Results for 'postmodern dance'

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  1.  8
    Semantics of Dance for Postmodern.Sumiko Uchiyama - 1999 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education 21 (2):1-9.
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  2.  3
    Dance and the Problem of Postmodern Politics.Phillips Edward Young - 1998 - International Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):131-143.
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  3. Explanations: Aesthetic and Scientific.Shen-yi Liao - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:127-149.
    Methodologically, philosophical aesthetics is undergoing an evolution that takes it closer to the sciences. Taking this methodological convergence as the starting point, I argue for a pragmatist and pluralist view of aesthetic explanations. To bring concreteness to discussion, I focus on vindicating genre explanations, which are explanations of aesthetic phenomena that centrally cite a work's genre classification. I show that theoretical resources that philosophers of science have developed with attention to actual scientific practice and the special sciences can be used (...)
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  4.  7
    Writing for the Body Notation, Reconstruction, and Reinvention in Dance.Mark Franko - 2011 - Common Knowledge 17 (2):321-334.
    This article explores the history of dance notation from the Renaissance to postmodern dance. It examines the tension between text and oral tradition in Western dance practices, as well as the issue of how to reconcile our views of choreography as both scriptural and visual. It has been difficult, if not impossible, to think of notation in relation to composition; notation has become almost solely associated with reconstruction as a phenomenon of historical interest. But, at the (...)
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  5. Differentiating Phenomenology and Dance.Philipa Rothfield - 2004 - Topoi 24 (1):43-53.
    This paper critically reviews phenomenological philosophy of the body in light of postmodern and postcolonial critiques of universalism. It aims to recast the notion of the lived body in plural rather than singular terms. It does so within the context of phenomenology and dance, using cultural anthropology to highlight the sense in which bodies are culturally and corporeally specific. The notion of corporeal specificity is applied to the perception of dance, paying particular attention to questions of power (...)
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  6.  14
    Pluralism in Postmodern Perspective.Ihab Hassan - 1986 - Critical Inquiry 12 (3):503-520.
    Postmodernism once more—that breach has begun to yawn! I return to it by way of pluralism, which itself has become the irritable condition of postmodern discourse, consuming many pages of both critical and uncritical inquiry. Why? Why pluralism now? This question recalls another that Kant raised two centuries ago—“Was heist Aufklärung?”—meaning, “Who are we now?” The answer was a signal meditation on historical presence, as Michel Foucault saw.1 But to meditate on that topic today—and this is my central claim—is (...)
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  7. Improvisational Artistry in Live Dance Performance as Embodied and Extended Agency.Aili Bresnahan - 2014 - Dance Research Journal 46 (1):84-94.
    This paper provides an account of improvisational artistry in live dance performance that construes the contribution of the dance performer as a kind of agency. Andy Clark’s theory of the embodied and extended mind is used in order to consider how this account is supported by research on how a thinking-while-doing person navigates the world. I claim here that while a dance performer’s improvisational artistry does include embodied and extended features that occur outside of the brain and (...)
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  8. Moving and Thinking Together in Dance.John Sutton - 2005 - In Robin Grove, Kate Stevens & Shirley McKechnie (eds.), Thinking in Four Dimensions: creativity and cognition in contemporary dance. Melbourne UP. pp. 51-56.
    The collaborative projects described in this e-book have already produced thrilling new danceworks, new technologies, and innovative experimental methods. As the papers collected here show, a further happy outcome is the emergence of intriguing and hybrid kinds of writing. Aesthetic theory, cognitive psychology, and dance criticism merge, as authors are appropriately driven more by the heterogeneous nature of their topics than by any fixed disciplinary affiliation. We can spy here the beginnings of a mixed phenomenology and ethnography of (...) practice and choreographic cognition, which is deeply informed and empirically inspired by the best current theory in the sciences of the embodied mind [footnote 1]. These sciences must themselves increasingly deal with culture and cognition all at once: questions about pleasure in movement, habit and skill, and kinaesthetic memory, for example, require neuroscientific, physiological, psychological, sociological, and anthropological investigation simultaneously. These then are essentially collaborative enterprises, and the active interpenetration of the concerns of dance practitioners and academic researchers is one remarkable success of Unspok en Knowledges and Conceiving Connections. (shrink)
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  9.  71
    Thinking-is-Moving: Dance, Agency, and a Radically Enactive Mind. [REVIEW]Michele Merritt - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):95-110.
    Recently, in cognitive science, the enactivist account of cognition has been gaining ground, due in part to studies of movement in conjunction with thought. The idea, as Noë , has put it, that “cognition is not something happening inside us or to us, but it’s something we do, something we achieve,” is increasingly supported by research on joint attention, movement coordination, and gesture. Not surprisingly, therefore, enactivists have also begun to look at “movement specialists”—dancers—for both scientific and phenomenological accounts of (...)
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  10. Neuroaesthetics and Beyond: New Horizons in Applying the Science of the Brain to the Art of Dance[REVIEW]Emily Cross & Luca Ticini - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):5-16.
    Throughout history, dance has maintained a critical presence across all human cultures, defying barriers of class, race, and status. How dance has synergistically co-evolved with humans has fueled a rich debate on the function of art and the essence of aesthetic experience, engaging numerous artists, historians, philosophers, and scientists. While dance shares many features with other art forms, one attribute unique to dance is that it is most commonly expressed with the human body. Because of this, (...)
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  11.  23
    Music and Dance as a Coalition Signaling System.Edward H. Hagen & Gregory A. Bryant - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (1):21-51.
    Evidence suggests that humans might have neurological specializations for music processing, but a compelling adaptationist account of music and dance is lacking. The sexual selection hypothesis cannot easily account for the widespread performance of music and dance in groups (especially synchronized performances), and the social bonding hypothesis has severe theoretical difficulties. Humans are unique among the primates in their ability to form cooperative alliances between groups in the absence of consanguineal ties. We propose that this unique form of (...)
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  12.  85
    Kinesthetic Empathy, Dance, and Technology.Andrew J. Corsa - 2016 - Polymath: An Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Journal 6 (2):1-34.
    I argue that when we use email, text messaging, or social media websites such as Facebook to interact, rather than communicating face-to-face, we do not experience the best kind of empathy, which is most conducive to experiencing benevolence for others. My arguments rely on drawing interdisciplinary connections between sources: early modern accounts of sympathy, dance theory, philosophy of technology, and neuroscience/psychology. I reflect on theories from these disciplines which, taken together, suggest that to empathize optimally, we must see or (...)
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  13. The Experience of Watching Dance: Phenomenological–Neuroscience Duets. [REVIEW]Corinne Jola, Shantel Ehrenberg & Dee Reynolds - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):17-37.
    This paper discusses possible correspondences between neuroscientific findings and phenomenologically informed methodologies in the investigation of kinesthetic empathy in watching dance. Interest in phenomenology has recently increased in cognitive science (Gallagher and Zahavi 2008 ) and dance scholars have recently contributed important new insights into the use of phenomenology in dance studies (e.g. Legrand and Ravn (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8(3):389–408, 2009 ); Parviainen (Dance Research Journal 34(1):11–26, 2002 ); Rothfield (Topoi 24:43–53, 2005 )). In (...)
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  14.  49
    The Bee Battles: Karl von Frisch, Adrian Wenner and the Honey Bee Dance Language Controversy. [REVIEW]Tania Munz - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):535 - 570.
    In 1967, American biologist Adrian Wenner (1928-) launched an extensive challenge to Karl von Frisch's (1886-1982) theory that bees communicate to each other the direction and distance of food sources by a symbolic dance language. Wenner and various collaborators argued that bees locate foods solely by odors. Although the dispute had largely run its course by 1973 -- von Frisch was awarded a Nobel Prize, while Wenner withdrew from active bee research -- it offers us a rare window into (...)
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  15.  20
    Filming Dance: Embodied Syntax in Sasha Waltz' S.Helen A. Fielding - 2015 - Paragraph 38 (1):69-85.
    This paper brings Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological approach to Sasha Waltz’s dance film S, which focuses on the relation between sexuality and language. Maintaining that movement in cinema takes place in the viewers and not the film, the paper considers how the visual can be deepened to include the ways we move and are moved. Saussure’s insights into language are brought to the sensible, which is here understood in terms of divergences from norms. Though film would seem to privilege vision, viewing (...)
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  16. Is the Post- in Postmodernism the Post- in Postcolonial?Kwame Anthony Appiah - 1991 - Critical Inquiry 17 (2):336-357.
    Sara Suleri has written recently, in Meatless Days, of being treated as an "otherness machine"-and of being heartily sick of it.20 Perhaps the predicament of the postcolonial intellectual is simply that as intellectuals-a category instituted in black Africa by colonialism-we are, indeed, always at the risk of becoming otherness machines, with the manufacture of alterity as our principal role. Our only distinction in the world of texts to which we are latecomers is that we can mediate it to our fellows. (...)
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  17.  60
    Practice Makes Perfect: The Effect of Dance Training on the Aesthetic Judge. [REVIEW]Barbara Montero - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):59-68.
    According to Hume, experience in observing art is one of the prerequisites for being an ideal art critic. But although Hume extols the value of observing art for the art critic, he says little about the value, for the art critic, of executing art. That is, he does not discuss whether ideal aesthetic judges should have practiced creating the form of art they are judging. In this paper, I address this issue. Contrary to some contemporary philosophers who claim that experience (...)
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  18. The Dance: Essence of Embodiment.Betty Block & Judith Lee Kissell - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (1):5-15.
    An analysis of movement, and particularly of dance,helps us to see in an extraordinarily effective way the meaningof embodiment. This paper then looks through the eyes ofdance theorists and at philosophers who consider dance andmovement and their meaning of embodiment. A study of movementand dance encompasses the fullest meaning of embodiment: that theembodied way of being-in-the-world is also an embedded way ofbeing in a world of others. Dance has critically importantsocial ramifications. In our own and other (...)
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  19. Postmodern Conceptualizations of Culture in Social Constructionism and Cultural Studies.Marco Gemignani & Ezequiel Peña - 2007 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 27 (2-1):276-300.
    The theorization of culture in psychology continues to gain momentum in spite of little agreement concerning the most suitable theoretical frameworks for examining cultural phenomena. We explore two contemporary approaches to culture--social constructionism and cultural studies--and examine their relevance for psychology. In juxtapositioning them we map their continuities and discontinuities in terms of ontological and epistemological stances on language, representation, knowledge, identity, history, ideology, social action and emancipation. We propose a bridge between the two, and discuss ways in which the (...)
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  20.  34
    Mind, Dance, and Pedagogy.Jay A. Seitz - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 36 (4):37-42.
    Explores the role of dance education both inside and outside the arts.
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  21.  21
    Derrida and the Tasks for the New Humanities: Postmodern Nursing and the Culture Wars.Michael Peters - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (1):47-57.
    Jacques Derrida is perhaps the foremost philosopher of the humanities and of its place in the university. Over the long period of his career he has been concerned with the fate, status, place and contribution of the humanities. Through his deconstructive readings and writings he has done much not only to reinvent the western tradition by attending closely to those texts which constitute it but also he has redefined its procedures and protocols. This paper first introduces the notion of (...) nursing, its relation to the culture wars and some of the main characteristics of so‐called poststructuralism, considered as a response to the scientific pretensions of structuralism. Secondly, it provides some background to Derrida, who Althusser believed to be the most important French philosopher of the 20th century. Thirdly, it explores a recent essay where Derrida outlines seven programmatic theses or what he calls ‘seven professions of faith’ for the new humanities. Finally, and very tentatively, it suggests what such a view might contribute to the nursing humanities. (shrink)
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  22.  21
    A Justification, After the Postmodern Turn, of Universal Ethical Principles and Educational Ideals1.Mark Mason - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):799-815.
    The implementation of education programmes in different cultures invites the question whether we are justified in doing so in cultures that may reject the programmes’ underlying principles. Are there indeed ethical principles and educational ideals that can be justified as applicable to all cultures? After a consideration of Zygmunt Bauman's postmodern rejection of the possibility of universal ethics, Ι cite and extend Harvey Siegel's defence of multiculturalism as a transcultural ethical ideal. I conclude the paper with a justification of (...)
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  23.  11
    Conservatism, Liberalism, and Postmodern Identity.Villanova Michael - 2017 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 11 (1).
    Throughout recent discussions of race, gender, and identity, both sides of the political spectrum avoid addressing the central concept of what the “Other” is. Using the psychoanalytic insights of Slavoj Zizek combined with the philosophical writings of Jean Baudrillard and Albert Camus, this paper will argue for the rejection of left liberalism, political correctness, and conservative cultural theory due to their inability to allow the subject more freedoms in relation to the Other. In postmodern times we find that the (...)
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  24.  2
    Abracadabra! Postmodern Therapeutic Methods: Language as a Neo-Magical Tool.Marianna Ruah-Midbar Shapiro - 2018 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 17 (49):3-17.
    This paper argues that a new genre of therapy has appeared in the arena of contemporary spiritual alternative healing, which expresses an outlook never-before-seen in the history of medicine: postmodern therapy. Postmodern therapeutic methods express a popularization of postmodernist philosophy in regards to language’s role in the therapeutic process, expressing a novel cosmology. These methods are illustrated in the paper, and then analyzed in comparison to two other groups of methods: traditional/occult magic, and modern medicine. Finally, PTMs are (...)
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  25.  40
    Theology and Science in a Postmodern Context.Nancey Murphy - 2010 - In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 721--731.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * 1 Introduction * 2 Defining Modern and Postmodern Philosophy * 3 Relevance of Postmodern Philosophy for Relating Theology and Science * 4 Conclusion * Bibliography.
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  26.  36
    Dance as Portrayed in the Media. Misirhiralall - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (3):72-95.
    In a Missouri school district during the late 1980s, parents and students argued that “the policy, reflecting the Christian fundamentalist view that social dance is sinful, violated the constitutionality required by separation of church and state.”1 The school board in Purdy, Missouri, advocated for a policy that banned school dances. In 1986, fundamentalist Christians, a majority of the town residents, wanted to maintain the century-old ban against school dances when some school board members discussed a modification of the policy. (...)
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  27.  13
    The Aesthetics of Electronic Dance Music, Part II: Dancers, DJs, Ontology and Aesthetics.Nick Wiltsher - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):426-436.
    What's aesthetically interesting or significant about electronic dance music? The first answer I consider here is that dancing is significant. Using literature on groove, dance and expression, I sketch an account of club dancing as expressive activity. I next consider the aesthetic achievements of DJs, introducing two conceptions of what they do. These thoughts lead to discussions of dance music's ontology. I suggest that the fundamental work of dance music is the mix and that mixes require (...)
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  28.  26
    The Poetry of Jeroen Mettes.Samuel Vriezen & Steve Pearce - 2012 - Continent 2 (1):22-28.
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 22–28. Jeroen Mettes burst onto the Dutch poetry scene twice. First, in 2005, when he became a strong presence on the nascent Dutch poetry blogosphere overnight as he embarked on his critical project Dichtersalfabet (Poet’s Alphabet). And again in 2011, when to great critical acclaim (and some bafflement) his complete writings were published – almost five years after his far too early death. 2005 was the year in which Dutch poetry blogging exploded. That year saw the foundation (...)
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  29.  29
    Media and Gender: Constructing Feminine Identities in a Postmodern Culture.Diana Damean - 2006 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):89-94.
    In the postmodern era the impact media have on our lives is continuously growing. Not only do media reflect reality, but they also shape and reconstruct it according to the public's hopes, fears or fantasies. Reality itself is not the sum of all objective processes and things, but it is socially constructed by the discourses that reflect and produce power. On the other hand, the public does not simply accept or reject the media messages, but interprets them according to (...)
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  30.  6
    Performing on the Beaches of the Mind: An Essay.Greg Dening - 2002 - History and Theory 41 (1):1–24.
    History--the past transformed into words or paint or dance or play--is always a performance. An everyday performance as we present our selective narratives about what has happened at the kitchen table, to the courts, to the taxman, at the graveside. A quite staged performance when we present it to our examiners, to the collegiality of our disciplines, whenever we play the role of "historian." History is theater, a place of thea . The complexities of living are seen in story. (...)
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  31.  12
    The Aesthetics of Electronic Dance Music, Part I: History, Genre, Scenes, Identity, Blackness.Nick Wiltsher - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):415-425.
    Electronic dance music has much about it to interest philosophers. In this article, I explore facets of dance music cultures, using the issue of authenticity as a framing question. The problem of sorting real or authentic dance music from mainstream or commercial clubbing can be treated as a matter of history and genre-definition; as a matter of defining scenes or subcultures; and as a matter of blackness. In each case, electronic dance music, and critical discourse surrounding (...)
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  32.  33
    A Contrarian View of Postmodern Society and Information Technologies.Paul T. Durbin - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (1):51-54.
    In this short paper—little more than a note, even a short “contrarian” sermon for this anniversary volume—what I do is argue that even the allegedly most “revolutionary” inventions of our computer-driven age are not revolutionary in the sense that their impacts are “driving” society. Some of them are genuinely revolutionary, I admit, but in the reverse direction. The inventions don’t “impact societies”; rather, particular communities within society use the technical languages that are at their core, invent them, embed them in (...)
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  33.  15
    Stockholm: Going Beyond the Human Through Dance.Julia Kristeva - 2013 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):1-12.
    I will then uphold that new political actors are incarnating and realizing this refoundation of humanism which the globalized world direly needs. I take as examples two of these experiences which cruelly lack a means of expression in today’s codes of humanism: adolescents in want of ideals and maternal passion at the cross-roads of biology and meaning. At these crossroads of body and meaning, of biology and sublimation it is perhaps dance more than other trans-linguistic experience that informs and (...)
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  34.  10
    The Invisibility of Disability: Using Dance to Shake From Bioethics the Idea of ‘Broken Bodies’.Shawn H. E. Harmon - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (7):488-498.
    Complex social and ethical problems are often most effectively solved by engaging them at the messy and uncomfortable intersections of disciplines and practices, a notion that grounds the InVisible Difference project, which seeks to extend thinking and alter practice around the making, status, ownership, and value of work by contemporary dance choreographers by examining choreographic work through the lenses of law, bioethics, dance scholarship, and the practice of dance by differently-abled dancers. This article offers a critical thesis (...)
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  35.  17
    Can We Demystify Theory? Examining Masculinity Discourses and Feminist Postmodern Theory.Rachel T. Hare-Mustin - 2004 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):14-29.
    In this essay I argue that theory in psychology need not be mystifying to non-theorists. I use feminist postmodern theory and the discourses of masculinity to demonstrate how theory can facilitate the exploration of questions and reveal what has been marginalized and obscured. My premise is further illustrated by an examination of the male sex drive discourse. I suggest in conclusion that the question in any theory is always about the choice of question. 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  36.  5
    Postmodern Ethics, Multiple Selves, and the Future of Democracy.Cristian Iftode - 2015 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (42):3-26.
    This article starts with a brief overview of well-known criticisms of modern democracy in order to suggest a different approach: reflecting on the principles of Western democracy in the basic horizon of the problematic of the self and wondering if the ‘multiple’ self should not be conceived as the single subjective correlate that is adequate to democratic pluralism and also as the only chance of curing ourselves of ‘fundamentalism’. I try to highlight the Derridian radical view of democracy as “always (...)
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  37.  6
    Beyond the Archive: Cultural Memory in Dance and Theater.Carol L. Bernstein - 2007 - Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M14.
    This essay uses the concept of the constellation to characterize the relations among interdisciplinarity, cultural memory, and comparative literature. To do so entails: (a) reviewing the paradoxical interdisciplinarity of comparative literature, (b) tracing its establishment at a liberal arts college (Bryn Mawr College, USA), and (c) describing a course on “The Cultural Politics of Memory” that tested the limits of scholarship and testimony. The discussion includes an account of an unusual conference on cultural memory: that is, the ways in which (...)
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  38.  10
    Are There Commonalties Between Modern and Postmodern Philosophies? An Examination of the Self and Knowledge.Christine M. Giarmo - 1997 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):67-78.
    Postmodern theories as exemplified by the work of J. F. Lyotard and K. Gergen are contrasted with modern theories with regard to their impact on theories of knowledge and of the self. It is argued that while some postmodern theories and the modernists philosophy of individualism are based on assumptions concerning the origins of knowledge and the nature of the self, both result in a relativism of self and knowledge. The rationale for an alternative viewpoint of the relationship (...)
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  39.  10
    Self-Deception: A Postmodern Reflection.Brian L. Lewis - 1996 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 16 (1):49-66.
    The traditional perspective on self-deception, which assumes that the mind can be simultaneously involved in contradictory stories, and that there is an integrated understanding of the "truth" somewhere inside, is apparent in most contemporary theories of psychology. A critique of the phenomenon from a postmodern perspective raises questions regarding these assumptions. Ideas from evolutionary biology and research concerning hypnotically induced amnesia are used to support the thesis that self-deception is more a cultural phenomenon maintained by the observer, than a (...)
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  40.  7
    Leaping Out of Our Skins: Postmodern Considerations in Use of an Electronic Whiteboard to Foster Critical Engagement in Early Literacy Lessons.Pamela A. Solvie - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (7):737–754.
    Postmodern theory is used to consider literacy instruction with and without an electronic whiteboard to investigate what it means to move beyond using technology to replicate older models of classroom structure that may be historically situated but that also limit or at least, do not support engagement in ways that may be possible through use of new technologies. Using postmodern theory in this regard is a way in which to consider again the thoughts and practices that tend to (...)
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  41. Philosophical Essays on Dance with Responses From Choreographers, Critics and Dancers.Gordon Fancher, Gerald Myers & Connecticut College American Dance Festival - 1981
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  42. The Nikolais/Louis Dance Technique: A Philosophy and Method of Modern Dance.Alwin Nikolais - 2005 - Routledge.
    The Nikolais/Louis Dance Technique provides the definite resource for understanding and practicing the influential dance technique developed by two pioneers of modern dance, Alwin Nikolais and Murray Louis. The Nikolais/Louis technique is presented in a week-to-week classroom manual, providing an indispensable tool for teachers and students of this widely studied movement practice. Theoretical background for further reading is set off from the manual for those interested in deeper study. Their philosophy and methodology span a broad readership and (...)
     
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  43. Movement, Gesture, and Meaning: A Sensorimotor Model for Audience Engagement with Dance.William Seeley - 2013 - In Helena De Preester (ed.), Moving Imagination: Explorations of Gesture and Inner Movement. Philadelphia: pp. 51-68.
    The neuroscience of dance is a vibrant, fast growing field which embodies the promise of a genuine and productive interdisciplinary rapprochement between neuroscience and art. The strength of this field lies in the way it ties the experience of dance to sensorimotor processes that underwrite our ordinary perceptual engagement with the environment. Motor simulation and mimicry enhance our capacity to interpret the goals, motives, and emotions of others. Recent studies demonstrate that these same processes enable us to recognize (...)
     
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  44. Postmodern Ethics.Zygmunt Bauman - 1993 - Blackwell.
    Introduction: Morality in Modern and Postmodern Perspective Shattered beings are best represented by bits and pieces. Rainer Maria Rilke As signalled in its ...
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  45.  42
    Postmodern Anxiety: The Politics of Epistemology.Steven Seidman - 1991 - Sociological Theory 9 (2):180-190.
  46.  36
    Postmodern Sophistication: Habermas Versus Lyotard.David Kolb - 1990 - In Postmodern Sphistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago press. pp. 36 – 50.
    A discussion of whether Habermas as a representative modernist and Lyotard as a representative postmodern echo the ancient dispute between Plato and the Sophists. My conclusion is that they do not quite do so. Each is more complex and ancient dichotomy should be revised.
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  47.  7
    Recontextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers.Janet Karin - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    The process of transmitting ballet’s complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers’ technique and expressivity is a core theme throughout the paper. A brief outline of (...)
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  48.  5
    Understanding Dance.Graham Mcfee - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (4):644-646.
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  49.  18
    Modern Versus Postmodern Architecture.David Kolb - 1990 - In Postmodern Sphistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago press. pp. 87 – 105.
    A discussion of "postmodern" architecture in the sense in which the term was used in the late 1980s, namely, the introduction of historical substantive content and reference into architecture, disrupting the supposedly ahistorical purity of modernist architecture. Argues that postmodern use of history is really another version of the modern distance from history.
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  50.  16
    All Quiet on the Postmodern Front?Richard Edwards - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (4):273-278.
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