Results for 'promising'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  90
    Promises, Morals and Law.P. S. Atiyah - 1981 - Clarendon Press.
    Chapter Promising in Law and Morals Promissory and contractual obligations raise many issues of common interest to philosophers and lawyers. ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  2. The Promise of Happiness.Sara Ahmed - 2010 - Duke University Press.
    _The Promise of Happiness_ is a provocative cultural critique of the imperative to be happy. It asks what follows when we make our desires and even our own happiness conditional on the happiness of others: “I just want you to be happy”; “I’m happy if you’re happy.” Combining philosophy and feminist cultural studies, Sara Ahmed reveals the affective and moral work performed by the “happiness duty,” the expectation that we will be made happy by taking part in that which is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   103 citations  
  3. Promising Ourselves, Promising Others.Jorah Dannenberg - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (2):159-183.
    Promising ourselves is familiar, yet some find it philosophically troubling. Though most of us take the promises we make ourselves seriously, it can seem mysterious how a promise made only to oneself could genuinely bind. Moreover, the desire to be bound by a promise to oneself may seem to expose an unflattering lack of trust in oneself. In this paper I aim to vindicate self-promising from these broadly skeptical concerns. Borrowing Nietzsche’s idea of a memory of the will, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4. Promises as Proposals in Joint Practical Deliberation.Brendan de Kenessey - 2020 - Noûs.
    This paper argues that promises are proposals in joint practical deliberation, the activity of deciding together what to do. More precisely: to promise to ϕ is to propose (in a particular way) to decide together with your addressee(s) that you will ϕ. I defend this deliberative theory by showing that the activity of joint practical deliberation naturally gives rise to a speech act with exactly the same properties as promises. A certain kind of proposal to make a joint decision regarding (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5.  1
    The Promise of Pragmatism: Modernism and the Crisis of Knowledge and Authority.John Patrick Diggins - 1995 - University of Chicago Press.
    For much of our century, pragmatism has enjoyed a charmed life, holding the dominant point of view in American politics, law, education, and social thought in general. After suffering a brief eclipse in the post-World War II period, pragmatism has experienced a revival, especially in literary theory and such areas as poststructuralism and deconstruction. In this critique of pragmatism and neopragmatism, one of our leading intellectual historians traces the attempts of thinkers from William James to Richard Rorty to find a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  6. Promises and Trust.Daniel Friedrich & Nicholas Southwood - 2011 - In Hanoch Sheinman (ed.), Promises and Agreements: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
    In this article we develop and defend what we call the “Trust View” of promissory obligation, according to which making a promise involves inviting another individual to trust one to do something. In inviting her trust, and having the invitation accepted (or at least not rejected), one incurs an obligation to her not to betray the trust that one has invited. The distinctive wrong involved in breaking a promise is a matter of violating this obligation. We begin by explicating the (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  7.  98
    Promising to Try.Jason D’Cruz & Justin Kalef - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):797-806.
    We maintain that in many contexts promising to try is expressive of responsibility as a promiser. This morally significant application of promising to try speaks in favor of the view that responsible promisers favor evidentialism about promises. Contra Berislav Marušić, we contend that responsible promisers typically withdraw from promising to act and instead promise to try, in circumstances in which they recognize that there is a significant chance that they will not succeed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  8.  28
    Promising‐Part 1.Ulrike Heuer - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (12):832-841.
    The explanation of promising is fraught with problems. In particular the problem that promises can be valid even when nothing good comes of keeping the promise, and the bootstrapping problem with explaining how the mere intention to put oneself under an obligation can create such an obligation have been recognized since Hume’s famous discussion of the topic. There are two influential accounts of promising, and promissory obligation, which attempt to solve the problems: The expectation account and the practice (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9.  17
    Promising's Neglected Siblings: Oaths, Vows, and Promissory Obligation.Kyle Fruh - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (3):858-880.
    Promises of a customary, interpersonal kind have received no small amount of philosophical attention. Of particular interest has been their capac- ity to generate moral obligations. This capacity is arguably what distinguishes promises from other, similar phenomena, like communicating a firm intention. But this capacity is common to still other nearby phenomena, such as oaths and vows. These latter phenomena belong to the same family of concepts as promises, but they are structurally and functionally distinct. Taken in their turn, they (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Promising, Intimate Relationships, and Conventionalism.Seana Valentine Shiffrin - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (4):481-524.
    The power to promise is morally fundamental and does not, at its foundation, derive from moral principles that govern our use of conventions. Of course, many features of promising have conventional components—including which words, gestures, or conditions of silence create commitments. What is really at issue between conventionalists and nonconventionalists is whether the basic moral relation of promissory commitment derives from the moral principles that govern our use of social conventions. Other nonconventionalist accounts make problematic concessions to the conventionalist's (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  11.  39
    Supererogatory Promises a Comment on Kawal's “Promising and Supererogation”.David Heyd - 2005 - Philosophia 32 (1-4):399-403.
  12. Promises, Morals and Law.P. S. Atiyah - 1983 - Oxford University Press UK.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13.  40
    Nudges: A Promising Behavioral Public Policy Tool to Reduce Vaccine Hesitancy.Alejandro Hortal - 2022 - Revista Brasileira de Políticas Públicas 12 (1):80-103.
    Although vaccines are considered an efficient public health tool by medical experts, in different countries, people’s confidence in them has been decreasing. COVID-19 has elevated medical scientists’ and practitioners’ social reputation, and it may have reduced global vaccination hesitancy. Still, this alone will not altogether remove the existent frictions that prevent people from complying with vaccination schedules. This paper will review the common causes behind vaccination hesitancy. It will also explore different types of public policy interventions that health experts in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  49
    Promises, Promises: General Learning Algorithms.David W. Lightfoot - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (4):582–587.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15. Promises and Practices Revisited.Niko Kolodny & R. Jay Wallace - 2003 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 31 (2):119-154.
    Promising is clearly a social practice or convention. By uttering the formula, “I hereby promise to do X,” we can raise in others the expectation that we will in fact do X. But this succeeds only because there is a social practice that consists (inter alia) in a disposition on the part of promisers to do what they promise, and an expectation on the part of promisees that promisers will so behave. It is equally clear that, barring special circumstances (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  16.  44
    Promising, Intending and Moral Autonomy.Michael H. Robins - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction Promising seems to be an act of intentionally creating an obligation where none existed before, but how is such a thing accomplished? ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  17. Promising Against the Evidence.Berislav Marušić - 2013 - Ethics 123 (2):292-317.
    We often promise to ϕ despite having evidence that there is a significant chance that we won’t ϕ. This gives rise to a pressing philosophical problem: Are we irresponsible in making such promises since, it seems, we are insincere or irrational in making them? I argue that we needn’t be. When it’s up to us to ϕ, our practical reasons for ϕ-ing partly determine whether it is rational for us to believe that we will ϕ. That is why we can (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  18. Promises Beyond Assurance.Nicholas Southwood & Daniel Friedrich - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 144 (2):261 - 280.
    Breaking a promise is generally taken to involve committing a certain kind of moral wrong, but what (if anything) explains this wrong? According to one influential theory that has been championed most recently by T.M. Scanlon, the wrong involved in breaking a promise is a matter of violating an obligation that one incurs to a promisee in virtue of giving her assurance that one will perform or refrain from performing certain acts. In this paper, we argue that the “Assurance View”, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  19.  14
    Promising ‐ Part 2.Ulrike Heuer - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (12):842-851.
    The explanation of promising is fraught with problems. In particular the problem that promises can be valid even when nothing good comes of keeping the promise, and the bootstrapping problem with explaining how the mere intention to put oneself under an obligation can create such an obligation have been recognized since Hume’s famous discussion of the topic. In part 1, I showed that two main views of promising which attempt to solve these problems fall short of explaining the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20.  40
    Promising by Right.Jorah Dannenberg - 2017 - Philosophers' Imprint 17.
    When you offer your promise you expect to be taken at your word. In this paper I shift focus away from more familiar questions about the ground of promissory obligation, concentrating instead on the familiar way that making a promise involves claiming another’s trust. Borrowing an idea from Nietzsche, I suggest that we understand this in terms of a “right to make promises” – that is, a right to “stand security for ourselves,” held and exercised by those who possess the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  23
    Promising, Conventionalism, and Intimate Relationships.Seana Valentine Shiffrin - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (4):481-524.
    The power to promise is morally fundamental and does not, at its foundation, derive from moral principles that govern our use of conventions. Of course, many features of promising have conventional components—including which words, gestures, or conditions of silence create commitments. What is really at issue between conventionalists and nonconventionalists is whether the basic moral relation of promissory commitment derives from the moral principles that govern our use of social conventions. Other nonconventionalist accounts make problematic concessions to the conventionalist's (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  22. Promises and the Backward Reach of Uptake.Hallie Liberto - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (1):15-26.
    I present a set of cases that pose problems for existing theories of promissory uptake. These cases involve a delayed receipt and/or acceptance of a promise, though the obligation arises before the receipt or acceptance has taken place; a delay or absence of agency on the part of the promisee—making it impossible to satisfy the various suggested uptake criteria, though promissory obligation is nonetheless generated; and the promise is made to someone, de dicto—that is, the person who will be the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23. Contract as Promise: A Theory of Contractual Obligation.Charles Fried - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Contract as Promise is a study of the philosophical foundations of contract law in which Professor Fried effectively answers some of the most common assumptions about contract law and strongly proposes a moral basis for it while defending the classical theory of contract. This book provides two purposes regarding the complex legal institution of the contract. The first is the theoretical purpose to demonstrate how contract law can be traced to and is determined by a small number of basic moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  24.  1
    Promises, Oaths, and Vows: On the Psychology of Promising.Herbert J. Schlesinger - 2008 - Routledge.
    Considering that getting along in civil society is based on the expectation that people will do what they say they will do, i.e., essentially live up to their explicit or implicit promises, it is amazing that so little scientific attention has been given to the act of promising. A great deal of research has been done on the moral development of children, for example, but not on the child’s ability to make and keep a promise, one of the highest (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. The Promise and Power of Ecofeminism.Karen J. Warren - 1990 - Environmental Ethics 12 (2):125-46.
    Ecological feminism is the position that there are important connections-historical, symbolic, theoretical-between the domination of women and the domination of nonhuman nature. I argue that because the conceptual connections between the dual dominations of women and nature are located in an oppressive patriarchal conceptual framework characterized by a logic of domination, the logic of traditional feminism requires the expansion of feminism to include ecological feminism and ecological feminism provides a framework for developing a distinctively feminist environmental ethic. I conclude that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  26. Promising Without Intending.David Owens - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy 105 (12):737-755.
    It is widely held that one who sincerely promises to do something must at least intend to do that thing: a promise communicates the intention to perform. In this paper, I argue that a promise need only communicate the intention to undertake an obligation to perform. I consider examples of sincere promisors who have no intention of performing. I argue that this fits well with what we want to say about other performatives - giving, commanding etc. Furthermore, it supports a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  27. Promises and Practices.Thomas Scanlon - 1990 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (3):199-226.
  28. Promising and Supererogation.Jason Kawall - 2005 - Philosophia 32 (1-4):389-398.
    A paradox involving promises to perform supererogatory actions is developed. Several attempts to resolve the problem, focusing in particular on changing our understanding of supererogatory actions, are explored. It is concluded that none of the proposed solutions are viable; the problem lies in promises with certain contents, not in our understanding of supererogation.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29.  50
    The Promising Puzzle.Anna Brinkerhoff - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (22).
    Here’s a plausible thought: we should make a promise only if we rationally believe that we will follow through. But if that’s right, and if it’s rational to believe only what our evidence supports, then it seems that we shouldn’t make promises to do things our evidence suggests that there’s a significant chance we don’t do – things that many others, or we ourselves, have set out and failed to do. Think: promises to stay faithful or to be on time (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  81
    Permissible Promise-Making Under Uncertainty.Alida Liberman - 2019 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 5 (4):468-486.
    I outline four conditions on permissible promise-making: the promise must be for a morally permissible end, must not be deceptive, must be in good faith, and must involve a realistic assessment of oneself. I then address whether promises that you are uncertain you can keep can meet these four criteria, with a focus on campaign promises as an illustrative example. I argue that uncertain promises can meet the first two criteria, but that whether they can meet the second two depends (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  23
    The Promise of Salvation: A Theory of Religion.Martin Riesebrodt - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    And, as The Promise of Salvation makes clear through abundant empirical evidence, religion will not disappear as long as these promises continue to help people ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32.  1
    Normativity, Meaning, and the Promise of Phenomenology.Matt Burch & Irene McMullin (eds.) - 2019 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    The aim of this volume is to critically assess the philosophical importance of phenomenology as a method for studying the normativity of meaning and its transcendental conditions. Using the pioneering work of Steven Crowell as a springboard, phenomenologists from all over the world examine the promise of phenomenology for illuminating long-standing problems in epistemology, the philosophy of mind, action theory, the philosophy of religion, and moral psychology. The essays are unique in that they engage with the phenomenological tradition not as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  3
    The Promise of Memory: History and Politics in Marx, Benjamin, and Derrida.Matthias Fritsch - 2005 - State University of New York Press.
    Argues for a closer connection between memories of injustice and promises of justice as a means to overcome violence.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  34.  10
    A Simple Theory of Promising.David Owens - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (1):51-77.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  35. A Simple Theory of Promising.David Owens - 2006 - Philosophical Review 115 (1):51-77.
    Why do human beings make and accept promises? What human interest is served by this procedure? Many hold that promising serves what I shall call an information interest, an interest in information about what will happen. And they hold that human beings ought to keep their promises because breaches of promise threaten this interest. On this view human beings take promises seriously because we want correct information about how other human beings are going to act. Some such view is (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  36. Ethical Promises and Pitfalls of OneHealth.Marcel Verweij & Bernice Bovenkerk - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):1-4.
    Emerging infectious diseases such as Ebola, Hendra, SARS, West Nile, Hepatitis E and avian influenza have led to a renewed recognition of how diseases in human beings, wildlife and livestock are interlinked. The changing prevalence and spread of such infections are largely determined by human activities and changes in environment and climate—where the latter are often also caused by human activities. Since the beginning of the 21st century, these insights have been brought together under the heading of OneHealth—a concept that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  37.  40
    The Promise and Perils of Industry‐Funded Science.Bennett Holman & Kevin C. Elliott - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (11).
  38. The Promise of Predistribution.Martin O'Neill - 2012 - Policy Network - Predistribution and the Crisis in Living Standards.
    If pursued with serious intent, Pre-distribution has the capacity to create an exciting and radical new agenda for social democracy. But the politics of Pre-distribution cannot be innocuous or uncontroversial. -/- In its more radical forms, predistribution is a potentially radical and inspiring project for social democrats who have come to see the limitations of the old ways of doing things. It’s a project that promises a strategy to deliver abundantly on values of social justice, economic freedom, and equality of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. The Promise and Predicament of Cosmetic Neurology.Anjan Chatterjee - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):110-113.
    Advances in cognitive neuroscience make cosmetic neurology in some form inevitable and will give rise to extremely difficult ethical issuesConsider the following hypothetical case study. A well heeled executive walks into my cognitive neurology clinic because he is concerned that he is becoming forgetful. It turns out that he is going through a difficult divorce and my clinical impression is that his memory problems stem from the stress he is experiencing. I place him on a selective seratonin reuptake inhibitor, sertraline, (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  40.  6
    The Promise of Perfect Adult Tissue Repair and Regeneration in Mammals: Learning From Regenerative Amphibians and Fish.James Godwin - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (9):861-871.
    Regenerative medicine promises to greatly impact on human health by improving repair outcomes in a range of tissues and injury contexts. Successful therapies will rely on identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic biological circuits that control wound healing, proliferation, cell survival, and developmental cell fate. Animals such as the zebrafish and the salamander display powerful examples of near‐perfect regeneration and scar‐free healing in a range of injury contexts not attained in mammals. By studying regeneration in a range of highly regenerative species (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Promises to the Self.Allen Habib - 2009 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):pp. 537-557.
    I Can we make promises to ourselves? This is a question that has not received much consideration in the large body of philosophical work on promising. And in what commentary there is, the answer is uniformly negative. I think this negativity is a mistake, and that the conventional view that we can't make reflexive promises is wrong. I also think that this has some important implications for promissory theory in general. In what follows, I will attempt to argue for (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42. Lying by Promising. A Study on Insincere Illocutionary Acts.Neri Marsili - 2016 - International Review of Pragmatics 8 (2):271-313.
    This paper is divided into two parts. In the first part, I extend the traditional definition of lying to illocutionary acts executed by means of explicit performatives, focusing on promising. This is achieved in two steps. First, I discuss how the utterance of a sentence containing an explicit performative such as “I promise that Φ ” can count as an assertion of its content Φ . Second, I develop a general account of insincerity meant to explain under which conditions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  43. Kant and the Promise of Rhetoric.Scott R. Stroud - 2014 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    While Immanuel Kant is an epochal figure in a variety of fields, he has not figured prominently in the study of rhetoric and communication. This book represents the most detailed examination available into Kant's uneasy but often misunderstood relationship with rhetoric. By explicating Kant's complex understanding of rhetoric, this book advances the thesis that communicative practices play an important role in Kant's account of how we become better humans and how we create morally cultivating communities.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44. The Normative Force of Promising.Jack Woods - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 6:77-101.
    Why do promises give rise to reasons? I consider a quadruple of possibilities which I think will not work, then sketch the explanation of the normativity of promising I find more plausible—that it is constitutive of the practice of promising that promise-breaking implies liability for blame and that we take liability for blame to be a bad thing. This effects a reduction of the normativity of promising to conventionalism about liability together with instrumental normativity and desire-based reasons. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45. The Promise of a New Past.Samuel Lebens & Tyron Goldschmidt - 2017 - Philosophers' Imprint 17:1-25.
    In light of Jewish tradition and the metaphysics of time, we argue that God can and will change the past. The argument makes for a new answer to the problem of evil and a new theory of atonement.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  46.  21
    The Promise of India's Secular Democracy.Rajeev Bhargava - 2010 - Oxford University Press India.
    Written over the last two decades, these essays answers important questions on secularism. Some of the topics covered are the democratic vision of the new republic of India, the evolution and distinctiveness of India's linguistic federalism, India's secular constitution, the Muslim personal law, and the majority-minority syndrome.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47. Promises and Conflicting Obligations.David Owens - 2016 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 11 (1):93-108.
    This paper addresses two questions. First can a binding promise conflict with other binding promises and thereby generate conflicting obligations? Second can binding promises conflict with other non-promissory obligations, so that we are obliged to keep so-called ‘wicked promises’? The answer to both questions is ‘yes’. The discussion examines both ‘natural right’ and ‘social practice’ approaches to promissory obligation and I conclude that neither can explain why we should be unable to make binding promises that conflict with our prior obligations. (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  28
    The Promise of Pharmacogenetics: Assessing the Prospects for Disease and Patient Stratification.Andrew Smart & Paul Martin - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (3):583-601.
    Pharmacogenetics is an emerging biotechnology concerned with understanding the genetic basis of drug response, and promises to transform the development, marketing and prescription of medicines. This paper is concerned with analysing the move towards segmented drug markets, which is implicit in the commercial development of pharmacogenetics. It is claimed that in future who gets a particular drug will be determined by their genetic make up. Drawing on ideas from the sociology of expectations we examine how pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  49.  16
    The Promise of Pragmatism: Modernism and the Crisis of Knowledge and Authority.John Patrick Diggins - 1994 - University of Chicago Press.
    The book also draws on an alternative set of American thinkers to explore the blind spots in the pragmatic temper."—William Connolly, New York Times Book Review "An extraordinarily ambitious work of both analysis and synthesis. . .
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  50.  57
    Better Than Human: The Promise and Perils of Enhancing Ourselves.Allen Buchanan - 2011 - Oup Usa.
    In Better than Human, noted bioethicist Allen Buchanan grapples with the ethical dilemmas of the medical revolution and biomedical enhancements. One problem, he argues, is that the debate over these enhancements has divided into polar extremes--into denunciations of meddling in the natural order, or else a heady optimism that we can cure all that ails humanity. In fact, Buchanan notes, the human genome has always been unstable, and intervention is no offense against nature.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000