Results for 'phenomena'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Multistable Phenomena: Changing Views in Perception.David A. Leopold & Nikos K. Logothetis - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (7):254-264.
    Traditional explanations of multistable visual phenomena (e.g. ambiguous figures, perceptual rivalry) suggest that the basis for spontaneous reversals in perception lies in antagonistic connectivity within the visual system. In this review, we suggest an alternative, albeit speculative, explanation for visual multistability – that spontaneous alternations reflect responses to active, programmed events initiated by brain areas that integrate sensory and non-sensory information to coordinate a diversity of behaviors. Much evidence suggests that perceptual reversals are themselves more closely related to the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   67 citations  
  2. Understanding Phenomena.Christoph9 Kelp - 2015 - Synthese 192 (12):3799-3816.
    The literature on the nature of understanding can be divided into two broad camps. Explanationists believe that it is knowledge of explanations that is key to understanding. In contrast, their manipulationist rivals maintain that understanding essentially involves an ability to manipulate certain representations. The aim of this paper is to provide a novel knowledge based account of understanding. More specifically, it proposes an account of maximal understanding of a given phenomenon in terms of fully comprehensive and maximally well-connected knowledge of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  3.  66
    The Phenomena of Inner Experience.Christopher L. Heavey & Russell T. Hurlburt - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):798-810.
    This study provides a survey of phenomena that present themselves during moments of naturally occurring inner experience. In our previous studies using Descriptive Experience Sampling we have discovered five frequently occurring phenomena—inner speech, inner seeing, unsymbolized thinking, feelings, and sensory awareness. Here we quantify the relative frequency of these phenomena. We used DES to describe 10 randomly identified moments of inner experience from each of 30 participants selected from a stratified sample of college students. We found that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  4. Phenomena and Objects of Research in the Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences.Uljana Feest - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):1165-1176.
    It is commonly held that research efforts in the cognitive and behavioral sciences are mainly directed toward providing explanations and that phenomena figure into scientific practice qua explananda. I contend that these assumptions convey a skewed picture of the research practices in question and of the role played by phenomena. I argue that experimental research often aims at exploring and describing “objects of research” and that phenomena can figure as components of, and as evidence for, such objects. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  5. Moorean Phenomena in Epistemic Logic.Wesley H. Holliday & Thomas F. Icard - 2010 - In Lev Beklemishev, Valentin Goranko & Valentin Shehtman (eds.), Advances in Modal Logic 8. College Publications. pp. 178-199.
    A well-known open problem in epistemic logic is to give a syntactic characterization of the successful formulas. Semantically, a formula is successful if and only if for any pointed model where it is true, it remains true after deleting all points where the formula was false. The classic example of a formula that is not successful in this sense is the “Moore sentence” p ∧ ¬BOXp, read as “p is true but you do not know p.” Not only is the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  6. Reconstituting Phenomena.Maria Kronfeldner - 2015 - In Mäki U., Votsis S., Ruphy S. & Schurz G. (eds.), Recent developments in the philosophy of science. Springer. pp. 169-182.
    In the face of causal complexity, scientists reconstitute phenomena in order to arrive at a more simplified and partial picture that ignores most of the 'bigger picture.' This paper will distinguish between two modes of reconstituting phenomena: one moving down to a level of greater decomposition (toward organizational parts of the original phenomenon), and one moving up to a level of greater abstraction (toward different differences regarding the phenomenon). The first aim of the paper is to illustrate that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7. Data, Phenomena, and Reliability.James Woodward - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):179.
    This paper explores how data serve as evidence for phenomena. In contrast to standard philosophical models which invite us to think of evidential relationships as logical relationships, I argue that evidential relationships in the context of data-to-phenomena reasoning are empirical relationships that depend on holding the right sort of pattern of counterfactual dependence between the data and the conclusions investigators reach on the phenomena themselves.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  8.  89
    Phenomena and Patterns in Data Sets.James W. McAllister - 1997 - Erkenntnis 47 (2):217-228.
    Bogen and Woodward claim that the function of scientific theories is to account for 'phenomena', which they describe both as investigator-independent constituents of the world and as corresponding to patterns in data sets. I argue that, if phenomena are considered to correspond to patterns in data, it is inadmissible to regard them as investigator-independent entities. Bogen and Woodward's account of phenomena is thus incoherent. I offer an alternative account, according to which phenomena are investigator-relative entities. All (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  9. Speech and Phenomena. And Other Essays on Husserl’s Theory of Signs.Jacques Derrida - 1973 - Evanston: Northwestern University Press.
  10. Critical Phenomena and Breaking Drops: Infinite Idealizations in Physics.Robert Batterman - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (2):225-244.
    Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics are related to one another through the so-called "thermodynamic limit'' in which, roughly speaking the number of particles becomes infinite. At critical points (places of physical discontinuity) this limit fails to be regular. As a result, the "reduction'' of Thermodynamics to Statistical Mechanics fails to hold at such critical phases. This fact is key to understanding an argument due to Craig Callender to the effect that the thermodynamic limit leads to mistakes in Statistical Mechanics. I discuss (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   81 citations  
  11.  96
    The Phenomena of Homology.Paul Edmund Griffiths - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):643-658.
    Philosophical discussions of biological classification have failed to recognise the central role of homology in the classification of biological parts and processes. One reason for this is a misunderstanding of the relationship between judgments of homology and the core explanatory theories of biology. The textbook characterisation of homology as identity by descent is commonly regarded as a definition. I suggest instead that it is one of several attempts to explain the phenomena of homology. Twenty years ago the ‘new experimentalist’ (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  12.  99
    Synchronistic Phenomena as Entanglement Correlations in Generalized Quantum Theory.Walter von Lucado & H. Romer - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (4):50-74.
    Synchronistic or psi phenomena are interpreted as entanglement correlations in a generalized quantum theory. From the principle that entanglement correlations cannot be used for transmitting information, we can deduce the decline effect, frequently observed in psi experiments, and we propose strategies for suppressing it and improving the visibility of psi effects. Some illustrative examples are discussed.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  13.  59
    Autoscopic Phenomena and One’s Own Body Representation in Dreams.Miranda Occhionero & Piera Carla Cicogna - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1009-1015.
    Autoscopic phenomena are complex experiences that include the visual illusory reduplication of one’s own body. From a phenomenological point of view, we can distinguish three conditions: autoscopic hallucinations, heautoscopy, and out-of-body experiences. The dysfunctional pattern involves multisensory disintegration of personal and extrapersonal space perception. The etiology, generally either neurological or psychiatric, is different. Also, the hallucination of Self and own body image is present during dreams and differs according to sleep stage. Specifically, the representation of the Self in REM (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  14.  85
    The Phenomena of Love and Hate.D. W. Hamlyn - 1978 - Philosophy 53 (203):5 - 20.
    There has been a good deal of interest in recent years in what Franz Brentano had to say about the notion of ‘intentional objects’ and about intentionality as a criterion of the mental. There has been less interest in his classification of mental phenomena. In his Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint Brentano asserts and argues for the thesis that mental phenomena can be classified in terms of three kinds of mental act or activity, all of which are directed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  15. Multistable Phenomena: Changing Views in Perception.N. K. Logothetis D. A. Leopold - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3:254-264.
    Traditional explanations of multistable visual phenomena (e.g. ambiguous figures, perceptual rivalry) suggest that the basis for spontaneous reversals in perception lies in antagonistic connectivity within the visual system. In this review, we suggest an alternative, albeit speculative. explanation for visual multistability - that spontaneous alternations reflect responses to active, programmed events initiated by brain areas that integrate sensory and non-sensory information to coordinate a diversity of behaviors. Much evidence suggests that perceptual reversals are themselves more closely related to the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  16. Data and Phenomena: A Restatement and Defense.James F. Woodward - 2011 - Synthese 182 (1):165-179.
    This paper provides a restatement and defense of the data/ phenomena distinction introduced by Jim Bogen and me several decades ago (e.g., Bogen and Woodward, The Philosophical Review, 303–352, 1988). Additional motivation for the distinction is introduced, ideas surrounding the distinction are clarified, and an attempt is made to respond to several criticisms.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  17. Phenomena and Representation.Norton Nelkin - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):527-547.
  18. Phenomena of Illusory Form: Can We Bridge the Gap Between Levels of Explanation?Lothar Spillmann & Birgitta Dresp - 1995 - Perception 24:1333-1364.
    The major theoretical framework relative to the perception of illusory figures is reviewed and discussed in the attempt to provide a unifying explanatory account for these phenomena.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19.  21
    Mental Phenomena and Behavior.B. Libet - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):434-434.
  20. Phenomena and Mechanisms: Putting the Symbolic, Connectionist, and Dynamical Systems Debate in Broader Perspective.Adele A. Abrahamsen & William P. Bechtel - 2006 - In R. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Blackwell.
    Cognitive science is, more than anything else, a pursuit of cognitive mechanisms. To make headway towards a mechanistic account of any particular cognitive phenomenon, a researcher must choose among the many architectures available to guide and constrain the account. It is thus fitting that this volume on contemporary debates in cognitive science includes two issues of architecture, each articulated in the 1980s but still unresolved: " • Just how modular is the mind? – a debate initially pitting encapsulated mechanisms against (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  21.  1
    Limit-Phenomena and Phenomenology in Husserl.Anthony J. Steinbock - 2017 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This major new work by Anthony J. Steinbock, a leading authority in Phenomenology and Husserl Studies, explores an interrelated set of problems in Husserl's phenomenology and provides an excellent example of phenomenology in practice, demonstrating how its methods and resources shed light on philosophical problems.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22.  17
    Speciation Phenomena in Birds.Ernst Mayr - 1940 - American Naturalist 74 (752):249-278.
  23. Saving the Phenomena.James Bogen & James Woodward - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (3):303-352.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   297 citations  
  24.  77
    Experiments Versus Models: New Phenomena, Inference and Surprise.Mary S. Morgan - 2005 - Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):317-329.
    A comparison of models and experiments supports the argument that although both function as mediators and can be understood to work in an experimental mode, experiments offer greater epistemic power than models as a means to investigate the economic world. This outcome rests on the distinction that whereas experiments are versions of the real world captured within an artificial laboratory environment, models are artificial worlds built to represent the real world. This difference in ontology has epistemic consequences: experiments have greater (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  25. Patterns in Cognitive Phenomena and Pluralism of Explanatory Styles.Angela Potochnik & Guilherme Sanches de Oliveira - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (4):1306-1320.
    Debate about cognitive science explanations has been formulated in terms of identifying the proper level(s) of explanation. Views range from reductionist, favoring only neuroscience explanations, to mechanist, favoring the integration of multiple levels, to pluralist, favoring the preservation of even the most general, high-level explanations, such as those provided by embodied or dynamical approaches. In this paper, we challenge this framing. We suggest that these are not different levels of explanation at all but, rather, different styles of explanation that capture (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26. From Data to Phenomena: A Kantian Stance.Michela Massimi - 2011 - Synthese 182 (1):101-116.
    This paper investigates some metaphysical and epistemological assumptions behind Bogen and Woodward’s data-to-phenomena inferences. I raise a series of points and suggest an alternative possible Kantian stance about data-to-phenomena inferences. I clarify the nature of the suggested Kantian stance by contrasting it with McAllister’s view about phenomena as patterns in data sets.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  27.  47
    Data, Phenomena, Signal, and Noise.James Woodward - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):792-803.
  28. Hypnotic Phenomena and Altered States of Consciousness: A Multilevel Framework of Description and Explanation.Sakari Kallio & Antti Revonsuo - 2003 - Contemporary Hypnosis 20 (3):111-164.
  29.  29
    Neuronal Phenomena Associated with Vigilance and Consciousness: From Cellular Mechanisms to Electroencephalographic Patterns.Anton M. L. Coenen - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):42-53.
    The neuroanatomical substrates controlling and regulating sleeping and waking, and thus consciousness, are located in the brain stem. Most crucial for bringing the brain into a state conducive for consciousness and information processing is the mesencephalic part of the brain stem. This part controls the state of waking, which is generally associated with a high degree of consciousness. Wakefulness is accompanied by a low-amplitude, high-frequency electroencephalogram, due to the fact that thalamocortical neurons fire in a state of tonic depolarization. Information (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30.  10
    Experimental Phenomena of Consciousness: A Brief Dictionary.Talis Bachmann, Bruno Breitmeyer & Haluk Ögmen - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Experimental Phenomena of Consciousness is the definitive collection of consciousness phenomena in which awareness emerges as an experimental variable.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. ‘Saving the Phenomena’ and Saving the Phenomena.Jim Bogen - 2011 - Synthese 182 (1):7-22.
    Empiricists claim that in accepting a scientific theory one should not commit oneself to claims about things that are not observable in the sense of registering on human perceptual systems (according to Van Fraassen’s constructive empiricism) or experimental equipment (according to what I call liberal empiricism ). They also claim scientific theories should be accepted or rejected on the basis of how well they save the phenomena in the sense delivering unified descriptions of natural regularities among things that meet (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  32.  57
    Mental Phenomena as Causal Determinants in Brain Functions.Roger W. Sperry - 1975 - Process Studies 5 (4):247-256.
  33.  21
    Analysis of the Phenomena of the Human Mind.James Mill - 1869 - New York: A. M. Kelley.
    We have now seen that, in what we call the mental world, Consciousness,- there are three grand classes of phenomena, the most familiar of all the facts with ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  34.  25
    Sketching Biological Phenomena and Mechanisms.Sheredos Benjamin & Bechtel William - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (4):970-985.
    In many fields of biology, both the phenomena to be explained and the mechanisms proposed to explain them are commonly presented in diagrams. Our interest is in how scientists construct such diagrams. Researchers begin with evidence, typically developed experimentally and presented in data graphs. To arrive at a robust diagram of the phenomenon or the mechanism, they must integrate a variety of data to construct a single, coherent representation. This process often begins as the researchers create a first sketch, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  17
    Recharacterizing scientific phenomena.David Colaço - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 10 (2):1-19.
    In this paper, I investigate how researchers evaluate their characterizations of scientific phenomena. Characterizing phenomena is an important – albeit often overlooked – aspect of scientific research, as phenomena are targets of explanation and theorization. As a result, there is a lacuna in the literature regarding how researchers determine whether their characterization of a target phenomenon is appropriate for their aims. This issue has become apparent for accounts of scientific explanation that take phenomena to be explananda. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36.  20
    Threshold Phenomena in Epistemic Networks.Patrick Grim - 2006 - In Proceedings, AAAI Fall Symposium on Complex Adaptive Systems and the Threshold Effect. AAAI Press.
    A small consortium of philosophers has begun work on the implications of epistemic networks (Zollman 2008 and forthcoming; Grim 2006, 2007; Weisberg and Muldoon forthcoming), building on theoretical work in economics, computer science, and engineering (Bala and Goyal 1998, Kleinberg 2001; Amaral et. al., 2004) and on some experimental work in social psychology (Mason, Jones, and Goldstone, 2008). This paper outlines core philosophical results and extends those results to the specific question of thresholds. Epistemic maximization of certain types does show (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  37.  4
    Cultural Phenomena Believed to Be Associated With Orthorexia Nervosa – Opinion Study in Dutch Health Professionals.Elena V. Syurina, Zarah M. Bood, Frida V. M. Ryman & Seda Muftugil-Yalcin - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Phenomena-Critique-Logos: The Project of Critical Phenomenology.Michael Marder - 2014 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A highly original reading of the history of phenomenology that offers a new systematic concept of critique.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. From Data to Phenomena and Back Again: Computer-Simulated Signatures.Eran Tal - 2011 - Synthese 182 (1):117-129.
    This paper draws attention to an increasingly common method of using computer simulations to establish evidential standards in physics. By simulating an actual detection procedure on a computer, physicists produce patterns of data (‘signatures’) that are expected to be observed if a sought-after phenomenon is present. Claims to detect the phenomenon are evaluated by comparing such simulated signatures with actual data. Here I provide a justification for this practice by showing how computer simulations establish the reliability of detection procedures. I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  40.  57
    Artificial Phenomena.Ian Hacking - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (2):235-241.
  41. Data and Phenomena.James Woodward - 1989 - Synthese 79 (3):393 - 472.
  42.  3
    To Save the Phenomena, an Essay on the Idea of Physical Theory From Plato to Galileo.Pierre Maurice Marie Duhem - 1969 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    Duhem's 1908 essay questions the relation between physical theory and metaphysics and, more specifically, between astronomy and physics–an issue still of importance today. He critiques the answers given by Greek thought, Arabic science, medieval Christian scholasticism, and, finally, the astronomers of the Renaissance.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  43. Saving Unobservable Phenomena.Michela Massimi - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (2):235-262.
    In this paper I argue-against van Fraassen's constructive empiricism-that the practice of saving phenomena is much broader than usually thought, and includes unobservable phenomena as well as observable ones. My argument turns on the distinction between data and phenomena: I discuss how unobservable phenomena manifest themselves in data models and how theoretical models able to save them are chosen. I present a paradigmatic case study taken from the history of particle physics to illustrate my argument. The (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  44. Can Mathematics Explain Physical Phenomena?Otávio Bueno & Steven French - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (1):85-113.
    Batterman raises a number of concerns for the inferential conception of the applicability of mathematics advocated by Bueno and Colyvan. Here, we distinguish the various concerns, and indicate how they can be assuaged by paying attention to the nature of the mappings involved and emphasizing the significance of interpretation in this context. We also indicate how this conception can accommodate the examples that Batterman draws upon in his critique. Our conclusion is that ‘asymptotic reasoning’ can be straightforwardly accommodated within the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  45.  12
    Viewpoint Phenomena in Multimodal Communication.Barbara Dancygier & Lieven Vandelanotte - 2017 - Cognitive Linguistics 28 (3):371-380.
    Journal Name: Cognitive Linguistics Issue: Ahead of print.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  99
    Deflationism and the Gödel Phenomena.Neil Tennant - 2002 - Mind 111 (443):551-582.
    consistent and sufficiently strong system of first-order formal arithmetic fails to decide some independent Gödel sentence. We examine consistent first-order extensions of such systems. Our purpose is to discover what is minimally required by way of such extension in order to be able to prove the Gödel sentence in a non-trivial fashion. The extended methods of formal proof must capture the essentials of the so-called ‘semantical argument’ for the truth of the Gödel sentence. We are concerned to show that the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  47.  30
    Mathematical Explanations of Physical Phenomena.Sorin Bangu - forthcoming - Tandf: Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    Can there be mathematical explanations of physical phenomena? In this paper, I suggest an affirmative answer to this question. I outline a strategy to reconstruct several typical examples of such explanations, and I show that they fit a common model. The model reveals that the role of mathematics is explicatory. Isolating this role may help to re-focus the current debate on the more specific question as to whether this explicatory role is, as proposed here, also an explanatory one.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  83
    Phenomena, Data and Theories: A Special Issue of Synthese.Peter Machamer - 2011 - Synthese 182 (1):1-5.
    The papers collected here are the result of an INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM: Data · Phenomena · Theories: What’s the notion of a scientific phenomenon good for? held in Heidelberg in September 2008. The event was organized by the research group Causality, Cognition, and the Constitution of Scientific Phenomena in cooperation with Philosophy Department at the University of Heidelberg (Peter McLaughlin and Andreas Kemmerling) and the IWH Heidelberg. The symposium was supported by the Emmy-Noether-Programm der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft and by Stiftung (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  2
    Climb Phenomena in Synthetic Fluorite Crystals.W. Bontinck - 1957 - Philosophical Magazine 2 (16):561-567.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  50. Are Only Mental Phenomena Intentional?Anders Nes - 2008 - Analysis 68 (299):205-215.
    I question Brentano's thesis that all and only mental phenomena are intentional. The common gloss on intentionality in terms of directedness does not justify the claim that intentionality is sufficient for mentality. One response to this problem is to lay down further requirements for intentionality. For example, it may be said that we have intentionality only where we have such phenomena as failure of substitution or existential presupposition. I consider a variety of such requirements for intentionality. I argue (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000