Results for 'propositions'

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  1. An algorithm for axiomatizing and theorem proving in finite many-valued propositional logics* Walter A. Carnielli.Proving in Finite Many-Valued Propositional - forthcoming - Logique Et Analyse.
     
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    Lester Embree.Human Scientific Propositions - 1992 - In D. P. Chattopadhyaya, Lester Embree & Jitendranath Mohanty (eds.), Phenomenology and Indian philosophy. New Delhi: Indian Council of Philosophical Research in association with Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
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    Paolo Crivelli.I. Propositions - 2012 - In Christopher John Shields (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aristotle. Oxford University Press USA. pp. 113.
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  4. Peter Caws.Propositions True - 2003 - In Heather Dyke (ed.), Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 99.
     
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  5.  13
    The Norms of Reason, RICHARD W. MILLER.Are Some Propositions Empirically Necessary - 1995 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):183-184.
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  6. Impossible worlds and propositions: Against the parity thesis.Francesco Berto - 2010 - Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):471-486.
    Accounts of propositions as sets of possible worlds have been criticized for conflating distinct impossible propositions. In response to this problem, some have proposed to introduce impossible worlds to represent distinct impossibilities, endorsing the thesis that impossible worlds must be of the same kind; this has been called the parity thesis. I show that this thesis faces problems, and propose a hybrid account which rejects it: possible worlds are taken as concrete Lewisian worlds, and impossibilities are represented as (...)
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  7.  27
    Attitudes Without Propositions.Mark Balaguer - 1998 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (4):805-826.
    This paper develops a novel version of anti-platonism, called semantic fictionalism. The view is a response to the platonist argument that we need to countenance propositions to account for the truth of sentences containing ‘that’-clause singular terms, e.g., sentences of the form ‘x believes that p’ and ‘σ means that p’. Briefly, the view is that (a) platonists are right that ‘that’-clauses purport to refer to propositions, but (b) there are no such things as propositions, and hence, (...)
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  8.  10
    Philosophical abstracts.Tensed Propositions as Predicates - 1969 - American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (4).
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  9. Transient Truths: An Essay in the Metaphysics of Propositions.Berit Brogaard - 2012 - Oxford: Oxford University Press. Edited by Berit Brogaard.
    Transient Truths: An Essay in the Metaphysics of Propositions provides the first book-length exposition and defense of semantic temporalism, the view that propositions are contents or semantic values that can change their truth-values across time.
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  10. Regular relations for temporal propositions.T. Fernando - unknown
    Relations computed by finite-state transducers are applied to interpret temporal propositions in terms of strings representing finite contexts or situations. Carnap–Montague intensions mapping indices to extensions are reformulated as relations between strings that can serve as indices and extensions alike. Strings are related according to information content, temporal span and granularity, the bounds on which reflect the partiality of natural language statements. That partiality shapes not only strings-as-extensions (indicating what statements are about) but also strings-as-indices (underlying truth conditions).
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  11. General Propositions and Causality.Frank Plumpton Ramsey - 1925 - In The Foundations of Mathematics and Other Logical Essays. London, England: Routledge & Kegan Paul. pp. 237-255.
    This article rebuts Ramsey's earlier theory, in 'Universals of Law and of Fact', of how laws of nature differ from other true generalisations. It argues that our laws are rules we use in judging 'if I meet an F I shall regard it as a G'. This temporal asymmetry is derived from that of cause and effect and used to distinguish what's past as what we can know about without knowing our present intentions.
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  12. Propositions and the objects of thought.Michael Jubien - 2001 - Philosophical Studies 104 (1):47 - 62.
  13.  73
    VI.—Symposium: “Facts and Propositions.”.F. P. Ramsey & G. E. Moore - 1927 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 7 (1):153-206.
  14. Another Side of Categorical Propositions: The Keynes–Johnson Octagon of Oppositions.Amirouche Moktefi & Fabien Schang - 2023 - History and Philosophy of Logic 44 (4):459-475.
    The aim of this paper is to make sense of the Keynes–Johnson octagon of oppositions. We will discuss Keynes' logical theory, and examine how his view is reflected on this octagon. Then we will show how this structure is to be handled by means of a semantics of partition, thus computing logical relations between matching formulas with a semantic method that combines model theory and Boolean algebra.
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  15.  5
    Newton's Propositions on Comets: Steps in Transition, 1681–84.J. A. Ruffner - 2000 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 54 (4):259-277.
    Isaac Newton's closest approach to a system of the world in the critical period 1681–84 is provided in a set of untitled propositions concerning comets. They drastically revise his position maintained against Flamsteed in 1681 and may signal his adoption of a single comet solution for the appearances of 1680/1. Points of agreement and difference with the key pre-Principia texts of 1684–85 are analysed. He shows substantial control of the phenomena of tails which change very little in mechanical detail (...)
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  16.  43
    On Necessarily True Propositions.José Ruiz Fernández - 2013 - Husserl Studies 29 (1):1-12.
    The main goal of this paper is to reflect on what characterizes the evidence of the propositions that we hold to be necessary. I have tried to show that the evidence of every necessarily true proposition takes the form of a self-contained operational composition. In conclusion, I will point out in what respects the view I defend might help to reconcile some traits of Husserl’s understanding of material a priori truth with some of the later Wittgenstein’s intuitions concerning linguistic (...)
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  17.  19
    Bertrand Russell and the Nature of Propositions: A History and Defence of the Multiple Relation Theory of Judgement.Samuel Lebens - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    Bertrand Russell and the Nature of Propositions offers the first book-length defence of the Multiple Relation Theory of Judgement (MRTJ). Although the theory was much maligned by Wittgenstein and ultimately rejected by Russell himself, Lebens shows that it provides a rich and insightful way to understand the nature of propositional content. In Part I, Lebens charts the trajectory of Russell’s thought before he adopted the MRTJ. Part II reviews the historical story of the theory: What led Russell to deny (...)
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  18.  50
    On Formally Undecidable Propositions of Principia Mathematica and Related Systems.Kurt Gödel - 1931 - New York, NY, USA: Basic Books.
    First English translation of revolutionary paper that established that even in elementary parts of arithmetic, there are propositions which cannot be proved or disproved within the system. Introduction by R. B. Braithwaite.
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  19.  49
    If structured propositions are logical procedures then how are procedures individuated?Marie Duží - 2019 - Synthese 196 (4):1249-1283.
    This paper deals with two issues. First, it identifies structured propositions with logical procedures. Second, it considers various rigorous definitions of the granularity of procedures, hence also of structured propositions, and comes out in favour of one of them. As for the first point, structured propositions are explicated as algorithmically structured procedures. I show that these procedures are structured wholes that are assigned to expressions as their meanings, and their constituents are sub-procedures occurring in executed mode. Moreover, (...)
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  20.  63
    Are synthetic a priori propositions informative?Yongfeng Yuan - unknown
    According to rationalists, synthetic a priori propositions convey new knowledge, whereas analytic propositions are non-informative or vacuous conceptual truths. However, as we argue in this article, each a priori proposition is necessarily true because of its semantic constituents and the way they are combined, and hence can be transformed into its equivalent analytic form. So each synthetic a priori proposition conveys only non-informative conceptual truths like analytic propositions.
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  21.  26
    Common Sense Propositions.A. C. Ewing - 1973 - Philosophy 48 (186):363-379.
    Philosophers have not been sceptical only about metaphysics or religious beliefs. There are a great number of other beliefs generally held which they have had at least as much difficulty in justifying, and in the present article I ask questions as to the right philosophical attitude to these beliefs in cases where to our everyday thought they seem so obvious as to be a matter of the most ordinary common sense. A vast number of propositions go beyond what is (...)
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  22. Russellians can solve the problem of empty names with nonsingular propositions.Thomas Hodgson - 2020 - Synthese 197:5411–5433.
    Views that treat the contents of sentences as structured, Russellian propositions face a problem with empty names. It seems that those sorts of things cannot be the contents of sentences containing such names. I motivate and defend a solution to the problem according to which a sentence may have a singular proposition as its content at one time, and a nonsingular one at another. When the name is empty the content is a nonsingular Russellian structured proposition; when the name (...)
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  23.  71
    A logic for propositions with indefinite truth values.G. F. Liddell - 1982 - Studia Logica 41 (2-3):197-226.
    In the first part of this paper a logic is defined for propositions whose probability of being true may not be known. A speaker's beliefs about which propositions are true are still interesting in this case. The meaning of propositions is determined by the consequences of asserting them: in this logic there are debates which incur certain costs for the protagonists.The second part of the paper describes the mathematics of the resulting logic which displays several novel features.
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    Deducing false propositions from true ideas: Nieuwentijt on mathematical reasoning.Sylvia Pauw - 2020 - Synthese 197 (11):4927-4945.
    This paper argues that, for Bernard Nieuwentijt, mathematical reasoning on the basis of ideas is not the same as logical reasoning on the basis of propositions. Noting that the two types of reasoning differ helps make sense of a peculiar-sounding claim Nieuwentijt makes, namely that it is possible to mathematically deduce false propositions from true abstracted ideas. I propose to interpret Nieuwentijt’s abstracted ideas as incomplete mental copies of existing objects. I argue that, according to Nieuwentijt, a proposition (...)
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  25. Regress, unity, facts, and propositions.Matti Eklund - 2019 - Synthese 196 (4):1225-1247.
    The problem, or cluster of problems, of the unity of the proposition, along with the cluster of problems that tend to go under the name of Bradley’s regress, has recently again become a going concern for philosophers, after having for some time been regarded as primarily of historical interest. In this paper, I distinguish between the different problems that tend to be brought up under the heading of the unity of the proposition, and between different related regress arguments. I present (...)
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  26. Propositions, warranted assertibility, and truth.John Dewey - 1941 - Journal of Philosophy 38 (7):169-186.
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  27. Why propositions have no structure.M. J. Cresswell - 2002 - Noûs 36 (4):643–662.
  28.  18
    Normatively determined propositions.Matteo Pascucci & Claudio E. A. Pizzi - 2022 - In V. Giardino, S. Linker, S. Burns, F. Bellucci, J. M. Boucheix & P. Viana (eds.), Diagrammatic Representation and Inference. Diagrams 2022. Springer. pp. 78-85.
    In the present work we provide a logical analysis of normatively determined and non-determined propositions. The normative status of these propositions depends on their relation with another proposition, here named reference proposition. Using a formal language that includes a monadic operator of obligation, we define eight dyadic operators that represent various notions of “being normatively (non-)determined”; then, we group them into two families, each forming an Aristotelian square of opposition. Finally, we show how the two resulting squares can (...)
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  29. Presentism and Times as Propositions.Luca Banfi & Daniel Deasy - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 179 (3):725-743.
    Some Presentists—according to whom everything is present—identify instants of time with propositions of a certain kind. However, the view that times are propositions seems to be at odds with Presentism: if there are times then there are past times, and therefore things that are past; but how could there be things that are past if everything is present? In this paper, we describe the Presentist view that times are propositions ; we set out the argument that Presentism (...)
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  30.  40
    Ramsey, ‘Universals’ and atomic propositions.S. J. Methven - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (1):134-154.
    ABSTRACTIn ‘Universals’, Ramsey declares that we do not, and cannot, know the forms of atomic propositions. A year later, in a symposium with Braithwaite and Joseph, he announces a change of mind: atomic propositions may, after all, be discoverable by analysis. It is clear from the 1926 paper that Ramsey intends this to be a revision of the 1925 claim. Puzzlingly, however, Ramsey does not mention analysis in 1925. My task in this article is to provide a justification (...)
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  31. Imagery, propositions and the form of internal representations.Stephen M. Kosslyn & J. Pomerantz - 1977 - Cognitive Psychology 9:52-76.
     
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  32. Empty names and `gappy' propositions.Anthony Everett - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 116 (1):1-36.
    In recent years a number of authors sympathetic to Referentialistaccounts of proper names have argued that utterances containingempty names express `gappy,' or incomplete, propositions. In this paper I want to take issue with this suggestion.In particular, I argue versions of this approach developedby David Braun, Nathan Salmon, Ken Taylor, and by Fred Adams,Gary Fuller, and Robert Stecker.
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  33.  2
    On the ‘Completely Generalized Propositions’ of the Tractatus. 박정일 - 2015 - Cheolhak-Korean Journal of Philosophy 122:101.
    『논리-철학 논고』에서 ‘완전히 일반화된 명제’는 여러 문제들과 의문들을 불러일으킨다. 그 주요한 의문은 다음과 같다: 그것은 실로 명제인가? 또한 그것은 합성되어 있는가 아니면 단순한가? 완전히 일반화된 명제는 동어반복이나 모순과 같이 논리적 명제인가 아니면 세계에 속하는 사실을 기술하는 경험적 명제인가? 아니라면 그것은 경험적 명제이지만 사실이 아닌 어떤 다른 것을 기술하는 명제인가? 요컨대 완전히 일반화된 명제는 그림인가? 그리고 그것이 그림이라면 그것은 무엇을 그리는가? 이러한 의문들에 대해서 『논고』에서 확인될 수 있는 첫 번째 대답은 다음과 같다. “세계는 완전히 일반화된 명제들에 의해서 완전히 기술될 수 있다.”(5.526) (...)
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  34. Structured propositions.Jeffrey C. King - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  35. Numbers and Propositions: Reply to Melia.Tim Crane - 1992 - Analysis 52 (4):253-256.
    Is the way we use propositions to individuate beliefs and other intentional states analogous to the way we use numbers to measure weights and other physical magnitudes? In an earlier paper [2], I argued that there is an important disanalogy. One and the same weight can be 'related to' different numbers under different units of measurement. Moreover, the choice of a unit of measurement is arbitrary,in the sense that which way we choose doesn't affect the weight attributed to the (...)
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  36. A problem with structured propositions.Tadeusz Ciecierski - 2011 - In Piotr Stalmaszczyk (ed.), Philosophical and Formal Approaches to Linguistic Analysis. Ontos. pp. 81.
    The paper shows that the paradox of the totality of propositions rest on assumptions characteristic of some theories of structured contents (like Jeffrey King's "new account of structured propositions").
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  37.  95
    Regulative Assumptions, Hinge Propositions and the Peircean Conception of Truth.Andrew W. Howat - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (2):451-468.
    This paper defends a key aspect of the Peircean conception of truth—the idea that truth is in some sense epistemically-constrained. It does so by exploring parallels between Peirce’s epistemology of inquiry and that of Wittgenstein in On Certainty. The central argument defends a Peircean claim about truth by appeal to a view shared by Peirce and Wittgenstein about the structure of reasons. This view relies on the idea that certain claims have a special epistemic status, or function as what are (...)
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  38. Self-referential propositions.Bruno Whittle - 2017 - Synthese 194 (12):5023-5037.
    Are there ‘self-referential’ propositions? That is, propositions that say of themselves that they have a certain property, such as that of being false. There can seem reason to doubt that there are. At the same time, there are a number of reasons why it matters. For suppose that there are indeed no such propositions. One might then hope that while paradoxes such as the Liar show that many plausible principles about sentences must be given up, no such (...)
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  39.  17
    Speaking of what is not: Hatibz'de and Taşköpriz'de K'sım on the existential import of negative propositions.Yusuf Daşdemir - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    This paper undertakes an in-depth examination of the intriguing argument for the existential import of negative propositions by the fifteenth-century Ottoman scholar Hatibzâde Mehmed (d. 1496) and the counterarguments by his disciple, Taşköprizâde Kâsım (d. 1513). It argues that this discussion is a significant example of Ottoman scholars engaging in long-standing disputes concerning the nature and ontological ground of negative propositions, which date back to Plato and Aristotle. It is also intended to underline the need for considering not (...)
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  40.  9
    In Defence of Singular Propositions.Filip Kawczyński - 2011 - In Piotr Stalmaszczyk (ed.), Philosophical and Formal Approaches to Linguistic Analysis. Ontos. pp. 197-214.
    In the paper I make an attempt to preserve Singular Propositions from the attack carried out by Jason Stanley. Stanley argues that propositions, in general, are not the bearers of modal properties, and thus he refutes one of the major arguments in favour of singular propositions (offered by David Kaplan). My aim is to show that Stanley’s reasoning is fallacious​ since the Expression-Communication Principle which is the basis for his argument suffers from being circular. In brief, a (...)
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  41. Against Naturalized Cognitive Propositions.Lorraine Juliano Keller - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (4):929-946.
    In this paper, I argue that Scott Soames’ theory of naturalized cognitive propositions faces a serious objection: there are true propositions for which NCP cannot account. More carefully, NCP cannot account for certain truths of mathematics unless it is possible for there to be an infinite intellect. For those who reject the possibility of an infinite intellect, this constitutes a reductio of NCP.
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  42. Properties, propositions and sets.Kit Fine - 1977 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 6 (1):135 - 191.
  43. First-Person Propositions.Peter W. Hanks - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (1):155-182.
    A first-person proposition is a proposition that only a single subject can assert or believe. When I assert ‘I am on fire’ I assert a first-person proposition that only I have access to, in the sense that no one else can assert or believe this proposition. This is in contrast to third-person propositions, which can be asserted or believed by anyone.
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  44. Structured propositions and complex predicates.Jeffrey C. King - 1995 - Noûs 29 (4):516-535.
  45. Time and Propositions in Jerónimo Pardo.Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe - 2000 - In I. Angelelli & P. Pérez-Ilzarbe (eds.), Medieval and Renaissance Logic in Spain. G. Olms. pp. 54--251.
    From the medieval and post-medieval analyses dealing with propositions and time one gathers that their relation can be considered from various points of view. It could be said that there is not one "time" connected with a proposition, but several "times": following d'Ors, I will distinguish at least three: the time of the utterance, the time of the copula, and the time of truth. These three times of the proposition may or may not coincide. In these pages I propose (...)
     
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  46. Pointers to propositions.Haim Gaifman - manuscript
    The semantic paradoxes, whose paradigm is the Liar, played a crucial role at a crucial juncture in the development of modern logic. In his 1908 seminal paper, Russell outlined a system, soon to become that of the Principia Mathematicae, whose main goal was the solution of the logical paradoxes, both semantic and settheoretic. Russell did not distinguish between the two and his theory of types was designed to solve both kinds in the same uniform way. Set theoreticians, however, were content (...)
     
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  47. Singular Propositions.Trenton Merricks - 2011 - In Clark Kelly James & Rea Michael C. (eds.), Science, Religion, and Metaphysics: New Essays on the Philosophy of Alvin Plantinga. Oxford University Press.
  48. Contingent Objects, Contingent Propositions, and Essentialism.Jonas Werner - 2021 - Mind 130 (520):1283-1294.
    Trevor Teitel (2017) has recently argued that combining the assumption that modality reduces to essence with the assumption that possibly some objects contingently exist leads to problems if one wishes to uphold that the logic of metaphysical modality is S5. In this paper I will argue that there is a way for the essentialist to evade the problem described by Teitel. The proposed solution crucially involves the assumption that some propositions possibly fail to exist. I will show how this (...)
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  49. Structures and circumstances: two ways to fine-grain propositions.David Ripley - 2012 - Synthese 189 (1):97 - 118.
    This paper discusses two distinct strategies that have been adopted to provide fine-grained propositions; that is, propositions individuated more finely than sets of possible worlds. One strategy takes propositions to have internal structure, while the other looks beyond possible worlds, and takes propositions to be sets of circumstances, where possible worlds do not exhaust the circumstances. The usual arguments for these positions turn on fineness-of-grain issues: just how finely should propositions be individuated? Here, I compare (...)
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  50.  22
    Anderson’s Restriction of Deontic Modalities to Contingent Propositions.Matteo Pascucci - 2017 - Theoria 83 (4):440-470.
    The deontic status of tautologies and contradictions is one of the major puzzles for authors of early works on deontic logic. It is well-known that von Wright addresses this problem by adopting a Principle of Deontic Contingency, which says that tautologies are not necessarily obligatory and contradictions are not necessarily forbidden. A more radical solution is proposed by Anderson within a reductionist approach to deontic logic and consists in restricting the range of application of deontic modalities to contingent propositions. (...)
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