Results for 'monsters'

786 found
Order:
  1. Timothy Schroeder.Monsters Among Us - 2001 - Naturalism, Evolution, and Intentionality 27:167.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  16
    The Effect of Social Network Size on Hashtag Adoption on Twitter.Iris Monster & Shiri Lev-Ari - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):3149-3158.
    Propagation of novel linguistic terms is an important aspect of language use and language change. Here, we test how social network size influences people's likelihood of adopting novel labels by examining hashtag use on Twitter. Specifically, we test whether following fewer Twitter users leads to more varied and malleable hashtag use on Twitter, because each followed user is ascribed greater weight and thus exerts greater influence on the following user. Focusing on Dutch users tweeting about the terrorist attack in Brussels (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  3
    Chapter seventeen.Monster Nature’S. & In Seneca’S. - 2008 - In I. Sluiter & Ralph Mark Rosen (eds.), Kakos: Badness and Anti-Value in Classical Antiquity. Brill. pp. 451.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Monsters in Kaplan’s logic of demonstratives.Brian Rabern - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 164 (2):393-404.
    Kaplan (1989a) insists that natural languages do not contain displacing devices that operate on character—such displacing devices are called monsters. This thesis has recently faced various empirical challenges (e.g., Schlenker 2003; Anand and Nevins 2004). In this note, the thesis is challenged on grounds of a more theoretical nature. It is argued that the standard compositional semantics of variable binding employs monstrous operations. As a dramatic first example, Kaplan’s formal language, the Logic of Demonstratives, is shown to contain (...). For similar reasons, the orthodox lambda-calculus-based semantics for variable binding is argued to be monstrous. This technical point promises to provide some far-reaching implications for our understanding of semantic theory and content. The theoretical upshot of the discussion is at least threefold: (i) the Kaplanian thesis that “directly referential” terms are not shiftable/bindable is unmotivated, (ii) since monsters operate on something distinct from the assertoric content of their operands, we must distinguish ingredient sense from assertoric content (cf. Dummett 1973; Evans 1979; Stanley 1997), and (iii) since the case of variable binding provides a paradigm of semantic shift that differs from the other types, it is plausible to think that indexicals—which are standardly treated by means of the assignment function—might undergo the same kind of shift. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  5. Mathematical Monsters.Andrew Aberdein - 2019 - In Diego Compagna & Stefanie Steinhart (eds.), Monsters, Monstrosities, and the Monstrous in Culture and Society. Vernon Press. pp. 391-412.
    Monsters lurk within mathematical as well as literary haunts. I propose to trace some pathways between these two monstrous habitats. I start from Jeffrey Jerome Cohen’s influential account of monster culture and explore how well mathematical monsters fit each of his seven theses. The mathematical monsters I discuss are drawn primarily from three distinct but overlapping domains. Firstly, late nineteenth-century mathematicians made numerous unsettling discoveries that threatened their understanding of their own discipline and challenged their intuitions. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Monsters and the theoretical role of context.Brian Rabern & Derek Ball - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (2):392-416.
    Kaplan (1989) famously claimed that monsters--operators that shift the context--do not exist in English and "could not be added to it". Several recent theorists have pointed out a range of data that seem to refute Kaplan's claim, but others (most explicitly Stalnaker 2014) have offered a principled argument that monsters are impossible. This paper interprets and resolves the dispute. Contra appearances, this is no dry, technical matter: it cuts to the heart of a deep disagreement about the fundamental (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  7. On Monsters: an unnatural history of our worst fears.Stephen T. Asma - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Hailed as "a feast" (Washington Post) and "a modern-day bestiary" (The New Yorker), Stephen Asma's On Monsters is a wide-ranging cultural and conceptual history of monsters--how they have evolved over time, what functions they have served for us, and what shapes they are likely to take in the future. Beginning at the time of Alexander the Great, the monsters come fast and furious--Behemoth and Leviathan, Gog and Magog, Satan and his demons, Grendel and Frankenstein, circus freaks and (...)
  8. Where monsters dwell.David Israel & John Perry - 1996 - In Jerry Seligman & Dag Westerstahl (eds.), Logic, Language and Computation. Center for the Study of Language and Inf. pp. 1--303.
    Kaplan says that monsters violate Principle 2 of his theory. Principle 2 is that indexicals, pure and demonstrative alike, are directly referential. In providing this explanation of there being no monsters, Kaplan feels his theory has an advantage over double-indexing theories like Kamp’s or Segerberg’s (or Stalnaker’s), which either embrace monsters or avoid them only by ad hoc stipulation, in the sharp conceptual distinction it draws between circumstances of evaluation and contexts of utterance. We shall argue that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  9. Modal monsters and talk about fiction.Stefano Predelli - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (3):277-297.
    This paper argues in favor of a treatment of discourse about fiction in terms of operators on character, that is, Kaplanesque ‘monsters’. The first three sections criticize the traditional analysis of ‘according to the fiction’ as an intensional operator, and the approach to fictional discourse grounded on the notion of contextual shifts. The final sections explain how an analysis in terms of monsters yields the correct readings for a variety of examples involving modal and temporal indexicals.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  10. "Monsters on the Brain: An Evolutionary Epistemology of Horror".Stephen Asma - 2014 - Social Research: An International Quarterly (N.4).
    The article discusses the evolutionary development of horror and fear in animals and humans, including in regard to cognition and physiological aspects of the brain. An overview of the social aspects of emotions, including the role that emotions play in interpersonal relations and the role that empathy plays in humans' ethics, is provided. An overview of the psychological aspects of monsters, including humans' simultaneous repulsion and interest in horror films that depict monsters, is also provided.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Semantic monsters.Brian Rabern - 2021 - In Heimir Geirsson & Stephen Biggs (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Reference. New York: Routledge. pp. 515-532.
    This chapter provides a general overview of the issues surrounding so-called semantic monsters. In section 1, I outline the basics of Kaplan’s framework and spell out how and why the topic of “monsters” arises within that framework. In Section 2, I distinguish four notions of a monster that are discussed in the literature, and show why, although they can pull apart in different frameworks or with different assumptions, they all coincide within Kaplan’s framework. In Section 3, I discuss (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Monsters and Philosophy.Charles T. Wolfe (ed.) - 2005 - College Publications.
    Table of contents for MONSTERS AND PHILOSOPHY, edited by Charles T. Wolfe (London 2005) -/- List of Contributors iii Acknowledgments vii List of Abbreviations ix -/- Introduction xi Charles T. Wolfe The Riddle of the Sphinx: Aristotle, Penelope, and 1 Empedocles Johannes Fritsche Science as a Cure for Fear: The Status of Monsters in 21 Lucretius Morgan Meis Nature and its Monsters During the Renaissance: 37 Montaigne and Vanini Tristan Dagron Conjoined Twins and the Limits of our (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  55
    The Monstering of Tamarisk: How Scientists made a Plant into a Problem.Matthew K. Chew - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (2):231-266.
    Dispersal of biota by humans is a hallmark of civilization, but the results are often unforeseen and sometimes costly. Like kudzu vine in the American South, some examples become the stuff of regional folklore. In recent decades, "invasion biology," conservation-motivated scientists and their allies have focused largely on the most negative outcomes and often promoted the perception that introduced species are monsters. However, cases of monstering by scientists preceded the rise of popular environmentalism. The story of tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14. Monster –Sammlung und Allegorie.Charles T. Wolfe & Alexandre Métraux - 2016 - In Sarah Schmidt (ed.), Sprachen des Sammelns. Literatur als Medium und Reflexionsform des Sammelns. Brill Fink. pp. 487-495.
    an essay on monsters, science and categories from Diderot to Baudelaire.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Utility Monsters for the Fission Age.Ray Briggs & Daniel Nolan - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (2):392-407.
    One of the standard approaches to the metaphysics of personal identity has some counter-intuitive ethical consequences when combined with maximising consequentialism and a plausible doctrine about aggregation of consequences. This metaphysical doctrine is the so-called ‘multiple occupancy’ approach to puzzles about fission and fusion. It gives rise to a new version of the ‘utility monster’ problem, particularly difficult problems about infinite utility, and a new version of a Parfit-style ‘repugnant conclusion’. While the article focuses on maximising consequentialism for simplicity, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  16.  49
    Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination.Rosemary Betterton - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and “prosthetic” pregnancy, it asks whether the “monstrous” can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and potential (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17. Monsters of Sex: Foucault and the Problem of Life.Sarah K. Hansen - 2018 - Foucault Studies 24 (2):102-124.
    This article argues, contra-Derrida, that Foucault does not essentialize or precomprehend the meaning of life or bio- in his writings on biopolitics. Instead, Foucault problematizes life and provokes genealogical questions about the meaning of modernity more broadly. In The Order of Things, the 1974-75 lecture course at the Collège de France, and Herculine Barbin, the monster is an important figure of the uncertain shape of modernity and its entangled problems (life, sex, madness, criminality, etc). Engaging Foucault’s monsters, I show (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. Monsters, Laws of Nature, and Teleology in Late Scholastic Textbooks.Silvia Manzo - 2019 - In Rodolfo Garau & Pietro Omodeo (eds.), Contingency and Natural Order in Early Modern Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 61-92.
    In the period of emergence of early modern science, ‘monsters’ or individuals with physical congenital anomalies were considered as rare events which required special explanations entailing assumptions about the laws of nature. This concern with monsters was shared by representatives of the new science and Late Scholastic authors of university textbooks. This paper will reconstruct the main theses of the treatment of monsters in Late Scholastic textbooks, by focusing on the question as to how their accounts conceived (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  80
    Monsters, Goddesses and Cyborgs: Feminist Confrontations with Science, Medicine and Cyberspace.Nina Lykke & Rosi Braidotti - 1996
    It is divided into four sections covering science as a whole, the new technologies of the postmodern era, bio-medical discourses, and nature. A distinguished cast of contributors explores the central feminist concerns in each arena, through the central metaphors of monster, mother goddess and cyborg. They look at the consequences of gynogenesis, postmodern eco-buddhism in heathcare, sexual violence in cyberspace, the postmodernization of menopause, the dolphin as androgyne and feminist environmentalism.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  20. Promising monsters: Pregnant bodies, artistic subjectivity, and maternal imagination.Rosemary Betterton - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. Das Monster in uns.Gianluigi Segalerba - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry 40 (1-2):38-57.
    The essay consists in the analysis of the problem of the evil in the man and in the analysis of the remedies which the man can find against the evil. Plato affirms the presence of an active principle of evil in the soul of every man, which coincides with some instincts of the appetitive soul; the opposite principle to the evil is the reason, which needs, though, a correct education in order to be able to fight efficiently against the evil (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  23
    Monsters of Sex: Michel Foucault and the Problem of Life.Sarah K. Hansen - 2018 - Foucault Studies 24:102-124.
    This article argues, contra-Derrida, that Foucault does not essentialize or pre-comprehend the meaning of life or bio- in his writings on biopolitics. Instead, Foucault problematizes life and provokes genealogical questions about the meaning of modernity more broadly. In The Order of Things, the 1974-75 lecture course at the Collège de France, and Herculine Barbin, the monster is an important figure of the uncertain shape of modernity and its entangled problems. Engaging Foucault’s monsters, I show that the problematization of life (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23.  28
    Dodging Monsters and Dancing with Dreams: Success and Failure at Different Levels of Approach and Avoidance.Abigail A. Scholer & E. Tory Higgins - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (3):254-258.
    Many models of motivation suggest that goals can be arranged in a hierarchy, ranging from higher-level goals that represent desired end-states to lower-level means that operate in the service of those goals. We present a hierarchical model that distinguishes between three levels—goals, strategies, and tactics—and between approach/avoidance and regulatory focus motivations at different levels. We focus our discussion on how this hierarchical framework sheds light on the different ways that success and failure are defined within the promotion and prevention systems (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  29
    Moral Monsters, Significance, and Meaning in Life.Chad Mason Stevenson - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-18.
    Can a moral monster - a person whose life is characterised by immoral actions - live a meaningful life? Pre-theoretical intuitions appear divided. For some, moral monsters can't live a meaningful life because they were immoral, while for others they did because morality is irrelevant. So what is the relationship between morality and meaning? This article contends that both sides are partially correct but for the wrong reasons: moral monsters don’t live meaningful lives, but morality is irrelevant for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  22
    Making Monsters: The Uncanny Power of Dehumanization.David Livingstone Smith - 2021 - Harvard University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26.  91
    Hopeful Monsters: A Note on Multiple Conclusions.Bogdan Dicher - 2020 - Erkenntnis 85 (1):77-98.
    Arguments, the story goes, have one or more premises and only one conclusion. A contentious generalisation allows arguments with several disjunctively connected conclusions. Contentious as this generalisation may be, I will argue nevertheless that it is justified. My main claim is that multiple conclusions are epiphenomena of the logical connectives: some connectives determine, in a certain sense, multiple-conclusion derivations. Therefore, such derivations are completely natural and can safely be used in proof-theoretic semantics.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27. Moral Monsters and Saints.Daniel M. Haybron - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):260-284.
    This paper argues for the moral significance of the notion of an evil person or character. First, I argue that accounts of evil character ought to support a robust bad/evil distinction; yet existing theories cannot plausibly do so. Consequentialist and related theories also fail to account for some crucial properties of evil persons. Second, I sketch an intuitively plausible “affective-motivational” account of evil character. Third, I argue that the notion of evil character, thus conceived, denotes a significant moral category. It (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  28. Monsters in early modern philosophy.Silvia Manzo & Charles T. Wolfe - 2020 - Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    Monsters as a category seem omnipresent in early modern natural philosophy, in what one might call a “long” early modern period stretching from the Renaissance to the late eighteenth century, when the science of teratology emerges. We no longer use this term to refer to developmental anomalies (whether a two-headed calf, an individual suffering from microcephaly or Proteus syndrome) or to “freak occurrences” like Mary Toft’s supposedly giving birth to a litter of rabbits, in Surrey in the early eighteenth-century (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  10
    Utility Monsters for the Fission Age.Rachael Briggs & Daniel Nolan - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (3):392-407.
    One of the standard approaches to the metaphysics of personal identity has some counter‐intuitive ethical consequences when combined with maximising consequentialism and a plausible (though not uncontroversial) doctrine about aggregation of consequences. This metaphysical doctrine is the so‐called ‘multiple occupancy’ approach to puzzles about fission and fusion. It gives rise to a new version of the ‘utility monster’ problem, particularly difficult problems about infinite utility, and a new version of a Parfit‐style ‘repugnant conclusion’. While the article focuses on maximising consequentialism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30. Ordinary Monsters: Ethical Criticism and the Lives of Artists.Christopher Bartel - 2019 - Contemporary Aesthetics 17.
    Should we take into account an artist's personal moral failings when appreciating or evaluating the work? In this essay, I seek to expand Berys Gaut's account of ethicism by showing how moral judgment of an artist's private moral actions can figure in one's overall evaluation of their work. To expand Gaut's view, I argue that the artist's personal morality is relevant to our evaluation of their work because we may only come to understand the point of view of the work, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  31.  5
    Are Monsters Members of the Moral Community?Nathan Stout - 2013-09-05 - In Galen A. Foresman (ed.), Supernatural and Philosophy. Wiley. pp. 5–15.
    Moral philosophy is concerned with matters of right and wrong, and with answering questions about how we should live. Moral philosophy aims to tell us how to think about particular moral dilemmas; it aims to give us principles by which we can make moral decisions; and it aims to give us insight into how those moral principles are grounded. This chapter presents a discussion on certain gropus of creatures that fall clearly outside of the boundaries of the moral community. These (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Kinds of monsters and kinds of compositionality.Mark McCullagh - 2018 - Analysis 78 (4):657-666.
    In response to Stefano Predelli's article finding in David Kaplan's “Demonstratives” a distinction between “context shifting” monsters and “operators on character,” I argue that context shifters are operators on character. That conclusion conflicts with the claim that operators on character must be covertly quotational. But that claim is itself unmotivated.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  3
    Political monsters and democratic imagination: Spinoza, Blake, Hugo, Joyce.Patrick McGee - 2016 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Political Monsters and Democratic Imagination explores the democratic thought of Spinoza and its relation to the thought of William Blake, Victor Hugo, and James Joyce. As a group, these visionaries articulate: a concept of power founded not on strength or might but on social cooperation; a principle of equality based not on the identity of individuals with one another but on the difference between any individual and the intellectual power of society as a whole; an understanding of thought as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  22
    On Monsters and Marvels. Ambroise Pare, Janis L. Pallister.Erwin H. Ackerknecht - 1983 - Isis 74 (3):445-445.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Monsters : the case of marineland.John Sorenson - 2008 - In Carla Jodey Castricano (ed.), Animal subjects: an ethical reader in a posthuman world. Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Fine’s Monster Objection Defanged.Damiano Costa, Alessandro Cecconi & Claudio Calosi - 2023 - Philosophical Quarterly 73 (2):435-451.
    The Monster Objection has often been considered one of the main reasons to explore non-standard mereological views, such as hylomorphism. Still, it has been rarely discussed and then only in a cursory fashion. This paper fills this gap by offering the first thorough assessment of the objection. It argues that different metaphysical stances, such as presentism and three- and four-dimensionalism, provide different ways of undermining the objection.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  39
    Monster wildfires and metaphor in risk communication.Matlock Teenie, Coe Chelsea & Westerling A. Leroy - 2017 - Metaphor and Symbol 32 (4):250-261.
    This work examines the use and understanding of metaphor in wildfire discourse. We focus on the framing of wildfires as monsters, seen in statements such as “Monster wildfire rages in Colorado” and “Two monster wildfires in Northern California are slowly being tamed,” which reflect a “wildfire is monster” metaphor. Study 1 analyzes how and when this phrase is used in TV news reports of wildfires, and Study 2A and Study 2B investigate how it influences reasoning about risks associated with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. Mothers, monsters, and machines.Rosi Braidotti - 1997 - In Katie Conboy Nadia Medina (ed.), Writing on the Body: Female Embodiment and Feminist Theory. pp. 59--79.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39. Heroes, Monsters and Values: Philosophy and Sci-Fi Films of the 1970's.Michael Berman & Rohit Dalvi (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Monsters, nature, and generation from the renaissance to the early modern period : The emergence of medical thought.Annie Bitbol-Hespériès - 2006 - In Justin E. H. Smith (ed.), The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  75
    A Plea against Monsters.Emar Maier - 2016 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 93 (3):363-395.
    Inspired by Schlenker's (2003) seminal 'Plea for Monsters', linguists have been analyzing every occurrence of a shifted indexical by postulating a monstrous operator. My aim in this paper is to show that Kaplan's (1989) original strategy of explaining apparent shifting in terms of a quotational use/mention distinction offers a much more intuitive, parsimonious and empirically superior analysis of many of these phenomena, including direct--indirect switches in Ancient Greek, role shift in signed languages, free indirect discourse in literary narratives, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  42. Evil, Monsters and Dualism.Luke Russell - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):45-58.
    In his book The Myth of Evil , Phillip Cole claims that the concept of evil divides normal people from inhuman, demonic and monstrous wrongdoers. Such monsters are found in fiction, Cole maintains, but not in reality. Thus, even if the concept of evil has the requisite form to be explanatorily useful, it will be of no explanatory use in the real world. My aims in this paper are to assess Cole’s arguments for the claim that there are no (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  16
    The Monster of Supercapitalism.Alex C. Michalos - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S1):37 - 48.
    Among other interesting claims made in Robert Reich's 2007 treatise, Supercapitalism, it is asserted in various ways that proponents of corporate social responsibility (CSR) or what I would call 'business ethics' are engaged in relatively unproductive exercises. Their resources would be better used if they undertook the hard work of engagement in democratic political processes leading to legislation that would force corporations to pursue the public interest as well as their own. In this article, I summarize some of Reich's central (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44.  34
    Normal monsters and monstrous monstrosities: A response to Cary Wolfe.Christopher Peterson - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (2):191 - 196.
    (2013). NORMAL MONSTERS AND MONSTROUS MONSTROSITIES: a response to cary wolfe. Angelaki: Vol. 18, No. 2, pp. 191-196.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  40
    Monsters we met, monsters we made.Karel Kleisner & Marco Stella - 2009 - Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):454-475.
    Creatures living under the rule of domestication form a communicative union based on shared morphological, behavioural, cognitive, and immunologicalresemblances. Domestic animals live under particular conditions that substantially differ from the original (natural) settings of their wild relatives. Here we focus on the fact that many parallel characters have appeared in various domestic forms that had been selected for different purposes. These characters are often unique for domestic animals and do not exist in wild forms. We argue that parallel similarities appear (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. A plea for monsters.Philippe Schlenker - 2002 - Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (1):29-120.
    Kaplan claims in Demonstratives that no operator may manipulate the context of evaluation of natural language indexicals. We show that this is not so. In fact, attitude reports always manipulate a context parameter (or, rather, a context variable). This is shown by (i) the existence of De Se readings of attitude reports in English (which Kaplan has no account for), and (ii) the existence of a variety of indexicals across languages whose point of evaluation can be shifted, but only in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   161 citations  
  47.  21
    Manufacturing Monsters: Dehumanization and Public Policy.David Livingstone Smith - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 263-275.
    In this chapter I explore the phenomenon of dehumanization in relation to public policy. Using two examples of spectacle lynchings of African Americans, I articulate a conception of dehumanization as the attitude of conceiving of others as subhuman creatures and explain the psychological basis for this phenomenon. I suggest that dehumanization is pertinent to policies concerning hate speech. I address objections to my conception of dehumanization: that dehumanizers implicitly or explicitly acknowledge the humanity of their victims and that dehumanizers regard (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  32
    The monster imagined: humanity's recreation of monsters and monstrosity.Laura K. Davis & Cristina Santos (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary.
    A collection of interdisciplinary essays examining how far and to what extent humanity and monstrosity have become intertwined.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  66
    Mother, Monster, Mrs, I: A Critical Evaluation of Gendered Naming Strategies in English Sentencing Remarks of Women Who Kill.Amanda Potts & Siobhan Weare - 2018 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 31 (1):21-52.
    In this article, we take a novel approach to analysing English sentencing remarks in cases of women who kill. We apply computational, quantitative, and qualitative methods from corpus linguistics to analyse recurrent patterns in a collection of English Crown Court sentencing remarks from 2012 to 2015, where a female defendant was convicted of a homicide offence. We detail the ways in which women who kill are referred to by judges in the sentencing remarks, providing frequency information on pronominal, nominative, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  38
    A ‘monster with human visage’: The orangutan, savagery, and the borders of humanity in the global Enlightenment.Silvia Sebastiani - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (4):80-99.
    To what extent did the debate on the orangutan contribute to the global Enlightenment? This article focuses on the first 150 years of the introduction, dissection, and public exposition of the so-called ‘orangutan’ in Europe, between the 1630s, when the first specimens arrived in the Netherlands, and the 1770s, when the British debate about slavery and abolitionism reframed the boundaries between the human and animal kingdoms. Physicians, natural historians, antiquarians, philosophers, geographers, lawyers, and merchants all contributed to the knowledge of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 786