Results for 'physician assisted suicide'

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  1. Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Look at the Arguments.J. M. Dieterle - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):127–139.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I examine the arguments against physician assisted suicide . Many of these arguments are consequentialist. Consequentialist arguments rely on empirical claims about the future and thus their strength depends on how likely it is that the predictions will be realized. I discuss these predictions against the backdrop of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and the practice of PAS in the Netherlands. I then turn to a specific consequentialist argument against PAS – Susan M. Wolf's (...)
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  2. PhysicianAssisted Suicide: Two Moral Arguments.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1999 - Ethics 109 (3):497-518.
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  3. Does Physician Assisted Suicide Violate the Integrity of Medicine?Richard Momeyer - 1995 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (1):13-24.
    This paper evaluates the arguments against physician assisted suicide which contend that it violates the integrity of medicine and the physician-patient relation; i.e. that it contradicts the goal of seeking health and healing, violates an absolute prohibition against killing, and undermines the patient's trust in the physician. These arguments against physician assisted suicide (1) misuse notions of teleology and teleological explanation; (2) rely on inappropriate notions of "ideal medicine", for which death is (...)
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  4. The Irony of Supporting Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Personal Account. [REVIEW]Margaret Pabst Battin - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):403-411.
    Under other circumstances, I would have written an academic paper rehearsing the arguments for and against legalization of physician-assisted suicide: autonomy and the avoidance of pain and suffering on the pro side, the wrongness of killing, the integrity of the medical profession, and the risk of abuse, the “slippery slope,” on the con side. I’ve always supported the pro side. What this paper is, however, is a highly personal account of the challenges to my thinking about right-to-die (...)
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  5.  68
    Physician-Assisted Suicide and Voluntary Euthanasia: How Not to Die as a Christian.Mark J. Cherry - 2018 - Christian Bioethics 24 (1):1-16.
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  6. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Rebuttals of Rebuttals the Moral Prohibition Remains.Edmund D. Pellegrino - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):93 – 100.
  7. PhysicianAssisted Suicide, the Doctrine of Double Effect, and the Ground of Value.F. M. Kamm - 1999 - Ethics 109 (3):586-605.
    In this article, I shall present three arguments for thc pcrmissibility 0f physician-assisted suicide (PAS), and then examine several objections 0f 21 "K21nti2m" and non-Kantian nature against them. These are really 0bjcctions against certain types of suicide. I shall focus 0n active PAS (eg., when 21 patient takes 21 lethal drug given by E1 physician, in which case both thc physician and patient are active). I shall assume the patient is 21 competent, responsible, rational (...)
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  8.  58
    Attitudes on Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide and Terminal Sedation -- A Survey of the Members of the German Association for Palliative Medicine.H. C. Müller-Busch, Fuat S. Oduncu, Susanne Woskanjan & Eberhard Klaschik - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):333-339.
    Background: Due to recent legislations on euthanasia and its current practice in the Netherlands and Belgium, issues of end-of-life medicine have become very vital in many European countries. In 2002, the Ethics Working Group of the German Association for Palliative Medicine has conducted a survey among its physician members in order to evaluate their attitudes towards different end-of-life medical practices, such as euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and terminal sedation. Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was sent to the 411 (...)
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  9.  32
    Can Physician-Assisted Suicide Be Regulated Effectively?Franklin G. Miller, Howard Brody & Timothy E. Quill - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):225-232.
    With breathtalung speed, traditional criminal prohibitions against assisted suicide have been declared unconstitutional in twelve states, including California and New York. This poses great promise and great peril. The promise is that competent terminally ill patients, as a compassionate measure of last resort, will have the option of putting an end to their suffering by physician-assisted suicide. More sigmficant, legally permitting this controversial option may be a catalyst for doctors, health care institutions, and society to (...)
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  10.  53
    Physician-Assisted Suicide: The Role of Mental Health Professionals.Nico Peruzzi, Andrew Canapary & Bruce Bongar - 1996 - Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):353 – 366.
    A review of the literature was conducted to better understand the (potential) role of mental health professionals in physician-assisted suicide. Numerous studies indicate that depression is one of the most commonly encountered psychiatric illnesses in primary care settings. Yet, depression consistently goes undetected and undiagnosed by nonpsychiatrically trained primary care physicians. Noting the well-studied link between depression and suicide, it is necessary to question giving sole responsibility of assisting patients in making end-of-life treatment decisions to these (...)
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  11.  38
    Physician-Assisted Suicide Reconsidered: Dying as a Christian in a Post-Christian Age.H. T. Engelhardt - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):143-167.
    The traditional Christian focus concerning dying is on repentance, not dignity. The goal of a traditional Christian death is not a pleasing, final chapter to life, but union with God: holiness. The pursuit of holiness requires putting on Christ and accepting His cross. In contrast, post-traditional Christian and secular concerns with self-determination, control, dignity, and self-esteem make physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia plausible moral choices. Such is not the case within the context of the traditional Christian (...)
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  12.  7
    Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Look at the Arguments.J. M. Dieterle - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):127-139.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I examine the arguments against physician assisted suicide. Many of these arguments are consequentialist. Consequentialist arguments rely on empirical claims about the future and thus their strength depends on how likely it is that the predictions will be realized. I discuss these predictions against the backdrop of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and the practice of PAS in the Netherlands. I then turn to a specific consequentialist argument against PAS – Susan M. Wolf's feminist (...)
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  13.  50
    PhysicianAssisted Suicide: Promoting Autonomy—Or Medicalizing Suicide?Tania Salem - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (3):30-36.
  14. Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Before, During, and After the Holocaust.Sheldon Rubenfeld & Daniel P. Sulmasy (eds.) - 2020 - Lexington Books.
    This book provides a history of Nazi medical euthanasia programs, demonstrating that arguments in their favor were widely embraced by Western medicine before the Third Reich. Contributors find significant continuities between history and current physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia and urge caution about their legalization or implementation.
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  15.  59
    Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: German Protestantism, Conscience, and the Limits of Purely Ethical Reflection.P. Bartmann - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):203-225.
  16.  88
    Physician-Assisted Suicide and Public Policy.Gerald Dworkin - 1998 - Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):133-141.
    A defense of Physician-assisted suicide as ethically justifiable, and as legally permissible.
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  17. Autonomy-Based Arguments Against Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: A Critique. [REVIEW]Manne Sjöstrand, Gert Helgesson, Stefan Eriksson & Niklas Juth - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):225-230.
    Respect for autonomy is typically considered a key reason for allowing physician assisted suicide and euthanasia. However, several recent papers have claimed this to be grounded in a misconception of the normative relevance of autonomy. It has been argued that autonomy is properly conceived of as a value, and that this makes assisted suicide as well as euthanasia wrong, since they destroy the autonomy of the patient. This paper evaluates this line of reasoning by investigating (...)
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  18.  58
    Physician-Assisted Suicide, Disability, and Paternalism.Danny Scoccia - 2010 - Social Theory and Practice 36 (3):479-498.
    Some disability rights (DR) advocates oppose physician-assisted suicide (PAS) laws like Oregon’s on the grounds that they reflect ableist prejudice: how else can their limit on PAS eligibility to the terminally ill be explained? The paper answers this DR objection. It concedes that the limit in question cannot be defended on soft paternalist grounds, and offers a hard paternalist defense of it. The DR objection makes two mistakes: it overlooks the possibility of a hard paternalist defense of (...)
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  19.  8
    Embracing Slippery Slope on Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia Could Have Significant Unintended Consequences.Zeljka Buturovic - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):257-258.
    In a recent article Joshua James Hatherley argues that, if physician-assisted suicide is morally permissible for patients suffering from somatic illnesses, it should be permissible for psychiatric patients as well. He argues that psychiatric disorders do not necessarily impair decision-making ability, that they are not necessarily treatable and that legalising PAS for psychiatric patients would not diminish research and therapeutic interest in psychiatric treatments or impair their recovery through loss of hope. However, by erasing distinction between somatic (...)
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  20.  78
    Physician-Assisted Suicide, Euthanasia, and Christian Bioethics: Moral Controversy in Germany.A. T. May - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):273-283.
  21. Is the Exclusion of Psychiatric Patients From Access to Physician-Assisted Suicide Discriminatory?Joshua James Hatherley - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):817-820.
    Advocates of physician-assisted suicide often argue that, although the provision of PAS is morally permissible for persons with terminal, somatic illnesses, it is impermissible for patients suffering from psychiatric conditions. This claim is justified on the basis that psychiatric illnesses have certain morally relevant characteristics and/or implications that distinguish them from their somatic counterparts. In this paper, I address three arguments of this sort. First, that psychiatric conditions compromise a person’s decision-making capacity. Second, that we cannot have (...)
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  22.  74
    Why Physician-Assisted Suicide Perpetuates the Idolatry of Medicine.M. J. Cherry - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):245-271.
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  23.  52
    Reporting of Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide in the Netherlands: Descriptive Study.Hilde Buiting, Johannes van Delden, Bregje Onwuteaka-Philpsen, Judith Rietjens, Mette Rurup, Donald van Tol, Joseph Gevers, Paul van der Maas & Agnes van der Heide - 2009 - BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):18-.
    BackgroundAn important principle underlying the Dutch Euthanasia Act is physicians' responsibility to alleviate patients' suffering. The Dutch Act states that euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are not punishable if the attending physician acts in accordance with criteria of due care. These criteria concern the patient's request, the patient's suffering (unbearable and hopeless), the information provided to the patient, the presence of reasonable alternatives, consultation of another physician and the applied method of ending life. To demonstrate their (...)
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  24.  49
    Attitudes Toward Physician-Assisted Suicide Among Physicians in Vermont.A. Craig, B. Cronin, W. Eward, J. Metz, L. Murray, G. Rose, E. Suess & M. E. Vergara - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (7):400-403.
    Background: Legislation on physician-assisted suicide is being considered in a number of states since the passage of the Oregon Death With Dignity Act in 1994. Opinion assessment surveys have historically assessed particular subsets of physicians.Objective: To determine variables predictive of physicians’ opinions on PAS in a rural state, Vermont, USA.Design: Cross-sectional mailing survey.Participants: 1052 physicians licensed by the state of Vermont.Results: Of the respondents, 38.2% believed PAS should be legalised, 16.0% believed it should be prohibited and 26.0% (...)
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  25. Confronting Physician Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: My Father's Death.Susan M. Wolf - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 23-26.
  26.  9
    Physician Assisted Suicide: New Developments in the Netherlands.Sjef Gevers - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):309-312.
    Until recently, physician assisted suicide was dealt with on the same basis as active voluntary euthanasia in the Netherlands. Over the last years, several cases relating to assistance in suicide of mental patients did raise specific issues, not addressed so far in the debate on euthanasia. One of these cases resulted in a Supreme Court decision. The paper summarizes this decision and comments on it from a legal point of view.
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  27.  49
    Physician-Assisted Suicide.John Lachs - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 25--203.
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  28. Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide.Gerald Dworkin, R. G. Frey & Sissela Bok - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The moral issues involved in doctors assisting patients to die with dignity are of absolutely central concern to the medical profession, ethicists, and the public at large. The debate is fuelled by cases that extend far beyond passive euthanasia to the active consideration of killing by physicians. The need for a sophisticated but lucid exposition of the two sides of the argument is now urgent. This book supplies that need. Two prominent philosophers, Gerald Dworkin and R. G. Frey present the (...)
     
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  29.  13
    Physician Assisted Suicide: New Developments in the Netherlands.Sjef Gevers - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):309–312.
    Until recently, physician assisted suicide was dealt with on the same basis as active voluntary euthanasia in the Netherlands. Over the last years, several cases relating to assistance in suicide of mental patients did raise specific issues, not addressed so far in the debate on euthanasia. One of these cases resulted in a Supreme Court decision. The paper summarizes this decision and comments on it from a legal point of view.
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  30.  20
    Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Current Legal Perspective.Richard S. Myers - 2001 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (3):345-361.
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  31.  48
    Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: Knowledge, Attitudes and Experiences of Nurses in Andalusia (Spain).M. -I. Tamayo-Velazquez, P. Simon-Lorda & M. Cruz-Piqueras - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (5):677-691.
    The aim of this study is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and experiences of Spanish nurses in relation to euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. In an online questionnaire completed by 390 nurses from Andalusia, 59.1% adequately identified a euthanasia situation and 64.1% a situation involving physician-assisted suicide. Around 69% were aware that both practices were illegal in Spain, while 21.4% had received requests for euthanasia and a further 7.8% for assisted suicide. A total (...)
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  32.  47
    Euthanasia, Physician Assisted Suicide, and Christianity's Positive Relationship to the World.C. Delkeskamp-Hayes - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):163-185.
  33. Voluntary Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and the Goals of Medicine.Jukka Varelius - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (2):121 – 137.
    It is plausible that what possible courses of action patients may legitimately expect their physicians to take is ultimately determined by what medicine as a profession is supposed to do and, consequently, that we can determine the moral acceptability of voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide on the basis of identifying the proper goals of medicine. This article examines the main ways of defining the proper goals of medicine found in the recent bioethics literature and argues that they (...)
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  34.  49
    Physician-Assisted Suicide: Where to Draw the Line?Ernlé W. D. Young - 2000 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (3):407-410.
    In brief compass, I will touch on three of the central ethical and public policy issues that divide those who are opposed to physician-assisted dying from those who are supportive of this practice. These are: the moral distinction between actively hastening death and passively allowing to die; how to interpret the Hippocratic tradition in medicine with respect to physician-assisted death; and whether physician-assisted suicide can be effectively regulated. I shall summarize the arguments pro (...)
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  35. Voluntary Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and the Right to Do Wrong.Jukka Varelius - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (3):1-15.
    It has been argued that voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) are morally wrong. Yet, a gravely suffering patient might insist that he has a moral right to the procedures even if they were morally wrong. There are also philosophers who maintain that an agent can have a moral right to do something that is morally wrong. In this article, I assess the view that a suffering patient can have a moral right to VE and PAS (...)
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  36.  20
    Physician-Assisted Suicide.J. Shand - 1998 - Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (3):208-209.
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  37.  10
    Euthanasia, Physician Assisted Suicide, and Christianity's Positive Relationship to the World. Delkeskamp-Hayes - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):163-185.
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  38.  9
    Physician-Assisted Suicide and the Dutch Courts.J. K. M. Gevers - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):93.
    Over the last two decades, Dutch courts have left room for euthanasia. Although a crime under the Penal Code, euthanasia will usually not result in prosecution and conviction if it is committed by a physician according to rules of careful medical practice ; if the patient's request is voluntary, well-considered, and enduring; and if there is unacceptable and hopeless suffering and there are no other solutions to the patient's situation.
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  39.  72
    When is Physician Assisted Suicide or Euthanasia Acceptable?S. Frileux - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (6):330-336.
    Objectives: To discover what factors affect lay people’s judgments of the acceptability of physician assisted suicide and euthanasia and how these factors interact.Design: Participants rated the acceptability of either physician assisted suicide or euthanasia for 72 patient vignettes with a five factor design—that is, all combinations of patient’s age ; curability of illness ; degree of suffering ; patient’s mental status , and extent of patient’s requests for the procedure .Participants: Convenience sample of 66 (...)
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  40.  32
    The Case for Physician Assisted Suicide: Not (yet) Proven.B. Steinbock - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):235-241.
    The legalisation of physician assisted suicide in Oregon and physician assisted death in the Netherlands has revitalised the debate over whether and under what conditions individuals should be able to determine the time and manner of their deaths, and whether they should be able to enlist the help of physicians in doing so. Although the change in the law is both dramatic and recent, the basic arguments for and against have not really changed since the (...)
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  41. Death Talk: The Case Against Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide.Margaret A. Somerville - 2001 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    There are vast ethical, legal, and social differences between natural death and euthanasia. In Death Talk Margaret Somerville argues that legalizing euthanasia would cause irreparable harm to society's value of respect for human life, which in secular societies is carried primarily by the institutions of law and medicine. Death has always been a central focus of the discussion that we engage in as individuals and as a society in searching for meaning in life. Moreover, we accommodate the inevitable reality of (...)
     
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  42.  10
    PhysicianAssisted Suicide and the Profession's Gyrocompass.Steven H. Miles - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (3):17-19.
  43.  11
    Reasoning About Physician-Assisted Suicide: Analysis of Comments by Physicians and the Swedish General Public.G. Helgesson, A. Lindblad, H. Thulesius & N. Lynoe - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (1):19-25.
    Two questionnaires directed to Swedish physicians and a sample of the Swedish population investigated attitudes towards physician-assisted suicide (PAS). The aim of the present work was to analyse qualitative data from these questionnaires in order to explore how respondents reason about PAS. Data were analysed in two steps. First, we categorized different kinds of responses and identified pro and con arguments. Second, we identified general conclusions from the responses. The data reflect the differences in attitudes towards PAS (...)
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  44.  4
    Suffering, Authenticity, and Physician Assisted Suicide.R. Ahlzen - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (3):353-359.
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  45.  22
    Attitudes Toward Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Study of the Multivariate Effects of Healthcare Training, Patient Characteristics, Religion and Locus of Control.Carrie-Anne Marie Hains & Nicholas J. Hulbert-Williams - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):713-716.
    Next SectionPublic and healthcare professionals differ in their attitudes towards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS), the legal status of which is currently in the spotlight in the UK. In addition to medical training and experience, religiosity, locus of control and patient characteristics (eg, patient age, pain levels, number of euthanasia requests) are known influencing factors. Previous research tends toward basic designs reporting on attitudes in the context of just one or two potentially influencing factors; we aimed to (...)
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  46. The Case for Physician Assisted Suicide: How Can It Possibly Be Proven?Edgar Dahl & Neil Levy - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (6):335-338.
    In her paper, The case for physician assisted suicide: not proven, Bonnie Steinbock argues that the experience with Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act fails to demonstrate that the benefits of legalising physician assisted suicide outweigh its risks. Given that her verdict is based on a small number of highly controversial cases that will most likely occur under any regime of legally implemented safeguards, she renders it virtually impossible to prove the case for physician (...)
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  47.  15
    Guidelines for Physician-Assisted Suicide: Can the Challenge Be Met?Carl H. Coleman & Alan R. Fleischman - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):217-224.
    The question of legalizing physician-assisted suicide has become a serious public debate. Growing interest in assisted suicide reflects a public increasingly fearful of the process of dying, particularly the prospect of dying a painful, protracted, or undignified death. PAS has been proposed as a compassionate response to unrelievable suffering, designed to give terminally or incurably ill individuals direct control over the timing, manner, and circumstances of their death. Although the American Medical Association remains firmly opposed (...)
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  48. Palliative Sedation, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia: “Same, Same but Different”?Bert Broeckaert - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):62 - 64.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 62-64, June 2011.
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  49.  37
    Conscience, Referral, and Physician Assisted Suicide.Kevin WM Wildes - 1993 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):323-328.
    Practices such as physician assisted suicide, even if legal, engender a range of moral conflicts to which many are oblivious. A recent proposal for physician assisted suicide provides an example by calling upon physicians opposed to suicide to refer patients to other, more sympathetic, physicians. However, the proposal does not address the moral concerns of those physicians for whom such referral would be morally objectionable. Keywords: collaboration, euthanasia, intrinsic evil, material cooperation, projects, referral, (...)
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  50.  25
    PhysicianAssisted Suicide: A Conservative Critique of Intervention.Daniel E. Lee - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (1):17-19.
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