation on Brain–Computer Interface Performance.Lee-Fan Tan, Zoltan Dienes, Ashok Jansari & Sing-Yau Goh - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 23:12-21.
    Electroencephalogram based Brain–Computer Interfaces enable stroke and motor neuron disease patients to communicate and control devices. Mindfulness meditation has been claimed to enhance metacognitive regulation. The current study explores whether mindfulness meditation training can thus improve the performance of BCI users. To eliminate the possibility of expectation of improvement influencing the results, we introduced a music training condition. A norming study found that both meditation and music interventions elicited clear expectations for improvement on the BCI task, with the (...)
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  41.  7
    Consciousness, Being and Life: Phenomenological Approaches to Mindfulness.Michel Bitbol - 2019 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 50 (2):127-161.
    A phenomenological view of contemplative disciplines is presented. However, studying mindfulness by phenomenology is at odds with both neurobiological and anthropological approaches. It involves the first-person standpoint, the openness of being-in-the-world, the umwelt of the meditator, instead of assessing her neural processes and behaviors from a neutral, distanced, third-person standpoint. It then turns out that phenomenology cannot produce a discourse about mindfulness. Phenomenology rather induces a cross-fertilization between the state of mindfulness and its own methods of mental (...)
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  42.  5
    School-Based Mindfulness Training and the Economisation of Attention: A Stieglerian View.James Reveley - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (8):804-821.
    Educational theorists may be right to suggest that providing mindfulness training in schools can challenge oppressive pedagogies and overcome Western dualism. Before concluding that this training is liberatory, however, one must go beyond pedagogy and consider schooling’s role in enacting the educational neurofuture envisioned by mindfulness discourse. Mindfulness training, this article argues, is a biopolitical human enhancement strategy. Its goal is to insulate youth from pathologies that stem from digital capitalism’s economisation of attention. I use Bernard Stiegler’s (...)
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  43.  70
    How Does Mindfulness Transform Suffering? I: The Nature and Origins of Dukkha.John D. Teasdale & Michael Chaskalson - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):89--102.
    This, the first of two linked papers, presents the Buddha's analysis of the nature and origins of dukkha (suffering) as a basis for understanding the ways in which mindfulness can transform suffering. The First and Second of the Buddha's Four Noble Truths are presented in a way that has proved helpful to teachers of mindfulness-based applications. These Truths offer a framework of understanding that can guide the application of mindfulness to stress and emotional disorders, while stressing the (...)
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  44.  46
    Mindfulness in Higher Education.Mirabai Bush - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):183--197.
    This paper explores the introduction of mindfulness into courses in higher education. Some of these courses are taught by Buddhist scholars; others are taught by scholars within other disciplines who themselves have a meditation practice. Those scholars included here represent a much larger number in diverse settings, including state universities, liberal arts colleges, Ivy League institutions, and historically black colleges. They teach in almost every discipline, including architecture, poetry, chemistry, economics, and law. The courses discussed in this paper are (...)
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  45.  16
    Awareness Versus Un-Clinging: Which Matters in Mindfulness?Siu-man Ng, King Wo Chow, Hi Po Lau & Qi Wang - 2017 - Contemporary Buddhism 18 (2):277-291.
    Awareness and un-clinging have been emphasised in Buddhist discourse as important facets of mindfulness practice for over 2500 years. However, there is a lack of rigorous research examining the relationship between these two elements and their importance to well-being. To evaluate these abstract constructs, the current study adopted multiple assessment modalities; namely, a self-report scale, experience sampling, and semi-structured interviews. A total of 415 participants completed the questionnaire survey. Among them, 71 participants further took part in the experience sampling (...)
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  46.  15
    The Construction of Mindfulness.Andrew Olendzki - 2011 - Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):55--70.
    Mindfulness is examined using the Abhidhamma system of classification of phenomena (dharmas) as found in the Pali work Abhidhammattha-sa[ndot]gaha. In this model the mental factors constituting the aggregate of formations (sa[ndot]kh?ra) are grouped so as to describe a layered approach to the practice of mental development. Thus all mental states involve a certain set of mental factors, while others are added as the training of the mind takes place. Both unwholesome and wholesome configurations also occur, and mindfulness turns (...)
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  47.  19
    Reaping the Fruits of Another’s Labor: The Role of Moral Meaningfulness, Mindfulness, and Motivation in Social Loafing.Katarina Katja Mihelič & Barbara Culiberg - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (3):713-727.
    Despite the popularity of teams in universities and modern organizations, they are often held back by dishonest actions, social loafing being one of them. Social loafers hide in the crowd and contribute less to the pooled effort of a team, which leads to an unfair division of work. While previous studies have mostly delved into the factors related to the task or the group in an attempt to explain social loafing, this study will instead focus on individual factors. Accordingly, the (...)
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    Stepping Out of History: Mindfulness Improves Insight Problem Solving.Brian D. Ostafin & Kyle T. Kassman - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):1031-1036.
    Insight problem solving is hindered by automated verbal–conceptual processes. Because mindfulness meditation training aims at “nonconceptual awareness” which involves a reduced influence of habitual verbal–conceptual processes on the interpretation of ongoing experience, mindfulness may facilitate insight problem solving. This hypothesis was examined across two studies . Participants in both studies completed a measure of trait mindfulness and a series of insight and noninsight problems. Further, participants in Study 2 completed measures of positive affect and a mindfulness (...)
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  49. Mindfulness and the Cognitive Neuroscience of Attention and Awareness.Antonino Raffone, Angela Tagini & Narayanan Srinivasan - 2010 - Zygon 45 (3):627-646.
    Mindfulness can be understood as the mental ability to focus on the direct and immediate perception or monitoring of the present moment with a state of open and nonjudgmental awareness. Descriptions of mindfulness and methods for cultivating it originated in eastern spiritual traditions. These suggest that mindfulness can be developed through meditation practice to increase positive qualities such as awareness, insight, wisdom, and compassion. In this article we focus on the relationships between mindfulness, with associated meditation (...)
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    Mindfulness in Context: A Historical Discourse Analysis.Jessie Sun - 2014 - Contemporary Buddhism 15 (2):394-415.
    Mindfulness’ has become a buzzword, yet its meaning and origins have received relatively little critical consideration. This article places the current ‘mindfulness movement’ in context, examining the evolving discourse surrounding the concept of mindfulness. Through the first systematic etymology of the term, drawing from old Western and Buddhist writings, contemporary psychology and popular media, it is established that the contemporary understanding of mindfulness has been substantially simplified and divorced from its origins. However, quantitative data suggests that (...)
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