Results for 'modernist architecture'

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  1.  62
    Modernist Architecture and Ruins.Mateja Kurir - 2019 - In Modell und Ruine. pp. 12-16.
    Modernist Architecture and Ruins: On Ruins as a Minus, Neoclassicism and the Uncanny.
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  2.  44
    Mutual Halo Effects in Cultural Production: The Case of Modernist Architecture.Randall Collins & Mauro F. Guillén - 2012 - Theory and Society 41 (6):527-556.
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  3.  2
    The Future of Modernism: Architectural Intention and Adaptive Reuse.Frank Mahan & Van Kluytenaar - 2020 - Architecture Philosophy 5 (1).
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  4.  1
    How Not To Read Pictures: The History of Grain Elevators in Buffalo, Photography, and European Modernist Architecture 1900 to 1930.William J. Brown - 1993 - Communications 18 (2):223-234.
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  5.  7
    Modernism's Love Child the Story of Happy Architectures.Yoke-Sum Wong - 2008 - Common Knowledge 14 (3):445-471.
    According to Thomas Kuhn, the entrenchment of a paradigm, especially in the critical stages when facing anomalies, requires the further suppression of competing ideas. This essay addresses the unconscious entrenchment of European modernist aesthetics in the everyday, especially in the American suburbs of the 1950s, and its popular and cultural manifestations. Taking Levittown as a starting point, modernist architectural principles have since its construction radiated into the mass-housing market and materialized in housing development projects that have led to (...)
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  6.  97
    Aufbau/Bauhaus: Logical Positivism and Architectural Modernism.Peter Galison - 1990 - Critical Inquiry 16 (4):709-752.
    On 15 October 1959, Rudolf Carnap, a leading member of the recently founded Vienna Circle, came to lecture at the Bauhaus in Dessau, southwest of Berlin. Carnap had just finished his magnum opus, The Logical Construction of the World, a book that immediately became the bible of the new antiphilosophy announced by the logical positivists. From a small group in Vienna, the movement soon expanded to include an international following, and in the sixty years since has exerted a powerful sway (...)
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  7.  4
    Architectures of Time: Towards a Theory of the Event in Modernist Culture. [REVIEW]Harold Brown - 2003 - Isis 94:340-340.
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  8.  67
    Review: Architectures: Modernism and After. [REVIEW]R. Hill - 2005 - British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):103-104.
  9.  13
    Architectural Modernism.Peter Galison - 1996 - In Sahotra Sarkar (ed.), The Legacy of the Vienna Circle: Modern Reappraisals. Garland. pp. 6--77.
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  10. Postmodern Sophistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition.David KOLB - 1990 - University of Chicago Press.
    Kolb discusses postmodern architectural styles and theories within the context of philosophical ideas about modernism and postmodernism. He focuses on what it means to dwell in a world and within a history and to act from or against a tradition.
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  11.  19
    Sanford Kwinter. Architectures of Time: Towards a Theory of the Event in Modernist Culture. Xiii + 237 Pp., Illus., Index. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2001. $29.95. [REVIEW]Harold I. Brown - 2003 - Isis 94 (2):340-340.
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  12.  11
    BALLANTYNE, ANDREW. Architectures: Modernism and After. Blackwell Publishing. 2003. Pp. 255. 11 B & W Figures. Hardback£ 50.00, Paperback£ 16.99. BOGUE, RONALD. Deleuze on Music, Painting, and The. [REVIEW]Commentationes Humanarum Litterarum - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1).
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  13.  25
    From Modernism to Hypermodernism and Beyond: An Interview with Paul Virilio.John Armitacge - 1999 - Theory, Culture and Society 16 (5-6):25-55.
    In this interview, Paul Virilio talks at length about his life and numerous published works ranging from Speed & Politics: An Essay on Dromology to the recently translated Polar Inertia. Considering important theoretical themes and questions relating to post- and 'hyper'- modernism, poststructuralism, modernity and postmodernity, Virilio discusses his often controversial views on the cultural writings of Foucault, Deleuze, Derrida and Baudrillard. In so doing, Virilio not only clarifies many of his architectural, political and cultural concepts such as 'military space', (...)
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  14.  14
    Photographic Architecture in the Twentieth Century.Claire Zimmerman - 2014 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Photographic Architecture and the Spread of German Modernism is a “picture anthropology” of modern architecture, showing how photography shaped its development, its reception, and its history in the 20th c. At first, architects used photography to promote their practices, even as they doubted its value and efficacy as a means of representation. Unlike other representations, photographs were both too real, and not real enough. Furthermore, the photographic image acted on its subject like an alchemical agent. Photography altered the (...)
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  15.  23
    A Matter of Interactions—Religion and Architectural Modernism, 1945–70: Introduction.Rajesh Heynickx & Stéphane Symons - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (3):251-257.
    Introduction to the Special Issue: A Matter of Interactions—Religion and Architectural Modernism, 1945–70.
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  16.  16
    Histories of the Immediate Present: Inventing Architectural Modernism.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2011 - Common Knowledge 17 (1):189-191.
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  17.  15
    Extended Review of Sandford Kwinter's' Architectures of Time: Towards a Theory of the Event in Modernist Culture'.Jeremy Till - 2002 - Radical Philosophy 113:47-48.
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  18.  13
    From Mission to Mishmash: How Modernism has Failed Sacred Architecture.Steven J. Schloeder - 2001 - Nexus 6:67.
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  19. Wittgenstein’s Architectural Idiosyncrasy.August Sarnitz - 2017 - Architecture Philosophy 2 (2).
    Ludwig Wittgenstein was deeply embedded in Viennese architectural Modernism, culturally as well as personally. His assimilation in recent historiography to existing trends within the local architectural movement—namely Loos—are based on aesthetic and intellectual simplifications. The simplifications eclipse the distinctive contribution Wittgenstein’s Palais Stonborough makes to architecture, to Viennese Modernism, and perhaps to philosophy. The present paper seeks to rectify this constellation by re-situating Wittgenstein as an architect in his own right by re-sensitizing us to the idiosyncrasy of Wittgenstein’s (...). (shrink)
     
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  20. Modern Versus Postmodern Architecture.David Kolb - 1990 - In Postmodern Sphistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago press. pp. 87 – 105.
    A discussion of "postmodern" architecture in the sense in which the term was used in the late 1980s, namely, the introduction of historical substantive content and reference into architecture, disrupting the supposedly ahistorical purity of modernist architecture. Argues that postmodern use of history is really another version of the modern distance from history.
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  21.  19
    Topographies of Class: Modern Architecture and Mass Society in Weimar Berlin.Owen Hatherley - 2010 - Historical Materialism 18 (2):177-194.
    The Weimar-Republic, and the modernist architecture and planning that was born there, is still a contested place, from whence liberals, reactionaries and Marxists can all trace their lineage. Sabine Hake’s Topographies of Class attempts to clarify this contestation, through an interdisciplinary study of the modernist geography of the interwar-capital, Berlin. The book offers many new insights into the Weimar-era city, countering a tendency on the Left to reject the twentieth-century city in favour of the romanticised ‘capitals of (...)
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  22.  19
    The Classical Vernacular: Architectural Principles in an Age of Nihilism.Edward Winters - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (185):535.
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  23.  13
    Can the Arts Survive Modernism?George Rochberg - 1984 - Critical Inquiry 11 (2):317-340.
    In trying to say what modernism is , we must remind ourselves that it cannot and must not—to be properly described and understood—be confined only to the arts of music, literature, painting, sculpture, theater, architecture, those arts with which we normally associate the term “culture.” Modernism can be said to embrace, in the broadest terms, not only the arts of Western culture but also science, technology, the family, marriage, sexuality, economics, the politics of democracy, the politics of authoritarianism, the (...)
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  24.  18
    Why Modern Architecture Emerged in Europe, Not America: The New Class and the Aesthetics of Technocracy.David Gartman - 2000 - Theory, Culture and Society 17 (5):75-96.
    Using theories by Pierre Bourdieu and the Frankfurt School that causally link art to class interests, this article examines the differential development of modern architecture in the United States and central Europe during the early 20th century. Modern architecture was the aesthetic expression of technocracy, a movement of the new class of professionals, managers and engineers to place itself at the center of rationalized capitalism. The aesthetic of modernism, which glorified technology and instrumental reason, was weak and undeveloped (...)
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  25.  46
    Architecture as the Art of Shaping the Human Environment and Human Space.Krystyna Najder-Stefaniak - 2007 - Dialogue and Universalism 17 (12):115-121.
    The author suggests to view the architectural planning of the human environment as „directing” the phenomena and events that occur in human surroundings. In her reflections on human existence she juxtaposes the concepts “environment” and “space”, which both accentuate different aspects of the human environment. The author views “environment” as the objective existence of human surroundings, and “space” as the effect of environmental envisionment and experiencing the environment by means of rationality and valuation.The author also focuses on interactions between the (...)
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  26. Music and Modernism, C. 1849-1950.Charlotte De Mille (ed.) - 2011 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    Music and Modernism is a collection of essays which re-evaluates the significant connections between the disciplines of music, fine art and architecture in the period covering the emergence and flowering of modernism, c. 1849-1950. Combining established scholars in the field with those at the start of their careers, this book presents an exceptional cross-section of European and American modernism through a series of detailed case-studies. Avoiding a simplistic engagement with cross- or inter-disciplinarity, the focus of attention centres on themes (...)
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  27. Historicism and Architectural Knowledge.Anthony O' Hear - 1993 - Philosophy 68:127.
    Even today, apologists for modernist and post-modernist architecture frequently appeal to what, following Sir Karl Popper, I will call historicist arguments. Such arguments have a particular poignancy when they are used to justify the replacement of some familiar part of an ancient city with some intentionally untraditional structure; as, for example, when a familiar nineteenth century block of offices in a prime city site is swept away to make room for something supposedly more fitting to the ‘new (...)
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  28.  17
    Historicism and Architectural Knowledge.Anthony O'Hear - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (264):127 - 144.
    Even today, apologists for modernist and post-modernist architecture frequently appeal to what, following Sir Karl Popper, I will call historicist arguments. Such arguments have a particular poignancy when they are used to justify the replacement of some familiar part of an ancient city with some intentionally untraditional structure; as, for example, when a familiar nineteenth century block of offices in a prime city site is swept away to make room for something supposedly more fitting to the ‘new (...)
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  29. Polanyi and Post-Modernism.Allen R. Dyer - 1992 - Tradition and Discovery 19 (1):31-38.
    Post-modernism is receiving much attention, but it is often seen as merely an extrapolation of modernism. Michael Polanyi’s post-critical epistemology offers a useful way of understanding post-modernism. The modern objectivism of critical thought leads to a dead-end dehumanization. Polanyi offers a recovery of the human dimension by demonstrating the ways in which all knowing, especially scientific discovery, requires human participation. An analogy is drawn with post-modern art and architecture, which similarly attempt to recover the human form and traditional or (...)
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  30.  2
    Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture, 1750-1950.Peter Collins - 1965 - Mcgill University Press.
    Changing Ideals in Modern Architecture revolutionized the understanding of modernism in architecture, pushing back the sense of its origin from the early twentieth century to the 1750s and thus placing architectural thought within the a broader context of Western intellectual history. This new edition of Peter Collins's ground-breaking study includes all seventy-two illustrations of the hard cover original edition, which has been out of print since 1967, and restores the large format.
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  31.  31
    Façades and Functions Sigurd Frosterus as a Critic of Architecture.Kimmo Sarje - 2011 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 22 (40-41).
    Alongside his work as a practising architect, Sigurd Frosterus (1876–1956) was one of Finland’s leading architectural critics during the first decades of the 20th century. In his early life, Frosterus was a strict rationalist who wanted to develop architecture towards scientific ideals instead of historical, archaeological, or mythological approaches. According to him, an architect had to analyse his tasks of construction in order to be able to logically justify his solutions, and he must take advantage of the possibilities of (...)
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  32.  2
    Art Nouveau Ukrainian Architecture in a Global Context.Nelia Romaniuk - 2019 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 6:137-148.
    The article is dedicated to Ukrainian Art Nouveau architecture, which became a unique phenomenon in the development of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century architecture. Along with the reality that architecture in Ukraine evolved as a component of the European artistic movement, a distinctive architectural style was formed, based on the development of the traditions of folk architecture and ornamentation. This style produced much innovation in the shaping, decor, and ornamentation of buildings. Significant contributions to the development (...)
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  33.  32
    Past or Post Modern in Architectural Fashion.Diane Ghirardo - 1984 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (62):187-196.
    If the historian has difficulty assessing events in the past, matters are worse for the contemporary critic who attempts to explore events which are still unfolding. Thus, it is not surprising that contemporary discourse about Post Modernism in architecture does not lend itself to a neat taxonomy, not least because the participants sometimes term themselves Post Modernists, and other times reject that label. It is possible, however, to distinguish between stylistic Post Modernism and theoretical Post Modernism. Stylistic Post Modernism (...)
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  34.  43
    The Project of Autonomy: Politics and Architecture Within and Against Capitalism, Pier Vittorio Aureli, New York: The Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University and Princeton Architectural Press, 2008.Gail Day - 2010 - Historical Materialism 18 (4):219-236.
  35. Minimum Dwellings: Otto Neurath and Karel Teige on Architecture.Tomas Hribek - 2020 - In Radek Schuster (ed.), Vienna Circle in Czechoslovakia. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag. pp. 111-134.
    While the Vienna Circle had virtually no impact on the Czech-speaking philosophical community during the 1930s, one can find a curious meeting point in the field of theory of architecture. There is now a growing literature on Otto Neurath as a theorist of architecture and urbanism, who emphasized the social aspects of modern building and approached architecture from his idiosyncratic viewpoint of Marxism interpreted as a physicalistic social science. It is less well known that a young Czech (...)
     
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  36.  13
    Conceptual Debts: Modern Architecture and Neo-Thomism in Postwar America.Rajesh Heynickx - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (3):258-277.
    This article analyzes the formative role of medieval theology and aesthetics in the development of postwar American architecture by focusing on the architectural theory and practice of Mies van der Rohe and Jean Labatut, both of whom became actively interested in Neo-Thomism from the late 1940s. More specifically, a closer look at their reliance on the work of Jacques Maritain, the preeminent promotor of Neo-Thomism, sheds light on the transmission and circulation of old and new concepts within twentieth-century architectural (...)
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  37. Postmodern Sophistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition. [REVIEW]Karsten Harries - 1991 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (3):641-643.
    "Do we stand sufficiently above traditions that we can manipulate them and make them from some detached point of view as if they were tools for other purposes", as modernists have claimed? Or are postmodernists right to criticize "the attempt to institutionalize an individual or social subject free from traditional restrictions"? But neither the modernist refusal of the authority of tradition nor postmodern play with historical contents takes history seriously enough. Kolb insists that we are more essentially placed in (...)
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  38. "Else-Where": Essays in Art, Architecture, and Cultural Production 2002-2011.Gavin Keeney - 2011 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    “Else-where” is a synoptic survey of the representational values given to art, architecture, and cultural production from 2002 through 2011. Written primarily as a critique of what is suppressed in architecture and what is disclosed in art, the essays are informed by the passage out of post-structuralism and its disciplinary analogues toward the real Real . While architecture nominally addresses an environmental ethos, it also famously negotiates its own representational values by way of its putative autonomy ; (...)
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  39. How Not to Be at Home in One’s Home: Adorno’s Critique of Architectural Reason.Matt Waggoner - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    Adorno wrote prolifically about modernism in culture and the arts, but little has been written about whether or in what form he might have addressed architectural concerns. The project of exploring this potentially fruitful intersection has been helped in the last couple of decades by authors from philosophy and critical theory contrasting his ideas about dwelling with Heidegger’s and by architectural theorists considering the import of his aesthetic theory.1 If these fall shy of the more immediate connections to architecture (...)
     
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  40.  25
    Dom Hans van der Laan’s Architectonic Space: A Peculiar Blend of Architectural Modernity and Religious Tradition.Caroline Voet - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (3):318-334.
    This article discusses the design methodology of the Benedictine monk-architect Dom Hans van der Laan, famous for his manifesto De Architectonische Ruimte, in which he proposed his ideal elementary architecture. In the past, this ideal achitecture was linked to Van der Laan’s proportional system and to his general approach as an architect rather than to his Catholic background. Consequently, the changing conceptual landscape in which he developed his ideas on the relation between religion and design was neglected. Yet, as (...)
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  41.  8
    Anarchy in Our Churches? The American Architectural Press, 1944–65.Catherine R. Osborne - 2017 - The European Legacy 22 (3):278-292.
    In the mid-twentieth century American architectural journals, including Architectural Forum, Architectural Record, and Progressive Architecture, routinely ran features on the state of contemporary church architecture in the United States. Rapid suburban expansion and the revival of religious life in the post-Depression, postwar era generated tremendous amounts of construction, with a great deal of work available for architects. This article examines the concerns and hopes of modernist editors in the 1940s–1960s, as they sought to stabilize a “direction” for (...)
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  42.  37
    The Revolutionary Mind of Walter Gropius: Architectural Utopias for the Machine Age.Felipe Loureiro - 2014 - Utopian Studies 25 (1):174-193.
    The fathers of the Modern movement have undoubtedly created a new tradition in architecture, as advertised by Siegfried Giedion in the classic book Space, Time, and Architecture, first published in 1941. As a practicing architect, I surely disagree with the “most reductive aspects of modern (twentieth-century) architecture,” as Nathaniel Coleman puts it,1 which are inherent to what he calls—following the definition by architectural critic Kenneth Frampton—“orthodox modern architecture.” However, this new tradition is not limited by the (...)
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  43.  30
    Symbol and Function in Contemporary Architecture.Curtis L. Carter - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:15-25.
    The focus here will be on the tension between architecture’s symbolic role and its function as a space to house and present art. ‘Symbolic’ refers both to a building as an aesthetic or sculptural form and secondly to its role in expressing civic identity. ‘Function’ refers to the intended purpose or practical use apart from its role as a form of art. As an art form, it serves important symbolic purposes; its practical purposes are linked to serving individual and (...)
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  44.  58
    Review of Ferreiros and Gray's The Architecture of Modern Mathematics. [REVIEW]Andrew Arana - 2008 - Mathematical Intelligencer 30 (4).
    This collection of essays explores what makes modern mathematics ‘modern’, where ‘modern mathematics’ is understood as the mathematics done in the West from roughly 1800 to 1970. This is not the trivial matter of exploring what makes recent mathematics recent. The term ‘modern’ (or ‘modernism’) is used widely in the humanities to describe the era since about 1900, exemplified by Picasso or Kandinsky in the visual arts, Rilke or Pound in poetry, or Le Corbusier or Loos in architecture (a (...)
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  45. Sacred Performance : Two Instances of Musical Architecture in Cambridge.Ayla Lepine - 2011 - In Charlotte De Mille (ed.), Music and Modernism, C. 1849-1950. Cambridge Scholars Press.
     
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  46.  13
    Brainwashing the Cybernetic Spectator: The Ipcress File, 1960s Cinematic Spectacle and the Sciences of Mind.Marcia Holmes - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (3):3-24.
    This article argues that the mid-1960s saw a dramatic shift in how ‘brainwashing’ was popularly imagined, reflecting Anglo-American developments in the sciences of mind as well as shifts in mass media culture. The 1965 British film The Ipcress File provides a rich case for exploring these interconnections between mind control, mind science and media, as it exemplifies the era’s innovations for depicting ‘brainwashing’ on screen: the film’s protagonist is subjected to flashing lights and electronic music, pulsating to the ‘rhythm of (...)
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  47.  70
    On the Twofold Nature of Artefacts: As Response to Wybo Houkes and Anthonie Meijers, “The Ontology of Artefacts: The Hard Problem”.Lynne Rudder Baker - 2006 - Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science 37:132-136.
    “Form follows function,” the slogan of modernist architecture, could well be a slogan of artefacts generally. Since the choice of material for a tool is guided by the function of the tool, we may be tempted to think that having a functional nature distinguishes artefacts from natural objects. But that would be a mistake. Certain natural objects—especially biological entities like mammalian hearts—have functional natures too.
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  48.  16
    A Chinese Ethics for the New Century.Donald J. Munro - 2005 - Columbia University Press.
    Modernism and the Architecture of Private Life offers a bold new assessment of the role of the domestic sphere in modernist literature, architecture, and design.
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  49. The Nature of Computational Things.Franck Varenne - 2013 - In Frédéric Migayrou Brayer & Marie-Ange (eds.), Naturalizing Architecture. Orléans: HYX Editions. pp. 96-105.
    Architecture often relies on mathematical models, if only to anticipate the physical behavior of structures. Accordingly, mathematical modeling serves to find an optimal form given certain constraints, constraints themselves translated into a language which must be homogeneous to that of the model in order for resolution to be possible. Traditional modeling tied to design and architecture thus appears linked to a topdown vision of creation, of the modernist, voluntarist and uniformly normative type, because usually (mono)functionalist. One available (...)
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  50.  51
    The Role of Utopian Projects in Urban Design.Amir Ganjavie - 2014 - Utopian Studies 25 (1):125-149.
    Who is not utopian? Only narrowly specialized prisoners working to order without the slightest critical examination of stipulated norms and constraints, only these not very interesting people escape utopianism. Utopian projects are rarely discussed in current official programs in urban design.1 The common perception about the conceptualization of utopia is that utopia is a code word synonymous with modernist urban design and architecture.2 The failure of modern urban planning and architecture, along with their attributed paternalist qualities, leads (...)
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