Results for 'prenatal screening'

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  1.  24
    Prenatal Screening: An Ethical Agenda for the Near Future.Antina Jong & Guido M. W. R. Wert - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):46-55.
    Prenatal screening for foetal abnormalities such as Down's syndrome differs from other forms of population screening in that the usual aim of achieving health gains through treatment or prevention does not seem to apply. This type of screening leads to no other options but the choice between continuing or terminating the pregnancy and can only be morally justified if its aim is to provide meaningful options for reproductive choice to pregnant women and their partners. However, this (...)
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  2.  63
    Challenging the Rhetoric of Choice in Prenatal Screening.Victoria Seavilleklein - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (1):68-77.
    Prenatal screening, consisting of maternal serum screening and nuchal translucency screening, is on the verge of expansion, both by being offered to more pregnant women and by screening for more conditions. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists have each recently recommended that screening be extended to all pregnant women regardless of age, disease history, or risk status. This screening is commonly justified by appeal (...)
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  3.  23
    Prenatal Screening: Current Practice, New Developments, Ethical Challenges.Antina Jong, Idit Maya & Jan M. M. Lith - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):1-8.
    Prenatal screening pathways, as nowadays offered in most Western countries consist of similar tests. First, a risk-assessment test for major aneuploides is offered to pregnant women. In case of an increased risk, invasive diagnostic tests, entailing a miscarriage risk, are offered. For decades, only conventional karyotyping was used for final diagnosis. Moreover, several foetal ultrasound scans are offered to detect major congenital anomalies, but the same scans also provide relevant information for optimal support of the pregnancy and the (...)
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  4. Gerhold K. Becker.The Ethics of Prenatal Screening & The - 2002 - In Julia Lai Po-Wah Tao (ed.), Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the (Im) Possibility of Global Bioethics. Kluwer Academic.
     
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  5.  15
    Psychological Aspects of Individualized Choice and Reproductive Autonomy in Prenatal Screening.Jenny Hewison - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):9-18.
    Probably the main purpose of reproductive technologies is to enable people who choose to do so to avoid the birth of a baby with a disabling condition. However the conditions women want information about and the ‘price’ they are willing to pay for obtaining that information vary enormously. Individual women have to arrive at their own prenatal testing choices by ‘trading off’ means and ends in order to resolve the dilemmas facing them. We know very little about how individuals (...)
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  6.  20
    Prenatal Screening, Reproductive Choice, and Public Health.Stephen Wilkinson - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):26-35.
    One widely held view of prenatal screening is that its foremost aim is, or should be, to enable reproductive choice; this is the Pure Choice view. The article critiques this position by comparing it with an alternative: Public Health Pluralism. It is argued that there are good reasons to prefer the latter, including the following. Public Health Pluralism does not, as is often supposed, render PNS more vulnerable to eugenics-objections. The Pure Choice view, if followed through to its (...)
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  7.  13
    Bioethical Concepts in Theory and Practice: An Exploratory Study of Prenatal Screening in Iceland. [REVIEW]Helga Gottfreðsdóttir & Vilhjálmur Árnason - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):53-61.
    A hallmark of good antenatal care is to respect prospective parent’s choices and provide information in a way that encourages their autonomy and informed decision making. In this paper, we analyse the meaning of autonomous and informed decision making from the theoretical perspective and attempt to show how those concepts are described among prospective parents in early pregnancy and in the public media in a society where NT screening is almost a norm. We use interviews with Icelandic prospective parents (...)
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  8.  20
    Ethical Issues Surrounding the Provider Initiated Opt – Out Prenatal HIV Screening Practice in Sub – Saharan Africa: A Literature Review.Luchuo Engelbert Bain, Kris Dierickx & Kristien Hens - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundPrevention of mother to child transmission of HIV remains a key public health priority in most developing countries. The provider Initiated Opt – Out Prenatal HIV Screening Approach, recommended by the World Health Organization lately has been adopted and translated into policy in most Sub – Saharan African countries. To better ascertain the ethical reasons for or against the use of this approach, we carried out a literature review of the ethics literature.MethodsPapers published in English and French Languages (...)
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  9.  16
    Toward an Ethically Sensitive Implementation of Noninvasive Prenatal Screening in the Global Context.Jessica Mozersky, Vardit Ravitsky, Rayna Rapp, Marsha Michie, Subhashini Chandrasekharan & Megan Allyse - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (2):41-49.
    Noninvasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA, which analyzes placental DNA circulating in maternal blood to provide information about fetal chromosomal disorders early in pregnancy and without risk to the fetus, has been hailed as a potential “paradigm shift” in prenatal genetic screening. Commercial provision of cell-free DNA screening has contributed to a rapid expansion of the tests included in the screening panels. The tests can include screening for sex chromosome anomalies, rare subchromosomal microdeletions (...)
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  10.  21
    Qualifying Choice: Ethical Reflection on the Scope of Prenatal Screening.Greg Stapleton - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):195-205.
    In the near future developments in non-invasive prenatal testing may soon provide couples with the opportunity to test for and diagnose a much broader range of heritable and congenital conditions than has previously been possible. Inevitably, this has prompted much ethical debate on the possible implications of NIPT for providing couples with opportunities for reproductive choice by way of routine prenatal screening. In view of the possibility to test for a significantly broader range of genetic conditions with (...)
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  11.  3
    Should Pregnant Women Be Charged for Non-Invasive Prenatal Screening? Implications for Reproductive Autonomy and Equal Access.Eline M. Bunnik, Adriana Kater-Kuipers, Robert-Jan H. Galjaard & Inez D. De Beaufort - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (3):194-198.
    The introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing in healthcare systems around the world offers an opportunity to reconsider funding policies for prenatal screening. In some countries with universal access healthcare systems, pregnant women and their partners are asked to pay for NIPT. In this paper, we discuss two important rationales for charging women for NIPT: to prevent increased uptake of NIPT and to promote informed choice. First, given the aim of prenatal screening, high or low uptake (...)
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  12.  8
    Ethics of Routine: A Critical Analysis of the Concept of ‘Routinisation’ in Prenatal Screening.Adriana Kater-Kuipers, Inez D. De Beaufort, Robert-Jan H. Galjaard & Eline M. Bunnik - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (9):626-631.
    In the debate surrounding the introduction of non-invasive prenatal testing in prenatal screening programmes, the concept of routinisation is often used to refer to concerns and potential negative consequences of the test. A literature analysis shows that routinisation has many different meanings, which can be distinguished in three major versions of the concept. Each of these versions comprises several inter-related fears and concerns regarding prenatal screening and particularly regarding NIPT in three areas: informed choice, freedom (...)
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  13.  12
    A Capabilities Approach to Prenatal Screening for Fetal Abnormalities.Greg Stapleton, Wybo Dondorp, Peter Schröder-Bäck & Guido de Wert - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (4):309-321.
    International guidelines recommend that prenatal screening for fetal abnormalities should only be offered within a non-directive framework aimed at enabling women in making meaningful reproductive choices. Whilst this position is widely endorsed, developments in cell-free fetal DNA based Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing are now raising questions about its continued suitability for guiding screening policy and practice. This issue is most apparent within debates on the scope of the screening offer. Implied by the aim of enabling meaningful (...)
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  14.  53
    Reconsidering Prenatal Screening: An Empirical-Ethical Approach to Understand Moral Dilemmas as a Question of Personal Preferences.E. Garcia, D. R. M. Timmermans & E. van Leeuwen - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (7):410-414.
    In contrast to most Western countries, routine offer of prenatal screening is considered problematic in the Netherlands. The main argument against offering it to every pregnant woman is that women would be brought into a moral dilemma when deciding whether to use screening or not. This paper explores whether the active offer of a prenatal screening test indeed confronts women with a moral dilemma. A qualitative study was developed, based on a randomised controlled trial that (...)
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  15.  34
    Right Not to Know or Duty to Know? Prenatal Screening for Polycystic Renal Disease.R. Kielstein & H. -M. Sass - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):395-405.
    New dimensions in different ethical scenarios following genetic information require new medical-ethical Action Guides for physician-patient interaction. This paper discusses the ambiguity in moral choice between a “right not to know” and “a duty to know”, regarding parental decisionmaking pro or contra selective abortion following prenatal screening for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (Potter III) and related public policy issues.
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  16.  24
    Women's Views on the Moral Status of Nature in the Context of Prenatal Screening Decisions.E. Garcia, D. R. M. Timmermans & E. van Leeuwen - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):461-465.
    Appeals to the moral authority of nature play an important role in ethical discussions about the acceptability of prenatal testing. While opponents consider testing a dangerous violation of the moral inviolable course of nature, defenders see testing as a new step in improving dominion over nature. In this study we explored the meaning of appeals to nature among pregnant women to whom a prenatal screening test was offered and the impact of these appeals on their choices regarding (...)
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  17.  2
    A Capabilities Approach to Prenatal Screening for Fetal Abnormalities.Guido Wert, Peter Schröder-Bäck, Wybo Dondorp & Greg Stapleton - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (4):309-321.
    International guidelines recommend that prenatal screening for fetal abnormalities should only be offered within a non-directive framework aimed at enabling women in making meaningful reproductive choices. Whilst this position is widely endorsed, developments in cell-free fetal DNA based Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing are now raising questions about its continued suitability for guiding screening policy and practice. This issue is most apparent within debates on the scope of the screening offer. Implied by the aim of enabling meaningful (...)
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  18.  14
    Huntington's Disease: Prenatal Screening for Late Onset Disease.S. G. Post - 1992 - Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (2):75-78.
    This article presents a set of moral arguments regarding the selective abortion of fetuses on the basis of prenatal screening for late onset genetic diseases only, and for Huntington's Disease* in particular. After discussion of human suffering, human perfection and the distinctive features of the lives of people confronting late onset genetic disease, the author concludes that selective abortion is difficult to justify ethically, although it must remain a matter of personal choice.
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  19.  21
    Prenatal Screening in Jewish Law.J. Brown - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (2):75-80.
    Although prenatal screening is routinely undertaken as part of a woman's antenatal care, the ethics surrounding it are complex. In this paper, the author examines the Jewish position on the permissibility of several tests, including those for Down's syndrome and Tay-Sachs disease, the latter being especially common in the Jewish community. Clearly, the status of the tests depends on whether termination of affected pregnancies is allowed, and contemporary rabbinical authorities are themselves in dispute as to the permissibility of (...)
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  20.  6
    Attitudes to Prenatal Screening Among Norwegian Citizens: Liberality, Ambivalence and Sensitivity.Morten Magelssen, Berge Solberg, Magne Supphellen & Guttorm Haugen - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):80.
    Norway’s liberal abortion law allows for abortion on social indications, yet access to screening for fetal abnormalities is restricted. Norwegian regulation of, and public discourse about prenatal screening and diagnosis has been exceptional. In this study, we wanted to investigate whether the exceptional regulation is mirrored in public attitudes. An electronic questionnaire with 11 propositions about prenatal screening and diagnosis was completed by 1617 Norwegian adults. A majority of respondents supports increased access to prenatal (...)
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  21.  14
    Just Choice: A Danielsian Analysis of the Aims and Scope of Prenatal Screening for Fetal Abnormalities.Greg Stapleton, Wybo Dondorp, Peter Schröder-Bäck & Guido de Wert - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (4):545-555.
    Developments in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing and cell-free fetal DNA analysis raise the possibility that antenatal services may soon be able to support couples in non-invasively testing for, and diagnosing, an unprecedented range of genetic disorders and traits coded within their unborn child’s genome. Inevitably, this has prompted debate within the bioethics literature about what screening options should be offered to couples for the purpose of reproductive choice. In relation to this problem, the European Society of Human Genetics and (...)
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  22.  17
    Communicating Risk in Prenatal Screening: The Consequences of Bayesian Misapprehension.Gorka Navarrete, Rut Correia & Dan Froimovitch - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  23.  20
    Dynamics of Prenatal Screening: New Developments Challenging the Ethical Framework.Wybo Dondorp & Jan Lith - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):ii-iv.
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  24.  67
    Currents in Contemporary Bioethics: Waiving Informed Consent to Prenatal Screening and Diagnosis? Problems with Paradoxical Negotiation in Surrogacy Contracts.Katherine Drabiak-Syed - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):559-564.
  25.  3
    Prenatal Screening and Prenatal Diagnosis: Contemporary Practices in Light of the Past.Ana S. Iltis - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (6):334-339.
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  26.  26
    Unjustified: The Imbalance of Information and Funding With Noninvasive Prenatal Screening.Mark W. Leach - 2015 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 6 (1):21-30.
  27.  13
    Imperfect Informed Consent for Prenatal Screening: Lessons From the Quad Screen.M. Constantine, M. Allyse, M. Wall, R. D. Vries & T. Rockwood - 2014 - Clinical Ethics 9 (1):17-27.
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  28.  17
    Informed Choice of Pregnant Women in Prenatal Screening Tests for Down's Syndrome.Hsien-Hsien Chiang, Y. M. Yu Chao & Y. S. Yuh - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (5):273-277.
  29.  13
    Prenatal Screening and Women's Perception of Infant Disability: A Sophie's Choice for Every Mother.Michele Chandler & Angie Smith - 1998 - Nursing Inquiry 5 (2):71-76.
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  30.  8
    A Voice for People with Disabilities in the Prenatal Screening Debate.Gillian Bricher - 1999 - Nursing Inquiry 6 (1):65-67.
  31.  1
    In California, Voluntary Mass Prenatal Screening.Robert Steinbrook - 1986 - Hastings Center Report 16 (5):5-7.
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  32.  13
    Huntington Disease: Prenatal Screening for Late Onset Disease.J. Greenberg - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (2):121-121.
  33.  3
    Prenatal Screening for Neural Tube Defects: A Choice for All.Lee N. Muecke - 1992 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 36 (1):87-96.
  34.  58
    Prenatal Screening, Ethics and Down’s Syndrome: A Literature Review.Priscilla Alderson - 2001 - Nursing Ethics 8 (4):360-374.
    This article reviews the literature on prenatal screening for Down’s syndrome. To be evidence based, medicine and nursing have to take account of research evidence and also of how this evidence is processed through the influence of prevailing social and moral attitudes. This review of the extensive literature examines how appropriate widely-held understandings of Down’s syndrome are, and asks whether or not practitioners and prospective parents have access to the full range of moral arguments and social evidence on (...)
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  35.  11
    Chromosome Screening Using Noninvasive Prenatal Testing Beyond Trisomy-21: What to Screen for and Why It Matters.Kristien Hens - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):8-21.
    With the new and highly accurate noninvasive prenatal test, new options for screening become available. I contend that the current state of the art of NIPT is already in need of a thorough ethical investigation and that there are different points to consider before any chromosomal or subchromosomal condition is added to the screening panel of a publicly funded screening program. Moreover, the application of certain ethical principles makes the inclusion of some conditions unethical in a (...)
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  36.  12
    Qualitative Research on Expanded Prenatal and Newborn Screening: Robust but Marginalized.Rachel Grob - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (S1):S72-S81.
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  37.  11
    The Psychological Well‐Being of Pregnant Women Undergoing Prenatal Testing and Screening: A Narrative Literature Review.Barbara B. Biesecker - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (S1):S53-S60.
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  38.  12
    Permissibility or Priority? Testing or Screening? Essential Distinctions in the Ethics of Prenatal Testing.Christian Munthe - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (1):30-32.
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  39.  20
    Down’s Syndrome Screening and Reproductive Politics: Care, Choice, and Disability in the Prenatal Clinic. [REVIEW]Daniel Rodger - 2018 - The New Bioethics 24 (1):95-97.
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  40. Prenatal Testing and Newborn Screening.Lainie Friedman Ross - 2008 - In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  41.  20
    A New Ethical Landscape of Prenatal Testing: Individualizing Choice to Serve Autonomy and Promote Public Health: A Radical Proposal.Christian Munthe - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):36-45.
    A new landscape of prenatal testing is presently developing, including new techniques for risk-reducing, non-invasive sampling of foetal DNA and drastically enhanced possibilities of what may be rapidly and precisely analysed, surrounded by a growing commercial genetic testing industry and a general trend of individualization in healthcare policies. This article applies a set of established ethical notions from past debates on PNT for analysing PNT screening-programmes in this new situation. While some basic challenges of PNT stay untouched, the (...)
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  42. Eugenics and Disability.Robert A. Wilson & Joshua St Pierre - 2016 - In Beatriz Mirandaa-Galarza Patrick Devlieger (ed.), Rethinking Disability: World Perspectives in Culture and Society. Antwerp, Belgium: pp. 93-112.
    In the intersection between eugenics past and present, disability has never been far beneath the surface. Perceived and ascribed disabilities of body and mind were one of the core sets of eugenics traits that provided the basis for institutionalized and sterilization on eugenic grounds for the first 75 years of the 20th-century. Since that time, the eugenic preoccupation with the character of future generations has seeped into what have become everyday practices in the realm of reproductive choice. As Marsha Saxton (...)
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  43.  49
    The New Genetics and Informed Consent: Differentiating Choice to Preserve Autonomy.Eline M. Bunnik, Antina Jong, Niels Nijsingh & Guido M. W. R. Wert - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (6):348-355.
    The advent of new genetic and genomic technologies may cause friction with the principle of respect for autonomy and demands a rethinking of traditional interpretations of the concept of informed consent. Technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and micro-array based analysis enable genome-wide testing for many heterogeneous abnormalities and predispositions simultaneously. This may challenge the feasibility of providing adequate pre-test information and achieving autonomous decision-making. At a symposium held at the 11th World Congress of Bioethics in June 2012 (Rotterdam), organized by (...)
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  44.  13
    Low Birth Weight, Intrauterine Growth-Retarded, and Pre-Term Infants.Troy D. Abell - 1992 - Human Nature 3 (4):335-378.
    Low birth weight, intrauterine growth retardation, and prematurity are overwhelming risk factors associated with infant mortality and morbidity. The lack of efficacious prenatal screening tests for these three outcomes illuminates the problems inherent in bivariate estimates of association. A biocultural strategy for research is presented, integrating societal and familial levels of analysis with the metabolic, immune, vascular, and neuroendocrine systems of the body. Policy decisions, it is argued, need to be based on this type of biocultural information in (...)
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  45.  17
    Can Safety Assurance Procedures in the Food Industry Be Used to Evaluate a Medical Screening Programme? The Application of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System to an Antenatal Serum Screening Programme for Down's Syndrome. Stage 1: Identifying Significant Hazards.M. Clare Derrington, Janet D. Glencross, Elizabeth S. Draper, Ronald T. Hsu & Jennifer J. Kurinczuk - 2003 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (1):39-47.
  46.  11
    Can Safety Assurance Procedures in the Food Industry Be Used to Evaluate a Medical Screening Programme? The Application of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System to an Antenatal Serum Screening Programme for Down's Syndrome. Stage 2: Overcoming the Hazards in Programme Delivery.M. Clare Derrington, Elizabeth S. Draper, Ronald T. Hsu & Jennifer J. Kurinczuk - 2003 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (1):49-57.
  47.  7
    Prenatal Testing: Does Reproductive Autonomy Succeed in Dispelling Eugenic Concerns?Dunja Begović - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (8):958-964.
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  48.  18
    First Trimester Down Syndrome Screening is Less Effective and the Number of Invasive Procedures is Increased in Women Younger Than 35 Years of Age.Sini Peuhkurinen, Paivi Laitinen, Markku Ryynanen & Jaana Marttala - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (2):324-326.
  49.  11
    Control Beliefs Are Related to Smoking Prevention in Prenatal Care.Sakari Lemola, Yvonne Meyer‐Leu, Jakub Samochowiec & Alexander Grob - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):948-952.
  50. Reproductive Freedom, Self-Regulation, and the Government of Impairment in Utero.Shelley Tremain - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):35-53.
    : This article critically examines the constitution of impairment in prenatal testing and screening practices and various discourses that surround these technologies. While technologies to test and screen prenatally are claimed to enhance women's capacity to be self-determining, make informed reproductive choices, and, in effect, wrest control of their bodies from a patriarchal medical establishment, I contend that this emerging relation between pregnant women and reproductive technologies is a new strategy of a form of power that began to (...)
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