Results for 'no-self'

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  1. The No Self View and the Meaning of Life.Baptiste Le Bihan - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (2):419-438.
    Several philosophers, both in Buddhist and Western philosophy, claim that the self does not exist. The no-self view may, at first glance, appear to be a reason to believe that life is meaningless. In the present article, I argue indirectly in favor of the no-self view by showing that it does not entail that life is meaningless. I then examine Buddhism and argue, further, that the no-self view may even be construed as partially grounding an account (...)
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  2. The no-self theory: Hume, Buddhism, and personal identity.James Giles - 1993 - Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, (...)
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  3. No Self and the Phenomenology of Agency.Monima Chadha - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):187-205.
    The Buddhists philosophers put forward a revisionary metaphysics which lacks a “self” in order to provide an intellectually and morally preferred picture of the world. The first task in the paper is to answer the question: what is the “self” that the Buddhists are denying? To answer this question, I look at the Abhidharma arguments for the No-Self doctrine and then work back to an interpretation of the self that is the target of such a doctrine. (...)
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  4.  73
    Buddhism and no-Self Theory: Examining the Relation between Human Actions and Moral Responsibility.Nishant Kumar & Satya Sundar Sethy - 2021 - Philosophia 10 (1).
    Buddhists endorse the concept of human actions and their consequences as they uphold the doctrine of karma. However, they deny the existence of a ‘permanent self’. Few questions arise in this regard. If a permanent self does not exist then who guides a person to decide the course of an action? How does a person choose to perform an action of the many alternatives in a situation? Who takes responsibility for the consequences of an action? This paper attempts (...)
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  5.  69
    No‐self and compassion: Nietzsche and Buddhism.Christopher Janaway - 2023 - European Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):950-966.
    The article examines two claims made by Antoine Panaïoti: (1) That both Nietzsche and Buddhists denounce the self as a misleading fiction. (2) That Buddhist compassion is close to a “compassion of strength” that Nietzsche approves. This article agrees with (1) and disagrees with (2). The descriptive metaphysical commitments of Nietzsche and Buddhism are subordinate to their divergent normative projects. Both reject a single, enduring, and independent self; but where Mahāyāna Buddhism advocates care or compassion toward all sentient (...)
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  6.  21
    Buddhist No-Self Reductionism, Moral Address, and the Metaphysics of Moral Practice.Michael Joseph Fletcher - 2023 - International Philosophical Quarterly 63 (2):171-190.
    In this paper, I argue that, on a reductionist reading of Buddhist no-self ontology, Buddhists could not have sincere ethical intentions toward persons. And if Buddhists cannot have sincere intentions toward persons, they cannot have second-personal moral reasons for acting. From this I conclude that Buddhists fail to qualify as genuine members of the moral community if, as some contemporary Anglo-American moral philosophers argue, such membership depends on an individual agent’s having the capacity to be motivated by second-personal moral (...)
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  7. Self, no self?: perspectives from analytical, phenomenological, and Indian traditions.Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson & Dan Zahavi (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    It is time to bring the rich resources of these traditions into the contemporary debate about the nature of self. This volume is the first of its kind.
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  8. No-Self and the Phenomenology of Ownership.Monima Chadha - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):14-27.
    The Abhidharma Buddhist revisionary metaphysics aims to provide an intellectually and morally preferred picture of the world that lacks a self. The first part of the paper claims that the Abhidharma ‘no-self’ view can be plausibly interpreted as a no-ownership view, according to which there is no locus or subject of experience and thus no owner of mental or bodily awarenesses. On this interpretation of the no-self view, the Abhidharma Buddhist metaphysicians are committed to denying the ownership (...)
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  9. The no-self alternative.Thomas Metzinger - 2011 - In Shaun Gallagher (ed.), The Oxford handbook of the self. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This article explores the ‘no-self alternative’ in the debate on the metaphysical and phenomenological concept of the self. It suggests that the no-self alternative may not be an alternative at all and it could simply be the default assumption for all rational approaches to self-consciousness and subjectivity. It outlines several different anti-realist arguments about the self and explains why the idea that there are no selves is counter-intuitive. It shows why the intuitions of phenomenology are (...)
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  10. No Self to be Found: The Search for Personal Identity.James Giles - 1997 - University Press of America.
    This book is a exploration of the notion of personal identity. Here it is shown how the various attempts to give an account of personal identity are all based on false assumptions and so inevitably run aground. One of the first Western thinkers to realize this was David Hume, the 18th century empiricist philosopher who argued that self was a fiction. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a (...)
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  11.  21
    No-Self, Natural Sustainability and Education for Sustainable Development.Chia-Ling Wang - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (5):550-561.
    This article explores the significance of sustainability and several ways in which education for sustainable development can be considered. It presents several issues related to the theories of sustainability and ESD, which are generated based on a firm concept of anthropocentrism. ESD has been used for developing a scientific understanding of the world and is expected to effectively address the environmental damage facing humans. However, this is a narrow view of sustainability, through which learners do not gain an authentic understanding (...)
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  12.  31
    No-Self in Sāṃkhya: A Comparative Look at Classical Sāṃkhya and Theravāda Buddhism.Douglas Osto - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 68 (1):201-222.
    In a number of standard introductory textbooks on Indian philosophy, classical Sāṃkhya is described as a Hindu philosophical school based on a fundamental dualism between a plurality of selves, or spirits and the material, or phenomenal world, whereas Buddhism, on the other hand, is most often described as a system based on the radically different position of "no-self" or selflessness.1 However, such depictions, although not entirely inaccurate, often obscure strong structural homologies between the two systems, which highlight the fundamental (...)
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  13.  17
    Consciousness and the Self, No Self Disagreement.David H. Lund - 2024 - Idealistic Studies 54 (1):49-69.
    My primary aim in this paper is to show that the structure of experience must include a subject (or self). I argue that the subjectless (No-Self) views of our experience must be rejected, primarily because without the consciousness-unifying function of a subject they are unable to account for the unities of consciousness present in our experience. In addition, I contend that such views fail in another respect. They emphasize the streaming of experience, the ever-changing flow of conscious events, (...)
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  14.  11
    Self or no-self?: the debate about selflessness and the sense of self: Claremont Studies in the Philosophy of Religion, Conference 2015.Ingolf U. Dalferth & Trevor W. Kimball (eds.) - 2017 - Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck.
    Religious, philosophical, and theological views on the self vary widely. For some the self is seen as the center of human personhood, the ultimate bearer of personal identity and the core mystery of human existence. For others the self is a grammatical error and the sense of self an existential and epistemic delusion. In Western psychology, philosophy, and theology, the term 'self' is often used as a noun that refers not to the performance of an (...)
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  15. Insight Knowledge of No Self in Buddhism: An Epistemic Analysis.Miri Albahari - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    Imagine a character, Mary Analogue, who has a complete theoretical knowledge of her subject matter: the illusory nature of self. Suppose that when presenting her paper on no self at a conference she suffers stage-fright – a reaction that implies she is under an illusion of the very self whose existence she denies. Might there be something defective about her knowledge of no self? The Buddhist tradition would claim that Mary Analogue, despite her theoretical omniscience, lacks (...)
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  16.  79
    Phenomenology and the Impersonal Subject: Between Self and No-Self.David W. Johnson - 2023 - Philosophy East and West 73 (2):286-306.
    This paper attempts to reconcile two ideas that seem fundamentally opposed to one another: the reality of the self and the doctrine of no-self. Buddhism offers a form of spiritual equanimity that turns on the denial of a self. Nonetheless, there seem to be good reasons to hold onto the reality of the self. The existence of a self enables us to account for praise and blame, the hopes for oneself that motivate actions, and attachments (...)
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  17. Is No-Self a Pathology?Georges B. J. Dreyfus - 2019 - In Matthew Kapstein, Daniel Anderson Arnold, Cécile Ducher & Pierre-Julien Harter (eds.), Reasons and lives in Buddhist traditions: studies in honor of Matthew Kapstein. Somerville, MA: Wisdom Publications.
     
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  18.  9
    No self, no problem: awakening to our true nature.Anam Thubten - 2009 - Boston, Massachusetts: Shambhala. Edited by Sharon Roe.
    An accessible introduction to the profound experience of enlightenment—with instructions on how to wake up to, and feel confident about, our true nature We can realize the highest truth in each moment when we learn to see through the illusion of the self. Anam Thubten, in remarkably easy-to-understand language, provides teachings for doing exactly that, based on the wisdom of the Buddhist traditions. He illuminates the path of going beyond the misconceptions of the ego to experience the reality of (...)
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  19.  26
    Normative Error Theory and No Self-Defeat: A Reply to Case.Mustafa Khuramy & Erik Schulz - 2024 - Philosophia 52 (1):135-140.
    Many philosophers have claimed that normative error theorists are committed to the claim ‘Error theory is true, but I have no reason to believe it’, which to some appears paradoxical. Case (2019) has claimed that the normative error theorist cannot avoid this paradox. In this paper, we argue that there is no paradox in the first place, that is once we clear up the ambiguity of the word ‘reason’, both on the error theorist’s side and those that claim that there (...)
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  20.  94
    Consciousness and no self?Sebastian Watzl - 2018 - Ratio 31 (4):363-375.
    Phenomenal consciousness, what it is like for each particular subject, seems to be at the heart of subjectivity and the primary home of the self. But is there in fact a role for the self in phenomenal consciousness? According to the phenomenal no‐self challenge, reflection on the character of phenomenal consciousness reveals no self and no subjectivity. I articulate an argument for this challenge based on the transparency of conscious experience. I then respond to this argument (...)
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  21.  86
    Conceptions of self/no‐self and modes of connection comparative soteriological structures in classical chinese thought.Mark A. Berkson - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):293-331.
    This essay examines the ways that the terms "self and "no-self can illuminate the views of classical Chinese thinkers, particularly Confucians such as Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi, and the Daoist thinker Zhuangzi. In particular, the use of the term "no-self" to describe Zhuangzi's position is defended. The concepts of self and no-self are analyzed in relation to other terms within the thinkers' "concept clusters" - specifically temporality, nature, and social roles - and suggestions are given (...)
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  22. A Mindful Bypassing: Mindfulness, Trauma and the Buddhist Theory of No-Self.Julien Tempone-Wiltshire & Traill Dowie - 2024 - Journal of the Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies 23 (1):149-174.
    This article examines the Buddhist idea of anātman, ‘no- self ’ and pudgala, ‘the person’ in relation to the notion of ‘self ’ emerging from contemporary cognitive science. The Buddhist no-self doctrine is enriched by the cognitive scientist’s understanding of the multiple facets of selfhood, or structures of experience, and the causative action of a functional self in the world. A proper understanding of the Buddhist concepts of anātman and pudgala proves critical to mindfulness-based therapeutic interventions: (...)
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  23. Insight and the no‐self in deep brain stimulation.Laura Specker Sullivan - 2018 - Bioethics 33 (4):487-494.
    Ethical analyses of the effects of neural interventions commonly focus on changes to personality and behavior, interpreting these changes in terms of authenticity and identity. These phenomena have led to debate among ethicists about the meaning of these terms for ethical analysis of such interventions. While these theoretical approaches have different criteria for ethical significance, they agree that patients’ reports are concerning because a sense of self is valuable. In this paper, I question this assumption. I propose that the (...)
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  24.  41
    No-Self, Dōgen, the Senika Doctrine, and Western Views of Soul.Gerhard Faden - 2011 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 31:41-54.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:No-Self, Dōgen, the Senika Doctrine, and Western Views of SoulGerhard FadenNo-Self Versus SoulFrom the very beginning of Buddhism, the concept of no-self (P. anattā, J. muga) has been at the heart of Buddhist thought. Based on this concept, Buddhist apologetics rejected the concept of Atman in the Upanishads as well as Western concepts of soul. Christian authors, on the other hand, see an unbridgeable abyss between (...)
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  25. Self-No-Self? Memory and Reflexive Awareness.Evan Thompson - 2011 - In Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson & Dan Zahavi (eds.), Self, no self?: perspectives from analytical, phenomenological, and Indian traditions. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  26. Buddhist Hard Determinism: No Self, No Free Will, No Responsibility.Rick Repetti - 2012 - Journal of Buddhist Ethics 19:130-197.
    A critical review of Charles Goodman's view about Buddhism and free will to the effect that Buddhism is hard determinist, basically because he thinks Buddhist causation is definitively deterministic, and he thinks determinism is definitively incompatible with free will, but especially because he thinks Buddhism is equally definitively clear on the non-existence of a self, from which he concludes there cannot be an autonomous self.
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  27.  20
    No Morality, No Self: Anscombe’s Radical Skepticism.James Doyle - 2017 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
    It is becoming increasingly apparent that Elizabeth Anscombe, long known as a student, friend and translator of Wittgenstein, was herself one of the most important philosophers of the twentieth century. No Morality, No Self examines her two best-known papers, in which she advanced her most amazing theses. In 'Modern Moral Philosophy', she claimed that the term moral, understood as picking out a special, sui generis category, is literally senseless and should therefore be abandoned. In 'The First Person', she maintained (...)
  28.  59
    Studies in No-Self Physicalism.Feng Ye - 2023 - Springer Nature Singapore.
    This book demonstrates how a radical version of physicalism (‘No-Self Physicalism’) can offer an internally coherent and comprehensive philosophical worldview. It first argues that a coherent physicalist should explicitly treat a cognitive subject merely as a physical thing and should not vaguely assume an amorphous or even soul-like subject or self. This approach forces the physicalist to re-examine traditional core philosophical notions such as truth, analyticity, modality, apriority because our traditional understandings of them appear to be predicated on (...)
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  29.  40
    Self, No Self? Perspectives from Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions. Edited by Mark Siderits, Evan Thompson, and Dan Zahavi.John Spackman - 2016 - Mind 125 (499):923-927.
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  30.  69
    No Self?: Some Reflections on Buddhist Theories of Personal Identity.Anthony Rudd - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (3):869-891.
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  31.  10
    Self and No-Self: Continuing the Dialogue Between Buddhism and Psychotherapy.Dale Mathers, Melvin E. Miller & Osamu Ando (eds.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    This collection explores the growing interface between Eastern and Western concepts of what it is to be human from analytical psychology, psychoanalytic and Buddhist perspectives. The relationship between these different approaches has been discussed for decades, with each discipline inviting its followers to explore the depths of the psyche and confront the sometimes difficult psychological experiences that can emerge during any in-depth exploration of mental processes. _Self and No-Self_ considers topics discussed at the Self and No-Self conference in (...)
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  32. Relevance of the no-self theory in contemporary mindfulness.James Giles - 2019 - Current Opinion in Psychology 28:298-301.
    The ideas of mindfulness and no-self are intimately connected in Buddhist philosophy. This is because, in Buddhist Philosophy, the practice of mindfulness leads to the realization that there is no self. In contemporary mindfulness in psychology, the no-self theory has not played such a basic role. An outline of Buddhist philosophy is given showing how the ‘root delusion’ of having a self lies at the base of human suffering and how mindfulness, when appropriately deployed, enables one (...)
     
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  33. No Self?: A Look at a Buddhist Argument.William F. Vallicella - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (4):453-466.
    Central to Buddhist thought and practice is the anattā doctrine. In its unrestricted form the doctrine amounts to the claim that nothing at all possesses self-nature. This article examines an early Buddhist argument for the doctrine. The argument, roughly, is that (i) if anything were a self, it would be both unchanging and self-determining; (ii) nothing has both of these properties; therefore, (iii) nothing is a self. The thesis of this article is that, despite the appearance (...)
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  34.  5
    No “Self” Advantage for Audiovisual Speech Aftereffects.Maria Modelska, Marie Pourquié & Martijn Baart - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  35.  23
    No Self to be Found: The Search for Personal Identity.James Giles - 1997 - The Personalist Forum 13 (2):321-325.
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  36.  36
    No‐self, real self, ignorance and self‐deception: Does self‐deception require a self?Michael P. Levine - 1998 - Asian Philosophy 8 (2):103 – 110.
    In this paper I dispute Eliot Deutsch's claim [See Deutsch, Eliot (1996) Self-deception: a comparative study, in: Roger T. Ames and Wimal Dissanayake (Eds) Self and Deception: a cross-cultural enquiry (Albany, State University of New York Press), pp. 315-326] that examining self-deception from the perspective of non-Western traditions (i.e. how it is understood in those cultures) can help us to better understand the nature of the phenomenon in one's own culture. Although the claim appears to be uncontrover-sial (...)
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  37. Self, No Self? Perspectives from Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions.Jan Westerhoff - 2012 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):812-815.
    Amongst its many other merits this collection of essays demonstrates the growing maturity of the study of the Indian philosophical tradition. Much of the good scholarship done on non-Western, and in particular on Indian philosophy over the last decades has attempted to show that these texts hailing from east of Suez contain interesting and sophisticated discussions in their own right, discussions that have to be understood against the Ancient Indian intellectual and cultural context rather than evaluated by how closely they (...)
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  38.  13
    Is Perspectival Self-Consciousness Non-Conceptual&quest.Alva NoË - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (207):185-194.
  39.  19
    Self and No-Self in Kant and Pali-Buddhism.Katrin Flikschuh - 2022 - Journal of Social and Political Philosophy 1 (2):186-199.
    This paper compares the Pali-Buddhist conception of the self outlined in Jonardon Ganeri’s Attention, Not Self with a Kantian understanding of the self as a form of reflexive consciousness. Noting that both reject conceptions of the self as ‘inner agent’, the paper points to significant differences between them via a consideration of popular ‘mindfulness practice’ that teaches practitioners how to achieve emotional detachment from the contents of consciousness. It questions the possibility and desirability of focus on (...)
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  40.  9
    No Self.Stefan Anacker - 1999 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 32:85-95.
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  41. Buddhist philosophy and the no-Self view.Jiri Benovsky - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):545-553.
    A widespread interpretation of Buddhist thought concerning the self makes a prominent place for the claim that there is no self. The idea is that this piece of Buddhist philosophy is best understood as being an eliminativist view about the self, sometimes called the "no-self view" or "non-self view". This claim is motivated, in Buddhist philosophy, by the idea that if there were a self, it would have to be a permanent entity that would (...)
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  42.  77
    Mudanças no self de carreira em estudantes universitários.Ana Daniela Silva, M. C. Taveira & Eugénia Ribeiro - 2009 - Paideia (Misc) 19 (44):283-292.
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  43.  25
    Buddhist No-Self, the Person Convention, and the Metaphysics of Moral Practice: Is Hayashi's Emergentist Account of Vasubandhu's Ontology of Persons Explanatorily Self-Defeating?Michael Joseph Fletcher - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (2):303-337.
    Post-millennial scholarship in Buddhist studies reflects increasing interest from Anglophone philosophers working within the analytic tradition.1 Within this emerging body of work the aim has been not merely to bring the conceptual toolkit of analytic philosophers to bear on topics traditionally of interest to Buddhist philosophers but also to enlist the theories that analytic philosophers have developed on core topics within epistemology and metaphysics as frameworks within which to interpret the work of major Buddhist philosophers. Two recent notable examples of (...)
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  44.  26
    No-Self and Episodic Memory.Monima Chadha - 2017 - Australasian Philosophical Review 1 (4):347-352.
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  45.  9
    Depersonalization, Meditation, and the Experience of (No-)Self.Manuela Kirberg & Monima Chadha - 2024 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 31 (5):151-177.
    This paper aims to contribute to an integrated understanding of what goes missing in adverse meditation experiences and in cases of depersonalization disorder. Depersonalization disorder is characterized by distressing alterations in, and sometimes the complete disappearance of, the 'I'-sense. This paper examines the nature of the 'I'-sense and what it means to lose it from a Buddhist perspective. We argue for a nihilist position that the loss of the sense of self arises from misidentifications of the psychophysical complex with (...)
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  46. Ātman_ (Self) and _Anātman (No-Self): A Possible Reconciliation.Bina Gupta - unknown
    In most common expositions of Indian philosophy the two traditions: self and no-self - are taken to be mutually incompatible. The former, having its origin in the Upaniṣads, finds expression in all āstikadarśanas , though its clearest and most important exposition is found in Advaita Vedānta. The latter having its origin in the teachings of the Buddha finds varied expressions in different schools of Buddhism. The Advaita Vedānta accepts ātman and rejects anattā ; the Buddhists argue for anattā (...)
     
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  47.  6
    Socialism.Peter Self - 1996 - In Robert E. Goodin, Philip Pettit & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.), A Companion to Contemporary Political Philosophy. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 414–438.
    Socialism grew up in opposition to capitalism, just as liberalism developed in reaction to feudalism. Both liberalism and socialism combined potent critiques of the existing socio‐economic order with blueprints for a desirable future society. However, liberalism provides a rather more coherent body of thought than does socialism, and its theories are linked with the emergence of a dominant system combining capitalism and liberal democracy. By contrast, no widespread socio‐economic order has as yet emerged which can be confidently or closely associated (...)
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  48.  40
    The No-Self Doctrine in Theravāda Buddhism.Donald W. Mitchell - 1969 - International Philosophical Quarterly 9 (2):248-260.
  49. Self or No-Self? The Debate about Selflessness and the Sense of Self. Claremont Studies in the Philosophy of Religion, Conference 2015.W. Ezekiel Goggin (ed.) - 2017
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  50. 'I' am a Fiction: An Analysis of the No-self Theories.Vineet Sahu - 2012 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 39 (1-2):117-128.
    The pronoun ‘I’ refers to myself from the first-person perspective and a person (me) from the third person perspective. Essentially there is something common between the two perspectives taken: ‘I’ from the first person perspective refers to ‘self’; from the third person perspective refers to a ‘person’. Now ‘self’ and ‘person’ signify the same concept. ‘Self’ is a term used in context of first-person statements and ‘person’ is a term used in third person contexts. Both the terms (...)
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