Results for 'pleasure, animals, reason'

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  1. The Rationality of Pleasure-Seeking Animals.Irwin Goldstein - 1988 - In Sander Lee (ed.), Inquiries Into Value. Edwin Mellen Press.
    Reason guides pleasure-seeking animals in leading them to prefer pleasure to pain.
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  2. John Dillon.That Irrational Animals Use Reason - 2009 - In Graham Robert Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), The History of Western Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 159.
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  3. Why People Prefer Pleasure to Pain.Irwin Goldstein - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (July):349-362.
    Against Hume and Epicurus I argue that our selection of pleasure, pain and other objects as our ultimate ends is guided by reason. There are two parts to the explanation of our attraction to pleasure, our aversion to pain, and our consequent preference of pleasure to pain: 1. Pleasure presents us with reason to seek it, pain presents us reason to avoid it, and 2. Being intelligent, human beings (and to a degree, many animals) are disposed to (...)
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  4.  84
    Pleasure, Desire and Practical Reason.James Lenman - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):143-149.
    This paper examines the role of stability in the constitution of pleasure and desire, its relevance to the intimate ways the two are related and to their role in the constitution of practical reason.
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  5.  56
    On the Backs of Animals: The Valorization of Reason in Contemporary Animal Ethics.Cathryn Bailey - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):1-17.
    : Despite the fact that feminists have compellingly drawn connections between traditional notions of reason and the oppression of women and nature, many animal ethicists fail to deeply incorporate these insights. After detailing the links between reason and the oppression of women and animals, I argue that the work of philosophers such as Tom Regan and Peter Singer fails to reflect that what feminists have called is not the mere inclusion of emotion, but a recognition of the inherent (...)
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    On the Backs of Animals:The Valorization of Reason in Contemporary Animal Ethics.Cathryn Bailey - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):1-17.
    Despite the fact that feminists have compellingly drawn connections between traditional notions of reason and the oppression of women and nature, many animal ethicists fail to deeply incorporate these insights. After detailing the links between reason and the oppression of women and animals, I argue that the work of philosophers such as Tom Regan and Peter Singer fails to reflect that what feminists have called is not the mere inclusion of emotion, but a recognition of the inherent continuity (...)
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  7.  34
    Pleasure and Reason as Adaptations to Nature's Requirements.Ralph Wendell Burhoe - 1982 - Zygon 17 (2):113-131.
  8. Sobel on Pleasure, Reason, and Desire.Attila Tanyi - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):101-115.
    The paper begins with a well-known objection to the idea that reasons for action are provided by desires. The objection holds that since desires are based on reasons (first premise), which they transmit but to which they cannot add (second premise), they cannot themselves provide reasons for action. In the paper I investigate an attack that has recently been launched against the first premise of the argument by David Sobel. Sobel invokes a counterexample: hedonic desires, i.e. the likings and dislikings (...)
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  9.  25
    Animals, Rights, and Reason in Plutarch and Modern Ethics.Stephen Thomas Newmyer - 2006 - Routledge.
    Plutarch is virtually unique in surviving classical authors in arguing that animals are rational and sentient, and in concluding that human beings must take notice of their interests. Stephen Newmyer explores Plutarch's three animal-related treatises, as well as passages from his other ethical treatises, which argue that non-human animals are rational and therefore deserve to fall within the sphere of human moral concern. Newmyer shows that some of the arguments Plutarch raises strikingly foreshadow those found in the works of such (...)
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  10.  42
    Pleasure as a Reason for Action.Alasdair Macintyre - 1965 - The Monist 49 (April):215-233.
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  11.  41
    Morals, Reason, and Animals.S. F. Sapontzis - 1987 - Temple University Press.
  12.  41
    Humans, Animals and the World We Inhabit—On and Beyond the Symposium ‘Second Nature, Bildung and McDowell: David Bakhurst's The Formation of Reason’.Koichiro Misawa - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):744-759.
    David Bakhurst's 2011 book ‘The Formation of Reason’ explores the philosophy of John McDowell in general and the Aristotelian notion of second nature more specifically, topics to which philosophers of education have not yet given adequate attention. The book's widespread appeal led to the symposium ‘Second Nature, Bildung and McDowell: David Bakhurst's The Formation of Reason’, which appeared in the first issue of the 50th anniversary volume of the Journal of Philosophy of Education in 2016. Despite its obvious (...)
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  13. Morality, Reason, and the Rights of Animals.Peter Singer - 2006 - In Stephen Macedo & Josiah Ober (eds.), Primates and Philosophers. Princeton University Press.
     
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  14.  20
    Silencing the Animals: Montaigne, Descartes, and the Hyperbole of Reason.Hassan Melehy - 2005 - Symploke 13 (1):263-282.
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    Is "Good" Indefinable for the Same Reason That Terms Like "Yellow" or "Bitter" or "Pleasure" Are Indefinable?Thomas King - 1972 - Southwest Philosophical Studies.
  16.  11
    Pleasure as a Reason for Action.Alisdair Mac Intyre - 1965 - The Monist 49 (2):215 - 233.
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  17.  14
    Boulogne (J.) (Ed.) Les Grecs de l'Antiquité Et les Animaux. Le Cas Remarquable de Plutarque. Pp. 205, Ills. Lille: Université Charles-de-Gaulle – Lille 3, 2005. Paper, €17. ISBN: 978-2-84467-073-1.Newmyer (S.T.) Animals, Rights and Reason in Plutarch and Modern Ethics. Pp. X + 139. London and New York: Routledge, 2006. Paper, £14.99. ISBN: 978-0-415-24047-. [REVIEW]Frances B. Titchener - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (02):362-364.
  18. Steve F. Sapontzis, Morals, Reason, and Animals Reviewed By.Frank De Roose - 1988 - Philosophy in Review 8 (3):110-113.
     
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  19.  1
    Review of Jennison, Animals for Show and Pleasure. [REVIEW]D'arcy Thompson - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (2):77-77.
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  20.  4
    Morals, Reason and Animals.J. A. Smith - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (3):167-167.
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  21.  1
    The Dawn of Reason or Mental Traits in the Lower Animals.E. A. Kirkpatrick - 1899 - Psychological Review 6 (3):327-329.
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  22.  1
    Book Review:The Dawn of Reason, or Mental Traits in the Lower Animals. James Wier. [REVIEW]J. B. Baillie - 1900 - Ethics 10 (2):264-.
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  23. The Dawn of Mental Reason, or Mental Traits in the Lower Animals, by James Wier. [REVIEW]J. B. Baillie - 1899 - Ethics 10:264.
     
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  24. The Dawn of Reason, or Mental Traits in the Lower Animals. James Wier.J. B. Baillie - 1900 - International Journal of Ethics 10 (2):264-265.
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  25. Critical Notice of Morals, Reason, and Animals.James Lindemann Nelson - 1990 - Between the Species 6 (4):13.
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  26. Morals Reason Animals.S. Sapontzis - 1987 - Temple University Press.
     
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  27. The Dawn of Reason, or Mental Traits in the Lower Animals.James Weir - 1900 - Philosophical Review 9 (2):231-232.
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  28.  6
    Speaking Bodies, Speaking Minds: Animals, Language, History.Susan Pearson - 2013 - History and Theory 52 (4):91-108.
    This essay explores a nineteenth-century debate over the linguistic capacity of animals in order to consider the links among language, reason, and history. Taking the American animal-protection movement as a point of departure, I show how protectionists, linguists, anthropologists, and advocates of deaf education were divided about the origins and nature of language. Was language a product of the soul and thus unique to humans, or was it a function of the body, a complex form of the corporeal expressions (...)
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  29.  37
    Rationally Agential Pleasure? A Kantian Proposal.Keren Gorodeisky - forthcoming - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: a History. Oxford University Press.
    The main claim of the paper is that, on Kant's account, aesthetic pleasure is an exercise of rational agency insofar as, when proper, it has the following two features: (1) It is an affective responsiveness to the question: “what is to be felt disinterestedly”? As such, it involves consciousness of its ground (the reasons for having it) and thus of itself as properly responsive to its object. (2) Its actuality depends on endorsement: actually feeling it involves its endorsement as an (...)
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  30.  54
    Vice and Reason.Terence Irwin - 2001 - The Journal of Ethics 5 (1):73-97.
    Aristotle''s account of vice presents a puzzle: (1) Viciouspeople must be guided by reason, since they act on decision(prohairesis), not on their non-rational desires. (2) And yet theycannot be guided by reason, since they are said to pay attention totheir non-rational part and not to live in accordance with reason. Wecan understand the conception of vice the reconciles these two claims,once we examine Aristotle''s account of (a) the pursuit of the fine andof the expedient; (b) the connexion (...)
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  31.  81
    'Use Them At Our Pleasure': Spinoza on Animal Ethics.John Grey - 2013 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (4):367-388.
    Although Spinoza disagrees with Descartes's claim that animals are mindless, he holds that we may nevertheless treat them as we please because their natures are different from human nature. Margaret Wilson has questioned the validity of Spinoza's argument, since it is not clear why differences in nature should imply differences in ethical status. In this paper, I propose a new interpretation of Spinoza's argument that responds to Wilson's challenge. We have ethical commitments to other humans only because we share the (...)
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  32. Animal Pain: What It is and Why It Matters. [REVIEW]Bernard E. Rollin - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (4):425-437.
    The basis of having a direct moral obligation to an entity is that what we do to that entity matters to it. The ability to experience pain is a sufficient condition for a being to be morally considerable. But the ability to feel pain is not a necessary condition for moral considerability. Organisms could have possibly evolved so as to be motivated to flee danger or injury or to eat or drink not by pain, but by “pangs of pleasure” that (...)
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  33.  15
    Introduction.Ullrich Melle - 2007 - Ethical Perspectives 14 (4):361-370.
    IntroductionIn May 2006, the small group of doctoral students working on ecophilosophy at the Higher Institute of Philosophy at K.U.Leuven invited the Dutch environmental philosopher Martin Drenthen to a workshop to discuss his writings on the concept of wilderness, its metaphysical and moral meaning, and the challenge social constructivism poses for ecophilosophy and environmental protection. Drenthen’s publications on these topics had already been the subject of intense discussions in the months preceding the workshop. His presentation on the workshop and the (...)
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  34. Respect for the Moral Law: The Emotional Side of Reason.Janelle DeWitt - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (1):31-62.
    Respect, as Kant describes it, has a duality of nature that seems to embody a contradiction – i.e., it is both a moral motive and a feeling, where these are thought to be mutually exclusive. Most solutions involve eliminating one of the two natures, but unfortunately, this also destroys what is unique about respect. So instead, I question the non-cognitive theory of emotion giving rise to the contradiction. In its place, I develop the cognitive theory implicit in Kant's work, one (...)
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  35.  51
    The Absolute Good and the Human Goods.R. Ferber - 2003 - Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3-4):117-126.
    By the absolute Good, I understand the Idea of the Good; by the human goods, I understand pleasure and reason, which have been disqualified in Plato's "Republic" as candidates for the absolute Good (cf.R.505b-d). Concerning the Idea of the Good, we can distinguish a maximal and a minimal interpretation. After the minimal interpretation, the Idea of the Good is the absolute Good because there is no final cause beyond the Idea of the Good. After the maximal interpretation, the Idea (...)
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  36.  35
    Hume's Place in the History of Ethics.Annette Baier - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 399.
    This chapter begins with a description of the general character of Hume's ethics, which are Epicurean in that he assumes that pleasure is good, and every good thing is pleasing. All virtues, for him, are ‘agreeable or useful’ to their possessor or to others, and the useful is defined as what can be expected to yield future pleasure. The discussion then covers Hume's views on sympathy and the principles governing our approbations; trust and its enlargement by social ‘artifices’; natural virtues, (...)
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  37.  32
    Do Nonhuman Animals Have a Language of Thought?Beck Jacob - forthcoming - In The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds. Routledge.
    Because we humans speak a public language, there has always been a special reason to suppose that we have a language of thought. For nonhuman animals, this special reason is missing, and the issue is less straightforward. On the one hand, there is evidence of various types of nonlinguistic representations, such as analog magnitude representations, which can explain many types of intelligent behavior. But on the other hand, the mere fact that some aspects of animal cognition can be (...)
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  38. The Asymmetrical Contributions of Pleasure and Pain to Animal Welfare.Adam Shriver - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):152-162.
    Recent results from the neurosciences demonstrate that pleasure and pain are not two symmetrical poles of a single scale of experience but in fact two different types of experiences altogether, with dramatically different contributions to well-being. These differences between pleasure and pain and the general finding that “the bad is stronger than the good” have important implications for our treatment of nonhuman animals. In particular, whereas animal experimentation that causes suffering might be justified if it leads to the prevention of (...)
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  39.  55
    Pleasure.Cory Wimberly - 2015 - In Blackwell Encyclopedia of Political Thought. Chichester: Blackwell. pp. 2716-2720.
    The history of the political thought on pleasure is not a cloistered affair in which scholars only engage one another. In political thought, one commonly finds a critical engagement with the wider public and the ruling classes, which are both perceived to be dangerously hedonistic. The effort of many political thinkers is directed towards showing that other political ends are more worthy than pleasure: Plato battles vigorously against Calicles' pleasure seeking in the Gorgias, Augustine argues in The City of God (...)
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  40.  32
    Kant and the Unity of Reason.Angelica Nuzzo - 2005 - Purdue University Press.
    Kant and the Unity of Reason is a comprehensive reconstruction and a detailed analysis of Kant's Critique of Judgment. In the light of the third Critique, the book offers a final inter­pretation of the critical project as a whole. It proposes a new reading of Kant's notion of human experience in which domains, as different as knowledge, morality, and the experience of beauty and life, are finally viewed in a unified perspective. The book proposes a reading of Kant's critical (...)
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  41.  23
    Reason and Sexuality in Western Thought.David West - 2005 - Polity: Cambridge UK & Malden US.
    This book traces the genealogy of ideas of reason, self and sexuality in the West, opening the way to a richer and more diverse understanding of sexual experience. Western philosophy and religion have distorted and continue to distort our experience of sex and love through three far-reaching constellations of reason, self and sexuality. Thinkers like Plato, Aquinas and Kant helped to fashion an ascetic ideal of reason hostile to bodily pleasures and sexual diversity. By contrast, philosophical hedonism (...)
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  42.  93
    The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure.Robin Mackenzie - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health strategies should foster (...)
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  43.  37
    Do All Subjects of a Life Have an Equal Right to Life? The Challenge of the Comparative Value of Life.Aaron Simmons - 2016 - In Mylan Engel & Gary Lynn Comstock (eds.), The Moral Rights of Animals. Lexington Books. pp. 107-117.
    In The Case for Animal Rights, Tom Regan defends the view that all animals who are “subjects of a life” have an equal moral right to life. In this chapter, I consider whether it makes sense to think that animals have an equal right to life in light of the challenge that life has less value for animals than humans. This challenge raises two central questions: (1) does life have less value for animals than humans and (2) if it does, (...)
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  44. The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.James Warren - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Human lives are full of pleasures and pains. And humans are creatures that are able to think: to learn, understand, remember and recall, plan and anticipate. Ancient philosophers were interested in both of these facts and, what is more, were interested in how these two facts are related to one another. There appear to be, after all, pleasures and pains associated with learning and inquiring, recollecting and anticipating. We enjoy finding something out. We are pained to discover that a belief (...)
     
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  45.  78
    Thinking Animals, Disagreement, and Skepticism.Eric Yang - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 166 (1):109-121.
    According to Eric Olson, the Thinking Animal Argument (TAA) is the best reason to accept animalism, the view that we are identical to animals. A novel criticism has been advanced against TAA, suggesting that it implicitly employs a dubious epistemological principle. I will argue that other epistemological principles can do the trick of saving the TAA, principles that appeal to recent issues regarding disagreement with peers and experts. I conclude with some remarks about the consequence of accepting these modified (...)
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  46. Is It Wrong to Eat Animals?Loren Lomasky - 2013 - Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):177-200.
    Eating meat appeals, but the cost is measured in millions of slaughtered animals. This has convinced many that vegetarianism is morally superior to a carnivorous diet. Increasingly, those who take pleasure in consuming animals find it a guilty pleasure. Are they correct? That depends on the magnitude of harm done to food animals but also on what sort of a good, if any, meat eating affords people. This essay aims to estimate both variables and concludes that standard arguments for moral (...)
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  47.  86
    Neuroethics and the Problem of Other Minds: Implications of Neuroscience for the Moral Status of Brain-Damaged Patients and Nonhuman Animals. [REVIEW]Martha J. Farah - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (1):9-18.
    Our ethical obligations to another being depend at least in part on that being’s capacity for a mental life. Our usual approach to inferring the mental state of another is to reason by analogy: If another being behaves as I do in a circumstance that engenders a certain mental state in me, I conclude that it has engendered the same mental state in him or her. Unfortunately, as philosophers have long noted, this analogy is fallible because behavior and mental (...)
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  48. Pleasure and Illusion in Plato.Jessica Moss - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (3):503 - 535.
    Plato links pleasure with illusion, and this link explains his rejection of the view that all desires are rational desires for the good. The Protagoras and Gorgias show connections between pleasure and illusion; the Republic develops these into a psychological theory. One part of the soul is not only prone to illusions, but also incapable of the kind of reasoning that can dispel them. Pleasure appears good; therefore this part of the soul (the appetitive part) desires pleasures qua good but (...)
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  49.  6
    Sublimity and the Ends of Reason: Questions for Deligiorgi.Tom Hanauer - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):195-199.
    The sublime has come under severe criticism in recent years. Jane Forsey, for instance, has argued that all theories of the sublime “rest on a mistake”. In her article, “The Pleasures of Contra-purposiveness: Kant, the Sublime, and Being Human,” Katerina Deligiorgi () provides a rejoinder to Forsey. Deligiorgi argues—with the help of Kant—that a coherent theory of the sublime is possible, and she provides a sketch for such a theory. Deligiorgi makes good progress in the debate over the sublime. But (...)
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  50. Moral Rights and Animals.H. J. McCloskey - 1979 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):23 – 54.
    In Section I, the purely conceptual issue as to whether animals other than human beings, all or some, may possess rights is examined. This is approached via a consideration of the concept of a moral right, and by way of examining the claims of sentience, consciousness, capacities for pleasure and pain, having desires, possessing interests, self-consciousness, rationality in various senses. It is argued that only beings possessed actually or potentially of the capacity to be morally self-determining can be possessors of (...)
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