Results for 'plant growth substances'

998 found
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  1.  16
    The Forgotten Promise of Thiamin: Merck, Caltech Biologists, and Plant Hormones in a 1930s Biotechnology Project. [REVIEW]Nicolas Rasmussen - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):245 - 261.
    The physiology of plant hormones was one of the most dynamic fields in experimental biology in the 1930s, and an important part of T. H. Morgan's influential life science division at the California Institute of Technology. I describe one episode of plant physiology research at the institution in which faculty member James Bonner discovered that the B vitamin thiamin is a plant growth regulator, and then worked in close collaboration with the Merck pharmaceutical firm to develop (...)
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  2.  32
    The Introduction of the Precautionary Principle in Danish Environmental Policy: The Case of Plant Growth Retardants. [REVIEW]Søren Løkke & Per Christensen - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (3):229-247.
    In this paper, we investigate the Precautionary Principle (PP) in action. Precaution is a fairly new concept in environmental policy. It emerged back in the 1960s but did not consolidate until the 1980s, as it formed part of the major changes taking place in environmental policies at that time. The PP is examined in three contexts. Firstly, we look at the meaning of the concept and how it is disseminated through the media and public discourses to the political arenas of (...)
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  3.  11
    How Mechanisms Explain Interfield Cooperation: Biological–Chemical Study of Plant Growth Hormones in Utrecht and Pasadena, 1930–1938.Caterina Schürch - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (3):16.
    This article examines to what extent a particular case of cross-disciplinary research in the 1930s was structured by mechanistic reasoning. For this purpose, it identifies the interfield theories that allowed biologists and chemists to use each other’s techniques and findings, and that provided the basis for the experiments performed to identify plant growth hormones and to learn more about their role in the mechanism of plant growth. In 1930, chemists and biologists in Utrecht and Pasadena began (...)
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  4. History of the Term Hormone in Botany and the Discovery of Growth-Substances.E. Hextermann - 1994 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):311-337.
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  5. Recent developments in the field of Plant growth regulation.A. Lang - 1959 - Scientia 53 (94):112.
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  6.  17
    The Architecture of Polarized Cell Growth: The Unique Status of Elongating Plant Cells.Franti?ek Balu?ka, Przemys?aw Wojtaszek, Dieter Volkmann & Peter Barlow - 2003 - Bioessays 25 (6):569-576.
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  7.  7
    Auxin-Binding Proteins and Their Possible Roles in Auxin-Mediated Plant Cell Growth.Alan M. Jones & Paruchuri V. Prasad - 1992 - Bioessays 14 (1):43-48.
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  8.  4
    The Description of Growth of Plant Organs: A Continuous Approach Based on the Growth Tensor.Jerzy Nakielski & Zygmunt Hejnowicz - 2003 - In J. B. Nation (ed.), Formal Descriptions of Developing Systems. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 119--136.
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  9. A Possible Technique for the Investigation of the Effect of Water-Insoluble Substances on the Growth of Tissues in Vitro, Using Alcohol as an Excipient.W. S. S. Ladell - 1938 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 26 (4):373-386.
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  10.  34
    The Historical Bases of the Concept of Allelopathy.R. J. Willis - 1985 - Journal of the History of Biology 18 (1):71-102.
    In the light of contemporary allelopathic research, the intuitively based statements of the early botanists stand up surprisingly well. The walnut tree is now understood to affect the growth of neighboring plants via juglone leached from the leaves, roots, and fruits.118 The replant or soil sickness problem of peach orchards has been related to the toxigenic breakdown of amygdalin, a constituent of peach roots.119 The declining yield of many crop species grown under continuous monoculture has been linked to the (...)
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  11.  20
    Julius Caesar Scaliger on Plant Generation and the Question of Species Constancy.Andreas Blank - 2010 - Early Science and Medicine 15 (3):266-286.
    The sixteenth-century physician and philosopher Julius Caesar Scaliger combines the view that living beings are individuated by a single substantial form with the view that the constituents of the organic body retain their identity due to the continued existence and operation of their own substantial forms. This essay investigates the implications of Scaliger's account of subordinate and dominant substantial forms for the question of the constancy of biological species. According to Scaliger, biological mutability involves not only change on the ontological (...)
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  12. A Plant Disease Extension of the Infectious Disease Ontology.Ramona Walls, Barry Smith, Elser Justin, Goldfain Albert & W. Stevenson Dennis - 2012 - In Proceeedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology (CEUR 897). pp. 1-5.
    Plants from a handful of species provide the primary source of food for all people, yet this source is vulnerable to multiple stressors, such as disease, drought, and nutrient deficiency. With rapid population growth and climate uncertainty, the need to produce crops that can tolerate or resist plant stressors is more crucial than ever. Traditional plant breeding methods may not be sufficient to overcome this challenge, and methods such as highOthroughput sequencing and automated scoring of phenotypes can (...)
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  13.  18
    'All Is Leaf'. Goethe's Plant Philosophy and Poetry.Ina Goy - 2019 - In Cécilia Bognon-Küss & Charles T. Wolfe (eds.), Philosophy of Biology Before Biology. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 146-169.
    In "The Metamorphosis of Plants" (1790) and the related didactic poem (1798) Goethe describes the generation and development of plants as six metamorphoses of the primal plant and its organ, the leaf. In a first step, I will try to analyze the nature of the primal plant and its organ, the leaf. Is the primal plant and its organ, the leaf, an idea or does it consist in matter? If it is an idea, is it the idea (...)
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  14.  54
    The Plant Ontology: A Common Reference Ontology for Plants.L. Walls Ramona, D. Cooper Laurel, Elser Justin, W. Stevenson Dennis, Barry Smith, Mungall Chris, A. Gandolfo Maria & Jaiswal Pankaj - 2010 - In Proceedings of the Workshop on Bio-Ontologies, ISMB, Boston, July, 2010.
    The Plant Ontology (PO) (http://www.plantontology.org) (Jaiswal et al., 2005; Avraham et al., 2008) was designed to facilitate cross-database querying and to foster consistent use of plant-specific terminology in annotation. As new data are generated from the ever-expanding list of plant genome projects, the need for a consistent, cross-taxon vocabulary has grown. To meet this need, the PO is being expanded to represent all plants. This is the first ontology designed to encompass anatomical structures as well as (...) and developmental stages across such a broad taxonomic range. While other ontologies such as the Gene Ontology (GO) (The Gene Ontology Consortium, 2010) or Cell Type Ontology (CL) (Bard et al., 2005) cover all living organisms, they are confined to structures at the cellular level and below. The diversity of growth forms and life histories within plants presents a challenge, but also provides unique opportunities to study developmental and evolutionary homology across organisms. (shrink)
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  15.  8
    Plant Peasants of the Southern Urals Before the Peasant Liberation From Serfdom.R. B. Shaikhislamov - 2015 - Liberal Arts in Russiaроссийский Гуманитарный Журналrossijskij Gumanitarnyj Žurnalrossijskij Gumanitaryj Zhurnalrossiiskii Gumanitarnyi Zhurnal 4 (5):389.
    In the article, the social structure of mountain-plant serf population of fief and seasonal plants in the Southern Urals in the first half of the 19th century is studied. It is noted that due to the kind of their activity, all mountain-plant population was in this or that way connected with plant work; according to their social structure they were peasants, bought for the plants, or were the owners’ private serfs. It is shown that because of the (...)
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  16.  33
    La simulation informatique face à la « méthode des modèles ». Le cas de la croissance des plantes.Franck Varenne - 2003 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 11 (1):16-28.
    The paper deals with an intellectual and historical approach to the changing meanings of the term “model” in life sciences. The author 1st tries to understand how modeling has gradually spread over life sciences then he particularly focus on the birth of mathematical modeling in this field. This quite new practice offers new insights on the old debate concerning the mathematization of life sciences. Nowadays, through computers, mathematics not only analyze or quantify but model things: what does it mean? The (...)
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  17. Reactive Oxygen Species as Signals That Modulate Plant Stress Responses and Programmed Cell Death.Tsanko S. Gechev, Frank Van Breusegem, Julie M. Stone, Iliya Denev & Christophe Laloi - 2006 - Bioessays 28 (11):1091-1101.
    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known as toxic metabolic products in plants and other aerobic organisms. An elaborate and highly redundant plant ROS network, composed of antioxidant enzymes, antioxidants and ROS-producing enzymes, is responsible for maintaining ROS levels under tight control. This allows ROS to serve as signaling molecules that coordinate an astonishing range of diverse plant processes. The specificity of the biological response to ROS depends on the chemical identity of ROS, intensity of the signal, sites of (...)
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  18.  28
    Optimization of Solutions for the One Plant Protection Problem.E. Kelman, R. S. Levy & Y. Levy - 2001 - Acta Biotheoretica 49 (1):61-71.
    Plant protection problems are simulated by a system of ordinary differential equations with given initial conditions. The sensitivity and resistance of pathogen subpopulations to fungicide mixtures, fungicide weathering, plant growth, etc. are taken into consideration. The system of equations is solved numerically for each set of initial conditions and parameters of the disease and fungicide applications. Optimization algorithms were investigated and a computer program was developed for optimization of these solutions. 14 typical cases of the disease were (...)
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  19.  5
    Plant and Soil Chemistry in Seventeenth-Century England: Worsley, Boyle and Coxe.Antonio Clericuzio - 2018 - Early Science and Medicine 23 (5-6):550-583.
    In seventeenth-century England agriculturalists, projectors and natural philosophers devoted special attention to the chemical investigation of plants, of soil composition and of fertilizers. Hugh Plat’s and Francis Bacon’s works became particularly influential in the mid-seventeenth century, and inspired much of the Hartlib Circle’s schemes and research for improving agriculture. The Hartlibians turned to chemistry in order to provide techniques for improving soil and to investigate plant generation and growth. They drew upon the Paracelsian chemistry of salts, as well (...)
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  20. The Biosemiotics of Plant Communication.Günther Witzany - 2008 - American Journal of Semiotics 24 (1/3):39-56.
    This contribution demonstrates that the development and growth of plants depends on the success of complex communication processes. These communication processes are primarily sign-mediated interactions and are not simply an mechanical exchange of ‘information’, as that term has come to be understood in science. Rather, such interactions as I will be describing here involve the active coordination and organisation of a great variety of different behavioural patterns — all of which must be mediated by signs. Thus proposed, a biosemiotics (...)
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  21.  42
    Coping with the Growth of Chemical Knowledge.Joachim Schummer - manuscript
    Chemistry is by far the most productive science concerning the number of publications. A closer look at chemical papers reveals that most papers deal with new substances. The rapid growth of chemical knowledge seriously challenges all institutions and individuals concerned with chemistry. Chemistry documentation following the principle of completeness is required to schematize chemical information, which in turn induces a schematization of chemical research. Chemistry education is forced to seek reasonable principles of selectivity, although nobody can have an (...)
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  22. The Philosopher's Plant: An Intellectual Herbarium.Michael Marder & Mathilde Roussel - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite their conceptual allergy to vegetal life, philosophers have used germination, growth, blossoming, fruition, reproduction, and decay as illustrations of abstract concepts; mentioned plants in passing as the natural backdrops for dialogues, letters, and other compositions; spun elaborate allegories out of flowers, trees, and even grass; and recommended appropriate medicinal, dietary, and aesthetic approaches to select species of plants. In this book, Michael Marder illuminates the vegetal centerpieces and hidden kernels that have powered theoretical discourse for centuries. Choosing twelve (...)
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  23.  22
    On Treating Athletes with Banned Substances: The Relationship Between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Hypopituitarism, and Hormone Replacement Therapy.Sarah Malanowski & Nicholas Baima - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (1):27-38.
    Until recently, the problem of traumatic brain injury in sports and the problem of performance enhancement via hormone replacement have not been seen as related issues. However, recent evidence suggests that these two problems may actually interact in complex and previously underappreciated ways. A body of recent research has shown that traumatic brain injuries, at all ranges of severity, have a negative effect upon pituitary function, which results in diminished levels of several endogenous hormones, such as growth hormone and (...)
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  24.  35
    Towards a More Dynamic Plant Morphology.Rolf Sattler - 1990 - Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4):303-315.
    From the point of view of a dynamic morphology, form is not only the result of process(es) — it is process. This process may be analyzed in terms of two pairs of fundamental processes: growth and decay, differentiation and dedifferentiation. Each of these processes can be analyzed in terms of various modalities (parameters) and submodalities. This paper deals with those of growth (see Table 1). For the purpose of systematits and phylogenetic reconstruction the modalities and submodalities can be (...)
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  25.  3
    History and Epistemology of Plant Behaviour: A Pluralistic View?Quentin Hiernaux - forthcoming - Synthese:1-26.
    Some biologists now argue in favour of a pluralistic approach to plant activities, understandable both from the classical perspective of physiological mechanisms and that of the biology of behaviour involving choices and decisions in relation to the environment. However, some do not hesitate to go further, such as plant “neurobiologists” or philosophers who today defend an intelligence, a mind or even a plant consciousness in a renewed perspective of these terms. To what extent can we then adhere (...)
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  26.  18
    Growth Activity and Structure at Various Organization Levels in Plants.Roger Buis - 1993 - Acta Biotheoretica 41 (3):231-247.
    The growth activity of an organ (variable y) is defined simultaneously by the instantaneous absolute ratedy/dt and its variationd 2y/dt2. The use of these two descriptors allows a sigmoidal (i.e. continuous and non periodical, as observed for the logistic function) growth curve to be discretized into a series of 5 growth states or phases which are delimited by the following singular values: max, Vmax (=0), max, adult stage. The (V, ) plot, termedgrowth trajectory, visualizes, e.g. in the (...)
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  27.  21
    Reciprocal Conditioning Between the “Plant Stand” Level and the “Ndividual Whole Plant” Level During the Formation of the Ear Population of a Spring Cereal Crop.M. Lafarge - 1991 - Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4):343-350.
    Growth of spring barley stands was followed in various conditions. Disposition of the seeds parameters the morphogenetic programme of each individual plant, which will afterwards form the stricture of the young plant stand. Later, individual stopping of tillering is controlled by this stricture. In return, the distribution of these events conditions the structure of the canopy during the shoot lengthening period. In sparse or patchy canopies, weak tillers in stopping of growth are able to survive temporarily.The (...)
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  28.  20
    Plant Cellular Osmotica.Deng K. Niu, Ming G. Wang & Ya F. Wang - 1997 - Acta Biotheoretica 45 (2):161-169.
    To cope with the water deficit resulting from saline environment, plant cells accumulate three kinds of osmotica: salts, small organic solutes and hydrophillic, glycine-rich proteins. Salts such as NaCl are cheap and available but has ion toxicity in high concentrations. Small organic solutes are assistant osmotica, their main function is to protect cytoplasmic enzymes from ionic toxicity and maintain the integrity of cellular membranes. Hydrophillic, glycine-rich proteins are the most effective osmotica, they have some characteristics to avoid crystallization even (...)
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  29.  19
    Plant Morphogenesis: A Geometrical Model for the Ramification.Michel Ferré & Hervé Guyader - 1990 - Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4).
    A geometrical model is proposed that describes the emergence of a primordium at the shoot apex in Dicotyledons. It is based on recent fundamental results on plant morphogenesis, viz.: – the emergence is preceded by the reorganization of the microtubules of the cortical cytoskeleton, leading to a new orientation of the synthesis of the cell wall microfibrils; – the resulting global stress is related to the general orientation of the cell growth.
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  30.  15
    Women's Reactions to Job Loss: The Moral Dilemmas of a Plant Closing. [REVIEW]Suzanna Smith - 1991 - Agriculture and Human Values 8 (3):35-45.
    Blue collar women in declining industries tend to suffer permanent job loss as a result of dislocation, and women living in rural areas may be particularly vulnerable to extended unemployment. Relatively little is known about their experiences, in part because existing conceptual models do not adequately represent women's perspectives. In this study it is proposed that an ethic of care, as conceptualized by Carol Gilligan, shapes women's interpretations of the meaning of job dislocation. Gilligan's constructs are applied to a study (...)
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  31.  23
    The Measure of Biological Age in Plant Modular Systems.A. Ritterbusch - 1990 - Acta Biotheoretica 38 (2):113-124.
    Phytomorphology — if concerned with development — often concentrates on correlative changes of form and neglects the aspects of age, time and clock, although the plant's spatial and temporal organisation are intimately interconnected. Common age as measured in physical time by a physical process is compared to biological age as measured by a biological clock based on a biological process. A typical example for a biological clock on the organ level is, for example, a shoot. Its biological age is (...)
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  32.  13
    From Social Irresponsibility to Social Responsiveness: The Chrysler/Kenosha Plant Closing. [REVIEW]Thomas F. McMahon - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 20 (2):101 - 111.
    In 1987, Chrysler bought American Motors which included a plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin, a city of 72 000. Employing 6 500 workers, most of whom were members of the United Auto Workers (UAW), Chrysler became the city's largest employer. For decades, the UAW had a strong influence on city politics. However, in the 1980s young professionals in Kenosha began challenging this status quo.Chrysler shocked the citizens of Kenosha when their executives announced the closing of their plant within a (...)
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  33.  18
    Food and Sustainability Challenges Under Climate Changes.Khaled Moustafa - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (6):1831-1836.
    Plants are permanently impacted by their environments, and their abilities to tolerate multiple fluctuating environmental conditions vary as a function of several genetic and natural factors. Over the past decades, scientific innovations and applications of the knowledge derived from biotechnological investigations to agriculture caused a substantial increase of the yields of many crops. However, due to exacerbating effects of climate change and a growing human population, a crisis of malnutrition may arise in the upcoming decades in some places in the (...)
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  34.  17
    Across-the-Border Contamination, The Andorra Power Plant : A Business Ethics Case.Domingo García-marzá, Carmen Ferrete Sarria & Elsa González Esteban - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 22 (3):261-271.
    The purpose of this article is to present a business ethics case from the viewpoint of discursive ethics. Dialogue and subsequent agreement constitute two key ideas of European identity and are two basic concepts of discursive ethics thinking. Our choice for this type of approach was determined by several reasons, of which there are three that should be pointed out, as they can be considered an heritage of the European way of thinking:1) the need for a rational dialogue, in which (...)
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  35.  26
    Learning Plants: Semiosis Between the Parts and the Whole. [REVIEW]Ramsey Affifi - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (3):547-559.
    In this article, I explore plant semiosis with a focus on plant learning. I distinguish between the scales and levels of learning conceivable in phytosemiosis, and identify organism-scale learning as the distinguishing question for plant semiosis. Since organism-scale learning depends on organism-scale semiosis, I critically review the arguments regarding whole-plant functional cycles. I conclude that they have largely relied on Uexküllian biases that have prevented an adequate interpretation of modern plant neurobiology. Through an examination of (...)
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  36.  2
    The Artificial Cell, the Semipermeable Membrane, and the Life That Never Was, 1864–1901.Daniel Liu - 2019 - Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 49 (5):504-555.
    Since the early nineteenth century a membrane or wall has been cenptral to the cell’s identity as the elementary unit of life. Yet the literally and metaphorically marginal status of the cell membrane made it the site of clashes over the definition of life and the proper way to study it. In this article I show how the modern cell membrane was conceived of by analogy to the first “artificial cell,” invented in 1864 by the chemist Moritz Traube (1826–1894), and (...)
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  37.  24
    Traditional Coping Mechanism and Environmental Sustainability Strategies in Nnewi, Nigeria.G. O. Anoliefo, O. S. Isikhuemhen & E. C. Okolo - 1998 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (2):101-109.
    Nnewi is situated some 30 kilometres South East of Onitsha in Anambra State in the southeastern part of Nigeria. This highly commercial town has undergone rapid urbanisation and industrialisation within the past two decades, since the end of the 1967–1970 Nigerian civil war. The Igbo community of the study area had traditionally employed bioconversion methods and other indigenous technology to process or recycle bio and non-degradable wastes. Industrialisation has enjoyed priority status in this locality as a requirement for modernisation and (...)
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  38.  28
    Phytoassessment of Vetiver Grass Enhanced with EDTA Soil Amendment Grown in Single and Mixed Heavy Metal–Contaminated Soil.Chuck Chuan Ng - 2019 - Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 191 (434):1-16.
    Over the years, ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetate (EDTA) has been widely used for many purposes. However, there are inadequate phytoassessment studies conducted using EDTA in Vetiver grass. Hence, this study evaluates the phytoassessment (growth performance, accumulation trends, and proficiency of metal uptake) of Vetiver grass, Vetiveria zizanioides (Linn.) Nash in both single and mixed heavy metal (Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn)—disodium EDTA-enhanced contaminated soil. The plant growth, metal accumulation, and overall efficiency of metal uptake by different plant parts (lower (...)
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  39.  23
    On the Evolution of Egg Placement and Gregariousness of Caterpillars in the Lepidoptera.Allen M. Young - 1983 - Acta Biotheoretica 32 (1):43-60.
    Drawing heavily upon natural history data from the Neotropical butterfly fauna, an attempt is made to develop a model, with testable hypotheses, to account for the evolution of egg-clustering and larval gregariousness. Given the high diversity of both plant and butterfly species in the American tropics, there is a higher incidence of egg-clustering there, including some species with aposematically-colored immature stages. Emphasis is placed on the need to examine both the physical (mechanical) toughness of larval food plants for larval (...)
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  40.  9
    Note sur ľexplication causale en biologie.par Denis Zaslawsky - 1982 - Dialectica 36 (1):43-50.
    RésuméContrairement à ce que pourrait donner à penser la these de E. Mayr sur ľimportance actuelle des explications évolutives en biologie, par opposition aux explications fonctionnelles, ľauteur soutient que, pour ľépistémologie de la causalité, le second type ?on;explication reste plus significatif que le premier. II tente de le montrer en reprenant brièvement son analyse des travaux de P.E. Pilet sur les inhibiteurs de croissance , telle qu'elle a ete présentée dans quatre articles antérieurs.SummaryStarting from E. Mayr's distinction between functional and (...)
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  41.  26
    Carbon Partitioning in Forage Crops.Jean-Louis Durand, Claude Varlet-Grancher, Gilles Lemaire, François Gastal & Bruno Moulia - 1991 - Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4):213-224.
    The paper describes the conceptual models used to understand the processes determining plant growth rates in response to environmental changes. A series of experiments and growth models were used at three organizational levels: the specific plant organs, the whole plant and the plant canopy. The energy conversion efficiency and the total plant carbon balance were first examined. The carbon partitioning amongst the plant parts was then studied. The energy conversion efficiency is generally (...)
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  42.  56
    The Plant Ontology Facilitates Comparisons of Plant Development Stages Across Species.Ramona Lynn Walls, Laurel Cooper, Justin Lee Elser, Maria Alejandra Gandolfo, Christopher J. Mungall, Barry Smith, Dennis William Stevenson & Pankaj Jaiswal - 2019 - Frontiers in Plant Science 10.
    The Plant Ontology (PO) is a community resource consisting of standardized terms, definitions, and logical relations describing plant structures and development stages, augmented by a large database of annotations from genomic and phenomic studies. This paper describes the structure of the ontology and the design principles we used in constructing PO terms for plant development stages. It also provides details of the methodology and rationale behind our revision and expansion of the PO to cover development stages for (...)
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  43. How the Growth of Science Ends Theory Change.Ludwig Fahrbach - 2011 - Synthese 180 (2):139-155.
    This paper outlines a defense of scientific realism against the pessimistic meta- induction which appeals to the phenomenon of the exponential growth of science. Here, scientific realism is defined as the view that our current successful scientific theories are mostly approximately true, and pessimistic meta- induction is the argument that projects the occurrence of past refutations of successful theories to the present concluding that many or most current successful scientific theories are false. The defense starts with the observation that (...)
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  44.  89
    The Pessimistic Induction and the Exponential Growth of Science Reassessed.K. Brad Wray - 2013 - Synthese 190 (18):4321-4330.
    My aim is to evaluate a new realist strategy for addressing the pessimistic induction, Ludwig Fahrbach’s (Synthese 180:139–155, 2011) appeal to the exponential growth of science. Fahrbach aims to show that, given the exponential growth of science, the history of science supports realism. I argue that Fahrbach is mistaken. I aim to show that earlier generations of scientists could construct a similar argument, but one that aims to show that the theories that they accepted are likely true. The (...)
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  45. Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge.Imre Lakatos & Alan Musgrave (eds.) - 1970 - Cambridge University Press.
    Two books have been particularly influential in contemporary philosophy of science: Karl R. Popper's Logic of Scientific Discovery, and Thomas S. Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Both agree upon the importance of revolutions in science, but differ about the role of criticism in science's revolutionary growth. This volume arose out of a symposium on Kuhn's work, with Popper in the chair, at an international colloquium held in London in 1965. The book begins with Kuhn's statement of his position followed (...)
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  46.  36
    The Philosophy of Plant Neurobiology: A Manifesto.Paco Calvo - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5).
    Plant neurobiology’ has emerged in recent years as a multidisciplinary endeavor carried out mainly by steady collaboration within the plant sciences. The field proposes a particular approach to the study of plant intelligence by putting forward an integrated view of plant signaling and adaptive behavior. Its objective is to account for the way plants perceive and act in a purposeful manner. But it is not only the plant sciences that constitute plant neurobiology. Resources from (...)
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  47. The Planteome Database: An Integrated Resource for Reference Ontologies, Plant Genomics and Phenomics.Laurel Cooper, Austin Meier, Marie-Angélique Laporte, Justin L. Elser, Chris Mungall, Brandon T. Sinn, Dario Cavaliere, Seth Carbon, Nathan A. Dunn, Barry Smith, Botong Qu, Justin Preece, Eugene Zhang, Sinisa Todorovic, Georgios Gkoutos, John H. Doonan, Dennis W. Stevenson, Elizabeth Arnaud & Pankaj Jaiswal - 2018 - Nucleic Acids Research 46 (D1):D1168–D1180.
    The Planteome project provides a suite of reference and species-specific ontologies for plants and annotations to genes and phenotypes. Ontologies serve as common standards for semantic integration of a large and growing corpus of plant genomics, phenomics and genetics data. The reference ontologies include the Plant Ontology, Plant Trait Ontology, and the Plant Experimental Conditions Ontology developed by the Planteome project, along with the Gene Ontology, Chemical Entities of Biological Interest, Phenotype and Attribute Ontology, and others. (...)
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  48.  15
    Unsustainable Growth, Hyper-Competition, and Worth in Life Science Research: Narrowing Evaluative Repertoires in Doctoral and Postdoctoral Scientists’ Work and Lives.Maximilian Fochler, Ulrike Felt & Ruth Müller - 2016 - Minerva 54 (2):175-200.
    There is a crisis of valuation practices in the current academic life sciences, triggered by unsustainable growth and “hyper-competition.” Quantitative metrics in evaluating researchers are seen as replacing deeper considerations of the quality and novelty of work, as well as substantive care for the societal implications of research. Junior researchers are frequently mentioned as those most strongly affected by these dynamics. However, their own perceptions of these issues are much less frequently considered. This paper aims at contributing to a (...)
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  49.  53
    The Philosophy of Plant Neurobiology: A Manifesto.Paco Calvo - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5):1323-1343.
    Plant neurobiology’ has emerged in recent years as a multidisciplinary endeavor carried out mainly by steady collaboration within the plant sciences. The field proposes a particular approach to the study of plant intelligence by putting forward an integrated view of plant signaling and adaptive behavior. Its objective is to account for the way plants perceive and act in a purposeful manner. But it is not only the plant sciences that constitute plant neurobiology. Resources from (...)
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  50. Persistence of Simple Substances.Markku Keinänen & Jani Hakkarainen - 2010 - Metaphysica 11 (2):119-135.
    In this paper, we argue for a novel three-dimensionalist solution to the problem of persistence, i.e. cross-temporal identity. We restrict the discussion of persistence to simple substances, which do not have other substances as their parts. The account of simple substances employed in the paper is a trope-nominalist strong nuclear theory, which develops Peter Simons' trope nominalism. Regarding the distinction between three dimensionalism and four dimensionalism, we follow Michael Della Rocca's formulation, in which 3D explains persistence in (...)
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