Results for 'pressure ulcer'

989 found
Order:
  1.  28
    Pressure Ulcer: prevention protocols and prevalence.Doris Wilborn, Ruud Halfens & Theo Dassen - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (6):630-638.
  2.  66
    Pressure ulcer prevalence in Europe: a pilot study.Katrien Vanderwee, Michael Clark, Carol Dealey, Lena Gunningberg & Tom Defloor - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (2):227-235.
  3.  23
    Obesity, Pressure Ulcers, and Family Enablers.Jeffrey P. Spike - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (7):81-82.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  23
    Pressure ulcer prevention in intensive care patients: guidelines and practice.Eman S. M. Shahin, Theo Dassen & Ruud J. G. Halfens - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):370-374.
  5.  41
    Pressure ulcer risk screening in hospitals and nursing homes with a general nursing assessment tool: evaluation of the care dependency scale.Elke I. Mertens, Ruud J. G. Halfens, Ekkehart Dietz, Ramona Scheufele & Theo Dassen - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (6):1018-1025.
  6.  49
    Pressure ulcer prevalence in intensive care patients: a cross‐sectional study.Eman S. M. Shahin, Theo Dassen & Ruud J. G. Halfens - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (4):563-568.
  7.  17
    Studying factors related to pressure ulcers prevention: a marginal scale model for modelling heterogeneity among hospitals.Ileana Baldi, Alberto Ferrando, Francesca Foltran, Giovannino Ciccone & Dario Gregori - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1085-1089.
  8.  29
    Exploring variation in pressure ulcer prevalence in Sweden and the USA: benchmarking in action.Lena Gunningberg, Nancy Donaldson, Carolyn Aydin & Ewa Idvall - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (4):904-910.
  9.  31
    The first national pressure ulcer prevalence survey in county council and municipality settings in Sweden.Lena Gunningberg, Ami Hommel, Carina Bååth & Ewa Idvall - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):862-867.
  10.  35
    Two-Hourly Repositioning for Prevention of Pressure Ulcers in the Elderly: Patient Safety or Elder Abuse?Catherine A. Sharp, Jennifer S. Schulz Moore & Mary-Louise McLaws - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (1):17-34.
    For decades, aged care facility residents at risk of pressure ulcers have been repositioned at two-hour intervals, twenty-four-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week. Yet, PUs still develop. We used a cross-sectional survey of eighty randomly selected medical records of residents aged ≥ 65 years from eight Australian Residential Aged Care Facilities to determine the number of residents at risk of PUs, the use of two-hourly repositioning, and the presence of PUs in the last week of life. Despite 91 per cent of residents identified (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  44
    Explaining the national differences in pressure ulcer prevalence between the Netherlands and Germany – adjusted for personal risk factors and institutional quality indicators.Antje Tannen, Ekkehart Dietz, Theo Dassen & Ruud Halfens - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):85-90.
  12.  68
    Two-Hourly Repositioning for Prevention of Pressure Ulcers in the Elderly: Patient Safety or Elder Abuse?Mary-Louise McLaws, Jennifer S. Schulz Moore & Catherine A. Sharp - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (1):17-34.
    For decades, aged care facility residents at risk of pressure ulcers (PUs) have been repositioned at two-hour intervals, twenty-four-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week (24/7). Yet, PUs still develop. We used a cross-sectional survey of eighty randomly selected medical records of residents aged ≥ 65 years from eight Australian Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) to determine the number of residents at risk of PUs, the use of two-hourly repositioning, and the presence of PUs in the last week of life. Despite 91 per cent (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  25
    Keeping vulnerable elderly patients free from pressure ulcer is associated with high caregiver burden in informal caregivers.Yosuke Yamamoto, Yasuaki Hayashino, Takahiro Higashi, Miho Matsui, Shin Yamazaki, Misa Takegami, Yoshiki Miyachi & Shunichi Fukuhara - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):585-589.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  23
    Pressure‐reducing interventions among persons with pressure ulcers: results from the first three national pressure ulcer prevalence surveys in Sweden.Carina Bååth, Ewa Idvall, Lena Gunningberg & Ami Hommel - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (1):58-65.
  15.  42
    Evaluation of the dissemination and implementation of pressure ulcer guidelines in Dutch nursing homes.Esther Meesterberends, Ruud J. G. Halfens, Christa Lohrmann, Jos M. G. A. Schols & Rianne de Wit - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (4):705-712.
  16.  28
    Friction and shear highly associated with pressure ulcers of residents in long‐term care – Classification Tree Analysis (CHAID) of Braden items.Nils A. Lahmann, Antje Tannen, Theo Dassen & Jan Kottner - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (1):168-173.
  17.  16
    Using hospital administrative data to evaluate the knowledge‐to‐action gap in pressure ulcer preventive care.Pieter Van Herck, Walter Sermeus, Virpi Jylha, Dominik Michiels & Koen Van den Heede - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):375-382.
  18.  33
    Impact of prevention structures and processes on pressure ulcer prevalence in nursing homes and acute‐care hospitals.Nils A. Lahmann, Ruud J. G. Halfens & Theo Dassen - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (1):50-56.
  19.  18
    Successful implementation of clinical practice guidelines for pressure risk management in a home nursing setting.Suzanne Kapp - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):895-901.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  23
    Refusing care as a legal pathway to medical assistance in dying.Jocelyn Downie & Matthew J. Bowes - unknown
    Can a competent individual refuse care in order to make their natural death reasonably foreseeable in order to qualify for medical assistance in dying (MAiD)? Consider a competent patient with left-side paralysis following a right brain stroke who is not expected to die for many years; normally his cause of death would not be predictable. However, he refuses regular turning, so his physician can predict that pressure ulcers will develop, leading to infection for which he will refuse treatment and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  12
    Expanding choice at the end of life.Dominic Wilkinson, Laura Gilbertson, Justin Oakley & Julian Savulescu - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (4):269-270.
    We are grateful to the commentators on our article1 for their thoughtful engagement with the ethical and clinical complexity of expanded terminal sedation (ETS) in end-of-life care. We will start by noting some points of common ground, before moving on to the more challenging ways in which TS might be permissibly expanded. First, several commentators pointed out, and we completely concur, that it is important to provide patients with full information about their end-of-life options, including the ‘outcomes, uncertainties and costs (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  38
    The Ethical Management of the Noncompliant Patient.Alister Browne, Brent Dickson & Rena van der Wal - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (3):289-299.
    It is a rare patient who always does everything healthcare providers advise. Sometimes no harm comes from this; sometimes good does. But occasionally, great harm comes from not listening, as when it results in patients returning time and again for costly and invasive treatments of, say, infections, valve replacements, pressure ulcers, and so forth. No class of patients arouses more anger and resentment in healthcare providers, who often put out a call to invoke some version of the three strikes (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Paper taps chart storage.Chart Index, Punched Tape, Pressure Index, Punched Tap, Punched Cards & Charts Key - 1968 - In Peter Koestenbaum (ed.), Proceedings. [San Jose? Calif.,: [San Jose? Calif.. pp. 391.
  24.  88
    Ulcers and bacteria I: discovery and acceptance.Paul Thagard - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 29 (1):107-136.
    In 1983, Dr. J. Robin Warren and Dr. Barry Marshall reported finding a new kind of bacteria in the stomachs of people with gastritis. Warren and Marshall were soon led to the hypothesis that peptic ulcers are generally caused, not by excess acidity or stress, but by a bacterial infection. Initially, this hypothesis was viewed as preposterous, and it is still somewhat controversial. In 1994, however, a U. S. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Panel concluded that infection appears to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  25.  29
    Stress ulcer prophylaxis for non‐critically ill patients on a teaching service.Kevin O. Hwang, Sanja Kolarov, Lee Cheng & Rebecca A. Griffith - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (5):716-721.
  26.  44
    Ulcers and bacteria II: Instruments, experiments, and social interactions.Paul Thagard - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 29 (2):317-342.
    My description of the cognitive processes involved in the discovery, development, and acceptance of the bacterial theory of ulcers might have left the impression that science is all in the mind (Thagard, forthcoming-b). But only part of the story of the bacterial theory of ulcers is psychological. This paper discusses the important role of physical interaction with the world by means of instruments and experiments, and the equally important role of social interactions among the medical researchers who developed the theory. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  27.  19
    Ulcers and bacteria I: discovery and acceptance.Paul Thagard - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 29 (1):107-136.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  28.  23
    Stress ulcer prophylaxis in non‐critically ill patients: a prospective evaluation of current practice in a general surgery department.Coraline Bez, Nancy Perrottet, Tobias Zingg, En-Ling Leung Ki, Nicolas Demartines & André Pannatier - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (2):374-378.
  29.  18
    Ulcers and bacteria II: Instruments, experiments, and social interactions.Paul Thagard - 1998 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 29 (2):317-342.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  30. Putting pressure on theories of choking: towards an expanded perspective on breakdown in skilled performance.Doris McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):253-293.
    There is a widespread view that well-learned skills are automated, and that attention to the performance of these skills is damaging because it disrupts the automatic processes involved in their execution. This idea serves as the basis for an account of choking in high pressure situations. On this view, choking is the result of self-focused attention induced by anxiety. Recent research in sports psychology has produced a significant body of experimental evidence widely interpreted as supporting this account of choking (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  31.  14
    Ulcers in Papua New Guinea: a contemplation on fairness.H. Relyea-Ashley - 2010 - The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-Honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha 74 (4):34 - 38.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  47
    Stakeholders Pressures and Strategic Prioritisation: An Empirical Analysis of Environmental Responses in Argentinean Firms.D. A. Vazquez-Brust, C. Liston-Heyes, J. A. Plaza-Úbeda & J. Burgos-Jiménez - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S2):171 - 192.
    This article focusses on corporate attitudes to stakeholder environmental pressures in Argentina. It uses a cross section survey of 505 CEOs of Argentinean firms to gather information on environmental attitudes and a stakeholder theory framework to design and interpret the statistical analyses. It is underpinned by theoretical and empirical findings in the literature on stakeholder management, targeting in particular studies that deal with corporate social responsibility (CSR) in Latin America. Its general aim is to gain a deeper empirical understanding of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  33.  19
    Putting pressure on theories of choking: towards an expanded perspective on breakdown in skilled performance.Massimiliano Cappuccio - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):253-293.
    There is a widespread view that well-learned skills are automated, and that attention to the performance of these skills is damaging because it disrupts the automatic processes involved in their execution. This idea serves as the basis for an account of choking in high pressure situations. On this view, choking is the result of self-focused attention induced by anxiety. Recent research in sports psychology has produced a significant body of experimental evidence widely interpreted as supporting this account of choking (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  34. How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the H elicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  35.  12
    Medical Fact and Ulcer Disease: A Study in Scientific Controversy Resolution.Mark Cherry - 2002 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):249 - 273.
    This study seeks to advance the understanding of controversy resolution in science. I take as a case study conceptualization and treatment of ulcer disease. Analysis of causal accounts and effective treatments illustrate the ways in which competing parallel research programs in medicine embody opposing social, political, and economic forces which are bound to the epistemological dimensions of scientific controversy (e.g., standards of evidence, reference, and inference), and which in turn shift perception of the burden of proof. The analysis illustrates (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  51
    Stakeholder Pressures as Determinants of CSR Strategic Choice: Why do Firms Choose Symbolic Versus Substantive Self-Regulatory Codes of Conduct? [REVIEW]Luis A. Perez-Batres, Jonathan P. Doh, Van V. Miller & Michael J. Pisani - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):157-172.
    To encourage corporations to contribute positively to the environment in which they operate, voluntary self-regulatory codes (SRC) have been enacted and refined over the past 15 years. Two of the most prominent are the United Nations Global Compact and the Global Reporting Initiative. In this paper, we explore the impact of different stakeholders' pressures on the selection of strategic choices to join SRCs. Our results show that corporations react differently to different sets of stakeholder pressures and that the SRC selection (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  37. Population pressure and prehistoric violence in the Yayoi period of Japan.Tomomi Nakagawa, Kohei Tamura, Yuji Yamaguchi, Naoko Matsumoto, Takehiko Matsugi & Hisashi Nakao - 2021 - Journal of Archaeological Science 132:105420.
    The causes of prehistoric inter-group violence have been a subject of long-standing debate in archaeology, an- thropology, and other disciplines. Although population pressure has been considered as a major factor, due to the lack of available prehistoric data, few studies have directly examined its effect so far. In the present study, we used data on skeletal remains from the middle Yayoi period of the Japanese archipelago, where archaeologists argued that an increase of inter-group violence in this period could be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  66
    Institutional Pressures and Ethical Reckoning by Business Corporations.Frances Chua & Asheq Rahman - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):307 - 329.
    Prior studies have provided explanations for the presence, use and dissemination of codes of corporate ethics or codes of corporate conduct of business corporations. Most such explanations are functional in nature, and are descriptive as they are derived from the codes and their associated documents. We search for more underlying explanations using two complementary theories: first, social contract theories explaining the exogenous and endogenous reasons of organizational behavior, and then institutional theory explaining why organizations take similar measures in response to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39.  28
    Perceived publication pressure and research misconduct: should we be too bothered with a causal relationship?Nicole Shu Ling Yeo-Teh & Bor Luen Tang - 2022 - Research Ethics 18 (4):329-338.
    Publication pressure has been touted to promote questionable research practices (QRP) and scientific or research misconduct (RM). However, logically attractively as it is, there is no unequivocal evidence for this notion, and empirical studies have produced conflicting results. Other than difficulties in obtaining unbiased empirical data, a direct causal relationship between perceived publication pressure (PPP) and QRP/RM is inherently difficult to establish, because the former is a complex biopsychosocial construct that is variedly influenced by multiple personal and environmental (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  11
    Sound Pressure: How Speaker Systems Influence, Manipulate and Torture.Toby Heys - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Sound Pressure reveals how speaker systems mounted in public, employment, military and entertainment environments have played a pivotal role in the way that humans have been physiologically and psychologically organised and disciplined throughout the past century.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  23
    When Treatment Pressures Become Coercive: A Context-Sensitive Model of Informal Coercion in Mental Healthcare.Christin Hempeler, Esther Braun, Sarah Potthoff, Jakov Gather & Matthé Scholten - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-13.
    Treatment pressures are communicative strategies that mental health professionals use to influence the decision-making of mental health service users and improve their adherence to recommended treatment. Szmukler and Appelbaum describe a spectrum of treatment pressures, which encompasses persuasion, interpersonal leverage, offers and threats, arguing that only a particular type of threat amounts to informal coercion. We contend that this account of informal coercion is insufficiently sensitive to context and fails to recognize the fundamental power imbalance in mental healthcare. Based on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. A pressure-reversible cellular mechanism of general anesthetics capable of altering a possible mechanism of consciousness.Kunjumon Vadakkan - 2015 - Springerplus 4:1-17.
    Different anesthetics are known to modulate different types of membrane-bound receptors. Their common mechanism of action is expected to alter the mechanism for consciousness. Consciousness is hypothesized as the integral of all the units of internal sensations induced by reactivation of inter-postsynaptic membrane functional LINKs during mechanisms that lead to oscillating potentials. The thermodynamics of the spontaneous lateral curvature of lipid membranes induced by lipophilic anesthetics can lead to the formation of non-specific inter-postsynaptic membrane functional LINKs by different mechanisms. These (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  10
    Feeling Pressure to Be a Perfect Mother Relates to Parental Burnout and Career Ambitions.Loes Meeussen & Colette Van Laar - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:342086.
    _Background and aims:_ Intensive mothering norms prescribe women to be perfect mothers. Recent research has shown that women’s experiences of pressure toward perfect parenting are related to higher levels of guilt and stress. The current paper follows up on this research with two aims: First, we examine how mothers regulate pressure toward perfect mothering affectively, cognitively, and behaviorally, and how such regulation may relate to parental burnout. Second, we examine how feeling pressure toward perfect mothering may spill (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  44.  47
    Under Pressure: Processing Representational Decoupling in False-Belief Tasks.Anna Ciaunica - 2014 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (4):527-542.
    Several studies demonstrated that children younger than 3 years of age, who consistently fail the standard verbal false-belief task, can anticipate others’ actions based on their attributed false beliefs. This gave rise to the so-called “Developmental Paradox”. De Bruin and Kästner recently suggested that the Developmental Paradox is best addressed in terms of the relation between coupled and decoupled processes and argued that if enactivism is to be a genuine alternative to classic cognitivism, it should be able to bridge the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45.  39
    Evolutionary pressures and a stable world for animals and robots: A commentary on Merker.Stan Franklin - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):115-118.
    In his article on The Liabilities of Mobility, Merker asserts that “Consciousness presents us with a stable arena for our actions—the world …” and argues for this property as providing evolutionary pressure for the evolution of consciousness. In this commentary, I will explore the implications of Merker’s ideas for consciousness in artificial agents as well as animals, and also meet some possible objections to his evolutionary pressure claim.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  46.  30
    Environmental Pressure and the Performance of Foreign Firms in an Emerging Economy.Nahyun Kim, Jon J. Moon & Haitao Yin - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):475-490.
    Does environmental management help foreign firms outperform local firms in emerging economies? While existing research suggests that environmental management may or may not benefit firm performance, the question is particularly under-investigated in the emerging economy context. Using the data on foreign investment into China, this study explores whether foreign firms that are under greater environmental pressure, at home or at the host, outperform comparable local firms in an emerging host country. In making this comparison, we use propensity-score matching and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  54
    How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the Helicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  48.  82
    Effect of Stakeholders’ Pressure on Transparency of Sustainability Reports within the GRI Framework.Belen Fernandez-Feijoo, Silvia Romero & Silvia Ruiz - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):53-63.
    Transparency is a quality of corporate social responsibility communication that enhances the relationship between the investors and the company. The objective of this paper is to analyze if the transparency of the sustainability reports is affected by the relationship of companies in different industries with their stakeholders. If this were the case, it would indicate that the pressure of significant stakeholders determines the required level of transparency of the reports. We find that the pressure of some groups of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  49.  51
    How causal are microbiomes? A comparison with the Helicobacter pylori explanation of ulcers.Kate E. Lynch, Emily C. Parke & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (6):62.
    Human microbiome research makes causal connections between entire microbial communities and a wide array of traits that range from physiological diseases to psychological states. To evaluate these causal claims, we first examine a well-known single-microbe causal explanation: of Helicobacter pylori causing ulcers. This apparently straightforward causal explanation is not so simple, however. It does not achieve a key explanatory standard in microbiology, of Koch’s postulates, which rely on manipulations of single-microorganism cultures to infer causal relationships to disease. When Koch’s postulates (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  50. Experimentalist pressure against traditional methodology.Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (5):743 - 765.
    According to some critics, traditional armchair philosophical methodology relies in an illicit way on intuitions. But the particular structure of the critique is not often carefully articulated—a significant omission, since some of the critics’ arguments for skepticism about philosophy threaten to generalize to skepticism in general. More recently, some experimentalist critics have attempted to articulate a critique that is especially tailored to affect traditional methods, without generalizing too widely. Such critiques are more reasonable, and more worthy of serious consideration, than (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
1 — 50 / 989