Results for 'privacy rights'

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  1. The nature and value of the.Moral Right To Privacy - 2002 - Public Affairs Quarterly 16 (4):329.
     
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  2. Privacy rights and ‘naked’ statistical evidence.Lauritz Aastrup Munch - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (11):3777-3795.
    Do privacy rights restrict what is permissible to infer about others based on statistical evidence? This paper replies affirmatively by defending the following symmetry: there is not necessarily a morally relevant difference between directly appropriating people’s private information—say, by using an X-ray device on their private safes—and using predictive technologies to infer the same content, at least in cases where the evidence has a roughly similar probative value. This conclusion is of theoretical interest because a comprehensive justification of (...)
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  3.  35
    Privacy Rights Forfeiture.Mark Hanin - 2022 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 22 (2).
    Privacy rights can surely be waived. But can they also be forfeited? If so, why and under what conditions? This article takes up these questions by developing a novel theory of privacy rights forfeiture that draws inspiration from Judith Thomson’s canonical work on privacy. The paper identifies two species of forfeiture rooted in modes of negligent and reckless conduct and argues that both self-directed and other-regarding considerations play a role in grounding forfeiture. The paper also (...)
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  4.  53
    How Privacy Rights Engender Direct Doxastic Duties.Lauritz Aastrup Munch - 2022 - Journal of Value Inquiry 56 (4):547-562.
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  5. Privacy Rights and Public Information.Benedict Rumbold & James Wilson - 2018 - Journal of Political Philosophy 27 (1):3-25.
    This article concerns the nature and limits of individuals’ rights to privacy over information that they have made public. For some, even suggesting that an individual can have a right to privacy over such information may seem paradoxical. First, one has no right to privacy over information that was never private to begin with. Second, insofar as one makes once-private information public – whether intentionally or unintentionally – one waives one’s right to privacy to that (...)
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  6. Privacy Rights and Democracy: A Contradiction in Terms?Annabelle Lever - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):142-162.
    This article argues that people have legitimate interests in privacy that deserve legal protection on democratic principles. It describes the right to privacy as a bundle of rights of personal choice, association and expression and shows that, so described, people have legitimate political interests in privacy. These interests reflect the ways that privacy rights can supplement the protection for people's freedom and equality provided by rights of political choice, association and expression, and can (...)
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  7. Privacy rights, crime prevention, CCTV, and the life of mrs aremac.Jesper Ryberg - 2007 - Res Publica 13 (2):127-143.
    Over the past decade the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) as a means of crime prevention has reached unprecedented levels. Though critics of this development do not speak with one voice and have pointed to a number of different problems in the use of CCTV, one argument has played a dominant role in the debate, namely, that CCTV constitutes an unacceptable violation of people’s right to privacy. The purpose of this paper is to examine this argument critically. It (...)
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  8.  23
    Privacy Rights: Moral and Legal Foundations.Adam D. Moore - 2010 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    We all know that Google stores huge amounts of information about everyone who uses its search tools, that Amazon can recommend new books to us based on our past purchases, and that the U.S. government engaged in many data-mining activities during the Bush administration to acquire information about us, including involving telecommunications companies in monitoring our phone calls. Control over access to our bodies and to special places, like our homes, has traditionally been the focus of concerns about privacy, (...)
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  9.  60
    Privacy Rights: Moral and Legal Foundations.Adam D. Moore - 2010 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    "Provides a definition and defense of individual privacy rights. Applies the proposed theory to issues including privacy versus free speech; drug testing; and national security and public accountability"--Provided by publisher.
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  10.  68
    Privacy Rights and Democracy: A Contradiction in Terms?Annabelle Lever - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):142-162.
    This article argues that people have legitimate interests in privacy that deserve legal protection on democratic principles. It describes the right to privacy as a bundle of rights of personal choice, association and expression and shows that, so described, people have legitimate political interests in privacy. These interests reflect the ways that privacy rights can supplement the protection for people's freedom and equality provided by rights of political choice, association and expression, and can (...)
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  11.  61
    Privacy rights and public spaces: CCTV and the problem of the “unobservable observer”.Benjamin J. Goold - 2002 - Criminal Justice Ethics 21 (1):21-27.
    (2002). Privacy rights and public spaces: CCTV and the problem of the “unobservable observer”. Criminal Justice Ethics: Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 21-27. doi: 10.1080/0731129X.2002.9992113.
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  12. Privacy Rights On The Internet.Norman E. Bowie & Karim Jamal - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):323-342.
    Consumer surveys indicate that concerns about privacy are a principal factor discouraging consumers from shopping online. The keypublic policy issue regarding privacy is whether the US should follow its current self-regulation course (where the FTC encourages websites to obtain private “privacy web-seals”), or whether a European style formal legal regulation approach should be adopted in the US.We conclude that the use of assurance seals has worked reasonably well and websites should be free to decide whether they have (...)
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  13.  33
    Privacy Rights On The Internet: Self-Regulation Or Government Regulation?Norman E. Bowie & Karim Jamal - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):323-342.
    Consumer surveys indicate that concerns about privacy are a principal factor discouraging consumers from shopping online. The keypublic policy issue regarding privacy is whether the US should follow its current self-regulation course, or whether a European style formal legal regulation approach should be adopted in the US.We conclude that the use of assurance seals has worked reasonably well and websites should be free to decide whether they have aprivacy seal or not. Given the narrow scope and the wide (...)
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  14.  7
    Privacy Rights On The Internet.Norman E. Bowie & Karim Jamal - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):323-342.
    Consumer surveys indicate that concerns about privacy are a principal factor discouraging consumers from shopping online. The keypublic policy issue regarding privacy is whether the US should follow its current self-regulation course (where the FTC encourages websites to obtain private “privacy web-seals”), or whether a European style formal legal regulation approach should be adopted in the US.We conclude that the use of assurance seals has worked reasonably well and websites should be free to decide whether they have (...)
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  15.  11
    Privacy rights in the age of Street View.Ben Lopez - 2010 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (4):62-69.
    Recently, Street View has come under public scrutiny due to its apparent disregard for personal privacy. Indeed, individuals should have the right to censor personal information -- prior to its public disclosure - and Street View-like services do seem to call this fundamental right into question. As the issue stands, Street View technology provides a useful service that allows for quick and easy access to most places within the vicinity of a main public road. In response to the public (...)
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  16.  73
    Privacy Rights in the Information EconomyLegislating Privacy: Technology, Social Values and Public Policy.Richard A. Spinello & Priscilla Regan - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (4):723.
  17.  73
    Privacy rights and protection: Foreign values in modern thai context. [REVIEW]Krisana Kitiyadisai - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (1):17-26.
    The concept of privacy as a basic human right which has to be protected by law is a recently adopted concept in Thailand, as the protection of human rights was only legally recognized by the National Human Rights Act in 1999. Moreover, along with other drafted legislation on computer crime, the law on privacy protection has not yet been enacted. The political reform and the influences of globalization have speeded up the process of westernization of the (...)
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  18.  16
    Individual privacy rights with respect to services such as Google Street View.James Thornton - 2010 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (4):70-76.
    For a person to squeeze his fingers is legal. For a person to face towards another person is legal. For a person to sight down the barrel of a gun is legal. Yet, for that same person to do all three of these things at once is very illegal. Although Google Street View, or GSV for short, and similar services may be comprised of previously accepted functions---operation of an automobile, photography, internet publishing, mapmaking, advertising, etc.---the whole of a thing is (...)
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  19.  26
    Employee Privacy Rights and New Communication Technologies.William P. Smith - 2012 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:170-177.
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  20.  37
    Moving Beyond Context: Reassessing Privacy Rights in the Neurotechnology Era.Callie Terris - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 15 (2):144-146.
    Neurotechnologies are revolutionizing our ability to monitor and modify the brain. As these technologies gather more data, many seek to understand whether brain data raises novel privacy concerns a...
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  21.  8
    Privacy Rights[REVIEW]Mark Tunick - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):510-517.
    Review of Adam Moore's book Privacy Rights.
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  22.  39
    Do Children Have Privacy Rights in the Classroom?Andrew Davis - 2001 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):245-254.
    Arguing that everyone has a right to privacy as control overaccess to `intimate' aspects of one's life, this author draws on thework of Julie Inness to discuss children's rights to privacy inclassrooms. Even if it is agreed that pupils should exercise this right,a central point is that there may be moral or other value considerationsthat justify setting the right aside. Among selected complexities, animportant extension is the right to psychological processes throughwhich learners acquire new knowledge.
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  23.  65
    An Analysis of Student Privacy Rights in the Use of Plagiarism Detection Systems.Bo Brinkman - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1255-1266.
    Plagiarism detection services are a powerful tool to help encourage academic integrity. Adoption of these services has proven to be controversial due to ethical concerns about students’ rights. Central to these concerns is the fact that most such systems make permanent archives of student work to be re-used in plagiarism detection. This computerization and automation of plagiarism detection is changing the relationships of trust and responsibility between students, educators, educational institutions, and private corporations. Educators must respect student privacy (...)
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  24.  4
    Pursuing the Anonymous User: Privacy Rights and Mandatory Registration of Prepaid Mobile Phones.Jennifer Parisi & Gordon A. Gow - 2008 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 28 (1):60-68.
    In recent years there has been concern among law enforcement and national security organizations about the use of “anonymous” prepaid mobile phone service and its purported role in supporting criminal and terrorist activities. As a result, a number of countries have implemented registration requirements for such service. Privacy rights advocates oppose such regulatory measures, arguing that there is little practical value in attempting to register prepaid mobile devices, and the issue raises important questions about a citizen's entitlement to (...)
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  25.  26
    Privacy Rights[REVIEW]Mark Tunick - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (3):510-517.
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  26.  13
    Correction to: Privacy rights and ‘naked’ statistical evidence.Lauritz Aastrup Munch - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (11):3797-3797.
    A correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11098-021-01640-1.
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  27.  57
    Privacy Rights, Moral and Legal Foundations, by Adam D. Moore. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2010, 237 pp. ISBN 978‐0‐271‐03685‐4 hb £57.95; ISBN 978‐0271‐036861 pb £16.95. [REVIEW]David Archard - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):338-340.
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  28.  15
    A survey on the attitude of college students to the privacy right as opposed to the right to know.Nader Ghotbi - 2020 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 11 (3):1-8.
    There are times when two essential human rights may appear to be in conflict, or need to be balanced against one another. This paper examines the right of a party, such as officials, a group of people or an individual, to ‘privacy and confidentiality’ when others may have a conflicting ‘right to know’ about them. Although similar conflicts have been studied by other researchers, there is still controversy over the rightful balance in situations driven by new information and (...)
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  29.  52
    Genes and Spleens: Property, Contract, or Privacy Rights in the Human Body?Radhika Rao - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):371-382.
    This article compares three frameworks for legal regulation of the human body. Property law systematically favors those who use the body to create commercial products. Yet contract and privacy rights cannot compete with the property paradigm, which alone affords a complete bundle of rights enforceable against the whole world. In the face of researchers' property rights, the theoretical freedom to contract and the meager interest in privacy leave those who supply body parts vulnerable to exploitation.
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  30.  24
    Genes and Spleens: Property, Contract, or Privacy Rights in the Human Body?Radhika Rao - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (3):371-382.
    The legal status of the human body is hotly contested, yet the law of the body remains in a state of confusion and chaos. Sometimes the body is treated as an object of property, sometimes it is dealt with under the rubric of contract, and sometimes it is not conceived as property at all, but rather as the subject of privacy rights. Which body of law should become the law of the body? This question is even more pressing (...)
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  31.  47
    The 2010 Schubmehl-Prein Essay Competition: what should individual privacy rights be with respect to services such as street view?Kevin W. Bowyer - 2010 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (4):54-54.
    The 2010 competition was the sixth year of the Schubmehl-Prein contest for the Best Essay on Social Impact of Computing. The topic for this year turned was one that turned out to be in the news even more than anticipated -- What Should Individual Privacy Rights Be With Respect To Services Such As "Street View? The topic was originally envisioned primarily as one that would lead students to consider the different concepts of privacy that various countries have (...)
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  32.  34
    Separation, risk, and the necessity of privacy to well-being: A comment on Adam Moore's toward informational privacy rights.Kenneth Einar Himma - manuscript
    Moore attempts to show that privacy, conceived as "control over access to oneself and to information about oneself" is "necessary" for human well-being. Moore grounds his argument in an analysis of the need for physical separation, which Moore suggests is universal among animal species. Moore notes, "One basic finding of animal studies is that virtually all animals seek periods of individual seclusion or small-group intimacy." Citing several studies involving rats and other animals, Moore points out that a lack of (...)
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  33.  6
    AIDS & HIV: Colorado court upholds privacy rights in disclosure of test results.J. Rand - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (4):353-355.
  34. think Donald Moon overestimates the dangers of “unconstrained conversation,” especially for individual privacy rights, he points to the difficult question concerning the kinds of institutional design that are appropriate to help ensure that the deliberations conducted in an “unconstrained conversation” influence the process of decision making. Should there, for example, be a system of public voting? See “Constrained Discourse and Public Life,”.I. Although - 1991 - Political Theory 19:202-229.
  35.  89
    Privacy and the Moral Right to Personal Autonomy.Edmund Wall - 2011 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):69-85.
    I argue that the moral right to privacy is the moral right to consent to access by others to one’s personal information. Although this thesis is relatively simple and already implicit in considerations about privacy, it has, nevertheless, been overlooked by philosophers. In the paper, I present and defend my account of the moral right to privacy, respond to possible objections to it, and attempt to show its advantages over two recent accounts: one by Steve Matthews and (...)
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  36.  72
    The Right to Privacy, Control Over Self‐Presentation, and Subsequent Harm.Lauritz Aastrup Munch - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (1):141-154.
    Andrei Marmor has recently offered a narrow interpretation of the right to privacy as a right to having a reasonable amount of control over one's self‐presentation. He claims that the interest people have in preventing others from abusing their personal information to do harm is not directly protected by the right to privacy. This article rejects that claim and defends a view according to which concerns about abuse play a central role in fleshing out the appropriate scope of (...)
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  37.  10
    The right to privacy.Janet E. Smith - 2008 - San Francisco: Ignatius Press.
    Foreword by Robert H. Bork -- Culture wars -- A distorted understanding of rights -- The right to privacy -- Griswold and contraception -- Roe and abortion -- Assisted suicide and homosexuality -- Political connections and natural consequences.
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  38.  27
    The Right to Know and the Right Not to Know: Genetic Privacy and Responsibility.Ruth Chadwick, Mairi Levitt & Darren Shickle (eds.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    The privacy concerns discussed in the 1990s in relation to the New Genetics failed to anticipate the relevant issues for individuals, families, geneticists and society. Consumers, for example, can now buy their personal genetic information and share it online. The challenges facing genetic privacy have evolved as new biotechnologies have developed, and personal privacy is increasingly challenged by the irrepressible flow of electronic data between the personal and public spheres and by surveillance for terrorism and security risks. (...)
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  39. The right to privacy.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1975 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 4 (4):295-314.
  40.  95
    Privacy and the Right to Privacy.H. J. McCloskey - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (211):17 - 38.
    The right to privacy is one of the rights most widely demanded today. Privacy has not always so been demanded. The reasons for the present concern for privacy are complex and obscure. They obviously relate both to the possibilities for very considerable enjoyment of privacy by the bulk of people living in affluent societies brought about by twentieth-century affluence, and to the development of very efficient methods of thoroughly and systematically invading this newly found (...). However, interesting and important as it is as a socio-philosophical inquiry, the concern of this paper is not with why privacy has come to be so highly prized, but rather with whether it is rightly prized, and if so, when and why. This means that my concern will be with what privacy is, what is its domain, whether there is a right to privacy, and, if so, whether it is an ultimate, basic, albeit, a prima facie right, or simply a conditional right. (shrink)
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  41. Privacy and the USA patriot act: Rights, the value of rights, and autonomy.Alan Rubel - 2007 - Law and Philosophy 26 (2):119-159.
    Civil liberty and privacy advocates have criticized the USA PATRIOT Act (Act) on numerous grounds since it was passed in the wake of the World Trade Center attacks in 2001. Two of the primary targets of those criticisms are the Act’s sneak-and-peek search provision, which allows law enforcement agents to conduct searches without informing the search’s subjects, and the business records provision, which allows agents to secretly subpoena a variety of information – most notoriously, library borrowing records. Without attending (...)
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  42. Privacy vs. security: Why privacy is not an absolute value or right.Kenneth Einar Himma - manuscript
    In this essay, I consider the relationship between the rights to privacy and security and argue that, in a sense to be made somewhat more precise below, that threats to the right to security outweighs comparable threats to privacy. My argument begins with an assessment of ordinary case judgments and an explanation of the important moral distinction between intrinsic value (i.e., value as an end) and instrumental value (i.e., value as a means), arguing that each approach assigns (...)
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  43. Privacy, Control, and Talk of Rights: R. G. FREY.R. G. Frey - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):45-67.
    An alleged moral right to informational privacy assumes that we should have control over information about ourselves. What is the philosophical justification for this control? I think that one prevalent answer to this question—an answer that has to do with the justification of negative rights generally—will not do.
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  44.  5
    The right to privacy: elusive in Malawi: perceptions of the "right to privacy" by Malawians: a book on socio-political philosophy.George Nyanga - 2016 - Balaka, Malawi: Montfort Media.
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  45.  28
    The Right Not to Be Subjected to AI Profiling Based on Publicly Available Data—Privacy and the Exceptionalism of AI Profiling.Thomas Ploug - 2023 - Philosophy and Technology 36 (1):1-22.
    Social media data hold considerable potential for predicting health-related conditions. Recent studies suggest that machine-learning models may accurately predict depression and other mental health-related conditions based on Instagram photos and Tweets. In this article, it is argued that individuals should have a sui generis right not to be subjected to AI profiling based on publicly available data without their explicit informed consent. The article (1) develops three basic arguments for a right to protection of personal data trading on the notions (...)
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  46.  46
    Privacy, Interests, and Inalienable Rights.Adam D. Moore - 2018 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 5 (2):327-355.
    Some rights are so important for human autonomy and well-being that many scholars insist they should not be waived, traded, or abandoned. Privacy is a recent addition to this list. At the other end of the spectrum is the belief that privacy is a mere unimportant interest or preference. This paper defends a middle path between viewing privacy as an inalienable, non-waivable, non-transferrable right and the view of privacy as a mere subjective interest. First, an (...)
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  47.  43
    Patients' privacy of the person and human rights.Jay Woogara - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (3):273-287.
    The UK Government published various circulars to indicate the importance of respecting the privacy and dignity of NHS patients following the implementation of the Human Rights Act, 1998. This research used an ethnographic method to determine the extent to which health professionals had in fact upheld the philosophy of these documents. Fieldwork using nonparticipant observation, and unstructured and semistructured interviews with patients and staff, took place over six months in three acute care wards in a large district NHS (...)
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  48. The right to privacy unveiled.Samuel C. Rickless - 2007 - San Diego Law Review 44 (1):773-799.
    The vast majority of philosophers and legal theorists who have thought about the issue agree that there is such a thing as a moral right to privacy. However, there is little or no theoretical consensus about the nature of this right. According to reductionists, the right to privacy amounts to nothing more than a cluster of property rights and rights over the person, and therefore plays no autonomous explanatory role in moral theory (Thomson 1975, Davis 1959). (...)
     
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  49. The Right to Privacy and the Right to Use the Bathroom Consistent with One’s Gender Identity.Vincent Samar - 2016 - Duke Journal of Gender Aw and Policy 24 (1):33-59.
    The Right to Privacy and the Right to Use the Bathroom Consistent with One’s Gender Identity.
     
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  50. Feminism, democracy and the right to privacy.Annabelle Lever - 2005 - Minerva 2005 (nov):1-31.
    This article argues that people have legitimate interests in privacy that deserve legal protection on democratic principles. It describes the right to privacy as a bundle of rights of personal choice, association and expression and shows that, so described, people have legitimate political interests in privacy. These interests reflect the ways that privacy rights can supplement the protection for people’s freedom and equality provided by rights of political choice, association and expression, and can (...)
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