Results for 'multinational companies'

999 found
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  1.  48
    Expanded Ethics: Developing a Macroethical Perspective for Multinational Companies in South Africa.Willem Fourie - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):99.
    In this article, it is argued that multinational companies (MNCs) that operate in South Africa should include a macroethical perspective in their ethical reflection. MNCs in South Africa are subjected to significant societal changes. At the same time, they are in a position to exert their influence in a way that affects more people than simply their shareholders, clients and employees. It is argued that a macroethical perspective can assist MNCs in coming to terms with these changes by (...)
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  2.  33
    Drivers of Change: A Multiple-Case Study on the Process of Institutionalization of Corporate Responsibility Among Three Multinational Companies[REVIEW]Ulf Henning Richter - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):261-279.
    In this multiple-case study, I analyze the perceived importance of seven categories of institutional entrepreneurs (DiMaggio, Institutional patterns and organizations, Ballinger, Cambridge, MA, 1988 ) for the corporate social responsibility discourse of three multinational companies. With this study, I aim to significantly advance the empirical analysis of the CSR discourse for a better understanding of facts and fiction in the process of institutionalization of CSR in MNCs. I conducted 42 semi-structured face-to-face and phone interviews in two rounds with (...)
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  3.  12
    Aggressive Tax Avoidance by Managers of Multinational Companies as a Violation of Their Moral Duty to Obey the Law: A Kantian Rationale.Hansrudi Lenz - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Managers of multinational companies often favour an aggressive tax avoidance strategy that pushes the legal limits onto the advantage of shareholders and the disadvantage of the spirit of democratically legitimized tax laws. The public and media debate whether such aggressive behaviour is immoral. Aggressive tax avoidance is a subset of the aggressive legal interpretations potentially observable in all fields which places little weight on the will of a democratically legitimized legislation. A thorough ethical analysis based on the deontological (...)
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  4.  43
    Are Multinational Companies Responsible for Working Conditions in Their Supply Chains? From Intuition to Argument.Sonja Dänzer - 2011 - Analyse & Kritik 33 (1):175-194.
    Although many people seem to share the intuition that multinational companies carry a responsibility for the working conditions in their supply chains, the justification offered for this assumption is usually rather unclear. This article explores a promising strategy for grounding the relevant intuition and for rendering its content more precise. It applies the criteria of David Miller's connection theory of remedial responsibility to different forms of supply chain governance as characterized by the Global Value Chains framework. The analysis (...)
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  5.  13
    Corporate Philanthropy, Multinational Companies and Controversial Countries.Stephen Brammer, Stephen Pavelin & Lynda Porter - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:64-69.
    This paper investigates the degree to which corporate philanthropy is influenced by the extent to which a firm is internationalised and/or whether it hasoperations in one or more controversial countries. Utilising data on a sample of large UK firms, we find evidence of a positive effect not for internationalisation per se, but only for a presence in these controversial countries. More specifically, we find evidence that in this connection the salient feature of a country is a lack of political rights (...)
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  6. Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility by Multinational Companies in Third World.O. Peter - 2004 - Business and Society 40:214-229.
     
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  7.  47
    Multinational Oil Companies and the Adoption of Sustainable Development: A Resource-Based and Institutional Theory Interpretation of Adoption Heterogeneity.Luis Fernando Escobar & Harrie Vredenburg - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):39-65.
    Sustainable development is often framed as a social issue to which corporations should pay attention because it offers both opportunities and challenges. Through the use of institutional theory and the resource-based view of the firm, we shed some light on why, more than 20 years after sustainable development was first introduced, we see neither the adoption of this business model as dominant nor its converse, that is the total abandonment of the model as unworkable and unprofitable. We focus on (...) corporations (MNCs) because they were among the organizations first called to take action. In order to illustrate the institutional pressures MNCs face and their strategic response to these pressures, we analysed four major oil and gas multinationals subject to similar sustainable development pressures – climate change, biodiversity, renewable energy development and social investment. We argue that normative and coercive isomorphism does not occur at the global level because sustainable development is largely a stakeholder-driven rather than a broad social pressure. That is, host country interpretation of sustainable development pressures varies across an MNC’s subsidiary network. Based on the analysis of the four major MNCs’ annual reports from 2000 to 2005, we argue that mimetic isomorphism may occur, but since it implies the use of complex and intangible resources, mimetic processes are slow, rare and discretionary. (shrink)
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  8.  7
    Strategies for Social and Environmental Disclosure: The Case of Multinational Gambling Companies.Tiffany Cheng-Han Leung & Robin Stanley Snell - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.
    This study investigates how firms in the gambling industry manage their corporate social disclosures about controversial issues. We performed thematic content analysis of CSDs about responsible gambling, money laundering prevention and environmental protection in the annual reports and stand-alone CSR reports of four USA-based multinational gambling firms and their four Macao counterparts. This study draws on impression management theory, camouflage theory and corporate integrity theory to examine the gambling firms’ CSDs. We infer that the CSD strategies of gambling firms (...)
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  9.  2
    Multinational Groups of Companies and Individual Employment Contracts in Spanish and European Private International Law.Paul Volken & Petar Sarcevic - 2009 - In Paul Volken & Petar Sarcevic (eds.), Yearbook of Private International Law: Volume Iv. Sellier de Gruyter.
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  10.  27
    The Impact of the Multinational in the Development: An Ethical Challenge. [REVIEW]J. Félix Lozano & Alejandra Boni - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):169 - 178.
    Multinational enterprises have continued their increase during the last decades. What these companies do and how they do, determines not only the economic development of countries, but also their social and cultural development. This enormous power implies responsibility and new challenges.If we also take into account the role of multinational enterprises in what has been called sustainable development, we see that their importance is still more decisive.
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  11.  44
    Understanding Japanese CSR: The Reflections of Managers in the Field of Global Operations.Kyoko Fukukawa & Yoshiya Teramoto - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):133 - 146.
    This paper examines how Japanese multinational companies manage corporate social responsibility (CSR). It considers how the concept has come to be framed within Japanese business, which is increasingly globalized and internationally focused, yet continues to exhibit strong cultural specificities. The discussion is based on interviews with managers who deal with CSR issues and strategy on a day-to-day basis from 13 multinational companies. In looking at how CSR practice has been adopted and adapted by Japanese corporations, we (...)
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  12.  49
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Societal Governance: Lessons From Transparency in the Oil and Gas Sector. [REVIEW]Jędrzej George Frynas - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (S2):163 - 179.
    This article evaluates the potential of the current Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) agenda for addressing issues related to societal governance. The investigation focuses on the experience of the oil and gas sector, which has been among the leading industry sectors in championing CSR. In particular, the article analyses the issue of revenue transparency, which has been the principal governance challenge addressed by multinational oil and gas companies. The article suggests that (1) tackling governance challenges is crucial to addressing (...)
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  13.  41
    Cannot Manage Without the ‚Significant Other': Mining, Corporate Social Responsibility and Local Communities in Papua New Guinea. [REVIEW]Benedict Young Imbun - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (2):177 - 192.
    The increasing pressure from different facets of society exerted on multinational companies (MNCs) to become more philanthropic and claim ownership of their impacts is now becoming a standard practice. Although research in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has arguably been recent (see subsequent section), the application of activities taking a voluntary form from MNCs seem to vary reflecting a plethora of factors, particularly one obvious being the backwater local communities of developing countries where most of the natural extraction projects (...)
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  14.  47
    Institutional Structure and Firm Social Performance in Transitional Economies: Evidence of Multinational Corporations in China.Justin Tan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (S2):171 - 189.
    With the expansion of multinational corporations (MNCs), the alarming upsurge in widely publicized and notable corporate scandals involving MNCs in emerging markets has begun to draw both academic and managerial attention to look beyond home market practices to the pressing concern of CSR in emerging markets. Previous studies on CSR have focused primarily on Western markets, reserving limited discussions in addressing the issue of MNC attitudes and CSR practices in their emerging host markets abroad. Despite this incongruity in academic (...)
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  15.  46
    The Influence of Internal and External Codes on CSR Practice: The Case of Companies Operating in Serbia. [REVIEW]Ivana S. Mijatovic & Dusan Stokic - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):533 - 552.
    In this article, our aim is to examine the difference between the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practice of the multinational companies (MNCs) and of the domestic companies operating in Serbia, as well as the influence of internal self-regulations such as statements of corporate values and codes of conduct, and external self-regulations such as the implementation of the ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 standards on CSR practice. The CSR practice is observed in five CSR areas: employee relations, customer (...)
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  16. Environmental Costs and Responsibilities Resulting From Oil Exploitation in Developing Countries: The Case of the Niger Delta of Nigeria.Gabriel Eweje - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 69 (1):27-56.
    Interest shown on the environmental impact of operations of multinational enterprises in developing countries has grown significantly recently, and has fuelled a heated public policy debate. In particular, there has been interest in the environmental degradation of host communities and nations resulting from the operations of multinational oil companies in developing countries. This article examines the issue of environmental costs and responsibilities resulting from oil exploitation and production in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. The case study (...)
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  17.  43
    “AIDS is Not a Business”: A Study in Global Corporate Responsibility – Securing Access to Low-Cost HIV Medications.William Flanagan & Gail Whiteman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):65-75.
    At the end of the 1990s, Brazil was faced with a potentially explosive HIV/AIDS epidemic. Through an innovative and multifaceted campaign, and despite initial resistance from multinational pharmaceutical companies, the government of Brazil was able to negotiate price reductions for HIV medications and develop local production capacity, thereby averting a public health disaster. Using interview data and document analysis, the authors show that the exercise of corporate social responsibility can be viewed in practice as a dynamic negotiation and (...)
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  18.  41
    Hazardous Employment and Regulatory Regimes in the South African Mining Industry: Arguments for Corporate Ethics at Workplace.Gabriel Eweje - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):163-183.
    This study examines the ethical position and behaviour of multinational mining companies regarding hazardous employment and health and safety of employees in the South African mining industry. Mining companies have long had a reputation for being unethical on health and safety issues. Too often there are occurrences of fatal accidents, which bring the ethical behaviour of multinational mining companies into question. The litmus test for the mining companies is to devise benchmark standards that will (...)
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  19.  33
    Multinational Corporations and Social Responsibility in Emerging Markets: Opportunities and Challenges for Research and Practice.Justin Tan - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (S2):151 - 153.
    With the expansion of multinational corporations, the alarming upsurge in widely publicized and notable corporate scandals involving MNCs in emerging markets has begun to draw both academic and managerial attention to look beyond home market practices to the pressing concern of CSR in emerging markets. Previous studies on CSR have focused primarily on Western markets, reserving limited discussions in addressing the issue of MNC attitudes and CSR practices in their emerging host markets abroad. Despite this incongruity in academic response (...)
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  20.  7
    Determinants of GHG Reporting: An Analysis of Global Oil and Gas Companies.Breeda Comyns - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):349-369.
    Corporate reporting on climate change is of increasing academic interest but is often considered solely from the firm perspective. This article extends current knowledge by considering how institutional pressures influence the greenhouse gas reporting practices of multinational oil and gas companies. The results show that regulation under the EU emissions trading scheme and reporting according to the global reporting initiative guidelines leads to better quality and more extensive reporting. Although generally adopting proactive climate change strategies, European companies (...)
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  21.  18
    “Teaching the Sushi Chef”: Hybridization Work and CSR Integration in a Japanese Multinational Company.Aurélien Acquier, Valentina Carbone & Valérie Moatti - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (3):625-645.
    While corporate social responsibility is recognized as taking on various national meanings and practices, research has not sufficiently investigated how multinational companies simultaneously achieve global CSR integration and local CSR adaptation. Building on a qualitative case study carried out at ASICS, an MNC headquartered in Japan, we show how this organizational dilemma may be solved through hybridization work, a form of institutional work performed by CSR managers in subsidiaries to combine and adapt different institutional approaches to CSR. By (...)
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  22.  27
    The Process of Embedding Human Rights Within Subsidiaries of a Multinational Corporation.Esther M. J. Schouten - 2009 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 4:35-57.
    Multinational companies (MNCs) can have positive and negative impacts on the human rights situation of a country. More and more MNCs have made a commitment to respect human rights. So far, little research has been done on how MNCs can embed their commitment and which factors determine its success. This paper therefore aims to describe and learn from the process of embedding human rights in six subsidiaries of the multinational oil company Royal Dutch Shell (in short, Shell), (...)
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  23.  5
    The Multinational Corporation as “the Good Despot”: The Democratic Costs of Privatization in Global Settings.Eyal Benvenisti & Doreen Lustig - 2014 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 15 (1):125-158.
    In 1861 John Stuart Mill published Considerations on Representative Government to discuss the justifications for democracy. In the third chapter of this book he explores why a government run by a Good Despot is unacceptable. In this Article we revisit Mill’s critique of the Good Despot to problematize the contemporary exercise of authority and influence by multinational companies, especially in foreign countries. Inspired by Mill, we redefine the problem of privatization. The challenges of privatization are mostly defined by (...)
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  24.  68
    The Multinational Corporation and Global Governance: Modelling Global Public Policy Networks.David Antony Detomasi - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (3):321-334.
    Globalization has increased the economic power of the multinational corporation (MNC), engendering calls for greater corporate social responsibility (CSR) from these companies. However, the current mechanisms of global governance are inadequate to codify and enforce recognized CSR standards. One method by which companies can impact positively on global governance is through the mechanism of Global Public Policy Networks (GPPN). These networks build on the individual strength of MNCs, domestic governments, and non-governmental organizations to create expected standards of (...)
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  25. Multinational Corporations and Local Communities: A Critical Analysis of Conflict.Lisa Calvano - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):793-805.
    As conflict between multinational corporations and local communities escalates, scholars, executives, activists, and community leaders are calling for companies to become more accountable for the impact of their activities on external stakeholders. In order for business to do so, managers must first understand the causes of conflict with local communities, and communities must understand what courses of action are available to challenge activities they deem harmful to their interests. In this article, I present a framework for examining the (...)
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  26.  40
    Sweatshops, Structural Injustice, and the Wrong of Exploitation: Why Multinational Corporations Have Positive Duties to the Global Poor.Brian Berkey - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.
    It is widely thought that firms that employ workers in “sweatshop” conditions wrongfully exploit those workers. This claim has been challenged by those who argue that because companies are not obligated to hire their workers in the first place, employing them cannot be wrong so long as they voluntarily accept their jobs and genuinely benefit from them. In this article, I argue that we can maintain that at least many sweatshop employees are wrongfully exploited, while accepting the plausible claim (...)
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  27.  28
    The OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises.Claes Hägg - 1984 - Journal of Business Ethics 3 (1):71 - 76.
    In July 1976 the OECD adopted voluntary guidelines for multinational enterprises. These guidelines deal, among other things, with transfer pricing and other transactions between companies which belong to the same multinational enterprise. The purpose of the present article is to analyze the OECD Guidelines from the point of view of business ethics. It is shown that inherent in the guidelines is a conflict between different goals. In the latter part of the article it is shown how this (...)
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  28.  13
    Institutional Determinants of Environmental Corporate Social Responsibility: Are Multinational Entities Taking Advantage of Weak Environmental Enforcement in Lower‐Income Nations?Stephen R. Luxmore, Clyde Eirikur Hull & Zhi Tang - 2018 - Business and Society Review 123 (1):151-179.
    Multinational enterprises are often accused of taking advantage of lax environmental regulations in developing countries. However, no quantitative analysis of the impact of doing business in nations of different income levels on environmental corporate social responsibility has been done prior to this study. Incorporating institutional factors in our approach, we argue that endoisomorphic and exoisomorphic pressures relating to ECSR impact MNEs differently according to the MNEs' level of activity in low-, lower-middle-, upper-middle-, and high-income nations. We predict and, using (...)
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  29.  30
    Pharmaceutical Companies and Access to Medicines – Social Integration and Ethical CSR Resolution of a Global Public Choice Problem.Onyeka K. Osuji & Okechukwu Timothy Umahi - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):139-167.
    This article argues that effective corporate social responsibility (CSR) of multinational pharmaceutical companies in developing countries should reflect context, opportunity, proximity, time and impact in accordance with the social integration and ethical approaches to CSR. It proposes a CSR model expressed as CSR=COPTI+SI+E, which acknowledges access-to-medicines as a matter in the global public domain, a public choice problem and a moral responsibility issue for multinational pharmaceutical companies. This model recognises the globalisation of the principle of humanity (...)
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  30.  5
    Why Leading Consumer Product Companies Develop Proactive Chemical Management Strategies.Harry J. Van Buren & Caroline E. Scruggs - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (5):635-675.
    Scholars have studied the various pressures that companies face related to socially responsible behavior when stakeholders know the particular social issues under consideration. Many have examined social responsibility in the context of environmental responsibility and the general approaches companies take regarding environmental management. The issue of currently unregulated, but potentially hazardous, chemicals in consumer products is not well understood by the general public, but a number of proactive consumer product companies have voluntarily adopted strategies to minimize use (...)
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  31.  97
    Business codes of multinational firms: What do they say?Muel Kaptein - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 50 (1):13-31.
    Business codes are an oft-cited management instrument. But how common are codes among multinationals? And what is their content? In an unprecedented study, the codes of the largest corporations in the world have been collected and thoroughly analyzed. This paper presents the results of that study. Of the two hundred largest companies in the world, 52.5% have a code. More than half of these codes describe company responsibilities regarding quality of products and services (67%), adherence to local laws and (...)
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  32.  72
    Managing Global Supply Chain: The Sports Footwear, Apparel and Retail Sectors.Ivanka Mamic - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):81-100.
    Amongst a backdrop of debate regarding Codes of Conduct and their raison d’etre this paper provides a detailed summary of the management systems used by multinational enterprises in the Code implementation process. It puts forth a framework for analysis based on the elements of – the creation of a vision, the development of understanding and ability, integration into operations and feedback, improvement and remediation – and then applies it across the sports footwear, apparel and retail sectors in order to (...)
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  33.  43
    The Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: United States and European Union Multinational Corporations.Laura P. Hartman, Robert S. Rubin & K. Kathy Dhanda - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):373-389.
    This study explores corporate social responsibility (CSR) by conducting a cross-cultural analysis of communication of CSR activities in a total of 16 U.S. and European corporations. Drawing on previous research contrasting two major approaches to CSR initiatives, it was proposed that U.S. companies would tend to communicate about and justify CSR using economic or bottom-line terms and arguments whereas European companies would rely more heavily on language or theories of citizenship, corporate accountability, or moral commitment. Results supported this (...)
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  34.  44
    Political and Economic Arguments for Corporate Social Responsibility: Analysis and a Proposition Regarding the CSR Agenda.Francis Weyzig - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):417-428.
    Different perspectives on corporate social responsibility (CSR) exist, each with their own agenda. Some emphasise management responsibilities towards stakeholders, others argue that companies should actively contribute to social goals, and yet others reject a social responsibility of business beyond legal compliance. In addition, CSR initiatives relate to different issues, such as labour standards and corruption. This article analyses what types of CSR initiatives are supported by political and economic arguments. The distinction between different CSR perspectives and CSR issues on (...)
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  35.  80
    CSR-Based Political Legitimacy Strategy: Managing the State by Doing Good in China and Russia. [REVIEW]Meng Zhao - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (4):439-460.
    The state is a key driver of corporate social responsibility across developed and developing countries. But the existing research provides comparatively little knowledge about: (1) how companies strategically manage the relationship with the state through corporate social responsibility (CSR); (2) how this strategy takes shape under the influence of political institutions. Understanding these questions captures a realistic picture of how a company applies CSR to interacting with the state, particularly in countries where the state relationship is critical to the (...)
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  36.  29
    Multinational Firms’ Leadership Role in Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin America.Gladys Torres-Baumgarten & Veysel Yucetepe - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):217-224.
    This paper explores the commitment to corporate citizenship on the part of the largest U.S.-based multinationals in the emerging market region of Latin America. The websites of the largest U.S.-based firms - according to the 2007 Fortune 500 list - are reviewed and their CSR efforts in Latin America are noted. The firms' positions on corporate citizenship in Latin America are mapped onto a three-by-three matrix in which firms' commitment to corporate citizenship ranges from profitmaking motivations to a more holistic (...)
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  37.  40
    MNC Reporting on CSR and Conflict in Central Africa.Ans Kolk & François Lenfant - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (S2):241 - 255.
    In recent years, corporate social responsibility (CSR) of Multinational Corporations (MNCs) in developing countries has received more attention. However, in this literature, Africa is much less well represented than other regions, and existing studies about Africa have mainly focused on South Africa and Nigeria. This focus has resulted in scant research on other African countries where MNCs are located as well, and where their presence is notable. Settings largely unexplored include conflict-ridden areas in Central Africa where a limited number (...)
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  38.  61
    The Failure of a Socially Responsive Gold Mining MNC in El Salvador: Ramifications of NGO Mistrust.Denis Collins - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S2):245 - 268.
    In July 2008, Pacific Rim Mining, a socially responsive Canadian gold mining Multinational Corporation (MNC) with $77 million invested in El Salvador, experienced a 30% decline in stock price when it suspended exploration drilling for gold there. In April 2009, the company filed a lawsuit against the government of El Salvador through Central American Free Trade Agreement to recover its investments plus damages. This corporate failure is explored based on: (1) four globalization economic development models, (2) the social, political, (...)
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  39.  15
    The Multinational Corporation as a Political Actor: ‘Varieties of Capitalism’ Revisited.David Detomasi - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):685-700.
    This paper argues that the literature examining the role that MNCs play in ‘political CSR’—an emerging area of management research concern—can be enhanced by more a fulsome examination of the ‘varieties of capitalism’ that currently exist in the global economy. We argue that the willingness and capacity of a particular MNC to participate in governance activity—which we broadly equate to political CSR—are contingent, at least in part, upon the national systems of government-business relations present in its home market. We argue (...)
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  40.  30
    An Analysis of U.S. Multinationals' Recruitment Practices in Mexico.Eileen Daspro - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):221 - 232.
    The frequency of discriminatory language in job advertisements placed by U. S. multinational corporations operating in Mexico was compared with that of Mexican companies using content analysis. A sample of 300 ads placed by companies from each culture was analyzed and coded by two groups of coders to calculate the frequency of discriminatory language in the job ads with respect to age, gender, physical appearance and marital status. Results of a chi square analysis revealed that U. S. (...)
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  41.  8
    Multinational Firm Strategy and Global Poverty Alleviation.S. R. Chatterjee - 2009 - Journal of Human Values 15 (2):133-152.
    Bottom of the Pyramid strategies recognize for the first time that global companies can contribute to the alleviation of worldwide poverty by adopting non-traditional and mostly non-Western models of business involvement. It is now widely accepted that poverty and hunger arise not because there are no goods or food, but because billions of people lack income to purchase them. It is also a common belief that the private sector can play a significant role in lifting the poor from the (...)
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  42.  35
    The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Organizational Commitment: Exploring Multiple Mediation Mechanisms. [REVIEW]Omer Farooq, Marielle Payaud, Dwight Merunka & Pierre Valette-Florence - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (4):1-18.
    Unlike previous studies that examine the direct effect of employees’ perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) on affective organizational commitment (AOC), this article examines a mediated link through organizational trust and organizational identification. Social exchange and social identity theory provide the foundation for predictions that the primary outcomes of CSR initiatives are organizational trust and organizational identification, which in turn affect AOC. The test of the research model relies on data collected from 378 employees of local and multinational companies (...)
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  43.  6
    Unpacking Transnational Corporate Responsibility: Coordination Mechanisms and Orientations.Daniel Arenas & Silvia Ayuso - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (3):217-237.
    This article aims to advance the discussion of how multinational companies manage the tension between global integration and local responsiveness in their corporate social responsibility. In particular, it studies the relationships between headquarters and subsidiaries in a transnational CSR strategy and the types of coordination mechanisms used. Building on a qualitative study of a multinational bank, we find that in addition to formal and informal coordination mechanisms, a transnational CSR strategy cannot be fully understood without considering lateral (...)
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  44.  86
    CSR in SMEs: Do SMEs Matter for the CSR Agenda?Mette Morsing & Francesco Perrini - 2009 - Business Ethics 18 (1):1-6.
    In this paper we argue that the collective grandness of small business is often underestimated in CSR research and policy-making. We emphasize the importance of understanding the contexts and the ways in which small- and medium-sized companies engage in CSR and how they differ from multinational companies. We suggest that it might be that researchers and practitioners are asking the wrong questions in their ambitions to prove 'the business case for CSR'. Perhaps we should rather focus on (...)
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  45.  13
    Special Issue: "Business Ethics in a Global Economy".Oliver F. Williams - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (4):755-774.
    The UN Global Compact is a voluntary initiative designed to help fashion a more humane world by enlisting business to follow ten principles concerning human rights, labor, the environment, and corruption. Although the four-year-old Compact is a relatively successful initiative, having signed up over eleven hundred companies and more than two hundred of the large multinationals, and having begun some important projects on globalization issues, there is a serious problem in that very few of the major U.S. companies (...)
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  46.  34
    The UN Global Compact: The Challenge and the Promise.Oliver F. Williams - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (4):755-774.
    The UN Global Compact is a voluntary initiative designed to help fashion a more humane world by enlisting business to follow ten principles concerning human rights, labor, the environment, and corruption. Although the four-year-old Compact is a relatively successful initiative, having signed up over eleven hundred companies and more than two hundred of the large multinationals, and having begun some important projects on globalization issues, there is a serious problem in that very few of the major U.S. companies (...)
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  47.  42
    Sleeping with the Enemy? Strategic Transformations in Business–NGO Relationships Through Stakeholder Dialogue.Jon Burchell & Joanne Cook - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):505-518.
    Campaigning activities of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have increased public awareness and concern regarding the alleged unethical and environmentally damaging practices of many major multinational companies. Companies have responded by developing corporate social responsibility strategies to demonstrate their commitment to both the societies within which they function and to the protection of the natural environment. This has often involved a move towards greater transparency in company practice and a desire to engage with stakeholders, often including many of the (...)
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  48.  64
    Can an Sme Become a Global Corporate Citizen? Evidence From a Case Study.Heidi Weltzien Hoivivonk & Domènec Melé - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S3):551-563.
    Global Corporate Citizenship (GCC) continues to become increasingly popular in large corporations. However, this concept has rarely been considered in small and medium size enterprises (SMEs). A case study of a Norwegian clothing company illustrates how GCC can be also applied to small companies. This case study also shows that SMEs can be very innovative in exercising corporate citizenship, without necessarily following the patterns of large multinational companies. The company studied engages as partner in some voluntary labor (...)
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  49. Giving Voice in a Culture of Silence. From a Culture of Compliance to a Culture of Integrity.Peter Verhezen - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):187 - 206.
    This article argues that attempting to overcome moral silence in organizations will require management to move beyond a compliance-oriented organizational culture toward a culture based on integrity. Such cultural change is part of good corporate governance that aims to steer an organization to enhance creativity and moral excellence, and thus organizational value. Governance mechanisms can be either formal or informal. Formal codes and other internal formal regulations that emphasize compliance are necessary, although informal mechanisms that are based on relationship-building are (...)
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  50.  5
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Worker Rights: Institutionalizing Social Dialogue Through International Framework Agreements.Reynald Bourque, Gregor Murray, Marc-Antonin Hennebert & Christian Lévesque - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (1):215-230.
    International framework agreements represent a new generation of transnational agreements between multinational companies and global trade union federations. This paper analyzes the impact of such an agreement on a successful union organizing campaign in Colombia in 2012. We argue that management strategies towards corporate social responsibility and social dialogue influence the impact of IFAs on worker rights. However, this relationship is mediated by the capacity of managers and worker representatives at multiple levels to mobilize their capabilities. The results (...)
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