Results for 'parents'

999 found
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  1. Licensing Parents.Hugh LaFollette - 1980 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (2):182-197.
    In this essay I shall argue that the state should require all parents to be licensed. My main goal is to demonstrate that the licensing of parents is theoretically desirable, though I shall also argue that a workable and just licensing program actually could be established.
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  2.  12
    When Parents Refuse: Resolving Entrenched Disagreements Between Parents and Clinicians in Situations of Uncertainty and Complexity.Janine Penfield Winters - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (8):20-31.
    When shared decision making breaks down and parents and medical providers have developed entrenched and conflicting views, ethical frameworks are needed to find a way forward. This article reviews the evolution of thought about the best interest standard and then discusses the advantages of the harm principle and the zone of parental discretion. Applying these frameworks to parental refusals in situations of complexity and uncertainty presents challenges that necessitate concrete substeps to analyze the big picture and identify key questions. (...)
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  3.  50
    Overriding Parents’ Medical Decisions for Their Children: A Systematic Review of Normative Literature.Rosalind J. McDougall & Lauren Notini - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):448-452.
    This paper reviews the ethical literature on conflicts between health professionals and parents about medical decision-making for children. We present the results of a systematic review which addressed the question ‘when health professionals and parents disagree about the appropriate course of medical treatment for a child, under what circumstances is the health professional ethically justified in overriding the parents’ wishes?’ We identified nine different ethical frameworks that were put forward by their authors as applicable across various ages (...)
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  4. Parents' Rights and the Value of the Family.Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift - 2006 - Ethics 117 (1):80-108.
  5. Licensing Parents Revisited.Hugh Lafollette - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (4):327-343.
    Although systems for licensing professionals are far from perfect, and their problems and costs should not be ignored, they are justified as a necessary means of protecting innocent people's vital interests. Licensing defends patients from inept doctors, pharmacists, and physical therapists; it protects clients from unqualified lawyers. We should protect people who are highly vulnerable to those who are supposed to serve them, those with whom they have a special relationship. Requiring professionals to be licensed is the most plausible way (...)
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  6.  97
    Licensing Parents to Protect Our Children?Jurgen De Wispelaere & Daniel Weinstock - 2012 - Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):195-205.
    In this paper we re-examine Hugh LaFollette's proposal that the state carefully determine the eligibility and suitability of prospective parents before granting them a ?license to parent?. Assuming a prima facie case for licensing parents grounded in our duty to promote the welfare of the child, we offer several considerations that complicate LaFollette's radical proposal. We suggest that LaFollette can only escape these problems by revising his proposal in a way that renders the license effectively obsolete, a route (...)
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  7. Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment.Michael McFall & Laurence Thomas - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines the negative power that child maltreatment has on individuals and society ethically and politically, while analyzing the positive power that parental love and healthy families have. To address how best to confront the problem of child maltreatment, it examines several policy options, ultimately defending a policy of licensing parents, while carefully examining the tension between child and adult rights and duties.
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  8.  17
    Do Parents and Peers Influence Adolescents’ Monetary Intelligence and Consumer Ethics? French and Chinese Adolescents and Behavioral Economics.Elodie Gentina, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Qinxuan Gu - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (1):115-140.
    Adolescents have increasing discretionary income, expenditures, and purchasing power. Inventory shrinkage costs $123.4 billion globally to retail outlets. Adolescents are disproportionately responsible for theft and shoplifting. Both parents and peers significantly influence adolescents’ monetary values, materialism, and dishonesty as consumers. In this study, we develop a theoretical model involving teenagers’ social attachment and their consumer ethics, treat adolescents’ money attitude in the context of youth materialism as a mediator, and simultaneously examine the direct and indirect paths. Results of 1018 (...)
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  9. Parents' Rights and Educational Provision.Roger Marples - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):23-39.
    Legitimate parental interests need to be distinguished from any putative rights parents qua parents may be said to possess. Parents have no right to insulate their children from conceptions of the good at variance with those of their own. Claims to the right to faith schools, private schools, home-schooling or to withdraw a child from any aspect of the curriculum designed to enhance a child’s capacity for autonomous decision-making, are refuted.
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  10.  18
    Parents, Adolescents, and Consent for Research Participation.A. S. Iltis - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (3):332-346.
    Decisions concerning children in the health care setting have engendered significant controversy and sparked ethics policies and statements, legal action, and guidelines regarding who ought to make decisions involving children and how such decisions ought to be made. Traditionally, parents have been the default decision-makers for children not only with regard to health care but with regard to other matters, such as religious practice and education. In recent decades, there has been a steady trend away from the view that (...)
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  11. Parents and Children: The Ethics of the Family.Gareth B. Matthews - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):330-332.
  12. Willing Parents: A Voluntarist Account of Parental Role Obligations.Elizabeth Brake - 2010 - In David Archard & David Benatar (eds.), Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children. Oxford University Press. pp. 151--77.
    Much of the bioethical literature on parenthood does not address a fact about parenthood which deserves more attention: parental rights and obligations are attached to socially constructed institutional roles. Both the content of these roles, and the way in which they determine who a child’s parents will be, issue from social and legal institutions of parenthood, and this makes a difference to accounts of the moral basis of parenthood. I will argue that this poses a problem for the causal (...)
     
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  13.  19
    Parents’ Posthumous Use of Daughter’s Ovarian Tissue: Ethical Dimensions.Aliya O. Affdal & Vardit Ravitsky - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):82-90.
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  14. Parents of Adults with Diminished Self-Governance.Jennifer Desante, David Degrazia & Marion Danis - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):93-107.
    Most theories of parenthood assume, at least implicitly, that a child will grow up to be an independent, autonomous adult. However, some children with cognitive limitations or psychiatric illness are unable to do so. For this reason, these accounts do not accommodate the circumstances and responsibilities of parents of such adult children. Our article attempts to correct this deficiency. In particular, we describe some of the common characteristics and experiences of this population of parents and children, examine the (...)
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  15.  17
    Parents' and Teachers' Views of the Child's Academic Potential.Riitta Kärkkäinen & Hannu Räty - 2010 - Educational Studies 36 (2):229-232.
    Parents and their child's class‐teachers were instructed to rate the child's potential for improvement in mathematics and Finnish. The results showed that there was a moderate correlation between the parents' and teachers' ratings. The parents rated their child's potential more optimistically than the teachers did. Views of malleability may be seen as a potentially important factor in defining the child's educability.
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  16.  5
    Parents or Peers? Predictors of Prosocial Behavior and Aggression: A Longitudinal Study.Elisabeth Malonda, Anna Llorca, Belen Mesurado, Paula Samper & M. Vicenta Mestre - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  17.  27
    Parents’ Attitudes Toward Consent and Data Sharing in Biobanks: A Multisite Experimental Survey.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, Kyle B. Brothers, John A. Myers, Yana B. Feygin, Sharon A. Aufox, Murray H. Brilliant, Pat Conway, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Nanibaa’ A. Garrison, Carol R. Horowitz, Gail P. Jarvik, Rongling Li, Evette J. Ludman, Catherine A. McCarty, Jennifer B. McCormick, Nathaniel D. Mercaldo, Melanie F. Myers, Saskia C. Sanderson, Martha J. Shrubsole, Jonathan S. Schildcrout, Janet L. Williams, Maureen E. Smith, Ellen Wright Clayton & Ingrid A. Holm - 2018 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):128-142.
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  18.  34
    Estranged Parents and a Schizophrenic Child: Choice in Economics, Psychology and Neuroeconomics.Don Ross - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):217-231.
    Gul and Pesendorfer provide the best-known and most strident of a set of recent backlashes by economists against methodological revolutions promoted by some behavioural economists and neuroeconomists. Philosophers are likely to read these responses as merely reactionary, especially as their rhetoric goes beyond what their explicit argumentation validly supports. The present paper identifies the accurate insight on Gul and Pesendorfer's part that explains the impact of their philosophically ragged polemic. This centers on importantly different concepts of choice in the psychological (...)
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  19.  17
    Parents Who Wish No Further Treatment for Their Child.Mirjam A. de Vos, Antje A. Seeber, Sjef K. M. Gevers, Albert P. Bos, Ferry Gevers & Dick L. Willems - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):195-200.
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  20.  9
    Are Parents Really Obligated to Learn as Much as Possible About Their Children's Genomes?Josephine Johnston & Eric Juengst - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S2):S14-S15.
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  21.  44
    Licensing Parents in International Contract Pregnancies.Andrew Botterell & Carolyn McLeod - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):178-196.
    The Hague Conference on Private International Law currently has a Parentage/Surrogacy Project, which evaluates the legal status of children in cross-border situations, including situations involving international contract pregnancy. Should a convention focusing on international contract pregnancy emerge from this project, it will need to be consistent with the Hague convention on Intercountry Adoption. The latter convention prohibits adoptions unless, among other things, ‘the competent authorities of the receiving State have determined that the prospective adoptive parents are eligible and suited (...)
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  22. Can Parents and Children Be Friends?Joseph Kupfer - 1990 - American Philosophical Quarterly 27 (1):15 - 26.
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  23.  27
    Parents’ and Physicians’ Perceptions of Children’s Participation in Decision-Making in Paediatric Oncology: A Quantitative Study.Michael Rost, Tenzin Wangmo, Felix Niggli, Karin Hartmann, Heinz Hengartner, Marc Ansari, Pierluigi Brazzola, Johannes Rischewski, Maja Beck-Popovic, Thomas Kühne & Bernice S. Elger - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):555-565.
    The goal is to present how shared decision-making in paediatric oncology occurs from the viewpoints of parents and physicians. Eight Swiss Pediatric Oncology Group centres participated in this prospective study. The sample comprised a parent and physician of the minor patient. Surveys were statistically analysed by comparing physicians’ and parents’ perspectives and by evaluating factors associated with children’s actual involvement. Perspectives of ninety-one parents and twenty physicians were obtained for 151 children. Results indicate that for six aspects (...)
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  24. Parents and Children: An Alternative to Selfless and Unconditional Love.Amy Mullin - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):181-200.
    I develop a model of love or care between children and their parents guided by experiences of parents, especially mothers, with disabilities. On this model, a caring relationship requires both parties to be aware of each other as a particular person and it requires reciprocity. This does not mean that children need to be able to articulate their interests, or that they need to be self-reflectively aware of their parents’ interests or personhood. Instead, parents and children (...)
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  25.  25
    Paper: Parents' Choices in Banking Boys' Testicular Tissue.Timothy Murphy - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):806-809.
    Researchers are working to derive sperm from banked testicular tissue taken from pre-pubertal boys who face therapies or injuries that destroy sperm production. Success in deriving sperm from this tissue will help to preserve the option for these boys to have genetically related children later in life. For the twin moral reasons of preserving access and equity in regard to having such children, clinicians and researchers are justified in offering the option to the parents of all affected boys. However, (...)
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  26.  51
    The Parents' Ability to Take Care of Their Baby as a Factor in Decisions to Withhold or Withdraw Life-Prolonging Treatment in Two Dutch NICUs.S. Moratti - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (6):336-338.
    In The Netherlands, it is openly acknowledged that the parents' ability to take care of their child plays a role in the decision-making process over administration of life-prolonging treatment to severely defective newborn babies. Unlike other aspects of such decision-making process up until the present time, the ‘ability to take care’ has not received specific attention in regulation or in empirical research. The present study is based on interviews with neonatologists in two Dutch NICUs concerning their definition of the (...)
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  27. Good Parents Would Not Fulfil Their Obligation to Genetically Enhance Their Unborn Children.R. Tonkens - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (10):606-610.
    The purpose of this paper is to unveil the incompleteness of John Harris' view that parents have a moral obligation to genetically enhance their unborn children. Specifically, here two main conclusions are proposed: (1) at present there exist insufficient empirical data for determining whether prenatal genetic enhancement (PGE) is a moral obligation on prospective parents. Although the purpose of PGE research would be to determine the extent to which PGE is safe and effective, the task of determining the (...)
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  28.  11
    Parents Perspectives on Whole Genome Sequencing for Their Children: Qualified Enthusiasm?J. A. Anderson, M. S. Meyn, C. Shuman, R. Zlotnik Shaul, L. E. Mantella, M. J. Szego, S. Bowdin, N. Monfared & R. Z. Hayeems - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (8):535-539.
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  29.  16
    Parents' Experiences of Newborn Screening for Genetic Susceptibility to Type 1 Diabetes.Nikki J. Kerruish - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):348-353.
    Advances in genomic medicine have lead to debate about the potential inclusion of genetic tests for susceptibility to common complex disorders in newborn screening programmes. Empirical evidence concerning psychosocial reactions to genetic testing is a crucial component of both ethical debate and policy development, but while there has been much speculation concerning the possible psychosocial impact of screening newborns for genetic susceptibilities, there remains a paucity of data. The aim of the study reported here is to provide some of this (...)
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  30.  25
    Good Parents, Better Babies : An Argument About Reproductive Technologies, Enhancement and Ethics.Erik Malmqvist - unknown
    This study is a contribution to the bioethical debate about new and possibly emerging reproductive technologies. Its point of departure is the intuition, which many people seem to share, that using such technologies to select non-disease traits – like sex and emotional stability - in yet unborn children is morally problematic, at least more so than using the technologies to avoid giving birth to children with severe genetic diseases, or attempting to shape the non-disease traits of already existing children by (...)
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  31.  86
    More Co-Parents, Fewer Children: Multiparenting and Sustainable Population.Anca Gheaus - 2019 - Essays in Philosophy 20 (1):3-23.
    Some philosophers argue that we should limit procreation – for instance, to one child per person or one child per couple – in order to reduce our aggregate carbon footprint. I provide additional support to the claim that population size is a matter of justice, by explaining that we have a duty of justice towards the current generation of children to pass on to them a sustainable population. But instead of, or, more likely, alongside with, having fewer children in in (...)
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  32.  34
    Parents as 'Educators': Languages of Education, Pedagogy and 'Parenting'.Stefan Ramaekers & Judith Suissa - 2011 - Ethics and Education 6 (2):197-212.
    In this article, we explore to what extent parents should be ?educators? of their children. In the course of this exploration, we offer some examples of these practices and ways of speaking and thinking, indicate some of the problems and limitations they import into our understanding of the parent?child relationship, and make some tentative suggestions towards an alternative way of thinking about this relationship.
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  33.  18
    Parents and Children: The Ethics of the Family.Howard Cohen - 1984 - Ethics 94 (2):345-346.
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  34. Children, Parents, and Politics.Geoffrey Scarre (ed.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This highly original collection of essays, first published in 1989, is concerned with the nature of children and their moral and political status. The international team of contributors explore, and in some cases criticise and revise popular thought on children and their place in society. The book is divided into three parts: the first deals with the historical, social and psychological framework of contemporary perspectives on children and childhood; a second set of papers takes up questions about the position of (...)
     
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  35.  33
    Conflicts Between Parents and Health Professionals About a Child’s Medical Treatment: Using Clinical Ethics Records to Find Gaps in the Bioethics Literature.Rosalind McDougall, Lauren Notini & Jessica Phillips - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):429-436.
    Clinical ethics records offer bioethics researchers a rich source of cases that clinicians have identified as ethically complex. In this paper, we suggest that clinical ethics records can be used to point to types of cases that lack attention in the current bioethics literature, identifying new areas in need of more detailed bioethical work. We conducted an analysis of the clinical ethics records of one paediatric hospital in Australia, focusing specifically on conflicts between parents and health professionals about a (...)
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  36.  16
    Epistemic Virtue, Prospective Parents and Disability Abortion.James B. Gould - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (3):389-404.
    Research shows that a high majority of parents receiving prenatal diagnosis of intellectual disability terminate pregnancy. They have reasons for rejecting a child with intellectual disabilities—these reasons are, most commonly, beliefs about quality of life for it or them. Without a negative evaluation of intellectual disability, their choice makes no sense. Disability-based abortion has been critiqued through virtue ethics for being inconsistent with admirable moral character. Parental selectivity conflicts with the virtue of acceptingness and exhibits the vice of wilfulness. (...)
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  37.  9
    Counseling Parents at Risk of Delivery of an Extremely Premature Infant: Differing Strategies.F. Haward Marlyse, Janvier Annie, M. Lorenz John & Fischhoff Baruch - 2017 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 8 (4):243-252.
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  38. Do Parents Make a Difference to Children's Academic Achievement? Differences Between Parents of Higher and Lower Achieving Students.Nicky Jacobs & David Harvey - 2005 - Educational Studies 31 (4):431-448.
    Differences in family factors in determining academic achievement were investigated by testing 432 parents in nine independent, coeducational Melbourne schools. Schools were ranked and categorized into three groups , based on student achievement scores in their final year of secondary school and school improvement indexes. Parents completed a questionnaire investigating their attitudes towards the school environment, their aspirations, expectations, encouragement and interest in their child’s education . They also responded to six open‐ended questions on their attitudes to achievement (...)
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  39.  92
    Parents and Children as Friends.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (2):250–265.
  40. Am I My Parents' Keeper?: An Essay on Justice Between the Young and the Old.Norman Daniels - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    The rapidly increasing numbers of elderly people in our society have raised some important moral questions: How should we distribute social resources among different age groups? What does justice require from both the young and the old? In this book, Norman Daniels offers the first systematic philosophical discussion of these urgent questions, advocating what he calls a "lifespan" approach to the problem: Since, as they age, people pass through a variety of institutions, the challenge of caring for the elderly becomes (...)
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  41.  14
    Parents’ Relative Socioeconomic Status and Paternal Involvement in Chinese Families: The Mediating Role of Coparenting.Chang Liu, Xinchun Wu & Shengqi Zou - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  42.  27
    Vaccine Rejecting Parents’ Engagement With Expert Systems That Inform Vaccination Programs.Katie Attwell, Julie Leask, Samantha B. Meyer, Philippa Rokkas & Paul Ward - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):65-76.
    In attempting to provide protection to individuals and communities, childhood immunization has benefits that far outweigh disease risks. However, some parents decide not to immunize their children with some or all vaccines for reasons including lack of trust in governments, health professionals, and vaccine manufacturers. This article employs a theoretical analysis of trust and distrust to explore how twenty-seven parents with a history of vaccine rejection in two Australian cities view the expert systems central to vaccination policy and (...)
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  43.  42
    Parents' Consent to the Post-Mortem Removal and Retention of Organs.Dudley Knowles - 2001 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (3):215–227.
    Parents of children who died following complex heart surgery have recently discovered that organs were removed and retained in post-m.
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  44.  57
    Meet the Parents: A Parents’ Perspective on Product Placement in Children’s Films. [REVIEW]Simon Hudson, David Hudson & John Peloza - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):289 - 304.
    The ethics of advertising to children has been identified as one of the most important topics worthy of academic research in the marketing field. A fast growing advertising technique is product placement, and its use in children's films is becoming more and more common. The limited evidence existing suggests that product placements are especially potent in their effects upon children. Yet regulations regarding placements targeted at children are virtually non-existent, with advertising guidelines suggesting that it remains the prime responsibility of (...)
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  45.  26
    Why Charlie Gard’s Parents Should Have Been the Decision-Makers About Their Son’s Best Interests.Raanan Gillon - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):462-465.
    This paper argues that Charlie Gard’s parents should have been the decision-makers about their son’s best interests and that determination of Charlie’s best interests depended on a moral decision about which horn of a profound moral dilemma to choose. Charlie’s parents chose one horn of that moral dilemma and the courts, like Charlie Gard’s doctors, chose the other horn. Contrary to the first UK court’s assertion, supported by all the higher courts that considered it, that its judgement was (...)
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  46.  38
    Filial Obligations to Elderly Parents: A Duty to Care? [REVIEW]Maria C. Stuifbergen & Johannes J. M. Van Delden - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):63-71.
    A continuing need for care for elderly, combined with looser family structures prompt the question what filial obligations are. Do adult children of elderly have a duty to care? Several theories of filial obligation are reviewed. The reciprocity argument is not sensitive to the parent–child relationship after childhood. A theory of friendship does not offer a correct parallel for the relationship between adult child and elderly parent. Arguments based on need or vulnerability run the risk of being unjust to those (...)
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  47.  23
    Parents' Perceptions of Decision Making for Children.Betsy Anderson & Barbara Hall - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (1):15-19.
    Futile treatment. Do not resuscitate. These terms and the thoughts they evoke may be unfamiliar to families with ill children. Similarly, laws, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act or the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, are probably unfamiliar. Yet these terms and laws, and, more important, their implications, are part of a new world of health care into which more families are thrust—the world of wrenching and complicated decisions.Although the number of these situations is increasing and even (...)
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  48.  36
    Farm Parents’ Views on Their Children’s Labor on Family Farms: A Focus Group Study of Wisconsin Dairy Farmers. [REVIEW]Lydia Zepeda & Jongsoog Kim - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (1):109-121.
    This study examines parents’ perspectives on their children working on their family dairy farms in Wisconsin. The objective of this focus group study is (1) to gain insights on why children work on their family farms, (2) to identify those benefits that parents perceive that they and their children gain from their children working on-farm, (3) to determine the concerns that parents have about their children working, (4) to identify ways to improve the safety of children on (...)
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  49.  38
    How Do Parents Experience Being Asked to Enter a Child in a Randomised Controlled Trial?Valerie Shilling & Bridget Young - 2009 - BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):1-.
    BackgroundAs the number of randomised controlled trials of medicines for children increases, it becomes progressively more important to understand the experiences of parents who are asked to enrol their child in a trial. This paper presents a narrative review of research evidence on parents' experiences of trial recruitment focussing on qualitative research, which allows them to articulate their views in their own words.DiscussionParents want to do their best for their children, and socially and legally their role is to (...)
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  50.  47
    Parents, Government, and Children: Authority Over Education in a Pluralist Liberal Democracy.William Galston - 2011 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 5 (2):285-305.
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