Results for 'plant succession'

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  1.  21
    Plant Succession and Tree Architecture: An Attempt at Reconciling Two Scales of Analysis of Vegetation Dynamics.Jeanne Millet, André Bouchard & Claude Édelin - 1998 - Acta Biotheoretica 46 (1):1-22.
    Plant succession is a phenomenon ascribed to vegetation dynamics at the scale of the plant community. The study of plant succession implies the analysis of the species involved and their relationships. Depending on the research done, the characteristics of trees have been studied according to either static, dimensional or partial approaches. We have revised the principal theories of succession, the methods of describing structure and development of tree and relationship established between tree species' attributes (...)
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  2.  7
    Modern Merthods and a Controversial Surname: Plant.Dr John S. Plant - 2005 - Philosophical Explorations.
    In the past few years, DNA testing has begun to contribute to our understanding. It is currently emerging more clearly which surnames are multi-origin, originating with many different forefathers, and which descend from a single male ancestor. As a case study, I shall describe the application of modern, multidisciplinary methods to the surname Plant, which has been ascribed a different meaning each time an authority has written about it. The recent emergence of a different view anout this name's origins (...)
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  3.  2
    From Formation to Ecosystem: Tansley's Response to Clements' Climax. [REVIEW]Arnold G. Van der Valk - 2013 - Journal of the History of Biology:1-29.
    Arthur G. Tansley never accepted Frederic E. Clements’ view that succession is a developmental process whose final stage, the climax formation, is determined primarily by regional climate and that all other types of vegetation are some kind of successional stage or arrested successional stage. Tansley was convinced that in a given region a variety of environmental factors could produce different kinds of climax formations. At the heart of their dispute was Clements’ organicist view of succession, i.e., the formation (...)
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  4. Competition Theory and Channeling Explanation.Christopher H. Eliot - 2011 - Philosophy and Theory in Biology 3 (20130604):1-16.
    The complexity and heterogeneity of causes influencing ecology’s domain challenge its capacity to generate a general theory without exceptions, raising the question of whether ecology is capable, even in principle, of achieving the sort of theoretical success enjoyed by physics. Weber has argued that competition theory built around the Competitive Exclusion Principle (especially Tilman’s resource-competition model) offers an example of ecology identifying a law-like causal regularity. However, I suggest that as Weber presents it, the CEP is not yet a causal (...)
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  5.  20
    Death, Fear, and Self-Mourning.Bob Plant - unknown
    Attitudes to our own mortality are characterized by more than just fear, suggests Bob Plant.
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  6.  12
    Hegel.Raymond Plant - 1973 - Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
    In his theological explorations, suggests Raymond Plant in this illuminating new guide, Hegel tackled the issues of interest to us all.
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  7.  4
    Gifts, Exchanges and the Political Economy of Health Care. Part I: Should Blood Be Bought and Sold?R. Plant - 1977 - Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (4):166-173.
    Should blood be bought and sold is in crude terms the question asked and answered by Richard Titmuss in his recent book The Gift Relationship. Dr Raymond Plant, a lecturer in philosophy at Manchester University, analyses Titmuss' arguments in a paper which we are printing in two parts. Titmuss has taken the provision of blood as his example of the gift relationship--and by extension that of health care generally. Dr Plant considers in turn each of Titmuss' arguments that (...)
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  8.  16
    Wittgenstein and Levinas: Ethical and Religious Thought.Bob Plant - 2005 - Routledge.
    _Wittgenstein and Levinas_ examines the oft-neglected relationship between the philosophies of two of the most important and notoriously difficult thinkers of the twentieth century. By bringing the work of each philosopher to bear upon the other, Plant navigates between the antagonistic intellectual traditions that they helped to share. The central focus on the book is the complex yet illuminating interplay between a number of ethical-religious themes in both Wittgenstein's mature thinking and Levinas's distinctive account of ethical responsibility.
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  9.  18
    Basic Principles of Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.V. G. Thomas & P. G. Kevan - 1993 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):1-19.
    In the final analysis, sustainable agriculture must derive from applied ecology, especially the principle of the regulation of the abundance and distribution of species (and, secondarily, their activities) in space and time. Interspecific competition in natural ecosystems has its counterparts in agriculture, designed to divert greater amounts of energy, nutrients, and water into crops. Whereas natural ecosystems select for a diversity of species in communities, recent agriculture has minimized diversity in favour of vulnerable monocultures. Such systems show intrinsically less stability (...)
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  10.  16
    Doing Justice to the Derrida–Levinas Connection: A Response to Mark Dooley.Bob Plant - 2003 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (4):427-450.
    Mark Dooley has recently argued (principally against Simon Critchley) that the attempt to establish too strong a ‘connection’ between Jacques Derrida and Emmanuel Levinas not only distorts crucial disparities between their respective philosophies, it also contaminates Derrida’s recent work with Levinas’s inherent ‘political naivety’. In short, on Dooley’s reading, Levinas is only of ‘inspirational value’ for Derrida. I am not concerned with defending Critchley’s own reading of the ‘Derrida–Levinas connection’. My objective is rather to demonstrate, first, the way in which (...)
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  11.  50
    The End(s) of Philosophy: Rhetoric, Therapy and Wittgenstein's Pyrrhonism.Bob Plant - 2004 - Philosophical Investigations 27 (3):222–257.
  12. Modern Political Thought.Raymond Plant - 1991 - Blackwell.
  13.  28
    Blasphemy, Dogmatism and Injustice: The Rough Edges of on Certainty. [REVIEW]Robert Plant - 2003 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 54 (2):101-135.
    On Certainty remains one the mostprovocative and challenging parts ofWittgenstein's intellectual legacy.Philosophers generally read this text as anassault on the traditional sceptic/anti-scepticdebate. But some commentators identifypolitical – specifically `conservative' –sentiments at work here. Others embraceWittgenstein's (alleged) `pluralism', whilethose less enthused think the latter collapsesinto relativism. Although this mixed receptionis, I will argue, partly due to Wittgenstein'sown troubled engagement with the central themesof On Certainty, the real difficultyand value of this text lies in itsintertwining questions of epistemology,religious belief and ethical-politicaljudgement.
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  14. Playing Games/Playing Us: Foucault on Sadomasochism.Bob Plant - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (5):531-561.
    The impact of Foucault's work can still be felt across a range of academic disciplines. It is nevertheless important to remember that, for him, theoretical activity was intimately related to the concrete practices of self-transformation; as he acknowledged: `I write in order to change myself.' 1 This avowal is especially pertinent when considering Foucault's work on the relationship between sex and power. For Foucault not only theorized about this topic; he was also actively involved in the S&M subculture of the (...)
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  15.  14
    Our Natural Constitution: Wolterstorff on Reid and Wittgenstein.Bob Plant - 2003 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 1 (2):157-170.
  16. Political Philosophy and Social Welfare: Essays on the Normative Basis of Welfare Provision.Raymond Plant - 1980 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    First published in 1980. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  17. Hegel: An Introduction.Raymond Plant - 1983 - Blackwell.
  18. Democratic Socialism and Equality.Raymond Plant - 1981 - In Anthony Crosland, David Lipsey & R. L. Leonard (eds.), The Socialist Agenda: Crosland's Legacy. Cape.
  19.  63
    Absurdity, Incongruity and Laughter.Bob Plant - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (1):111-134.
    In "The Myth of Sisyphus", Camus recommends scornful defiance in the face of our absurd, meaningless existence. Although Nagel agrees that human life possesses an absurd dimension, he objects to Camus' existentialist 'dramatics'. For Nagel, absurdity arises from the irreducible tension between our subjective and objective perspectives on life. In this paper I do two things: (i) critically reconstruct Camus' and Nagel's positions, and (ii) develop Nagel's critique of Camus in order to argue that humour is an appropriate response to (...)
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  20.  41
    The Banality of Death.Bob Plant - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (4):571-596.
    Notwithstanding the burgeoning literature on death, philosophers have tended to focus on the significance death has (or ought/ought not to have) for the one who dies. Thus, while the relevance one's own death has for others (and the significance others' deaths have for us) is often mentioned, it is rarely attributed any great importance to the purported real philosophical issues. This is a striking omission, not least because the deaths of others - and the anticipated effects our own death will (...)
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  21.  28
    The Phenomenon of "the Look".George J. Stack & Robert W. Plant - 1982 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (3):359-373.
  22.  19
    Ethics Without Exit: Levinas and Murdoch.Bob Plant - 2003 - Philosophy and Literature 27 (2):456-470.
  23.  14
    Perhaps.Bob Plant - 2006 - Angelaki 11 (3):137 – 156.
    The formulae "perhaps" and "perhaps not," [] we adopt in place of "perhaps it is and perhaps it is not" []. But here again we do not fight about phrases [] these expressions are indicative of non-assertion. Sextus Empiricus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism One could spend years on [] the perhaps [] whose modality will render fictional and fragile everything that follows []. One does not testify in court and before the law with "perhaps." Jacques Derrida, Demeure: Fiction and Testimony.
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  24.  12
    Apologies: Levinas and Dialogue.Bob Plant - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):79 – 94.
    In his recent article 'Speech and Sensibility: Levinas and Habermas on the Constitution of the Moral Point of View', Steven Hendley argues that Levinas's preoccupation with language as 'exposure' to the 'other' provides an important corrective to Habermas's focus on the 'procedural' aspects of communication. Specifically, what concerns Hendley is the question of moral motivation, and how Levinas, unlike Habermas, responds to this question by stressing the dialogical relation as one of coming 'into proximity to the face of the other' (...)
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  25.  6
    The Tardy Adoption of the Plantagenet Surname.Dr John S. Plant - 2007 - Philosophical Explorations.
    Accounts of the origins of Plantagenet have ignored a tradition of similar names, some of which had a bawdy insinuation. There could have been a mischievous interpretation of Plantagenet, building its currency amongst neighbouring commoners whilst delaying its acceptance for official royal purposes. This and other developments such as the spread of contemporary scholastic teachings can explain the slow but eventual adoption of the Plantagenet nickname as a hereditary royal surname despite the scarcity of its early mentions.
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  26.  15
    The Philosophy of Plant Neurobiology: A Manifesto.Paco Calvo - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5):1323-1343.
    Plant neurobiology’ has emerged in recent years as a multidisciplinary endeavor carried out mainly by steady collaboration within the plant sciences. The field proposes a particular approach to the study of plant intelligence by putting forward an integrated view of plant signaling and adaptive behavior. Its objective is to account for the way plants perceive and act in a purposeful manner. But it is not only the plant sciences that constitute plant neurobiology. Resources from (...)
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  27.  18
    The Philosophy of Plant Neurobiology: A Manifesto.Paco Calvo - forthcoming - Synthese:1-21.
    Plant neurobiology’ has emerged in recent years as a multidisciplinary endeavor carried out mainly by steady collaboration within the plant sciences. The field proposes a particular approach to the study of plant intelligence by putting forward an integrated view of plant signaling and adaptive behavior. Its objective is to account for the way plants perceive and act in a purposeful manner. But it is not only the plant sciences that constitute plant neurobiology. Resources from (...)
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  28.  29
    Mendelism, Plant Breeding and Experimental Cultures: Agriculture and the Development of Genetics in France. [REVIEW]Christophe Bonneuil - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):281 - 308.
    The article reevaluates the reception of Mendelism in France, and more generally considers the complex relationship between Mendelism and plant breeding in the first half on the 20th century. It shows on the one side that agricultural research and higher education institutions have played a key role in the development and institutionalization of genetics in France, whereas university biologists remained reluctant to accept this approach on heredity. But on the other side, plant breeders, and agricultural researchers, despite an (...)
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  29.  7
    Sexuality and Succession Law: Beyond Formal Equality. [REVIEW]Daniel Monk - 2011 - Feminist Legal Studies 19 (3):231-250.
    This article endeavours to open up a dialogue between succession law and the field of gender, sexuality and the law. It presents a detailed analysis of five cases concerning inheritance disputes relating to lesbians or gay men. The sexuality of the parties in the cases is ‘doctrinally irrelevant’ but the analysis demonstrates the significance of sexuality in the resolution of the legal disputes. In doing so it identifies how legal discourse remains a critical site for the production of societal (...)
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  30. Ontologies as Integrative Tools for Plant Science.Ramona Walls, Balaji Athreya, Laurel Cooper, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Pankaj Jaiswal, Christopher J. Mungall, Justin Preece, Stefan Rensing, Barry Smith & Dennis W. Stevenson - 2012 - American Journal of Botany 99 (8):1-13.
    Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the Semantic Web. This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to (...) science, with a detailed description of the Plant Ontology (PO). We discuss the challenges of building an ontology that covers all green plants (Viridiplantae). Key results: Ontologies can advance plant science in four keys areas: 1. comparative genetics, genomics, phenomics, and development, 2. taxonomy and systematics, 3. semantic applications and 4. education. Conclusions: Bio-ontologies offer a flexible framework for comparative plant biology, based on common botanical understanding. As genomic and phenomic data become available for more species, we anticipate that the annotation of data with ontology terms will become less centralized, while at the same time, the need for cross-species queries will become more common, causing more researchers in plant science to turn to ontologies. (shrink)
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  31.  6
    Scientific Theory and Agricultural Practice: Plant Breeding in Germany From the Late 19th to the Early 20th Century. [REVIEW]Thomas Wieland - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):309 - 343.
    The paper deals with the transformation of plant breeding from an agricultural practice into an applied academic science in the late 19th and early 20th centuries Germany. The aim is to contribute to the ongoing debate about the relationship between science and technology. After a brief discussion of this debate the first part of the paper examines how pioneers of plant breeding developed their breeding methods and commercially successful varieties. The focus here is on the role of scientific (...)
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  32.  16
    Is Plant Breeding Science Objective Truth or Social Construction? The Case of Yield Stability.David A. Cleveland - 2001 - Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):251-270.
    This article presents a holistic framework for understanding the scienceof plant breeding, as an alternative to the common objectivist andconstructivist approaches in studies of science. It applies thisapproach to understanding disagreements about how to deal with yieldstability. Two contrasting definitions of yield stability are described,and concomitant differences in the understanding and roles ofsustainability and of selection, test, and target environments areexplored. Critical questions about plant breeding theory and practiceare posed, and answers from the viewpoint of the two contrastingdefinitions (...)
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  33.  9
    Julius Caesar Scaliger on Plant Generation and the Question of Species Constancy.Andreas Blank - 2010 - Early Science and Medicine 15 (3):266-286.
    The sixteenth-century physician and philosopher Julius Caesar Scaliger combines the view that living beings are individuated by a single substantial form with the view that the constituents of the organic body retain their identity due to the continued existence and operation of their own substantial forms. This essay investigates the implications of Scaliger's account of subordinate and dominant substantial forms for the question of the constancy of biological species. According to Scaliger, biological mutability involves not only change on the ontological (...)
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  34.  5
    The Forgotten Promise of Thiamin: Merck, Caltech Biologists, and Plant Hormones in a 1930s Biotechnology Project. [REVIEW]Nicolas Rasmussen - 1999 - Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):245 - 261.
    The physiology of plant hormones was one of the most dynamic fields in experimental biology in the 1930s, and an important part of T. H. Morgan's influential life science division at the California Institute of Technology. I describe one episode of plant physiology research at the institution in which faculty member James Bonner discovered that the B vitamin thiamin is a plant growth regulator, and then worked in close collaboration with the Merck pharmaceutical firm to develop it (...)
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  35.  10
    Little Things Mean a Lot: Working with Central American Farmers to Address the Mystery of Plant Disease. [REVIEW]Stephen G. Sherwood - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):181-189.
    Cornell University and Zamorano (ThePanamerican School of Agriculture) facilitatedworkshops that provided Honduran and Nicaraguanfarmers new experience with plant diseases and helpedfarmers assimilate information and identify diseasemanagement alternatives. After learning about thebiology of plant diseases, farmers were able toidentify disease problems in their field, enablingthem to use pesticides more selectively. Furthermore,participants of seven courses conceived 273 pathogen-specificmanagement alternatives, and they identifiedon average 66 percent of the common recommendations by plantpathologists for the control of general disease types.Many ideas were novel (...)
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  36.  13
    Plant as Object Within Herbal Landscape: Different Kinds of Perception. [REVIEW]Renata Sõukand & Raivo Kalle - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (3):299-313.
    This contribution takes the notion of herbal landscape (a mental field associated with plants used to cure or prevent diseases and established within specific cultural and climatic zones) as a starting point. The authors argue that the features by which a person recognises the plant in the natural growing environment is of crucial importance for the classification and the use of plants within the folk tradition. The process of perception of the plant can be divided into analytical categories (...)
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  37.  11
    Exclusion, Commodification and Plant Variety Rights Legislation.Andrew Alexandra & Adrian Walsh - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (4):313-323.
    Plant variety rights legislation, now enactedin most Western countries, fosters the commodificationof plant varieties. In this paper, we look at theconceptual issues involved in understanding andjustifying this commodification, with particularemphasis on Australian legislation. The paper isdivided into three sections. In the first, we lay outa taxonomy of goods, drawing on this in the secondsection to point out that the standard justificationof the allocation of exclusionary property rights byappeal to scarcity will not do for abstract goods suchas plant (...)
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  38.  36
    Integrity and Rights of Plants: Ethical Notions in Organic Plant Breeding and Propagation. [REVIEW]Edith T. Lammerts Van Bueren & Paul C. Struik - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (5):479-493.
    In addition to obviating the use of synthetic agrochemicals and emphasizing farming in accordance with agro-ecological guidelines, organic farming acknowledges the integrity of plants as an essential element of its natural approaches to crop production. For cultivated plants, integrity refers to their inherent nature, wholeness, completeness, species-specific characteristics, and their being in balance with their (organically farmed) environment, while accomplishing their “natural aim.” We argue that this integrity of plants has ethical value, distinguishing integrity of life, plant-typic integrity, genotypic (...)
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  39.  14
    Beyond “Second Animals”: Making Sense of Plant Ethics. [REVIEW]Sylvie Pouteau - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):1-25.
    Concern for what we do to plants is pivotal for the field of environmental ethics but has scarcely been voiced. This paper examines how plant ethics first emerged from the development of plant science and yet also hit theoretical barriers in that domain. It elaborates on a case study prompted by a legal article on “the dignity of creatures” in the Swiss Constitution. Interestingly, the issue of plant dignity was interpreted as a personification or rather an “animalization (...)
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  40.  27
    Comparative Analysis of the Risk-Handling Procedures for Gene Technology Applications in Medical and Plant Science.Anna Lydia Svalastog, Petter Gustafsson & Stefan Jansson - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):465-479.
    In this paper we analyse how the risks associated with research on transgenic plants are regulated in Sweden. The paper outlines the way in which pilot projects in the plant sciences are overseen in Sweden, and discusses the international and national background to the current regulatory system. The historical, and hitherto unexplored, reasons for the evolution of current administrative and legislative procedures in plant science are of particular interest. Specifically, we discuss similarities and differences in the regulation of (...)
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  41.  14
    Charles Darwin's Beagle Voyage, Fossil Vertebrate Succession, and "The Gradual Birth & Death of Species". [REVIEW]Paul D. Brinkman - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):363 - 399.
    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he (...)
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  42.  22
    Healing with Plant Intelligence: A Report From Ayahuasca.Richard Doyle - 2012 - Anthropology of Consciousness 23 (1):28-43.
    Numerous and diverse reports indicate the efficacy of shamanic plant adjuncts (e.g., iboga, ayahuasca, psilocybin) for the care and treatment of addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, cancer, cluster headaches, and depression. This article reports on a first-person healing of lifelong asthma and atopic dermatitis in the shamanic context of the contemporary Peruvian Amazon and the sometimes digital ontology of online communities. The article suggests that emerging language, concepts, and data drawn from the sciences of plant signaling and behavior regarding (...)
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  43.  7
    Henry David Thoreau's Science inThe Dispersion of Seeds.Michael Berger - 1996 - Annals of Science 53 (4):381-397.
    A major manuscript by nineteenth-century American writer-naturalist Henry David Thoreau was published for the first time in 1993. The Dispersion of Seeds is a study of ecological dynamics in forests in and around Concord, Massachusetts. Drafted by Thoreau just before his premature death in 1862, it emphasizes plant-animal mutualism in the dispersion of oak seed, as a fundamental factor in forest succession patterns. If Thoreau had lived to publish this study, it is likely that his pioneering role in (...)
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  44.  25
    The Introduction of the Precautionary Principle in Danish Environmental Policy: The Case of Plant Growth Retardants. [REVIEW]Søren Løkke & Per Christensen - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (3):229-247.
    In this paper, we investigate the Precautionary Principle (PP) in action. Precaution is a fairly new concept in environmental policy. It emerged back in the 1960s but did not consolidate until the 1980s, as it formed part of the major changes taking place in environmental policies at that time. The PP is examined in three contexts. Firstly, we look at the meaning of the concept and how it is disseminated through the media and public discourses to the political arenas of (...)
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  45.  10
    Justus Liebig and the Plant Physiologists.Petra Werner & Frederic L. Holmes - 2002 - Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):421 - 441.
    In his book "Organic Chemistry in its Application to Agriculture and Chemistry." Justus Liebig attacked "the plant physiologists" for their support of the humus theory and for their general ignorance of chemistry. Two leading botanists, Matthias Schleiden and Hugo von Mohl, responded by sharply criticizing Liebig for his lack of knowledge of plants and his misrepresentation of the views of plant physiologists. The origin and character of this debate can be understood in part through the temperaments of Liebig (...)
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  46.  6
    Diplomatic Protection and Questions Related to Succession of States.Birutė Kunigėlytė-Žiūkienė - 2013 - Jurisprudence 20 (2):591-609.
    Succession of states regains its importance in current geopolitical situation as now we are witnessing a possible new wave of state succession: South Sudan has been accepted to the United Nations, Kosovo’s independence has been recognized by many countries, Palestine has gained new status in the United Nations, etc. This would lead to the necessity to resolve questions related to succession of states, which might, among other subjects, include issues of diplomatic protection which was subject to international (...)
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  47.  8
    Trees and Family Trees in theAeneid.Emily Gowers - 2011 - Classical Antiquity 30 (1):87-118.
    Tree-chopping in the Aeneid has long been seen as a disturbingly violent symbol of the Trojans' colonization of Italy. The paper proposes a new reading of the poem which sees Aeneas as progressive extirpator not just of foreign rivals but also of his own Trojan relatives. Although the Romans had no family “trees” as such, their genealogical stemmata had “branches” and “stock” , and their vocabulary of family relationships takes many of its metaphors from planting, adoption, and uprooting, while (...) life is often described in human metaphors. Imperial historians use the growth and collapse of trees to mark the rise and fall of dynasties; natural historians like Columella and Pliny use metaphors of adoption, abortion, and adultery to characterize the perversions of agriculture and horticulture. It is thus no coincidence that Aeneas' encounters with Hector, Priam, Deiphobus, and others often take place against a background of real or metaphorical trees . These encourage us to see an element of dynastic encroachment in scenes that look pious and peaceable but confirm Aeneas' ascendancy and claim to Trojan succession. The Polydorus episode in particular can be read not just as a grotesque interlude but as a nightmare about endlessly reproducing heirs; one loose strand from Priam's house is allowed to remain, while Virgil deals imperfectly with the problem of Aeneas' own successors. The paper ends by re-examining Virgil's account of grafting in Georgics 2 and arguing that it is viewed positively, perhaps in order to cast Augustus' adoption of heirs as a miracle solution. (shrink)
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  48.  4
    The Evolutionary Stages of Plant Physiology and a Plea for Transdisciplinarity.Jorge Marques da Silva & Elena Casetta - 2015 - Axiomathes 25 (2):205-215.
    In this paper, the need of increasing transdisciplinarity research is advocated. After having set out some peculiarity of transdisciplinarity compared with related concepts such as multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity, four evolutionary stages of scientific disciplines, based on a model recently proposed are presented. This model is then applied to the case of Plant Physiology in order to attempt an evaluation of the potential for transdisciplinary engagement of the discipline, and each of the four stages of the discipline is evaluated. In (...)
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  49.  4
    Transfer of the Rights of Succession (text only in Lithuanian).Asta Dambrauskaitė - 2010 - Jurisprudence 122 (4):111-133.
    The article deals with a specific type of contract that an heir is entitled to conclude—the transfer (or sale) of the rights of succession. As a starting point, the author of the article analyses the formation and further development of the transfer of succession as a whole (hereditas) in the Roman law. Two major proceedings used by Roman lawyers for the purposes of the alienation of hereditas are analysed, one being in iure cessio hereditatis and the second taking (...)
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    True Succession and Inheritance of Traditions: Looking Back on the Debate.John N. Williams - 2014 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 3 (9):15-19.
    Starting with my (1988) and largely continued by David Ruben’s instructive (2013a), a lively debate has occurred over how one is to analyze the concepts of true succession and membership of a tradition in order to identify the source of the intractability typically found in disputes in which two groups each claim that it, but not its rival, is in the tradition of some earlier group. This debate was initially between myself (2013a, 2013b) and Ruben (2013b, 2013c) but later (...)
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