Results for 'organ transplantation'

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  1. The Body as Gift, Resource or Commodity? Heidegger and the Ethics of Organ Transplantation.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):163-172.
    Three metaphors appear to guide contemporary thinking about organ transplantation. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating organs, the underlying perspective from the side of the state, authorities and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall rather be understood as a resource . The acute scarcity of organs, which generates a desperate demand in relation to a group of potential suppliers who are desperate to an equal extent, leads easily to the gift’s (...)
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  2.  21
    Moral Evaluations of Organ Transplantation Influence Judgments of Death and Causation.Michael Nair-Collins & Mary A. Gerend - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):283-297.
    Two experiments investigated whether moral evaluations of organ transplantation influence judgments of death and causation. Participants’ beliefs about whether an unconscious organ donor was dead and whether organ removal caused death in a hypothetical vignette varied depending on the moral valence of the vignette. Those who were randomly assigned to the good condition were more likely to believe that the donor was dead prior to organ removal and that organ removal did not cause death. (...)
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  3. How is Organ Transplantation Depicted in Internal Medicine and Transplantation Journals.Céline Durand, Andrée Duplantie, Yves Chabot, Hubert Doucet & Marie-Chantal Fortin - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):39.
    In their book Spare Parts, published in 1992, Fox and Swazey criticized various aspects of organ transplantation, including the routinization of the procedure, ignorance regarding its inherent uncertainties, and the ethos of transplant professionals. Using this work as a frame of reference, we analyzed articles on organ transplantation published in internal medicine and transplantation journals between 1995 and 2008 to see whether Fox and Swazey’s critiques of organ transplantation were still relevant.
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  4.  18
    Organ Transplantation and Meaning of Life: The Quest for Self Fulfilment. [REVIEW]Jacques Quintin - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):565-574.
    Today, the frequency and the rate of success resulting from advances in medicine have made organ transplantations an everyday occurrence. Still, organ transplantations and donations modify the subjective experience of human beings as regards the image they have of themselves, of body, of life and of death. If the concern of the quality of life and the survival of the patients is a completely human phenomenon, the fact remains that the possibility of organ transplantation and its (...)
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  5.  22
    A Proposal For Revision Of The Organ Transplantation Law Based On A Child Donor’s Prior Declaration.Masahiro Morioka & Tateo Sugimoto - 2001 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 11 (4):108-109.
    This is the translation of the so-called Morioka&Sugimoto proposal on brain death and transplantation. We proposed that the prior declaration of a brain dead child should be respected, and that when the child does not have a donor card the organ removal should be prohibited. A material for understanding an unprecedented bioethics debate now occurring in Japan.
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  6.  66
    Intimate Distances: Fragments for a Phenomenology of Organ Transplantation.F. Varela - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):259-271.
    In this article, the author uses his recent experience of organ transplantation as the basis for reflection on phenomenologically-derived notions of lived experience, temporality, selfhood and medical ethics.
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  7.  98
    What is an Organ? Heidegger and the Phenomenology of Organ Transplantation.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):179-196.
    This paper investigates the question of what an organ is from a phenomenological perspective. Proceeding from the phenomenology of being-in-the-world developed by Heidegger in Being and Time and subsequent works, it compares the being of the organ with the being of the tool. It attempts to display similarities and differences between the embodied nature of the organs and the way tools of the world are handled. It explicates the way tools belong to the totalities of things of the (...)
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  8.  5
    The Ethical Implications and Religious Significance of Organ Transplantation Payment Systems.Hunter Jackson Smith - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (1):33-44.
    One of the more polarizing policies proposed to alleviate the organ shortage is financial payment of donors in return for organs. A priori and empirical investigation concludes that such systems are ethically inadequate. A new methodological approach towards policy formation and implementation is proposed which places ethical concerns at its core. From a hypothetical secular origin, the optimal ethical policy structure concerning organ donation is derived. However, when applied universally, it does not yield ideal results for every culture (...)
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  9. Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range (...)
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  10.  5
    France and the Early History of Organ Transplantation.Thomas E. Starzl - 1993 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 37 (1):35.
  11.  1
    Should Lack of Social Support Prevent Access to Organ Transplantation?Keren Ladin, Norman Daniels & Kelsey N. Berry - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):13-24.
    Transplantation programs commonly rely on clinicians’ judgments about patients’ social support when deciding whether to list them for organ transplantation. We examine whether using social support to make listing decisions for adults seeking transplantation is morally legitimate, drawing on recent data about the evidence-base, implementation, and potential impacts of the criterion on underserved and diverse populations. We demonstrate that the rationale for the social support criterion, based in the principle of utility, is undermined by its reliance (...)
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  12.  48
    Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation.Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):409-421.
    In 1968, the Harvard criteria equated irreversible coma and apnea with human death and later, the Uniform Determination of Death Act was enacted permitting organ procurement from heart-beating donors. Since then, clinical studies have defined a spectrum of states of impaired consciousness in human beings: coma, akinetic mutism, minimally conscious state, vegetative state and brain death. In this article, we argue against the validity of the Harvard criteria for equating brain death with human death. Brain death does not disrupt (...)
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  13.  52
    Organ Transplantation and Personal Identity: How Does Loss and Change of Organs Affect the Self?F. Svenaeus - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):139-158.
    In this paper, changes in identity and selfhood experienced through organ transplantation are analyzed from a phenomenological point of view. The chief examples are heart and face transplants. Similarities and differences between the examples are fleshed out by way of identifying three layers of selfhood in which the procedures have effects: embodied selfhood, self-reflection, and social-narrative identity. Organ transplantation is tied to processes of alienation in the three layers of selfhood, first and foremost a bodily alienation (...)
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  14.  13
    Taking Science Seriously in the Debate on Death and Organ Transplantation.Michael Nair-Collins - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (6):38-48.
    The concept of death and its relationship to organ transplantation continue to be sources of debate and confusion among academics, clinicians, and the public. Recently, an international group of scholars and clinicians, in collaboration with the World Health Organization, met in the first phase of an effort to develop international guidelines for determination of death. The goal of this first phase was to focus on the biology of death and the dying process while bracketing legal, ethical, cultural, and (...)
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  15.  62
    Moral Agency and the Family: The Case of Living Related Organ Transplantation.Robert A. Crouch & Carl Elliott - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):275-287.
    Living related organ transplantation is morally problematic for two reasons. First, it requires surgeons to perform nontherapeutic, even dangerous procedures on healthy donors—and in the case of children, without their consent. Second, the transplant donor and recipient are often intimately related to each other, as parent and child, or as siblings. These relationships challenge our conventional models of medical decisionmaking. Is there anything morally problematic about a parent allowing the interests of one child to be risked for the (...)
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  16.  62
    Easy Rescues and Organ Transplantation.Jeremy Snyder - 2009 - HEC Forum 21 (1):27-53.
    Many people in desperate need of an organ will die on waiting lists for transplantation or face increased morbidity because of their wait. This circumstance is particularly troubling since many viable organs for transplantation go unused when individuals fail to participate in their local organ donation system. In this paper, I consider whether participating in organ transplantation should be considered a form of a rescue of others from the great harms caused by a shortage (...)
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  17.  4
    Family-Based Consent to Organ Transplantation: A Cross-Cultural Exploration.Mark J. Cherry, Ruiping Fan & Kelly Kate Evans - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):521-533.
    This special thematic issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy brings together a cross-cultural set of scholars from Asia, Europe, and North America critically to explore foundational questions of familial authority and the implications of such findings for organ procurement policies designed to increase access to transplantation. The substantial disparity between the available supply of human organs and demand for organ transplantation creates significant pressure to manipulate public policy to increase organ procurement. As the (...)
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  18. Postmortem Brain Donation and Organ Transplantation in Schizophrenia: What About Patient Consent?R. D. Strous, T. Bergman-Levy & B. Greenberg - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (7):442-444.
    In patients with schizophrenia, consent postmortem for organ donation for transplantation and research is usually obtained from relatives. By means of a questionnaire, the authors investigate whether patients with schizophrenia would agree to family members making such decisions for them as well as compare decisions regarding postmortem organ transplantation and brain donation between patients and significant family members. Study results indicate while most patients would not agree to transplantation or brain donation for research, a proportion (...)
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  19.  79
    The Morality and Utility of Organ Transplantation.Robert Audi - 1996 - Utilitas 8 (2):141.
    Organ transplantation is at once a technology that raises new ethical problems and a good testing ground for various moral principles. It has become a common procedure in some countries and, at least in the United States, promises to become even more so. It poses questions about costs and benefits as well as the very large question of whether we should try to renew human life indefinitely and, if so, at what cost. It raises the problem of whether (...)
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  20. The Kindness of Strangers: Organ Transplantation in a Capitalist Age.Thomas Anthony Shannon - 2001 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (3):285-303.
    : The topic of organ transplantation is examined from the perspective of three authors: Robert Bellah, Jeremy Rifkin, and Margaret Jane Radin. Introduced by reflections on the development of the justification of organ transplantation within the Roman Catholic community and the various themes raised by the historical study in Richard Titmuss's The Gift Relationship, the paper examines how and in what ways the possible commodification of organs will affect our society and the impacts this may have (...)
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  21.  56
    Normative and Prescriptive Criteria: The Efficacy of Organ Transplantation Allocation Protocols.Tom Koch - 1996 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    Normative criteria adopted to assure just, equitable, and efficient allocation of donor organs to potential recipients has been widely praised as a model for the allocation of scarce medical resources. Because the organ transplantation program relies upon voluntary participation by potential donors, all such programs necessarily rely upon public confidence in allocation decision making protocols. Several well publicized cases have raised questions in North America about the efficacy of allocation procedures. An analysis of those cases, and the relevant (...)
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  22.  82
    Organ Transplantation: Contemporary Sunni Muslim Legal and Ethical Perspectives.Abul Fadl Mohsin Ebrahim - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):291–302.
    The problems that organ transplantation poses to the Muslim mind may be summarized as follows: firstly, a muslim believes that whatever he owns or possesses has been given to him as an amānah from Alla¯h. Would it not be a breach of trust to give consent for the removal of parts of one's body, while still alive, for transplantation to benefit one's child, sibling or parent? Secondly, the Sharā'ah emphasizes the sacredness of the human body. Would it (...)
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  23.  4
    Organ Transplantation: Contemporary Sunni Muslim Legal and Ethical Perspectives.Abul Fadl Mohsin Ebrahim - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):291-302.
    The problems that organ transplantation poses to the Muslim mind may be summarized as follows: firstly, a muslim believes that whatever he owns or possesses has been given to him as an amānah from Alla¯h. Would it not be a breach of trust to give consent for the removal of parts of one's body, while still alive, for transplantation to benefit one's child, sibling or parent? Secondly, the Sharā'ah emphasizes the sacredness of the human body. Would it (...)
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  24.  2
    On the Idea of Person and the Japanese Notion of Ningen and its Relation to Organ Transplantation.Enric Huguet Cañamero - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):185-198.
    It is not possible to talk about bioethics without recognizing the plurality inherent in it. In this sense, the notion of person is important due to its multiplicity of possible interpretations depending on its cultural context. This fact is highlighted in the case of organ transplantation in Japan. While there are many critiques against this procedure from scholars in various fields, those that deal with the problem of brain death are especially problematic. This is because the definition of (...)
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  25.  27
    Nurse-Focused Ethical Solutions to Problems in Organ Transplantation.Hakan Ertin, Arzu Kader Harmanci, Fatih Selami Mahmutoglu & Ibrahim Basagaoglu - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (6):705-714.
    Technological developments in recent years have brought about a rapid increase in the number and variety of organ transplants, leading to problems in finding enough organs to meet the need. Organ transplantation has also become a particularly significant issue in medical ethics, especially regarding the question of how and from whom organs are procured. Many methods have been tried in order to solve these problems and discussed from an ethical perspective. This study investigates the Spanish, Belgian and (...)
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  26.  21
    Expectations and Outcomes in Organ Transplantation.Lawrence P. Mcchesney & Susan S. Braithwaite - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):299-310.
    The coauthors of this dialogue, a surgeon and an internist, work together on an institutional patient selection committee for transplantation of solid organs. They have observed a spectrum of outcomes of organ transplantation, mostly favorable, at several institutions.
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  27. Promoting Organ Donation Registration with the Priority Incentive: Israeli Transplantation Surgeons' and Other Medical Practitioners' Views and Ethical Concerns.Nurit Guttman, Gil Siegal, Naama Appel-Doron & Gitit Bar‐On - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  28.  89
    Death, Dying and Donation: Organ Transplantation and the Diagnosis of Death.I. H. Kerridge - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):89.
    Refusal of organ donation is common, and becoming more frequent. In Australia refusal by families occurred in 56% of cases in 1995 in New South Wales, and had risen to 82% in 1999, becoming the most important determinant of the country's very low organ donation rate .Leading causes of refusal, identified in many studies, include the lack of understanding by families of brain death and its implications, and subsequent reluctance to relegate the body to purely instrumental status. It (...)
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  29.  29
    Shifting Ethics: Debating the Incentive Question in Organ Transplantation.D. Joralemon - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (1):30-35.
    The paper reviews the discussion within transplantation medicine about the organ supply and demand problem. The focus is on the evolution of attitudes toward compensation plans from the early 1980s to the present. A vehement rejection on ethical grounds of anything but uncompensated donation—once the professional norm—has slowly been replaced by an open debate of plans that offer financial rewards to persons willing to have their organs, or the organs of deceased kin, taken for transplantation. The paper (...)
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  30. Islamic Legal and Ethical Views on Organ Transplantation and Donation.Ghulam‐Haider Aasi - 2003 - Zygon 38 (3):725-734.
    In Islam, one of the core beliefs is in the life of the hereafter. At the end of time and all that exists, all human beings will be resurrected and will face the Day of Judgment. Even their body parts or organs will stand witness against them. Furthermore, in Islamic law, every action or thing is categorized either as legitimate or prohibited. This article explores ethico‐legal opinions on the issues of organ donation and transplantation in the light of (...)
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  31.  19
    Proceeding with Clinical Trials of Animal to Human Organ Transplantation: A Way Out of the Dilemma.A. Ravelingien - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):92-98.
    The transplantation of porcine organs to humans could in the future be a solution to the worldwide organ shortage, but is to date still highly experimental. Further research on the potential effects of crossing the species barrier is essential before clinical application is acceptable. However, many crucial questions on efficacy and safety will ultimately only be answered by well designed and controlled solid organ xenotransplantation trials on humans. This paper is concerned with the question under which conditions, (...)
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  32.  9
    "Living Apart Together": Moral Frictions Between Two Coexisting Organ Transplantation Schemes.M. T. Hilhorst - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):484-488.
    Cadaveric transplantation and living transplantation exist side by side. Both practices help to alleviate organ need. They provide us with two separate moral schemes. Is it rational to keep them apart? The cadaveric system is organised along strict, impartial lines, while the living system is inherently partial and local. The ethical justification for this partial scheme seems to be that it merely supplements the cadaveric scheme: partial transplants do not come at the expense of cadaveric impartiality, but (...)
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  33.  3
    “Living Apart Together”: Moral Frictions Between Two Coexisting Organ Transplantation Schemes.M. T. Hilhorst - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):484-488.
    Cadaveric transplantation and living transplantation exist side by side. Both practices help to alleviate organ need. They provide us with two separate moral schemes. Is it rational to keep them apart? The cadaveric system is organised along strict, impartial lines, while the living system is inherently partial and local. The ethical justification for this partial scheme seems to be that it merely supplements the cadaveric scheme: partial transplants do not come at the expense of cadaveric impartiality, but (...)
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  34. Catastrophic Diseases Who Decides What? : A Psychosocial and Legal Analysis of the Problems Posed by Hemodialysis and Organ Transplantation.Jay Katz & Alexander Morgan Capron - 1975
     
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  35.  33
    Can the Brain-Dead Be Harmed or Wronged?: On the Moral Status of Brain Death and its Implications for Organ Transplantation.Michael Nair-Collins - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (4):525-559.
    The dead donor rule, which requires that organ donors not be killed by the process of organ procurement, is thought to protect vulnerable patients from exploitation and from being harmed through organ procurement. In current practice, the majority of transplantable organs are retrieved from patients who are declared dead by neurological criteria, or "brain-dead." Because brain death is considered to be sufficient for death, it is thought that brain-dead donors are neither harmed nor wronged by organ (...)
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  36. Harvesting the Living?: Separating Brain Death and Organ Transplantation.Courtney S. Campbell - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):301-318.
    : The chronic shortage of transplantable organs has reached critical proportions. In the wake of this crisis, some bioethicists have argued there is sufficient public support to expand organ recovery through use of neocortical criteria of death or even pre-mortem organ retrieval. I present a typology of ways in which data gathered from the public can be misread or selectively used by bioethicists in service of an ideological or policy agenda, resulting in bad policy and bad ethics. Such (...)
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  37.  27
    The Ethics of Organ Tourism: Role Morality and Organ Transplantation.Marcus P. Adams - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (6):670-689.
    Organ tourism occurs when individuals in countries with existing organ transplant procedures, such as the United States, are unable to procure an organ by using those transplant procedures in enough time to save their life. In this paper, I am concerned with the following question: When organ tourists return to the United States and need another transplant, do US transplant physicians have an obligation to place them on a transplant list? I argue that transplant physicians have (...)
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  38.  37
    The Institute of Medicine on Non-Heart-Beating Organ Transplantation.Alister Browne - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):75-86.
    The current main source of transplantable organs is from heart-beating donors. These are patients who have suffered a catastrophic brain injury, been ventilated, declared dead by neurological criteria, and had their vital functions maintained mechanically until the point of transplantation. But the demand for organs far outstrips the supply, and these patients are not the only potential donors. The idea behind non-heart-beating transplantation is to expand the donor pool by including in it patients who are in hopeless conditions (...)
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  39.  16
    The Ethics of Limiting Informed Debate: Censorship of Select Medical Publications in the Interest of Organ Transplantation.Michael Potts, Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & David W. Evans - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (6):625-638.
    Recently, several articles in the scholarly literature on medical ethics proclaim the need for “responsible scholarship” in the debate over the proper criteria for death, in which “responsible scholarship” is defined in terms of support for current neurological criteria for death. In a recent article, James M. DuBois is concerned that academic critiques of current death criteria create unnecessary doubt about the moral acceptability of organ donation, which may affect the public’s willingness to donate. Thus he calls for a (...)
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  40.  5
    Allocating Scarce Medical Resources and the Availability of Organ Transplantation — Some Moral Presuppositions.H. Tristram Engelhardt - 1984 - New England Journal of Medicine 311 (1):66-71.
    Some controversies have a staying power because they spring from unavoidable moral and conceptual puzzles. The debates concerning transplantation are a good example. To begin with, they are not a single controversy. Rather, they are examples of the scientific debates with heavy political and ethical overlays that characterize a large area of public-policy discussions.
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  41.  41
    Death, Organ Transplantation and Medical Practice.Thomas S. Huddle, Michael A. Schwartz, F. Amos Bailey & Michael A. Bos - 2008 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:5.
    A series of papers in Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine (PEHM) have recently disputed whether non-heart beating organ donors are alive and whether non-heart beating organ donation (NHBD) contravenes the dead donor rule. Several authors who argue that NHBD involves harvesting organs from live patients appeal to.
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  42.  31
    The Ethics of Human Cadaver Organ Transplantation: A Biologist's Viewpoint.H. E. Emson - 1987 - Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):124-126.
    The rights of the various individuals involved in decision-making in cadaver organ donation are considered, and there is discussion of the relation of human cadavers to the planetary biomass. I conclude that the rights of the potential recipient should outweigh those of the other parties concerned and that education and legislation should recognise and promote this.
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  43.  22
    Coercion, Autonomy, and the Preferential Option for the Poor in the Ethics of Organ Transplantation.Michael P. Jaycox - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (3):135-147.
    The debate concerning whether to legalize and regulate the global market in human organs is hindered by a lack of adequate bioethical language. The author argues that the preferential option for the poor, a theological category, can provide the grounding for an inductive moral epistemology adequate for reforming the use of culturally Western bioethical language. He proposes that the traditional, Western concept of bioethical coercion ought to be modified and expanded because the conditions of the market system, as viewed from (...)
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  44.  6
    Contrasting Medical Technology with Deprivation and Social Vulnerability. Lessons for the Ethical Debate on Cloning and Organ Transplantation Through the Film Never Let Me Go.Solveig Lena Hansen & Sabine Wöhlke - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (3):245-256.
    In the film Never Let Me Go, clones are forced to donate their organs anonymously. As a work of fiction, this film can be regarded as a negotiation of limited agency, since the clones are depicted as vulnerable individuals. Thereby, it evokes a confrontation with underprivileged positions in technocratic societies, encouraging the audience to take the perspective of the marginalised. The clones are situated in ‘privileged deprivation’; from the audience’s point of view, they are unable to evolve into autonomous agents—but (...)
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  45.  14
    Ethical Considerations in the Application of Preconditioning to Solid Organ Transplantation.S. J. McNally - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (11):631-634.
    The shortage of organs for transplantation has led researchers to look for new techniques to expand the donor pool. Preconditioning strategies have the potential to protect organs from transplant associated injury or may improve the function of substandard organs so that they become suitable for transplantation. Translating this type of technology to the clinical setting raises ethical issues, particularly relating to the deceased donor. It is important that society has the opportunity to discuss the issues raised by implementation (...)
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  46.  21
    A Narrative Review of the Empirical Evidence on Public Attitudes on Brain Death and Vital Organ Transplantation: The Need for Better Data to Inform Policy.Seema K. Shah, Kenneth Kasper & Franklin G. Miller - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):291-296.
  47. Where It Hurts: Indian Material for an Ethics of Organ Transplantation.Lawrence Cohen - 2003 - Zygon 38 (3):663-688.
    This article focuses on ethical issues surrounding the selling and buying of human organs. The author argues that most people who sell their organs in India do so in order to pay already existing debts. The transaction is only temporarily an exchange of “life for life,” and most “donors” are back in debt soon after the operation. The author discusses the flexible ethics that reduce reality to dyadic transactions and the purgatorial ethics that collapse real and imaginary exploitation in the (...)
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  48.  48
    The Ethics of Donation and Transplantation: Are Definitions of Death Being Distorted for Organ Transplantation?Ari R. Joffe - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:28.
    A recent commentary defends 1) the concept of 'brain arrest' to explain what brain death is, and 2) the concept that death occurs at 2–5 minutes after absent circulation. I suggest that both these claims are flawed. Brain arrest is said to threaten life, and lead to death by causing a secondary respiratory then cardiac arrest. It is further claimed that ventilation only interrupts this way that brain arrest leads to death. These statements imply that brain arrest is not death (...)
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  49.  8
    Using Non-Human Primates to Benefit Humans: Research and Organ Transplantation.David Shaw, Wybo Dondorp & Guido de Wert - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):573-578.
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  50.  37
    Do Genetic Relationships Create Moral Obligations in Organ Transplantation?Walter Glannon & Lainie Friedman Ross - 2002 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (2):153-159.
    In 1999, a case was described on national television in which a woman had enlisted onto an international bone marrow registry with the altruistic desire to offer her bone marrow to some unidentified individual in need of a transplant. The potential donor then was notified that she was a compatible match with someone dying from leukemia and gladly donated her marrow, which cured the recipient of the disease. Years later, though, the recipient developed end-stage renal disease, a consequence of the (...)
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