Results for 'monsters'

326 found
Order:
  1. Monsters in Kaplan’s Logic of Demonstratives.Brian Rabern - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 164 (2):393-404.
    Kaplan (1989a) insists that natural languages do not contain displacing devices that operate on character—such displacing devices are called monsters. This thesis has recently faced various empirical challenges (e.g., Schlenker 2003; Anand and Nevins 2004). In this note, the thesis is challenged on grounds of a more theoretical nature. It is argued that the standard compositional semantics of variable binding employs monstrous operations. As a dramatic first example, Kaplan’s formal language, the Logic of Demonstratives, is shown to contain (...). For similar reasons, the orthodox lambda-calculus-based semantics for variable binding is argued to be monstrous. This technical point promises to provide some far-reaching implications for our understanding of semantic theory and content. The theoretical upshot of the discussion is at least threefold: (i) the Kaplanian thesis that “directly referential” terms are not shiftable/bindable is unmotivated, (ii) since monsters operate on something distinct from the assertoric content of their operands, we must distinguish ingredient sense from assertoric content (cf. Dummett 1973; Evans 1979; Stanley 1997), and (iii) since the case of variable binding provides a paradigm of semantic shift that differs from the other types, it is plausible to think that indexicals—which are standardly treated by means of the assignment function—might undergo the same kind of shift. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  2. Monsters and the Theoretical Role of Context.Brian Rabern & Derek Ball - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (2):392-416.
    Kaplan (1989) famously claimed that monsters--operators that shift the context--do not exist in English and "could not be added to it". Several recent theorists have pointed out a range of data that seem to refute Kaplan's claim, but others (most explicitly Stalnaker 2014) have offered a principled argument that monsters are impossible. This paper interprets and resolves the dispute. Contra appearances, this is no dry, technical matter: it cuts to the heart of a deep disagreement about the fundamental (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  3. Modal Monsters and Talk About Fiction.Stefano Predelli - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (3):277-297.
    This paper argues in favor of a treatment of discourse about fiction in terms of operators on character, that is, Kaplanesque ‘monsters’. The first three sections criticize the traditional analysis of ‘according to the fiction’ as an intensional operator, and the approach to fictional discourse grounded on the notion of contextual shifts. The final sections explain how an analysis in terms of monsters yields the correct readings for a variety of examples involving modal and temporal indexicals.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  4. On Monsters: An Unnatural History of Our Worst Fears.Stephen Asma - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Hailed as "a feast" (Washington Post) and "a modern-day bestiary" (The New Yorker), Stephen Asma's On Monsters is a wide-ranging cultural and conceptual history of monsters--how they have evolved over time, what functions they have served for us, and what shapes they are likely to take in the future. Beginning at the time of Alexander the Great, the monsters come fast and furious--Behemoth and Leviathan, Gog and Magog, Satan and his demons, Grendel and Frankenstein, circus freaks and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5. Where Monsters Dwell.David Israel & John Perry - 1996 - In Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation. Csli Publications, Stanford. pp. 1--303.
    Kaplan says that monsters violate Principle 2 of his theory. Principle 2 is that indexicals, pure and demonstrative alike, are directly referential. In providing this explanation of there being no monsters, Kaplan feels his theory has an advantage over double-indexing theories like Kamp’s or Segerberg’s (or Stalnaker’s), which either embrace monsters or avoid them only by ad hoc stipulation, in the sharp conceptual distinction it draws between circumstances of evaluation and contexts of utterance. We shall argue that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  6. Monsters of Sex: Foucault and the Problem of Life.Sarah K. Hansen - 2018 - Foucault Studies 24 (2):102-124.
    This article argues, contra-Derrida, that Foucault does not essentialize or precomprehend the meaning of life or bio- in his writings on biopolitics. Instead, Foucault problematizes life and provokes genealogical questions about the meaning of modernity more broadly. In The Order of Things, the 1974-75 lecture course at the Collège de France, and Herculine Barbin, the monster is an important figure of the uncertain shape of modernity and its entangled problems (life, sex, madness, criminality, etc). Engaging Foucault’s monsters, I show (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. A Plea for Monsters.Philippe Schlenker - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (1):29-120.
    Kaplan claims in Demonstratives that no operator may manipulate the context of evaluation of natural language indexicals. We show that this is not so. In fact, attitude reports always manipulate a context parameter (or, rather, a context variable). This is shown by (i) the existence of De Se readings of attitude reports in English (which Kaplan has no account for), and (ii) the existence of a variety of indexicals across languages whose point of evaluation can be shifted, but only in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   135 citations  
  8.  15
    Monsters of Sex: Michel Foucault and the Problem of Life.Sarah K. Hansen - forthcoming - Foucault Studies:102-124.
    This article argues, contra-Derrida, that Foucault does not essentialize or pre-comprehend the meaning of life or bio- in his writings on biopolitics. Instead, Foucault problematizes life and provokes genealogical questions about the meaning of modernity more broadly. In The Order of Things, the 1974-75 lecture course at the Collège de France, and Herculine Barbin, the monster is an important figure of the uncertain shape of modernity and its entangled problems. Engaging Foucault’s monsters, I show that the problematization of life (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Moral Monsters and Saints.Daniel M. Haybron - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):260-284.
    This paper argues for the moral significance of the notion of an evil person or character. First, I argue that accounts of evil character ought to support a robust bad/evil distinction; yet existing theories cannot plausibly do so. Consequentialist and related theories also fail to account for some crucial properties of evil persons. Second, I sketch an intuitively plausible “affective-motivational” account of evil character. Third, I argue that the notion of evil character, thus conceived, denotes a significant moral category. It (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  10. Utility Monsters for the Fission Age.Rachael Briggs & Daniel Nolan - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (2):392-407.
    One of the standard approaches to the metaphysics of personal identity has some counter-intuitive ethical consequences when combined with maximising consequentialism and a plausible doctrine about aggregation of consequences. This metaphysical doctrine is the so-called ‘multiple occupancy’ approach to puzzles about fission and fusion. It gives rise to a new version of the ‘utility monster’ problem, particularly difficult problems about infinite utility, and a new version of a Parfit-style ‘repugnant conclusion’. While the article focuses on maximising consequentialism for simplicity, the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11. Monsters and Philosophy.Charles T. Wolfe (ed.) - 2005 - College Publications.
    Table of contents for MONSTERS AND PHILOSOPHY, edited by Charles T. Wolfe (London 2005) -/- List of Contributors iii Acknowledgments vii List of Abbreviations ix -/- Introduction xi Charles T. Wolfe The Riddle of the Sphinx: Aristotle, Penelope, and 1 Empedocles Johannes Fritsche Science as a Cure for Fear: The Status of Monsters in 21 Lucretius Morgan Meis Nature and its Monsters During the Renaissance: 37 Montaigne and Vanini Tristan Dagron Conjoined Twins and the Limits of our (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Kinds of Monsters and Kinds of Compositionality.Mark McCullagh - 2018 - Analysis 78 (4):657-666.
    In response to Stefano Predelli's article finding in David Kaplan's “Demonstratives” a distinction between “context shifting” monsters and “operators on character,” I argue that context shifters are operators on character. That conclusion conflicts with the claim that operators on character must be covertly quotational. But that claim is itself unmotivated.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  35
    Hopeful Monsters: A Note on Multiple Conclusions.Bogdan Dicher - 2020 - Erkenntnis 85 (1):77-98.
    Arguments, the story goes, have one or more premises and only one conclusion. A contentious generalisation allows arguments with several disjunctively connected conclusions. Contentious as this generalisation may be, I will argue nevertheless that it is justified. My main claim is that multiple conclusions are epiphenomena of the logical connectives: some connectives determine, in a certain sense, multiple-conclusion derivations. Therefore, such derivations are completely natural and can safely be used in proof-theoretic semantics.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  53
    Ordinary Monsters: Ethical Criticism and the Lives of Artists.Christopher Bartel - 2019 - Contemporary Aesthetics 17.
    Should we take into account an artist's personal moral failings when appreciating or evaluating the work? In this essay, I seek to expand Berys Gaut's account of ethicism by showing how moral judgment of an artist's private moral actions can figure in one's overall evaluation of their work. To expand Gaut's view, I argue that the artist's personal morality is relevant to our evaluation of their work because we may only come to understand the point of view of the work, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  49
    A Plea Against Monsters.Emar Maier - 2016 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 93 (3):363-395.
    Inspired by Schlenker's (2003) seminal 'Plea for Monsters', linguists have been analyzing every occurrence of a shifted indexical by postulating a monstrous operator. My aim in this paper is to show that Kaplan's (1989) original strategy of explaining apparent shifting in terms of a quotational use/mention distinction offers a much more intuitive, parsimonious and empirically superior analysis of many of these phenomena, including direct--indirect switches in Ancient Greek, role shift in signed languages, free indirect discourse in literary narratives, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  74
    Strangers, Gods and Monsters: Interpreting Otherness.Richard Kearney - 2002 - Routledge.
    Strangers, Gods and Monster is a fascinating look at how human identity is shaped by three powerful but enigmatic forces. Often overlooked in accounts of how we think about ourselves and others, Richard Kearney skillfully shows, with the help of vivid examples and illustrations, how the human outlook on the world is formed by the mysterious triumvirate of strangers, gods and monsters. Throughout, Richard Kearney shows how strangers, gods and monsters do not merely reside in myths or fantasies (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  17. Between Monsters, Goddesses, and Cyborgs Feminist Confrontations with Science, Medicine, and Cyberspace.Nina Lykke & Rosi Braidotti - 1996
  18.  84
    Evil, Monsters and Dualism.Luke Russell - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):45-58.
    In his book The Myth of Evil , Phillip Cole claims that the concept of evil divides normal people from inhuman, demonic and monstrous wrongdoers. Such monsters are found in fiction, Cole maintains, but not in reality. Thus, even if the concept of evil has the requisite form to be explanatorily useful, it will be of no explanatory use in the real world. My aims in this paper are to assess Cole’s arguments for the claim that there are no (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  10
    Diderot’s Monsters, Between Physiology and Politics.Annie Ibrahim - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):125-138.
    The monstrous power of the blind in Diderot’s 1949 Letter is not due to its ability to make people laugh or afraid, as its most common etymology would indicate: monstrum, monstrare, to point to an abnormal fact. The monstrous power of Diderot’s monster is that of one who shows: monere, monitor, in the manner of a guide or pathfinder. It shows us that everything that lives, and especially the human being, is a hybrid. It takes the idea of a possible (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  35
    Monsters We Met, Monsters We Made: On the Parallel Emergence of Phenotypic Similarity Under Domestication.Karel Kleisner & Marco Stella - 2009 - Sign Systems Studies 37 (3/4):454-475.
    Creatures living under the rule of domestication form a communicative union based on shared morphological, behavioural, cognitive, and immunologicalresemblances. Domestic animals live under particular conditions that substantially differ from the original settings of their wild relatives. Here we focus on the fact that many parallel characters have appeared in various domestic forms that had been selected for different purposes. These characters are often unique for domestic animals and do not exist in wild forms. We argue that parallel similarities appear in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. “The Materialist Denial of Monsters”.Charles T. Wolfe - 2005 - In Charles Wolfe (ed.), Monsters and Philosophy. pp. 187--204.
    Locke and Leibniz deny that there are any such beings as ‘monsters’ (anomalies, natural curiosities, wonders, and marvels), for two very different reasons. For Locke, monsters are not ‘natural kinds’: the word ‘monster’ does not individuate any specific class of beings ‘out there’ in the natural world. Monsters depend on our subjective viewpoint. For Leibniz, there are no monsters because we are all parts of the Great Chain of Being. Everything that happens, happens for a reason, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22. Monsters, Disgust and Fascination.Susan L. Feagin & Noel Carroll - 1992 - Philosophical Studies 65 (1-2):75 - 84.
  23.  9
    Utility Monsters and the Distribution of Dharmas: A Reply to Charles Goodman.Vishnu Sridharan - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):650-652.
    In both the Consequences of Compassion and his response to my article, Goodman outlines a consequentialist theory that is both coherent and, in many ways, compelling. One can imagine that out of a concern toward—as Goodman puts it—“the impersonal events which fill the world”, we will accept “momentary experiences as the morally significant units”, and our actions will aim to promote the existence of “good dharmas.” However, as this brief reply argues, Goodman’s equating of a consequentialism focused on good dharmas (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. Mothers, Monsters, and Machines.Rosi Braidotti - 1997 - In Katie Conboy Nadia Medina (ed.), Writing on the Body: Female Embodiment and Feminist Theory. pp. 59--79.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25. Mathematical Intuition Vs. Mathematical Monsters.Solomon Feferman - 2000 - Synthese 125 (3):317-332.
    Geometrical and physical intuition, both untutored andcultivated, is ubiquitous in the research, teaching,and development of mathematics. A number ofmathematical ``monsters'', or pathological objects, havebeen produced which – according to somemathematicians – seriously challenge the reliability ofintuition. We examine several famous geometrical,topological and set-theoretical examples of suchmonsters in order to see to what extent, if at all,intuition is undermined in its everyday roles.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  26. Quotation Marks as Monsters, or the Other Way Around?Emar Maier - 2007 - In Dekker Aloni (ed.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Amsterdam Colloquium. pp. 145-150.
    Mixed quotation exhibits characteristics of both mention and use. Some even go so far as to claim it can be described wholly in terms of the pragmatics of language use. Thus, it may be argued that the observed shifting of indexicals under all quotation shows that a monstrous operator is involved. I will argue the opposite: a proper semantic account of quotation can be used to exorcize Schlenker's monsters from semantic theory.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  27.  22
    Monsters as Evidence: The Uses of the Abnormal Body During the Early Eighteenth Century. [REVIEW]Javier Moscoso - 1998 - Journal of the History of Biology 31 (3):355 - 382.
  28.  13
    Dodging Monsters and Dancing with Dreams: Success and Failure at Different Levels of Approach and Avoidance.Abigail A. Scholer & E. Tory Higgins - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (3):254-258.
    Many models of motivation suggest that goals can be arranged in a hierarchy, ranging from higher-level goals that represent desired end-states to lower-level means that operate in the service of those goals. We present a hierarchical model that distinguishes between three levels—goals, strategies, and tactics—and between approach/avoidance and regulatory focus motivations at different levels. We focus our discussion on how this hierarchical framework sheds light on the different ways that success and failure are defined within the promotion and prevention systems (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  9
    Monsters in Metal Cocoons: `Road Rage' and Cyborg Bodies.Deborah Lupton - 1999 - Body and Society 5 (1):57-72.
    In this article, the sociocultural meanings and social relations and expectations that cohere around `road rage' and serve to invest it with its particular resonance in contemporary Western societies are examined. It is argued that the combination of car and driver in the driving experience produces a cyborg body, which influences the ways in which people experience, perceive and respond to driving and other cars/drivers. But in contemporary societies the expression of such `negative' emotions is problematic and complex. In this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30. Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination.Rosemary Betterton - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  19
    Enabling Monsters: A Reply to Professor Miller.Fernando R. Tesón - 2011 - Ethics and International Affairs 25 (2):165-182.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. Foucault's Monsters and the Challenge of Law.Andrew N. Sharpe - 2010 - Routledge.
    Foucault's theoretical framework -- Foucault's monsters as genealogy : the abnormal individual -- An English legal history of monsters -- Changing sex : the problem of transsexuality -- Sharing bodies : the problem of conjoined twins -- Admixing embyros : the problem of human/animal hybrids -- Conclusion.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. Moral Saints, Moral Monsters, and the Mirror Thesis.Peter Brian Barry - 2009 - American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):163 - 176.
    A number of philosophers have been impressed with the thought that moral saints and moral monsters—or, evil people, to put it less sensationally—“mirror” one another, in a sense to be explained. Call this the mirror thesis. The project of this paper is to cash out the metaphorical suggestion that moral saints and evil persons mirror one other and to articulate the most plausible literal version of the mirror thesis. To anticipate, the most plausible version of the mirror thesis implies (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34. Capitalist Monsters.Steve Shaviro - 2002 - Historical Materialism 10 (4):281-290.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  23
    Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination.Rosemary Betterton - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and “prosthetic” pregnancy, it asks whether the “monstrous” can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and potential (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  12
    Two Monsters in Search of a Concept.Robert Yanal - 2003 - Contemporary Aesthetics 1.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  63
    Monsters of Architecture: Anthropomorphism in Architectural Theory.Edward Winters & Marco Frascari - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (171):251.
    '...deserves serious attention among new theories in architecture, and is recommended for all university architectural collections.'|s CHOICE.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  5
    Monsters of Architecture.Diana Bitz - 1993 - New Vico Studies 11:108-111.
  39.  18
    Monsters of Biopower.A. Kiarina Kordela - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (1):193-205.
    This paper argues that today the true source of terror in the economico-biopolitically advanced countries of global capitalism lies in biopower’s own constitution as a normative field that presupposes its exception as its own precondition. At the two extreme poles of this exception we find “terrorism,” and particularly suicide bombing, and unmanned aerial vehicles, as the pair revealing the core of biopower. However, of the two only “terrorism” is discursively constructed in the “West” as a monstrous act that should incite (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  4
    In/Fertile Monsters: The Emancipatory Significance of Representations of Women on Infertility Reality TV.Marjolein Lotte de Boer, Cristina Archetti & Kari Nyheim Solbraekke - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-16.
    Reality TV is immensely popular, and various shows in this media genre involve a storyline of infertility and infertility treatment. Feminists argue that normative and constructed realities about infertility and infertility treatment, like those in reality TV, are central to the emancipation of women. Such realities are able to steer viewers' perceptions of the world. This article examines the emancipatory significance of representations of women on 'infertility reality TV shows'. While the women in these shows all have 'abnormal' qualities, we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Rational Fear of Monsters.R. Joyce - 2000 - British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (2):209-224.
    Colin Radford must weary of defending his thesis that the emotional reactions we have towards fictional characters, events, and states of affairs are irrational.1 Yet, for all the discussion, the issue has not, to my mind, been properly settled—or at least not settled in the manner I should prefer—and so this paper attempts once more to debunk Radford’s defiance of common sense. For some, the question of whether our emotional responses to fiction are rational does not arise, for they are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  42. Kaplan's Three Monsters.Stefano Predelli - 2014 - Analysis 74 (3):389-393.
    This paper distinguishes three non-equivalent senses of 'monster' in Kaplan's Demonstratives: context-shifters, global-shifters, and character-shifters.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43. Monsters of Architecture: Anthropomorphism in Architectural Theory.Marco Frascari - 1990 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    '...deserves serious attention among new theories in architecture, and is recommended for all university architectural collections.'|s CHOICE.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  7
    Hopeful Monsters: Literary Teleology and Emergence.Victoria N. Alexander - 2005 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 7.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  54
    Mathematical Monsters.Andrew Aberdein - 2019 - In Diego Compagna & Stefanie Steinhart (eds.), Monsters, Monstrosities, and the Monstrous in Culture and Society. Wilmington, DE, USA: pp. 391-412.
    Monsters lurk within mathematical as well as literary haunts. I propose to trace some pathways between these two monstrous habitats. I start from Jeffrey Jerome Cohen’s influential account of monster culture and explore how well mathematical monsters fit each of his seven theses. The mathematical monsters I discuss are drawn primarily from three distinct but overlapping domains. Firstly, late nineteenth-century mathematicians made numerous unsettling discoveries that threatened their understanding of their own discipline and challenged their intuitions. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  65
    The Return of Hopeful Monsters.Stephen Jay Gould - manuscript
    Big Brother, the tyrant of George Orwell's 1984, directed his daily Two Minutes Hate against Emmanuel Goldstein, enemy of the people. When I studied evolutionary biology in graduate school during the mid-1960s, official rebuke and derision focused upon Richard Goldschmidt, a famous geneticist who, we were told, had gone astray. Although 1984 creeps up on us, I trust that the world will not be in Big Brother's grip by then. I do, however, predict that during this decade Goldschmidt will be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  47. "Monsters on the Brain: An Evolutionary Epistemology of Horror".Stephen Asma - 2014 - Social Research: An International Quarterly (N.4).
    The article discusses the evolutionary development of horror and fear in animals and humans, including in regard to cognition and physiological aspects of the brain. An overview of the social aspects of emotions, including the role that emotions play in interpersonal relations and the role that empathy plays in humans' ethics, is provided. An overview of the psychological aspects of monsters, including humans' simultaneous repulsion and interest in horror films that depict monsters, is also provided.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Semantic Monsters.Brian Rabern - forthcoming - In Heimir Geirsson & Stephen Biggs (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Reference.
    This chapter provides a general overview of the issues surrounding so-called semantic monsters. In section 1, I outline the basics of Kaplan’s framework and spell out how and why the topic of “monsters” arises within that framework. In Section 2, I distinguish four notions of a monster that are discussed in the literature, and show why, although they can pull apart in different frameworks or with different assumptions, they all coincide within Kaplan’s framework. In Section 3, I discuss (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  17
    Diderot’s Monsters, Between Physiology and Politics in Advance.Annie Ibrahim - forthcoming - Philosophy Today.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  10
    Turtles as Hopeful Monsters.Olivier Rieppel - 2001 - Bioessays 23 (11):987-991.
    A recently published study on the development of the turtle shell(1) highlights the important role that development plays in the origin of evolutionary novelties(1). The evolution of the highly derived adult anatomy of turtles is a prime example of a macroevolutionary event triggered by changes in early embryonic development. Early ontogenetic deviation may cause patterns of morphological change that are not compatible with scenarios of gradualistic, stepwise transformation.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 326