Results for 'neuroaesthetics'

32 found
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  1. Neuroaesthetics and Beyond: New Horizons in Applying the Science of the Brain to the Art of Dance. [REVIEW]Emily Cross & Luca Ticini - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):5-16.
    Throughout history, dance has maintained a critical presence across all human cultures, defying barriers of class, race, and status. How dance has synergistically co-evolved with humans has fueled a rich debate on the function of art and the essence of aesthetic experience, engaging numerous artists, historians, philosophers, and scientists. While dance shares many features with other art forms, one attribute unique to dance is that it is most commonly expressed with the human body. Because of this, social scientists and neuroscientists (...)
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  2.  41
    Feeling, Meaning, and Intentionality—a Critique of the Neuroaesthetics of Beauty.Peer F. Bundgaard - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):781-801.
    This article addresses the phenomenology of aesthetic experience. It first, critically, considers one of the most influential approaches to the psychophysics of aesthetic perception, viz. neuroaesthetics. Hereafter, it outlines constitutive tenets of aesthetic perception in terms of a particular intentional relation to the object. The argument comes in three steps. First, I show the inadequacies of the neuroaesthetics of beauty in general and Semir Zeki’s and V.J. Ramachandran’s versions of it in particular. The neuroaesthetics of beauty falls (...)
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  3.  26
    Phenomenology and Neuroaesthetics.Elio Franzini - 2015 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):135-145.
    Phenomenology is not the simple description of a fact, but rather the description of an intentional immanent moment, and it presents itself as a science of essences, and not of matter of facts. The Leib, the lived body of the phenomenological tradition, is not a generic corporeal reality, but rather an intentional subject, a transcendental reference point, on the base of which the connections between physical body and psychic body should be grasped. So, the reduction of empathy to mirror neurons (...)
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  4.  17
    Philip Ball on Neuroaesthetics.Simon van Rysewyk - 2013
  5.  11
    Neuroaesthetics’, Gombrich, and Depiction.Patrick Maynard - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):191-201.
    For philosophical readers, a review of biology Nobel laureate Eric R. Kandel’s Age of Insight historical thesis, that today’s ‘neuroaesthetics’ is a continuation of Vienna’s great contributions to modernism from 1900 on, becomes a ‘critical study’, by closely examining Kandel’s valuable account of E.H. Gombrich’s psychology, then, broadly, his own case for the validity of ‘neuroaesthetics’. The article much credits Kandel for recognising and explaining—unlike most philosophers, with their epistemological and metaphysical perspectives—why Gombrich’s Art and Illusion is subtitled (...)
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  6.  47
    Art, the Brain, and Family Resemblances: Some Considerations on Neuroaesthetics.Marcello Frixione - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (5):699 - 715.
    The project of neuroaesthetics could be interpreted as an attempt to identify a ?neural essence? of art, i.e., a set of necessary and sufficient conditions formulated in the language of neuroscience, which define the concept art . Some proposals developed within this field can be read in this way. I shall argue that such attempts do not succeed in individuating a neural definition of art. Of course, the fact that the proposals available for defining art in neural terms do (...)
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  7.  36
    Neuroaesthetics.Anjan Chatterjee & Oshin Vartanian - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (7):370-375.
  8.  3
    Crossing Boundaries: Toward a General Model of Neuroaesthetics.Manuela M. Marin - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  9.  2
    The Neuroaesthetics of Prose Fiction: Pitfalls, Parameters and Prospects.Michael Burke - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  10.  97
    Neuroaesthetics.D. Keller - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):125-129.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  11.  41
    Neuroaesthetics Edited by Skov, Martin and Oshin Vartanian.Vincent Bergeron - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):191-192.
  12.  11
    Neuroaesthetics: Range and Restrictions.Anjan Chatterjee - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):137-138.
    Bullot & Reber (B&R) should be commended for highlighting tensions between scientific aesthetics and art history. The question of how each tradition can learn from the other is timely. While I am sympathetic to their views, their diagnosis of the problem appears exaggerated and their solution partial. They underestimate the reach of scientific aesthetics while failing to identify its inherent restrictions.
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  13. Conceptual Art Made Simple for Neuroaesthetics.Alexander Kranjec - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  14.  68
    Art as a Metaphor of the Mind.Andrea Lavazza - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):159-182.
    This paper focuses on the emergent neo-Jamesian perspective concerning the phenomenology of art and aesthetic experience. Starting from the distinction between nucleus and fringe in the stream of thought described by William James, it can be argued that our appreciation of a work of art is guided by a vague and blurred perception of a much more powerful content, of which we are not fully aware. Accordingly, a work of art is seen as a kind of metaphor of our mental (...)
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  15.  33
    “Aesthetic Primitives”: Fundamental Biological Elements of a Naturalistic Aesthetics.Ellen Dissanayake - 2015 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 8 (1):6-24.
    Aesthetics, like other philosophical subjects, has historically made use of «top down» methods. Recent discoveries in genetics, evolutionary psychology, paleoarchaeology, and neuroscience call for a new «naturalistic» or «bottom up» perspective. Combining these fields with behavioral biology and ethnoarts studies, I offer seven premises that underlie a new understanding of evolved predispositions of the brain/mind that all artists use to attract attention, sustain interest, and create, mold, and shape emotion. I describe aesthetic «primitives» in somatic and behavioral modalities, suggesting that (...)
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  16. Experimental Philosophy of Aesthetics.Florian Cova, Amanda Garcia & Shen-yi Liao - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (12):927-939.
    In the past decade, experimental philosophy---the attempt at making progress on philosophical problems using empirical methods---has thrived in a wide range of domains. However, only in recent years has aesthetics succeeded in drawing the attention of experimental philosophers. The present paper constitutes the first survey of these works and of the nascent field of 'experimental philosophy of aesthetics'. We present both recent experimental works by philosophers on topics such as the ontology of aesthetics, aesthetic epistemology, aesthetic concepts, and imagination, as (...)
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  17. The Aesthetic Stance - on the Conditions and Consequences of Becoming a Beholder.Maria Brincker - 2015 - In Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Springer. pp. 117-138.
    What does it mean to be an aesthetic beholder? Is it different than simply being a perceiver? Most theories of aesthetic perception focus on 1) features of the perceived object and its presentation or 2) on psychological evaluative or emotional responses and intentions of perceiver and artist. In this chapter I propose that we need to look at the process of engaged perception itself, and further that this temporal process of be- coming a beholder must be understood in its embodied, (...)
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  18. Mental Imagery, Emotion, and Literary Task Sets Clues Towards a Literary Neuroart.Federico Langer - 2012 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (7-8):168-215.
  19.  84
    Memories of Art.William Hirstein - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):146 - 147.
    Although the art-historical context of a work of art is important to our appreciation of it, it is our knowledge of that history that plays causal roles in producing the experience itself. This knowledge is in the form of memories, both semantic memories about the historical circumstances, but also episodic memories concerning our personal connections with an artwork. We also create representations of minds in order to understand the emotions that artworks express.
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  20.  3
    CHATTERJEE, ANJAN. The Aesthetic Brain: How We Evolved to Desire Beauty and Enjoy Art. Oxford University Press, 2013, Xxiii + 217 Pp., $36.95 Cloth. [REVIEW]William P. Seeley - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (4):430-432.
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  21.  19
    Neuromania: On the Limits of Brain Science.Paolo Legrenzi & Carlo Umilta - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Neuroeconomics, neuromarketing, neuroaesthetics, and neurotheology are just a few of the novel disciplines that have been inspired by a combination of ancient knowledge along with recent discoveries about how the human brain works.This fascinating and thought provoking new book critically questions our love affair with brain imaging.
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  22.  26
    Towards a Sensorimotor Aesthetics of Performing Art.B. Calvomerino, C. Jola, D. Glaser & P. Haggard - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):911-922.
    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of (...)
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  23. Art and Neuroscience.John Hyman - unknown
    1. I want to discuss a new area of scientific research called neuro-aesthetics, which is the study of art by neuroscientists. The most prominent champions of neuroaesthetics are V.S. Ramachandran and Semir Zeki, both of whom have both made ambitious claims about their work. Ramachandran says boldly that he has discovered “the key to understanding what art really is”, and that his theory of art can be tested by brain imaging experiments, although he does not describe these experiments, or (...)
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  24.  19
    Neural Concept Formation & Art Dante, Michelangelo, Wagner Something, and Indeed the Ultimate Thing, Must Be Left Over for the Mind to Do.Semir Zeki - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (3):53-76.
    What is art? What constitutes great art? Why do we value art so much and why has it been such a conspicuous feature of all human societies? These questions have been discussed at length though without satisfactory resolution. This is not surprising. Such discussions are usually held without reference to the brain, through which all art is conceived, executed and appreciated. Art has a biological basis. It is a human activity and, like all human activities, including morality, law and religion, (...)
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  25.  6
    Psychological and Neural Responses to Art Embody Viewer and Artwork Histories.Oshin Vartanian & James C. Kaufman - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):161-162.
    The research programs of empirical aesthetics and neuroaesthetics have reflected deep concerns about viewers' sensitivities to artworks' historical contexts by investigating the impact of two factors on art perception: viewers' developmental (and educational) histories and the contextual histories of artworks. These considerations are consistent with data demonstrating that art perception is underwritten by dynamically reconfigured and evolutionarily adapted neural and psychological mechanisms.
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  26.  6
    Another Darwinian Aesthetics.Catherine Wilson - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):237-252.
    I offer a Darwinian perspective on the existence of aesthetic interests, tastes, preferences, and productions. It is distinguished from the approaches of Denis Dutton and Geoffrey Miller, drawing instead on Richard O. Prum's notion of biotic artworlds. The relevance of neuroaesthetics to the philosophy of art is defended.
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  27.  16
    The Doors of Perception and the Artist Within.Catherine Wilson - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):1-20.
    This paper discusses the significance for the philosophy of perception and aesthetics of certain productions of the ‘offline brain’. These are experienced in hypnagogic and other trance states, and in disease- or drug-induced hallucination. They bear a similarity to other visual patterns in nature, and reappear in human artistry, especially of the craft type. The reasons behind these resonances are explored, along with the question why we are disposed to find geometrical complexity and ‘supercolouration’ beautiful. The paper concludes with a (...)
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  28.  21
    Empirical Psycho-Aesthetics and Her Sisters: Substantive and Methodological Issues—Part II.Vladimir J. Konečni - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (1):1-21.
    Several key substantive, methodological, and science-practice issues that concern the field designated as empirical psycho-aesthetics were examined in part I (in the Winter 2012 issue of JAE) of this two-part article. Also presented was an outline of the discipline's origin and its relationship with elder and younger "sisters"—philosophical aesthetics, experimental philosophy, cognitive-science-and-art, (cognitive) neuroscience of art, and neuroaesthetics. The comparative goal was in part approached through the analysis of several recent significant controversies and debates.Here, in the six sections of (...)
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  29.  26
    Looking for Beauty in the Brain.Ethan Weed - 2008 - Estetika 45 (1):5-23.
    The emerging research area of neuroaesthetics has provoked a good deal of discussion. Although it seems reasonable to describe the experience of aesthetic enjoyment as a mental event, and it also seems reasonable to claim that mental states must be related to brain states, the search for specific brain states that correlate with aesthetic enjoyment is tricky, despite the many recent advances in brain-imaging technology. Correlating the aesthetic experience with specific brain states involves defining the aesthetic experience. By applying (...)
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  30.  17
    Empirical Psycho-Aesthetics and Her Sisters: Substantive and Methodological Issues—Part I.Vladimir J. Konečni - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (4):1-12.
    This article is in two parts, with part II to appear in the next issue of JAE (Spring 2013). Part I (with six sections), in this issue, has two related objectives. The first objective is to examine a number of key substantive, methodological, and science-practice issues related to the field designated here as empirical psycho-aesthetics. The second objective is to present an outline of its origin and discuss certain important features of several related fields—experimental philosophy, cognitive-science-and-art, (cognitive) neuroscience of art, (...)
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  31.  5
    The Butcher, the Baker, and the Candlestick Maker: John Dewey’s Philosophy of Art Experience Saving Twenty-First-Century Art Education From Limbo.Anne G. Jones & Michael T. Risku - 2015 - Education and Culture 31 (1):77-87.
    Researchers in the areas of prehistoric art, anthropology of art, psychology, philosophy, feminist art theory, histories of visual arts education, and the emerging field of neuroaesthetics have created new interest within education in the writings of John Dewey related to art and experiential learning as found in Art as Experience and Experience and Nature. Thus, another look at Dewey’s life experience and his philosophy of experiential art may bring renewed support for visual arts education in the twenty-first century. Dewey (...)
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  32. Neuromania: On the Limits of Brain Science.Frances Anderson (ed.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Neuroeconomics, neuromarketing, neuroaesthetics, and neurotheology are just a few of the novel disciplines that have been inspired by a combination of ancient knowledge along with recent discoveries about how the human brain works.This fascinating and thought provoking new book critically questions our love affair with brain imaging.
     
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