Results for 'nonsense'

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  1.  29
    The right kind of nonsense – a study of McTaggart’s C and D series.William Mander - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 31 (2):314-330.
    ABSTRACT Leaving to one side McTaggart’s notorious proof of the unreality of time, this paper examines his positive account of the way in which reality, thus judged to be timeless, misleadingly appears to us as temporal, something which has been almost entirely ignored in the literature. The paper first examines his complex motivations in taking up the issue. It next considers an early unsuccessful approach, before expounding the details of its complex replacement as set out in McTaggart’s magnum opus, The (...)
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  2. Nonsense and the Dialectic of Order.Viatcheslav Vetrov - 2021 - In The Linguistic Picture of the World: Alice's Adventures in Many Languages (Preface). Baden-Baden: Ergon Verlag. pp. 61-94.
    In this chapter, Nonsense is approached as a category that reveals a close relation both to order and disorder, rationality and illogicality, conventionality and arbitrariness, reality and dream. Among its various illustrations, quite a prominent role is assigned to the Duchess’ sentence, which, in spite of being universally acknowledged as one of the best pieces of Nonsense, is rarely discussed in detail in philosophical and literary investigations: ‘Be what you would seem to be’ - or, if you’d like (...)
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  3. Pragmatic Nonsense.Ricardo Peraça Cavassane, Itala M. Loffredo D'Ottaviano & Felipe Sobreira Abrahão - manuscript
    Inspired by the early Wittgenstein’s concept of nonsense (meaning that which lies beyond the limits of language), we define two different, yet complementary, types of nonsense: formal nonsense and pragmatic nonsense. The simpler notion of formal nonsense is initially defined within Tarski’s semantic theory of truth; the notion of pragmatic nonsense, by its turn, is formulated within the context of the theory of pragmatic truth, also known as quasi-truth, as formalized by da Costa and (...)
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  4. Nonsense and illusions of thought.Herman Cappelen - 2013 - Philosophical Perspectives 27 (1):22-50.
    This paper addresses four issues: 1. What is nonsense? 2. Is nonsense possible? 3. Is nonsense actual? 4. Why do the answers to (1)–(3) matter, if at all? These are my answers: 1. A sentence (or an utterance of one) is nonsense if it fails to have or express content (more on ‘express’, ‘have’, and ‘content’ below). This is a version of a view that can be found in Carnap (1959), Ayer (1936), and, maybe, the early (...)
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  5.  16
    Nonsense Upon Stilts : Bentham, Burke and Marx on the Rights of Man.Jeremy Waldron - 1987 - Routledge.
    In _Nonsense upon Stilts¸_ first published in 1987, Waldron includes and discusses extracts from three classic critiques of the idea of natural rights embodied in the 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen. Each text is prefaced by an historical introduction and an analysis of its main themes. The collection as a whole in introduced with an essay tracing the philosophical background to the three critiques as well as the eighteenth-century idea of natural rights which they attacked. (...)
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  6. Nonsense: a user's guide.Manish Oza - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Many philosophers suppose that sometimes we think we are saying or thinking something meaningful when in fact we’re not saying or thinking anything at all: we are producing nonsense. But what is nonsense? An account of nonsense must, I argue, meet two constraints. The first constraint requires that nonsense can be rationally engaged with, not just mentioned. In particular, we can reason with nonsense and use it within that-clauses. An account which fails to meet this (...)
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  7.  9
    “Nonsensical” Caring in Ali Smith’s Fiction and Its Kierkegaardian Defence.Joanna Klara Teske - 2023 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 71 (2):261-288.
    The present paper considers the possible sense of “nonsensical” caring—caring (1) which for various reasons apparently cannot help the cared-for, and (2) in which the carer, though convinced that it will not be effective, whole-heartedly engages. The project is inspired by the fiction of Ali Smith, which offers varied, vivid and memorable examples of such caring: worried that her dead sister misses life experience, Clare in Hotel World makes sure her sensations are doubly intense and rich though she knows her (...)
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  8.  71
    Nonsense upon Stilts: Bentham, Burke and Marx on the Rights of Man.Jeremy Waldron - 1987 - Studies in Soviet Thought 43 (1):68-71.
    In _Nonsense upon Stilts¸_ first published in 1987, Waldron includes and discusses extracts from three classic critiques of the idea of natural rights embodied in the 1789 Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen. Each text is prefaced by an historical introduction and an analysis of its main themes. The collection as a whole in introduced with an essay tracing the philosophical background to the three critiques as well as the eighteenth-century idea of natural rights which they attacked. (...)
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  9.  26
    Nonsense‐mediated RNA decay – a switch and dial for regulating gene expression.Jenna E. Smith & Kristian E. Baker - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (6):612-623.
    Nonsense‐mediated RNA decay (NMD) represents an established quality control checkpoint for gene expression that protects cells from consequences of gene mutations and errors during RNA biogenesis that lead to premature termination during translation. Characterization of NMD‐sensitive transcriptomes has revealed, however, that NMD targets not only aberrant transcripts but also a broad array of mRNA isoforms expressed from many endogenous genes. NMD is thus emerging as a master regulator that drives both fine and coarse adjustments in steady‐state RNA levels in (...)
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  10. The Riddle of Understanding Nonsense.Krystian Bogucki - 2023 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 30 (4):372–411.
    Typically, if I understand a sentence, then it expresses a proposition that I entertain. Nonsensical sentences don’t express propositions, but there are contexts in which we talk about understanding nonsensical sentences. For example, we accept various kinds of semantically defective sentences in fiction, philosophy, and everyday life. Furthermore, it is a standard assumption that if a sentence is nonsensical, then it makes no sense to say that it implies anything or is implied by other sentences. Semantically uninterpreted sentences don’t have (...)
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  11. Nonsense Lab.Sean Smith - 2016 - Continent 5 (3).
    "Nonsense Lab" is the unofficial name of a studio space that hosted Sean Smith and the Department of Biological Flow at University of Western Ontario. Here, in an offhand reflexive tumblr post, the infrastructural thematics of acoustic ecology, perceptual programming and media environments are cut across and sewn together.
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  12.  16
    Nonsense‐mediated RNA decay: A molecular system micromanaging individual gene activities and suppressing genomic noise.Claudio R. Alonso - 2005 - Bioessays 27 (5):463-466.
    Nonsense‐mediated RNA decay (NMD) is an evolutionary conserved system of RNA surveillance that detects and degrades RNA transcripts containing nonsense mutations. Given that these mutations arise at a relatively low frequency, are there any as yet unknown substrates of NMD in a wild‐type cell? With this question in mind, Mendell et al.1 have used a microarray assay to identify those human genes under NMD regulation. Their results show that, in human cells, NMD regulates hundreds of physiologic transcripts and (...)
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  13. Nonsense Made Intelligible.Hans-Johann Glock - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):111-136.
    My topic is the relation between nonsense and intelligibility, and the contrast between nonsense and falsehood which played a pivotal role in the rise of analytic philosophy . I shall pursue three lines of inquiry. First I shall briefly consider the positive case, namely linguistic understanding . Secondly, I shall consider the negative case—different breakdowns of understanding and connected forms of failure to make sense . Third, I shall criticize three important misconceptions of nonsense and unintelligibility: the (...)
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  14. Ineffability and Nonsense.Adrian W. Moore - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77:169-223.
    [A. W. Moore] There are criteria of ineffability whereby, even if the concept of ineffability can never serve to modify truth, it can sometimes serve to modify other things, specifically understanding. This allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus and those who adopt the new reading recently championed by Diamond, Conant, and others. By maintaining that what the nonsense in the Tractatus is supposed to convey is ineffable understanding, rather (...)
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  15.  27
    Nonsense Made Intelligible.Anna Kollenberg & Alex Burri - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):111-136.
    My topic is the relation between nonsense and intelligibility, and the contrast between nonsense and falsehood which played a pivotal role in the rise of analytic philosophy. I shall pursue three lines of inquiry. First I shall briefly consider the positive case, namely linguistic understanding. Secondly, I shall consider the negative case—different breakdowns of understanding and connected forms of failure to make sense. Third, I shall criticize three important misconceptions of nonsense and unintelligibility: the austere conception of (...)
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  16.  26
    Ineffability and Nonsense.A. Moore - 2003 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 77 (1):169-193.
    Criteria of ineffability are presented which, it is claimed, preclude the possibility of truths that are ineffable, but not the possibility of other things that are ineffable—not even the possibility of other things that are non-trivially ineffable. Specifically, they do not preclude the possibility of states of understanding that are ineffable. This, it is argued, allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and those who adopt the new reading recently championed (...)
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  17. On Woodruff’s Constructive Nonsense Logic.Jonas R. B. Arenhart & Hitoshi Omori - forthcoming - Studia Logica:1-20.
    Sören Halldén’s logic of nonsense is one of the most well-known many-valued logics available in the literature. In this paper, we discuss Peter Woodruff’s as yet rather unexplored attempt to advance a version of such a logic built on the top of a constructive logical basis. We start by recalling the basics of Woodruff’s system and by bringing to light some of its notable features. We then go on to elaborate on some of the difficulties attached to it; on (...)
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  18. What Nonsense Might Be.Cora Diamond - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (215):5 - 22.
    There is a natural view of nonsense, which owes what attraction it has to the apparent absence of alternatives. In Frege and Wittgenstein there is a view which goes against the natural one, and the purpose of this paper is to establish that it is a possible view of nonsense.
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  19. Non-reflexive Nonsense: Proof-Theory for Paracomplete Weak Kleene Logic.Bruno Da Ré, Damian Szmuc & María Inés Corbalán - forthcoming - Studia Logica:1-17.
    Our aim is to provide a sequent calculus whose external consequence relation coincides with the three-valued paracomplete logic `of nonsense' introduced by Dmitry Bochvar and, independently, presented as the weak Kleene logic K3W by Stephen C. Kleene. The main features of this calculus are (i) that it is non-reflexive, i.e., Identity is not included as an explicit rule (although a restricted form of it with premises is derivable); (ii) that it includes rules where no variable-inclusion conditions are attached; and (...)
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  20. Nonsense: A Riddle Without Solution.Gilad Nir - forthcoming - In James Conant & Gilad Nir (eds.), Early Analytic Philosophy: Origins and Transformations.
    This paper concerns Wittgenstein’s conception of philosophical and mathematical problems. Both in his earlier and in his later writings Wittgenstein grapples with the tendency of philosophers to misconstrue the nature of the difficulties that they are facing. Whereas philosophers tend to assume that their problems are comparable to those that come up in the sciences, and take these problems to consist in questions the answers to which will provide them with substantive knowledge, Wittgenstein compares philosophical problems with riddles. What is (...)
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  21. Logics of Nonsense and Parry Systems.Thomas Macaulay Ferguson - 2015 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 44 (1):65-80.
    We examine the relationship between the logics of nonsense of Bochvar and Halldén and the containment logics in the neighborhood of William Parry’s A I. We detail two strategies for manufacturing containment logics from nonsense logics—taking either connexive and paraconsistent fragments of such systems—and show how systems determined by these techniques have appeared as Frederick Johnson’s R C and Carlos Oller’s A L. In particular, we prove that Johnson’s system is precisely the intersection of Bochvar’s B 3 and (...)
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  22. Purposeful Nonsense, Intersectionality, and the Mission to Save Black Babies.Melissa M. Kozma & Jeanine Weekes Schroer - 2014 - In Namita Goswami, Maeve M. O'Donovan & Lisa Yount (eds.), Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. London: Pickering & Chatto. pp. 101-116.
    The competing expressions of ideology flooding the contemporary political landscape have taken a turn toward the absurd. The Radiance Foundation’s recent anti-abortion campaign targeting African-American women, including a series of billboards bearing the slogan “The most dangerous place for an African-American child is in the womb”, is just one example of political "discourse" that is both infuriating and confounding. Discourse with these features – problematic intelligibility, disinterest in the truth, and inflammatory rhetoric – has become increasingly common in politics, the (...)
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  23.  15
    Childish Nonsense? The Value of Interpretation in Plato’s Protagoras.Franco V. Trivigno - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (4):509-543.
    In the Protagoras, Plato presents us with a Puzzle regarding the value of interpretation. On the one hand, Socrates claims to find several familiar Socratic theses about morality and the human condition in his interpretation of a poem by Simonides (339e−347a). On the other hand, immediately after the interpretation, Socrates castigates the whole task of interpretation as “childish nonsense” appropriate for second-rate drinking parties (347d5−6).1 The core problem is this: taking Socrates’s interpretation of Simonides seriously requires undermining the significance (...)
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  24. Nonsense and Visual Evanescence.Clare Mac Cumhaill - 2018 - In Thomas Crowther & Clare Mac Cumhaill (eds.), Perceptual Ephemera. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. pp. 289-311.
    I introduce a perceptual phenomenon so far overlooked in the philosophical literature: ‘visual evanescence’. ‘Evanescent’ objects are those that due to their structured visible appearances have a tendency to vanish or evanesce from sight at certain places and for certain ‘biologically apt’ perceivers. Paradigmatically evanescent objects are those associated with certain forms of animal camouflage. I show that reflection on visual evanescence helps create conceptual room for a treatment of looks statements not explicit in the contemporary literature, one which takes (...)
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  25. A Defence of the Austere View of Nonsense.Krystian Bogucki - 2023 - Synthese 201 (5):1-30.
    The austere view of nonsense says that the source of nonsense is not a violation of the rules of logical syntax, but nonsense is always due to a lack of meaning in one of the components of a sentence. In other words, the necessary and sufficient condition for nonsensicality is that no meaning has been assigned to a constituent in a sentence. The austere conception is the key ingredient of the resolute reading of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus that presents (...)
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  26.  20
    Nonsense’ in comic scholia.Stephen E. Kidd - 2017 - Classical Quarterly 67 (2):507-521.
    In 1968 E.K. Borthwick, with a brilliant conjecture, cleared up a passage from Aristophanes’Peacethat had been considered ‘nonsense’ since antiquity. ‘Bell goldfinch’ the line seemed to be saying: a jumbled idea at best, gibberish at worst. The scholium reads ad loc.: ταῦτα δὲ πάντα ἐπίτηδες ἀδιανοήτως ἔφρασεν, ‘all this is said as deliberate nonsense’, and later scholars generally follow suit. But Borthwick showed that this was not the case: ‘even nonsense expressions in Aristophanes’, he writes, ‘are not (...)
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  27. Nonsense and cosmic exile: The austere reading of the tractatus.Meredith Williams - 2004 - In Max Kölbel & Bernhard Weiss (eds.), Wittgenstein's Lasting Significance. New York: Routledge.
     
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  28. Wittgenstein, Contextualism, and Nonsense: A Reply to Hans-Johann Glock.Edmund Dain - 2008 - Journal of Philosophical Research 33:101-125.
    What nonsense might be, and what Wittgenstein thought that nonsense might be, are two of the central questions in the current debate between those—such as Cora Diamond, James Conant and Michael Kremer—who favour a “resolute” approach to Wittgenstein’s work, and those—such as P. M. S. Hacker and Hans-Johann Glock—who instead favour a more “traditional” approach. What answer we give to these questions will determine the nature and force of his criticisms of traditional philosophy, and so the very shape (...)
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  29. Wittgenstein's Later Nonsense.Daniel Whiting - 2022 - In Christoph C. Pfisterer, Nicole Rathgeb & Eva Schmidt (eds.), Wittgenstein and Beyond: Essays in Honour of Hans-Johann Glock. New York: Routledge.
    According to an influential reading of his later philosophy, Wittgenstein thinks that nonsense can result from combining expressions in ways prohibited by the rules to which their use is subject. According to another influential reading, the later Wittgenstein thinks that nonsense only ever results from privation—that is, from a failure to assign a meaning to one or more of the relevant expressions. This chapter challenges Glock’s defence of the view that the later Wittgenstein allows for combinatorial nonsense. (...)
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  30.  4
    A theology of nonsense.Josephine Gabelman - 2016 - Eugene, Oregon: Pickwick Publications.
    There is within all theological utterances something of the ridiculous, perhaps more so in Christianity, given its proclivity for the paradoxical and the childlike. Yet, few theologians are willing to discuss that consent to the Christian doctrine often requires a faith that goes beyond reason or does not exclusively identify with it. There seems to be a fear that the association of theology with the absurd will give fuel to the skeptic's refrain: "you can't seriously believe in all that (...)" This book considers the legitimacy of the skeptic's objection and rather than trying to explain away points of logical contradiction, the author explores the possibility that an idea can be contrary to rationality and also true and meaningful. The study involves the systematic analysis of central stylistic features of literary nonsense using Lewis Carroll's famous Alice stories as exemplar. The project culminates in the setting up of a nonsense theology by considering the practical and evangelical ramifications of associating Christian faith with nonsense literature; and conversely, the value of relating theological principles to the study of literary nonsense. Ultimately, the research suggests that faith is always a risk and that a strictly rational apologetic misrepresents the nature of Christian truth. (shrink)
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  31. Systemy nonsense-logics.Krystyna Piróg-Rzepecka - 1977 - Wrocław: Państwowe Wydawn. Naukowe.
  32.  74
    Nonsense and the New Wittgenstein.Edmund Dain - 2006 - Dissertation, Cardiff University
    This thesis focuses on 'New' or 'Resolute' readings of Wittgenstein's work, early and later, as presented in the work of, for instance, Cora Diamond and James Conant. One of the principal claims of such readings is that, throughout his life, Wittgenstein held an 'austere' view of nonsense. That view has both a trivial and a non-trivial aspect. The trivial aspect is that any string of signs could, by appropriate assignment, be given a meaning, and hence that, if such a (...)
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  33.  26
    Was Moore talking nonsense?: Wittgenstein’s criticism in On Certainty.Edoardo Https://Orcidorg Sartore - 2023 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 100 (3):277-301.
    This article examines Wittgenstein’s criticism of Moore’s use of “know”, as he developed it in On Certainty. Arguing against much of the literature, the author claims that, by Wittgenstein’s own lights, Moore was not talking nonsense. He does so by showing, first, that the standard reading is based on the idea that hinge propositions are non-epistemic, and second, that Wittgenstein’s alleged adoption of the non-epistemic view is not adequately supported by the textual evidence. The author argues that claims to (...)
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  34.  10
    Logical Nonsense: The Works of Lewis Carroll.Lewis Carroll - 1934 - New York, NY, USA: Putnam's.
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  35. Sense, nonsense, and the senses: An inquiry into the powers of the human mind.Hilary Putnam - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (9):445-517.
  36. No Nonsense Neuro-law.Sarah K. Robins & Carl F. Craver - 2010 - Neuroethics 4 (3):195-203.
    In Minds, Brains, and Norms , Pardo and Patterson deny that the activities of persons (knowledge, rule-following, interpretation) can be understood exclusively in terms of the brain, and thus conclude that neuroscience is irrelevant to the law, and to the conceptual and philosophical questions that arise in legal contexts. On their view, such appeals to neuroscience are an exercise in nonsense. We agree that understanding persons requires more than understanding brains, but we deny their pessimistic conclusion. Whether neuroscience can (...)
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  37.  15
    Wittgenstein and Nonsense: Psychologism, Kantianism, and the Habitus.JosÉ Medina - 2003 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (3):293-318.
    This paper is a critical examination of Wittgenstein's view of the limits of intelligibility. In it I criticize standard analytic readings of Wittgenstein as an advocate of transcendental or behaviourist theses in epistemology; and I propose an alternative interpretation of Wittgenstein's view as a social contextualism that transcends the false dichotomy between Kantianism and psychologism. I argue that this social contextualism is strikingly similar to the social account of epistemic practices developed by Pierre Bourdieu. Through a comparison between Wittgenstein's and (...)
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  38.  15
    The Great Riddle: Wittgenstein and Nonsense, Theology and Philosophy.Stephen Mulhall - 2015 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press UK.
    Can we talk meaningfully about God? The theological movement known as Grammatical Thomism affirms that religious language is nonsensical, because the reality of God is beyond our capacity for expression. Stephen Mulhall critically evaluates the claims of this movement to be a legitimate inheritor of Wittgenstein's philosophical methods as well as Aquinas's theological project. The major obstacle to this claim is that Grammatical Thomism makes the nonsensicality of religious language when applied to God a touchstone of Thomist insight, whereas ' (...)' is standardly taken to be solely a term of criticism in Wittgenstein's work. Mulhall argues that a place can be found in both his early work and his later writings for a more positive role to be assigned to nonsensical utterances--one which depends on exploiting an analogy between religious language and riddles. This allows us to see various ways in which his later work has a perfectionist dimension, and results in a radical reconception of the role of analogous usage in language, and in the relation between philosophy and theology. (shrink)
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  39. Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science From Bunk.Massimo Pigliucci - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Introduction : science versus pseudoscience and the "demarcation problem" -- Hard science, soft science -- Almost science -- Pseudoscience -- Blame the media? -- Debates on science : the rise of think tanks and the decline of public intellectuals -- Science and politics : the case of global warming -- Science in the courtroom : the case against intelligent design -- From superstition to natural philosophy -- From natural philosophy to modern science -- The science wars I : do we (...)
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  40. Literary nonsense as enactment of Alan Watts' philosophy : "not just blathering balderdash".Michael Heyman - 2021 - In Peter J. Columbus (ed.), The Relevance of Alan Watts in Contemporary Culture: Understanding Contributions and Controversies. New York, NY: Routledge.
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  41.  7
    Nonsense: cultural mediations on the beyond.Kuang-Ming Wu - 2012 - New York: Nova Science Publishers.
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  42. Ineffability and nonsense.A. W. Moore - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):169–193.
    [A. W. Moore] Criteria of ineffability are presented which, it is claimed, preclude the possibility of truths that are ineffable, but not the possibility of other things that are ineffable—not even the possibility of other things that are non-trivially ineffable. Specifically, they do not preclude the possibility of states of understanding that are ineffable. This, it is argued, allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and those who adopt the new (...)
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  43.  8
    The Nonsense of “Applied Ethics”.Ante Čović - 2019 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 39 (1):247-264.
    The author considers the current process of fragmenting ethics into numerous special ethics at the starting point of the article as a process of destroying ethics as a philosophical discipline. He relates this to the historical failure of ethics which due to categorical limitations could not address the challenges of the advanced scientific-technical civilisation, resulting in an “ethical vacuum”. In response to the ethical vacuum, a number of ethical initiatives have emerged which the author, according to the effects on the (...)
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  44.  8
    Sense, nonsense, and subjectivity.Markus Gabriel - 2024 - London, England: Harvard University Press.
    Philosophers have spent millennia accumulating knowledge about knowledge. But negative epistemological phenomena, such as ignorance, falsity, and delusion, are persistently overlooked. Markus Gabriel argues that being wrong is part and parcel of subjectivity itself, adding a novel perspective on epistemic failures to debates around New Realism.
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  45.  7
    Ineffability and Nonsense in the Tractatus.Leo K. C. Cheung - 2017 - In Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.), A Companion to Wittgenstein. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 195–208.
    Early commentaries on the Tractatus, such as Russell's introduction and Ramsey's review in Mind already noted and commented on Wittgenstein's peculiar views concerning nonsense and elucidation. Ramsey also complains that 'sentences apparently asserting such properties of objects are held by Mr Wittgenstein to be nonsense, but to stand in some obscure relation to something inexpressible'. However, there would not be 'the orthodox reading' of the Tractatus exemplified by these remarks, were it not for the emergence of the 'resolute (...)
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  46.  8
    Sociobiology: Sense Or Nonsense?Michael Ruse - 1979 - Dordrecht: Reidel.
    In June 1975, the distinguished Harvard entomologist Edward O. Wilson published a truly huge book entitled, Sociobiology: The New Synthesis. In this book, drawing on both fact and theory, Wilson tried to present a com prehensive overview of the rapidly growing subject of 'sociobiology', the study of the biological nature and foundations of animal behaviour, more precisely animal social behaviour. Although, as the title rather implies, Wilson was more surveying and synthesising than developing new material, he com pensated by giving (...)
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  47.  8
    Nonsense‐mediated decay: paving the road for genome diversification.Francisco Sánchez-Sánchez & Sibylle Mittnacht - 2008 - Bioessays 30 (10):926-928.
    The expression of protein‐encoding genes is a complex process culminating in the production of mature mRNA and its translation by the ribosomes. The production of a mature mRNA involves an intricate series of processing steps. The majority of eukaryotic protein‐encoding genes contain intron sequences that disrupt the protein‐encoding frame, and hence have to be removed from immature mRNA prior to translation into protein. The mechanism involved in the selection of correct splice sites is incompletely understood. A considerable body of evidence (...)
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  48.  54
    Sense, Nonsense, and the Senses: An Inquiry into the Powers of the Human Mind.Hilary Putnam - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (9):445-465.
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  49.  83
    Wittgenstein's Nonsense Objection to Russell's Theory of Judgment.José L. Zalabardo - 2015 - In Michael Campbell & Michael O'Sullivan (eds.), Wittgenstein and Perception. New York: Routledge. pp. 126-151.
    I offer an interpretation of Wittgenstein's claim that Russell's theory of judgment fails to show that it's not possible to judge nonsense.
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  50.  17
    Compound nonsense-syllable stimuli presented without an intervening space.Barbara S. Musgrave, Albert E. Goss & Elizabeth Shrader - 1963 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (6):609.
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