Results for 'monads'

199 found
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  1.  88
    Leibnizian Bodies: Phenomena, Aggregates of Monads, or Both?Stephen Puryear - 2016 - The Leibniz Review 26:99-127.
    I propose a straightforward reconciliation of Leibniz’s conception of bodies as aggregates of simple substances (i.e., monads) with his doctrine that bodies are the phenomena of perceivers, without in the process saddling him with any equivocations. The reconciliation relies on the familiar idea that in Leibniz’s idiolect, an aggregate of Fs is that which immediately presupposes those Fs, or in other words, has those Fs as immediate requisites. But I take this idea in a new direction. I argue that (...)
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  2. Bodies, Matter, Monads and Things in Themselves.Nicholas Stang - forthcoming - In Brandon Look (ed.), Leibniz and Kant.
    In this paper I address a structurally similar tension between phenomenalism and realism about matter in Leibniz and Kant. In both philosophers, some texts suggest a starkly phenomenalist view of the ontological status of matter, while other texts suggest a more robust realism. In the first part of the paper I address a recent paper by Don Rutherford that argues that Leibniz is more of a realist than previous commentators have allowed. I argue that Rutherford fails to show that Leibniz (...)
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  3. Monads and Mathematics: Gödel and Husserl.Richard Tieszen - 2012 - Axiomathes 22 (1):31-52.
    In 1928 Edmund Husserl wrote that “The ideal of the future is essentially that of phenomenologically based (“philosophical”) sciences, in unitary relation to an absolute theory of monads” (“Phenomenology”, Encyclopedia Britannica draft) There are references to phenomenological monadology in various writings of Husserl. Kurt Gödel began to study Husserl’s work in 1959. On the basis of his later discussions with Gödel, Hao Wang tells us that “Gödel’s own main aim in philosophy was to develop metaphysics—specifically, something like the monadology (...)
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  4.  14
    Monads at the Bottom, Monads at the Top, Monads All Over.Ohad Nachtomy - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (1):197-207.
    This paper examines a widely accepted reading of monads as the most fundamental elements of reality. Garber [Leibniz – Body, Substance, Monad, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009] argues that simple monads – seen as mind-like atoms without parts and extension – replace the corporeal substance of Leibniz’s middle period. Phemister [Leibniz and the Natural World – Activity, Passivity and Corporeal Substances in Leibniz’s Philosophy, Dordrecht: Springer, 2005] argues that monads figure also at the top as complete corporeal (...)
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  5.  4
    Leibnizian Chronadology: Monads and Time.Andrew Pessin - 2006 - Journal of Philosophical Research 31:185-218.
    I argue that we can learn quite a lot about Leibniz’s metaphysics, in particular about monads and their relationship to time, by viewing Leibniz through a McTaggartian lens. After presenting McTaggart’s highly influential two basic conceptions of time, the A- and B- conceptions, I distinguish four possible models of the relationship between monads and time: the fi rst two invoke tenses, differing in whether they treat non-present states as “real,” while the latter two are tenseless, differing in whether (...)
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  6.  29
    Learning From Leibniz: Whitehead on Mind, Matter and Monads.Pierfrancesco Basile - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (6):1128-1149.
    Whitehead's system may be interpreted as a majestic attempt at recasting Leibniz's theory of monads in terms of sounder ontological categories. After a brief introductory section on the sources of Whitehead's knowledge of Leibniz's philosophy, the paper explains why Whitehead turned to Leibniz for metaphysical inspiration. Attention then shifts to Whitehead's understanding of the problems involved with Leibniz's theory of monads and his alternative explanation of monadic causation. Whitehead's endeavour to install windows in Leibniz's monads may not (...)
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  7.  44
    Clues, Margins, and Monads: The Micro–Macro Link in Historical Research.Matti Peltonen - 2001 - History and Theory 40 (3):347–359.
    This article discusses the new microhistory of the 1970s and 1980s in terms of the concept of exceptional typical, and contrasts the new microhistory to old microhistory, in which the relationship between micro and macro levels of phenomena was defined by means of the concepts of exceptionality and typicality. The focus of the essay is on Carlo Ginzburg's method of clues, Walter Benjamin's idea of monads, and Michel de Certeau's concept of margins. The new microhistory is also compared with (...)
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  8.  29
    Kant's Picture of Monads in the Physical Monadology.Sheldon Smith - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (1):102-111.
    Many discussions of Kant’s picture of monads in his early Physical Monadology highlight the similarities between the view in it and Roger Joseph Boscovich’s view. Though I find this comparison interesting, I argue in this paper that Kant shows significant strands of having a fundamentally non-Boscovichian view in this work. Moreover, I trace the various strands that, I believe, pushed Kant to think about things in a non-Boscovichian way.
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  9.  2
    Kant’s Picture of Monads in the Physical Monadology.Sheldon Smith - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (1):102-111.
    Many discussions of Kant’s picture of monads in his early Physical Monadology highlight the similarities between the view in it and Roger Joseph Boscovich’s view. Though I find this comparison interesting, I argue in this paper that Kant shows significant strands of having a fundamentally non-Boscovichian view in this work. Moreover, I trace the various strands that, I believe, pushed Kant to think about things in a non-Boscovichian way.
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  10. Leibniz's Final System: Monads, Matter, and Animals.Glenn A. Hartz - 2007 - Routledge.
    Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz was one of the central figures of seventeenth-century philosophy, and a huge intellectual figure in his age. This book from Glenn A. Hartz is an advanced study of Leibniz's metaphysics. Hartz analyzes a very complicated topic, widely discussed in contemporary commentaries on Leibniz, namely the question of whether Leibniz was a metaphysical idealist, realist, or whether he tried to reconcile both trends in his mature philosophy. Because Leibniz is notoriously unclear about this, much has been written on (...)
     
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  11. Kant’s Multi-Layered Conception of Things in Themselves, Transcendental Objects, and Monads.Karin de Boer - 2014 - Kant-Studien 105 (2):221-260.
    While Kant in the Critique of Pure Reason maintains that things in themselves cannot be known, he also seems to assert that they affect our senses and produce representations. Following Jacobi, many commentators have considered these claims to be contradictory. Instead of adding another artificial solution to the existing literature on this subject, I maintain that Kant’s use of terms such as thing-in-itself, noumenon, and transcendental object becomes perfectly consistent if we take them to acquire a different meaning in the (...)
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  12.  49
    The “Death” of Monads: G. W. Leibniz on Death and Anti-Death.Roinila Markku - 2016 - In Charles Tandy (ed.), Death and Anti Death, vol. 14: Four Decades after Michael Polanyi, Three Centuries after G. W. Leibniz. Ann Arbor: RIA University Press. pp. 243-266.
    According to Leibniz, there is no death in the sense that the human being or animal is destroyed completely. This is due to his metaphysical pluralism which would suffer if the number of substances decreased. While animals transform into other animals after “death”, human beings are rewarded or punished of their behavior in this life. This paper presents a comprehensive account of how Leibniz thought the “death” to take place and discusses his often unclear views on the life after death. (...)
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  13.  19
    From Habit to Monads: Félix Ravaisson's Theory of Substance.Jeremy Dunham - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (6):1085-1105.
    In this article, I argue that in his 1838 De l'habitude, Félix Ravaisson uses the analysis of habit to defend a Leibnizian monadism. Recent commentators have failed to appreciate this because they read Ravaisson as a typically post-Kantian philosopher, and underemphasize the distinct context in which he developed his work. I explore three key claims made by interpreters who argue that Ravaisson should be read as a Schellingian, and show [i] that these claims are incompatible with the text of De (...)
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  14.  45
    Christian Wolff and Leibnizian Monads.Martin Schönfeld - 2002 - The Leibniz Review 12:131-135.
  15. Leibniz's Final System. Monads, Matter, and Animals.Glenn Hartz - 2006 - Studia Leibnitiana 38 (1):109-118.
     
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  16.  85
    From the Metaphysical Union of Mind and Body to the Real Union of Monads: Leibniz onSuppositaandVincula Substantialia.Brandon Look - 1998 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):505-529.
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  17.  79
    Monads and Chaos: The Vitality of Leibniz's Philosophy.L. Bouquiaux - 1993 - Diogenes 41 (161):87-105.
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  18.  35
    The Windowless Monads.D. M. Datta - 1936 - The Monist 46 (1):13-24.
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  19.  4
    Force, Cosmos, Monads and Other Themes of Kant's Early Thought.Ralph C. S. Walker & Irving I. Polonoff - 1975 - Philosophical Quarterly 25 (98):83.
  20.  23
    Heidegger on the Being of Monads: Lessons in Leibniz and in the Practice of Reading the History of Philosophy.Paul Lodge - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (6):1169-1191.
    This paper is a discussion of the treatment of Leibniz's conception of substance in Heidegger's The Metaphysical Foundations of Logic. I explain Heidegger's account, consider its relation to recent interpretations of Leibniz in the Anglophone secondary literature, and reflect on the ways in which Heidegger's methodology may illuminate what it is to read Leibniz and other figures in the history of philosophy.
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  21.  20
    Maps and Monads for Modal Frames.Robert Goldblatt - 2006 - Studia Logica 83 (1-3):309-331.
    The category-theoretic nature of general frames for modal logic is explored. A new notion of "modal map" between frames is defined, generalizing the usual notion of bounded morphism/p-morphism. The category Fm of all frames and modal maps has reflective subcategories CHFm of compact Hausdorff frames, DFm of descriptive frames, and UEFm of ultrafilter enlargements of frames. All three subcategories are equivalent, and are dual to the category of modal algebras and their homomorphisms. An important example of a modal map that (...)
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  22.  25
    Leibniz's Final System: Monads, Matter and Animals.Philip Beeley - 2006 - The Leibniz Review:187-197.
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  23.  42
    Leibniz's Monads and Bradley's Finite Centers.T. Stearns Eliot - 1916 - The Monist 26 (4):566-576.
  24.  54
    Corporeal Substances and Physical Monads in Kant and Leibniz.Gary Banham - manuscript
  25.  11
    Monads and Sets: On Gödel, Leibniz, and the Reflection Principle.Mark van Atten & Mark Atten - 2015 - In Mark van Atten & Mark Atten (eds.), Essays on Gödel’s Reception of Leibniz, Husserl, and Brouwer. Springer Verlag.
    Gödel once offered an argument for the general reflection principle in set theory that took the form of an analogy with Leibniz' Monadology. I discuss the mathematical and philosophical background to Gödel's argument, reconstruct the proposed analogy in detail, and argue that it has no justificatory force.
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  26.  16
    Are Leibnizian Monads Spatial?J. A. Cover & Glenn A. Hartz - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (3):295 - 316.
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  27. Monads and Machines.Pauline Phemister - 2011 - In J. E. H. Smith & Ohad Nachtomy (eds.), Machines of Nature and Corporeal Substances in Leibniz. Springer. pp. 39-60.
     
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  28.  20
    Leibniz and Huayan Buddhism: Monads as Modified Li?Casey Rentmeester - 2014 - Lyceum 13 (1):36-57.
  29.  20
    Monads and Matter.Nicholas Rescher - 1955 - Modern Schoolman 32 (2):172-175.
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  30.  13
    Reviving Spiritualism with Monads: Francisque Bouillier's Impossible Mission.Delphine Antoine-Mahut - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (6):1106-1127.
    This paper studies Francisque Bouillier’s contribution to cousinian Spiritualism, from his first text on the History of Cartesian Philosophy from 1839 to the publication of Du principe vital et de l’âme pensante, a work which was likewise considerably amended as a result of the polemics it gave rise to. The paper is concerned with the reception of Leibniz in a double sense. In a positive sense, Bouillier managed to reintegrate in the caricature of the Cartesian soul conceived by the Cousinians, (...)
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  31.  17
    Monads and Mathematics: The Logic of Leibniz's Mereology.Roy T. Cook - 2000 - Studia Leibnitiana 32 (1):1 - 20.
    Es bestehen tiefgreifende Zusammenhänge zwischen Leibniz' Mathematik und seiner Metaphysik. Dieser Aufsatz hat das Ziel, das Verständnis für diese beiden Bereiche zu erweitern, indem er Leibniz' Mereologie (die Theorie der Teile und des Ganzen) näher untersucht. Zunachst wird Leibniz' Mereologie primär anhand seiner Schrift “Initia rerum mathematicarum metaphysica" rekonstruiert. Dieses ehrgeizige Programm beginnt mit dem einfachen Begriff der Kompräsenz, geht dann iiber zu komplexeren Begriffen wie Gleichheit, Ähnlichkeit und Homogenität und kulminiert letztlich in der Leibnizschen Definition der Begriffe Teil, Ganzes (...)
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  32.  11
    A Theory of Monads: Outlines of the Philosophy of the Principle of Relativity. [REVIEW]Wm Pepperell Montague - 1925 - Journal of Philosophy 22 (21):577-583.
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  33.  26
    Leibniz' Monads: A Heritage of Gnosticism and a Source of Rational Science.R. E. Butts - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):47 - 62.
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  34. A Theory of Monads.H. Wildon Carr - 1923 - Mind 32 (126):225-233.
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  35.  8
    Force, Cosmos, Monads and Other Themes of Kant's Early Thought.Jill Vance Buroker - 1977 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (1):109-112.
  36.  13
    Monads Facing the Labyrinth of the Continuum.Rogelio Rovira - 2000 - Modern Schoolman 77 (4):273-291.
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  37. Husserl's Phenomenology of the Monads. Remarks on Husserl's Confrontation with Leibniz.K. Mertens - 2000 - Husserl Studies 17 (1):1-20.
     
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  38.  13
    Force, Cosmos, Monads and Other Themes of Kant's Early Thought.Werner Flach - 1978 - Philosophy and History 11 (2):154-154.
  39.  5
    3. Leibnizian Ideas in Nietzsche’s Philosophy: On Force, Monads, Perspectivism, and the Subject.Christopher Brinkmann & Nikolaos Loukidelis - 2015 - In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter. pp. 95-109.
  40. Are Monads Intentional Systems?C. Calabi - 2004 - Studia Leibnitiana. Sonderheft 32.
     
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  41.  12
    The "Modes" of Spinoza and the "Monads" of Leibniz.G. Dawes Hicks - 1917 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 18:329 - 362.
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  42.  6
    Monads and Meta-Lambda Calculus.Daisuke Bekki - 2009 - In Hattori (ed.), New Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 193--208.
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  43.  9
    Monads and Sets: On Leibniz, Gödel, and the Reflection Principle.Mark Van Atten - unknown
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  44.  10
    Moral Monads and Ethical Reductionism.Arthur Zucker - 1984 - Journal of Religious Ethics 12 (1):116 - 122.
    Daniel C. Maguire (1978, 1982) has presented a moral theory based on affective experiences. He sees this sort of theory as protection against ethical relativism as well as leading toward a morality necessarily based on religion. Along the way, ethical reductionism is discarded. This paper argues that precisely the opposite has happened. Maguire is open to the charge of ethical relativism and so loses religion as a base. A sense can be given to ethical reductionism and to what Maguire terms (...)
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  45.  10
    Monads, Nonexistent Individuals and Possible Worlds Reply to Rosenkrantz.Roderick M. Chisholm - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 58 (1/2):173 - 175.
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  46.  3
    Luxemburg W. A. J.. A General Theory of Monads. Applications of Model Theory to Algebra, Analysis, and Probability, Edited by Luxemburg W. A. J., Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Dallas, Montreal, Toronto, London, and Sidney, 1969, Pp. 18–86. [REVIEW]Louis Narens - 1971 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (3):541-542.
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  47.  2
    From the Metaphysical Union of Mind and Body to the Real Union of Monads: Leibniz on Supposita and Vincula Substantialia.Brandon Look - 1998 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):505-529.
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  48.  4
    Monads and Matter: A Note on Leibniz's Metaphysics.Nicholas Rescher - 1954 - Modern Schoolman 32:172.
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  49.  1
    A Theory of Monads: Outlines of the Philosophy of the Principle of Relativity.H. Wildon Carr - 1923 - Philosophical Review 32 (5):544-548.
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  50.  2
    Discussion of Dr. Wildon Carr's "A Theory of Monads." Outline of Introduction.Hilda D. Oakeley - 1922 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 23:157 - 172.
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