Results for 'nitre'

7 found
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  1.  29
    Springs, Nitre, and Conatus. The Role of the Heart in Hobbes's Physiology and Animal Locomotion.Rodolfo Garau - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):231-256.
    This paper focuses on an understudied aspect of Hobbes's natural philosophy: his approach to the domain of life. I concentrate on the role assigned by Hobbes to the heart, which occupies a central role in both his account of human physiology and of the origin of animal locomotion. With this, I have three goals in mind. First, I aim to offer a cross-section of Hobbes's effort to provide a mechanistic picture of human life. Second, I aim to contextualize Hobbes's views (...)
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  2.  1
    The Poets' Nitre.Henry Guerlac - 1954 - Isis 45 (3):243-255.
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    On “Nitre” and “Natron”.F. W. Gibbs - 1938 - Annals of Science 3 (2):213-216.
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  4. The Poets' Nitre.Henry Guerlac - 1954 - Isis 45:243-255.
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  5.  5
    Boyle, Spinoza and Glauber: On the Philosophical Redintegration of Saltpeter—a Reply to Antonio Clericuzio.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2020 - Foundations of Chemistry 22 (1):59-76.
    The so-called ‘redintegration experiment’ is traditionally at the center of the comments on the supposed Boyle/Spinoza controversy. A. Clericuzio influentially argued in his publications that, in De nitro, Boyle accounted for the ‘redintegration’ of saltpeter on the grounds of the chemical properties of corpuscles and “did not make any attempt to deduce them from mechanical principles”. By way of contrast, this paper argues that with his De nitro Boyle wanted to illustrate and promote his new corpuscular or mechanical philosophy, and (...)
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    La lixiviación cultural del hombre y el desierto (1830-1930): la transformación del desierto en pampa y del enganchado en pampino. [REVIEW]Sergio González Miranda - 2004 - Polis: Revista Latinoamericana 9.
    Se explora en este artículo cómo el hombre del desierto sufre un proceso de disolución de su cultura de origen ‘lixiviación cultural’-, emergiendo desde su interior un habla, una organización, un habitar y un laborar, que bajo el sol cristaliza una nueva identidad: el ser pampino. Como el salitre que recorrió el mundo fertilizando territorios cansados, también la fama del pampino recorrió el mundo; con su solidaridad, su sacrificio y su organización fue ejemplo para otros obreros del país y del (...)
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  7.  4
    John Flamsteed's Letter Concerning the Natural Causes of Earthquakes.Frances Willmoth - 1987 - Annals of Science 44 (1):23-70.
    A letter in which astronomer John Flamsteed expounded his unusual views about the causes of earthquakes survives in a number of drafts and copies. Though it was compiled in response to shocks felt in England in 1692 and Sicily in 1693, its relationship to the wide range of comparable theories current in the later seventeenth century must be considered. Flamsteed's suggestion that an ‘earthquake’ might be an explosion in the air was linked with contemporary thinking about the roles of sulphur (...)
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