Results for 'ownership'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1.  70
    Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality.G. A. Cohen - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book G. A. Cohen examines the libertarian principle of self-ownership, which says that each person belongs to himself and therefore owes no service or product to anyone else. This principle is used to defend capitalist inequality, which is said to reflect each person's freedom to do as as he wishes with himself. The author argues that self-ownership cannot deliver the freedom it promises to secure, thereby undermining the idea that lovers of freedom should embrace capitalism and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   115 citations  
  2. Embodiment, Ownership and Disownership.Frédérique de Vignemont - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):1-12.
    There are two main pathways to investigate the sense of body ownership, (i) through the study of the conditions of embodiment for an object to be experienced as one's own and (ii) through the analysis of the deficits in patients who experience a body part as alien. Here, I propose that E is embodied if some properties of E are processed in the same way as the properties of one's body. However, one must distinguish among different types of embodiment, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  3. Mental Ownership and Higher Order Thought.Timothy Lane & Caleb Liang - 2010 - Analysis 70 (3):496-501.
    Mental ownership concerns who experiences a mental state. According to David Rosenthal (2005: 342), the proper way to characterize mental ownership is: ‘being conscious of a state as present is being conscious of it as belonging to somebody. And being conscious of a state as belonging to somebody other than oneself would plainly not make it a conscious state’. In other words, if a mental state is consciously present to a subject in virtue of a higher-order thought (HOT), (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  4.  23
    Ownership Concentration and CSR Policy of European Multinational Enterprises.Lammertjan Dam & Bert Scholtens - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):117-126.
    This study investigates how ownership concentration in European multinational firms is associated with these firms’ corporate social responsibility (CSR). We employ factor analysis on responsibility data from EIRiS and use a regression analysis. Using firm-level data for almost 700 European firms, we find that shareholder concentration is significantly related to such policies. That is, more concentrated ownership goes hand in hand with poorer CSR policies. In our analysis, we control for size, leverage, profitability, industry, and country of origin. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  5.  81
    Ownership Reasoning in Children Across Cultures.Philippe Rochat, Erin Robbins, Claudia Passos-Ferreira, Angela Donato Oliva, Maria D. G. Dias & Liping Guo - 2014 - Cognition 132 (3):471-484.
    To what extent do early intuitions about ownership depend on cultural and socio-economic circumstances? We investigated the question by testing reasoning about third party ownership conflicts in various groups of three- and five-year-old children (N = 176), growing up in seven highly contrasted social, economic, and cultural circumstances (urban rich, poor, very poor, rural poor, and traditional) spanning three continents. Each child was presented with a series of scripts involving two identical dolls fighting over an object of possession. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6. Bodily Ownership, Bodily Awareness and Knowledge Without Observation.José Luis Bermúdez - 2015 - Analysis 75 (1):37-45.
    In a recent paper, Fredérique de Vignemont has argued that there is a positive quale of bodily ownership . She thinks that tactile and other forms of somatosensory phenomenology incorporate a distinctive feeling of myness and takes issue with my defense in Bermúdez of a deflationary approach to bodily ownership. That paper proposed an argument deriving from Elizabeth Anscombe’s various discussions of what she terms knowledge without observation . De Vignemont is not convinced and appeals to the Rubber (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  7. Self-Ownership and Disgust: Why Compulsory Body Part Redistribution Gets Under Our Skin.Christopher Freiman & Adam Lerner - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (12):3167-3190.
    The self-ownership thesis asserts, roughly, that agents own their minds and bodies in the same way that they can own extra-personal property. One common strategy for defending the self-ownership thesis is to show that it accords with our intuitions about the wrongness of various acts involving the expropriation of body parts. We challenge this line of defense. We argue that disgust explains our resistance to these sorts of cases and present results from an original psychological experiment in support (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality.Eric Mack - 1995 - Philosophy 72 (281):478-482.
  9. Self-Ownership, World Ownership, and Equality: Part II: G. A. COHEN.G. A. Cohen - 1986 - Social Philosophy and Policy 3 (2):77-96.
    1. The present paper is a continuation of my “Self-Ownership, World Ownership, and Equality,” which began with a description of the political philosophy of Robert Nozick. I contended in that essay that the foundational claim of Nozick's philosophy is the thesis of self-ownership, which says that each person is the morally rightful owner of his own person and powers, and, consequently, that each is free to use those powers as he wishes, provided that he does not deploy (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  10. Self-Ownership and the Limits of Libertarianism.Robert S. Taylor - 2005 - Social Theory and Practice 31 (4):465-482.
    In the longstanding debate between liberals and libertarians over the morality of redistributive labor taxation, liberals such as John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin have consistently taken the position that such taxation is perfectly compatible with individual liberty, whereas libertarians such as Robert Nozick and Murray Rothbard have adopted the (very) contrary position that such taxation is tantamount to slavery. In this paper, I argue that the debate over redistributive labor taxation can be usefully reconstituted as a debate over the incidents (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  11.  52
    Bodily Ownership, Psychological Ownership, and Psychopathology.José Bermúdez - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (2):263-280.
    Debates about bodily ownership and psychological ownership have typically proceeded independently of each other. This paper explores the relation between them, with particular reference to how each is illuminated by psychopathology. I propose a general framework for studying ownership that is applicable both to bodily ownership and psychological ownership. The framework proposes studying ownership by starting with explicit judgments of ownership and then exploring the bases for those judgments. Section 3 discusses John Campbell’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Self-Ownership and the Conflation Problem.David Sobel - forthcoming - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics.
    Libertarian self-ownership views in the tradition of Locke, Nozick, and the left-libertarians have supposed that we enjoy very powerful deontological protections against infringing upon our property. Such a conception makes sense when we are focused on property that is very important to its owner, such as a person’s kidney. However, this stringency of our property rights is harder to credit when we consider more trivial infringements such as very mildly toxic pollution or trivial risks such having planes fly overhead. (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  25
    Family Ownership and Corporate Misconduct in U.S. Small Firms.Shujun Ding & Zhenyu Wu - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):183-195.
    This study adds to the theory of family business management by exploring the effects of family ownership on the corporate misconduct of small firms in the United States. The empirical findings indicate that small family-owned firms are less likely to commit misconduct than small non-family-owned firms. We interpret this finding as family firms aiming to achieve the trans-generational succession of moral capital. Further investigation shows a nonlinear family-ownership–misconduct relationship. A negative relationship between them only appears in mature firms. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14.  44
    For Ownership Theory: A Response to Nicholas Dixon.Stephen Kershnar - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (2):226-235.
    In an earlier paper, Stephen Kershnar argued for the following thesis: An instance of trash-talking is permissible if and only if the relevant sports organization’s system of rules permits the expression. One person trash-talks a second if and only if the first intentionally insults the second during competition. The above theory sounds implausible. Surely, the conditions under which a player may insult another do not depend on what the owners arbitrarily decide. Such an approach doesn’t appear to be true in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  15. Coercion, Ownership, and the Redistributive State: Justificatory Liberalism's Classical Tilt: Gerald Gaus.Gerald Gaus - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):233-275.
    Justificatory liberalism is liberal in an abstract and foundational sense: it respects each as free and equal, and so insists that coercive laws must be justified to all members of the public. In this essay I consider how this fundamental liberal principle relates to disputes within the liberal tradition on “the extent of the state.” It is widely thought today that this core liberal principle of respect requires that the state regulates the distribution of resources or well-being to conform to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  16.  53
    Ownership, Agency, and Defeat.Daniel S. Breyer - 2013 - Acta Analytica 28 (2):253-256.
    In this article, I respond to Jennifer Duke-Yonge’s (2012) discussion of my article ‘Reflective Luck and Belief Ownership’ (Breyer, Acta Analytica, 25:133–154, 2010) and defend my Taking Responsibility account of belief ownership against her insightful criticisms.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17.  33
    Shareholder Ownership is Irrelevant for Shareholder Primacy.Hasko von Kriegstein - 2020 - Business Ethics Journal Review 8 (4):20-26.
    Strudler rejects shareholder primacy and argues that, once contractual obligations have been fulfilled and shareholders have received a reasonable return on investment, corporate executives may use corporate wealth for the general good. He seeks to establish this claim via an argument that, contrary to the received view, shareholders do not own corporations. After raising some questions about the latter argument, this commentary goes on to argue that the question of corporate ownership is a red herring. The argument for shareholder (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  7
    Does Ownership Matter? Firm Ownership and Corporate Illegality in China.Yongqiang Gao & Haibin Yang - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 168 (2):431-445.
    This study explores whether or not a firm’s ownership status, as state-owned enterprise or private-owned enterprise, will influence its likelihood of engaging in illegality in China. We build our arguments on the institution-based view, positing that firms rationally pursue their interests in the distinct institutional context of China. Compared to SOEs, POEs have limited access to institutional resources, the lack of which threatens their development or even survival, forcing them to “break rules” to overcome institutional barriers. We thus suggest (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  71
    Institutional Ownership of Stock and Dimensions of Corporate Social Performance: An Empirical Examination. [REVIEW]Betty S. Coffey & Gerald E. Fryxell - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (6):437 - 444.
    Collectively, institutions own an increasing proportion of outstanding corporate equities. As an emergent force in shaping corporate America, the linkages between institutional ownership and corporate social performance (CSP) require empirical examination. Not only do corporate policy makers need to know those areas where social performance may lure or inhibit capital infusions, lawmakers also need a better understanding of the social forces guiding corporate policy. As anticipated, this study found a positive relationship between the amount of institutional ownership of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  20. Self-Ownership and World Ownership: Against Left-Libertarianism: Richard J. Arneson.Richard J. Arneson - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):168-194.
    Left-libertarianism is a version of Lockean libertarianism that combines the idea that each person is the full rightful owner of herself and the idea that each person should have the right to own a roughly equal amount of the world's resources. This essay argues against left-libertarianism. The specific target is an interesting form of left-libertarianism proposed by Michael Otsuka that is especially stringent in its equal world ownership claim. One criticism advanced is that there is more tension than Otsuka (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  21. A Role for Ownership and Authorship in the Analysis of Thought Insertion.Lisa Bortolotti & Matthew Broome - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):205-224.
    Philosophers are interested in the phenomenon of thought insertion because it challenges the common assumption that one can ascribe to oneself the thoughts that one can access first-personally. In the standard philosophical analysis of thought insertion, the subject owns the ‘inserted’ thought but lacks a sense of agency towards it. In this paper we want to provide an alternative analysis of the condition, according to which subjects typically lack both ownership and authorship of the ‘inserted’ thoughts. We argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  22. Ownership and Justice for Animals.Alasdair Cochrane - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (4):424-442.
    This article argues that it is not necessary to abolish all incidents of animal ownership in order to achieve justice for them. It claims that ownership does not grant owners a right to absolute control of their property. Rather, it argues that ownership is a much more qualified concept, conveying different rights in different contexts. With this understanding of ownership in mind, the article argues that it is possible for humans to own animals and at the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  23.  15
    Ownership Dilemmas: The Case of Finders Versus Landowners.Peter DeScioli, Rachel Karpoff & Julian De Freitas - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S3):502-522.
    People sometimes disagree about who owns which objects, and these ownership dilemmas can lead to costly disputes. We investigate the cognitive mechanisms underlying people's judgments about finder versus landowner cases, in which a person finds an object on someone else's land. We test psychological hypotheses motivated directly by three major principles that govern these cases in the law. The results show that people are more likely to favor the finder when the object is in a public space compared to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. Self-Ownership and Property in the Person: Democratization and a Tale of Two Concepts.Carole Pateman - 2002 - Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (1):20-53.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  25.  70
    Bodily Ownership and Self-Location: Components of Bodily Self-Consciousness.Andrea Serino, Adrian Alsmith, Marcello Costantini, Alisa Mandrigin, Ana Tajadura-Jimenez & Christophe Lopez - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1239-1252.
  26.  39
    Body Ownership and Experiential Ownership in the Self-Touching Illusion.Caleb Liang, Si-Yan Chang, Wen-Yeo Chen, Hsu-Chia Huang & Yen-Tung Lee - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5 (1591):1-13.
    We investigate two issues about the subjective experience of one's body: first, is the experience of owning a full-body fundamentally different from the experience of owning a body-part?Second, when I experience a bodily sensation, does it guarantee that I cannot be wrong about whether it is me who feels it? To address these issues, we conducted a series of experiments that combined the rubber hand illusion (RHI) and the “body swap illusion.” The subject wore a head mounted display (HMD) connected (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. The Feeling of Personal Ownership of One’s Mental States: A Conceptual Argument and Empirical Evidence for an Essential, but Underappreciated, Mechanism of Mind.Stan Klein - 2015 - Psychology of Consciousness: Research, Practice, and Theory 2 (4):355-376.
    I argue that the feeling that one is the owner of his or her mental states is not an intrinsic property of those states. Rather, it consists in a contingent relation between consciousness and its intentional objects. As such, there are (a variety of) circumstances, varying in their interpretive clarity, in which this relation can come undone. When this happens, the content of consciousness still is apprehended, but the feeling that the content “belongs to me” no longer is secured. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  28. The Ownership of Thoughts.John Campbell - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):35-39.
  29.  64
    The Effect of Ownership Structure on Corporate Social Responsibility: Empirical Evidence From Korea. [REVIEW]Won Yong Oh, Young Kyun Chang & Aleksey Martynov - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):283-297.
    Relatively little research has examined the effects of ownership on the firms’ corporate social responsibility (CSR). In addition, most of it has been conducted in the Western context such as the U.S. and Europe. Using a sample of 118 large Korean firms, we hypothesize that different types of shareholders will have distinct motivations toward the firm’s CSR engagement. We break down ownership into different groups of shareholders: institutional, managerial, and foreign ownerships. Results indicate a significant, positive relationship between (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  30. Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Autonomy.George G. Brenkert - 1998 - The Journal of Ethics 2 (1):27-55.
    The libertarian view of freedom has attracted considerable attention in the past three decades. It has also been subjected to numerous criticisms regarding its nature and effects on society. G. A. Cohen''s recent book, Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality, continues this attack by linking libertarian views on freedom to their view of self-ownership. This paper formulates and evaluates Cohen''s major arguments against libertarian freedom and self-ownership. It contends that his arguments against the libertarian rights definition of freedom are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31. Self‐Ownership and Equality: A Lockean Reconciliation.Michael Otsuka - 1998 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (1):65-92.
    I thank the members of the Law and Philosophy Discussion Group in Los Angeles and those who attended a talk sponsored by the philosophy department at New York University, where I presented earlier versions of this paper. I would also like to thank G. A. Cohen, Stephen Munzer, Seana Shiffrin, Peter Vallentyne, Andrew Williams, and the editors of Philosophy & Public Affairs, who read and provided written commentary on earlier drafts.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  32. Self-Ownership and Non-Culpable Proviso Violations.Preston J. Werner - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (1):67-83.
    Left and right libertarians alike are attracted to the thesis of self-ownership because, as Eric Mack says, they ‘believe that it best captures our common perception of the moral inviolability of persons’. Further, most libertarians, left and right, accept that some version of the Lockean Proviso restricts agents’ ability to acquire worldly resources. The inviolability of SO purports to make libertarianism more appealing than its egalitarian counterparts, since traditional egalitarian theories cannot straightforwardly explain why, e.g. forced organ donation and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. Self-Ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part I: Challenges to Historical Entitlement.Eric Mack - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):75-108.
    This two-part article offers a defense of a libertarian doctrine that centers on two propositions. The first is the self-ownership thesis according to which each individual possesses original moral rights over her own body, faculties, talents, and energies. The second is the anti-egalitarian conclusion that, through the exercise of these rights of self-ownership, individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings. The self-ownership thesis remains in the background during Part I of this essay, while the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  34. Self-Ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part II: Challenges to the Self-Ownership Thesis.Eric Mack - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (2):237-276.
    Part I of this essay supports the anti-egalitarian conclusion that individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings by criticizing end-state and pattern theories of distributive justice and defending the historical entitlement doctrine of justice in holdings. Part II of this essay focuses on a second route to the anti-egalitarian conclusion. This route combines the self-ownership thesis with a contention that is especially advanced by G.A. Cohen. This is the contention that the anti-egalitarian conclusion can be inferred (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  35.  7
    Self-Ownership as Personal Sovereignty.John Thrasher - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (2):116-133.
    :Self-ownership has fallen out of favor as a core moral and political concept. I argue that this is because the most popular conception of self-ownership, what I call the property conception, is typically linked to a libertarian political program. Seeing self-ownership and libertarianism as being necessarily linked leads those who are not inclined toward libertarianism to reject the idea of self-ownership altogether. This, I argue, is a mistake. Self-ownership is a crucial moral and political concept (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Self-Ownership, Equality, and the Structure of Property Rights.John Christman - 1991 - Political Theory 19 (1):28-46.
  37.  13
    Acquiring Ownership and the Attribution of Responsibility.Max Palamar, Doan T. Le & Ori Friedman - 2012 - Cognition 124 (2):201-208.
    How is ownership established over non-owned things? We suggest that people may view ownership as a kind of credit given to agents responsible for making possession of a non-owned object possible. On this view, judgments about the establishment of ownership depend on attributions of responsibility. We report three experiments showing that people’s judgments about the establishment of ownership are influenced by an agent’s intent and control in bringing about an outcome, factors that also affect attributions of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Corporate Social Responsibility, Ownership Structure, and Political Interference: Evidence From China. [REVIEW]Wenjing Li & Ran Zhang - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (4):631 - 645.
    Prior research suggests that ownership structure is associated to corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developed countries. This article examines whether and how ownership structure affects CSR in emerging markets using Chinese firms' social responsibility ranking. Our empirical evidences show that for non-state-owned firms, corporate ownership dispersion is positively associated to CSR. However, for state-owned firms, whose controlling shareholder is the state, this relation is reversed. We attribute the reversed relationship to political interferences and further test this hypothesis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  39. In Defence of Public Ownership: A Reply to Frye.Tom O’Shea - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (5):581-587.
    Harrison Frye claims that socialist republicanism may be unable to reduce domination due to efficiency costs and accountability deficits imposed by public ownership. I argue that the empirical and theoretical grounds for expecting such a decline in economic efficiency are weak. Moreover, the egalitarian distributive effects of public ownership are likely to be more important for insulating people from domination. So too, workers, consumers, and citizens are not well-protected from domination by the accountability of managers to profit-seeking shareholders. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Agency, Ownership, and the Standard Theory.Markus E. Schlosser - 2010 - In A. Buckareff, J. Aguilar & K. Frankish (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Action. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 13-31.
    The causal theory of action has been the standard view in the philosophy of action and mind. In this chapter, I will present responses to two challenges to the theory. The first says, basically, that there is no positive argument in favour of the causal theory, as the only reason that supports it consists in the apparent lack of tenable alternatives. The second challenge says that the theory fails to capture the phenomenon of agency, as it reduces activity to mere (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  41.  72
    Ownership Unity, Neural Substrates, and Philosophical Relevance: A Response to Rex Welshon’s “Searching for the Neural Realizers of Ownership Unity”.Lukasz A. Kurowski - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (1):123-132.
    In this commentary, I critically assess Rex Welshon’s position on the neural substrates of ownership unity. First, I comment on Welshon’s definition of ownership unity and underline some of the problems stemming from his phenomenological analysis. Second, I analyze Welshon’s proposal to establish a mechanistic relation between neural substrates and ownership unity. I show that it is insufficient and defend my own position on how neural mechanisms may give rise to whole subjects of experience, which I call (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  87
    Sense of Ownership and Sense of Agency During Trauma.Yochai Ataria - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):199-212.
    This paper seeks to describe and analyze the traumatic experience through an examination of the sense of agency—the sense of controlling one’s body, and sense of ownership—the sense that it is my body that undergoes experiences. It appears that there exist two levels of traumatic experience: on the first level one loses the sense of agency but retains the sense of ownership, whilst on the second one loses both of these, with symptoms becoming progressively more severe. A comparison (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  43.  57
    Experiencing Ownership Over a Dark-Skinned Body Reduces Implicit Racial Bias.Lara Maister, Natalie Sebanz, Günther Knoblich & Manos Tsakiris - 2013 - Cognition 128 (2):170-178.
    No categories
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  44.  70
    Towards a Structural Ownership Condition on Moral Responsibility.Benjamin Matheson - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 49 (4):458-480.
    In this paper, I propose and defend a structural ownership condition on moral responsibility. According to the condition I propose, an agent owns a mental item if and only if it is part of or is partly grounded by a coherent set of psychological states. As I discuss, other theorists have proposed or alluded to conditions like psychological coherence, but each proposal is unsatisfactory in some way. My account appeals to narrative explanation to elucidate the relevant sense of psychological (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45.  54
    Self-Ownership, Autonomy, and Property Rights.Alan Ryan - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (2):241-258.
    Writers of very different persuasions have relied on arguments about self-ownership; in recent years, it is libertarians who have rested their political theory on self-ownership, but Grotian authoritarianism rested on similar foundations, and, even though it matters a good deal that Hegel did not adopt a full-blown theory of self-ownership, so did Hegel's liberal-conservatism. Whether the high tide of the idea has passed it is hard to say. One testimony to its popularity was the fact that G. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  46.  5
    Self-Ownership and Despotism: Locke on Property in the Person, Divine Dominium of Human Life, and Rights-Forfeiture.Johan Olsthoorn - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (2):242-263.
    :This essay explores the meaning and normative significance of Locke’s depiction of individuals as proprietors of their own person. I begin by reconsidering the long-standing puzzle concerning Locke’s simultaneous endorsement of divine proprietorship and self-ownership. Befuddlement vanishes, I contend, once we reject concurrent ownership in the same object: while God fully owns our lives, humans are initially sole proprietors of their own person. Locke employs two conceptions of “personhood”: as expressing legal independence vis-à-vis humans and moral accountability vis-à-vis (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  13
    Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality.Eric Mack - 1995 - Ethics 107 (3):517-520.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  48. Ownership, Authority, and Self-Determination: Moral Principles and Indigenous Rights Claims.Burke A. Hendrix - 2008 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Much controversy has existed over the claims of Native Americans and other indigenous peoples that they have a right—based on original occupancy of land, historical transfers of sovereignty, and principles of self-determination—to a political status separate from the states in which they now find themselves embedded. How valid are these claims on moral grounds? -/- Burke Hendrix tackles these thorny questions in this book. Rather than focusing on the legal and constitutional status of indigenous nations within the states now ruling (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49.  9
    Self-Ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part I: Challenges to Historical Entitlement.Eric Mack - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):75-108.
    This two-part article offers a defense of a libertarian doctrine that centers on two propositions. The first is the self-ownership thesis according to which each individual possesses original moral rights over her own body, faculties, talents, and energies. The second is the anti-egalitarian conclusion that, through the exercise of these rights of self-ownership, individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings. The self-ownership thesis remains in the background during Part I of this essay, while the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  50.  9
    Self-Ownership and Moral Relations to Self in Early Modern Britain.Colin Heydt - 2016 - History of European Ideas 42 (2).
    SummaryThis paper scrutinises early modern thinking about our moral relations to ourselves. It begins by reiterating the too-often-ignored point that full self-ownership was not a position defended in Britain—by Locke or anyone else. In fact, the actual early modern positions about the moral relations we have to ourselves have been obscured by our present-day interest in self-ownership. The paper goes on to organise the moral history of the self by examining the reasons available for prohibiting self-harm. Those reasons (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000