Results for 'psychopathology'

973 found
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  1.  95
    General Psychopathology.Karl Jaspers - 1913 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    In 1910, Karl Jaspers wrote a seminal essay on morbid jealousy in which he laid the foundation for the psychopathological phenomenology that through his work and the work of Hans Gruhle and Kurt Schneider, among others, would become the ...
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  2.  5
    Philosophical Psychopathology.George Graham & G. Lynn Stephens - 1994 - MIT Press.
  3. Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds.Harold Kincaid & Jacqueline Anne Sullivan - 2014 - In Harold Kincaid & Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (eds.), Classifying Psychopathology: Mental Kinds and Natural Kinds. MIT Press. pp. 1-10.
    In this volume, leading philosophers of psychiatry examine psychiatric classification systems, including the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, asking whether current systems are sufficient for effective diagnosis, treatment, and research. Doing so, they take up the question of whether mental disorders are natural kinds, grounded in something in the outside world. Psychiatric categories based on natural kinds should group phenomena in such a way that they are subject to the same type of causal explanations and respond similarly to (...)
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  4. Psychopathology and the Ability to Do Otherwise.Hanna Pickard - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (1):135-163.
    When philosophers want an example of a person who lacks the ability to do otherwise, they turn to psychopathology. Addicts, agoraphobics, kleptomaniacs, neurotics, obsessives, and even psychopathic serial murderers, are all purportedly subject to irresistible desires that compel the person to act: no alternative possibility is supposed to exist. I argue that this conception of psychopathology is false and offer an empirically and clinically informed understanding of disorders of agency which preserves the ability to do otherwise. First, I (...)
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  5. Phenomenological Psychopathology and Psychiatric Classification.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2019 - In Giovanni Stanghellini, Matthew Broome, Anthony Vincent Fernandez, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Andrea Raballo & René Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology. Oxford, UK: pp. 1016-1030.
    In this chapter, I provide an overview of phenomenological approaches to psychiatric classification. My aim is to encourage and facilitate philosophical debate over the best ways to classify psychiatric disorders. First, I articulate phenomenological critiques of the dominant approach to classification and diagnosis—i.e., the operational approach employed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Second, I describe the type or typification approach to psychiatric classification, which I distinguish into three different (...)
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  6. Phenomenological Psychopathology and Schizophrenia: Contemporary Approaches and Misunderstandings.Louis Sass, Josef Parnas & Dan Zahavi - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):1–23.
    The phenomenological approach to schizophrenia has undergone something of a renaissance in Anglophone psychiatry in recent years. There has been a proliferation of works that focus on the nature of subjectivity in schizophrenia and related disorders, and that take inspiration from the work of such German and French philosophers as Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty, and such classical psychiatrists as Minkowski, Blankenburg, and Binswanger (Rulf 2003; Sass 2001a, 2001b). This trend includes predominantly theoretical articles, which typically incorporate clinical material as well (...)
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  7. The Psychopathology of Hyperreflexivity.Thomas Fuchs - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (3):239-255.
    The structure of human embodiment is fundamentally characterized by a polarity or ambiguity between Leib and Körper, the subjective body and the objectified body, or between being-body and having-a-body. This ambiguity, emphasized, above all, by Helmuth Plessner and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, is also of crucial significance for psychopathology. Insofar as mental illnesses disturb or interrupt the unhindered conduct of one’s life, they also exacerbate the tension within embodiment that holds between being-body and having-a-body. In mental illnesses, there is a failure (...)
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  8.  6
    Phenomenological Psychopathology and Autobiography.Anna Bortolan - 2019 - In Giovanni Stanghellini, Matthew Broome, Andrea Raballo, Anthony Vincent Fernandez, Paolo Fusar-Poli & René Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Memoirs and autobiographical accounts of mental illness have been widely utilized in phenomenological psychopathology and, in particular, in the investigation of depression (Fuchs 2013; Ratcliffe 2010; Ratcliffe 2015), mania (Binswanger 1960; Bowden 2013), schizophrenia (Binswanger 1957; Parnas and Henriksen 2016; Sass 1994), anorexia nervosa (Bowden 2012; Legrand 2010), and borderline personality disorder (Stanghellini and Rosfort 2013). In this article I will provide a critical illustration of the different ways in which self- narratives have been employed in this context and (...)
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  9.  40
    Disinhibitory Psychopathology: A New Perspective and a Model for Research.Ethan E. Gorenstein & Joseph P. Newman - 1980 - Psychological Review 87 (3):301-315.
  10. Affective Affordances and Psychopathology.Joel Krueger & Giovanna Colombetti - 2018 - Discipline Filosofiche 2 (18):221-247.
    Self-disorders in depression and schizophrenia have been the focus of much recent work in phenomenological psychopathology. But little has been said about the role the material environment plays in shaping the affective character of these disorders. In this paper, we argue that enjoying reliable (i.e., trustworthy) access to the things and spaces around us — the constituents of our material environment — is crucial for our ability to stabilize and regulate our affective life on a day-today basis. These things (...)
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  11.  25
    Psychopathology and Truth: A Defense of Realism.Markus I. Eronen - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (4):507-520.
    Recently Kenneth Kendler and Peter Zachar have raised doubts about the correspondence theory of truth and scientific realism in psychopathology. They argue that coherentist or pragmatist approaches to truth are better suited for understanding the reality of psychiatric disorders. In this article, I show that rejecting realism based on the correspondence theory is deeply problematic: It makes psychopathology categorically different from other sciences, and results in an implausible view of scientific discovery and progress. As an alternative, I suggest (...)
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  12. Temporality and Psychopathology.Thomas Fuchs - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):75-104.
    The paper first introduces the concept of implicit and explicit temporality, referring to time as pre-reflectively lived vs. consciously experienced. Implicit time is based on the constitutive synthesis of inner time consciousness on the one hand, and on the conative–affective dynamics of life on the other hand. Explicit time results from an interruption or negation of implicit time and unfolds itself in the dimensions of present, past and future. It is further shown that temporality, embodiment and intersubjectivity are closely connected: (...)
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  13. Externalizing Psychopatholog Yand the Error-Related Negativity.J. R. Hall, E. M. Bernat & C. J. Patrick - 2007 - Psychological Science 18 (4):326-333.
    Prior research has demonstrated that antisocial behavior, substance-use disorders, and personality dimensions of aggression and impulsivity are indicators of a highly heritable underlying dimension of risk, labeled externalizing. Other work has shown that individual trait constructs within this psychopathology spectrum are associated with reduced self-monitoring, as reflected by amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN) brain response. In this study of undergraduate subjects, reduced ERN amplitude was associated with higher scores on a self-report measure of the broad externalizing construct that (...)
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  14.  14
    Psychopathologies of Time: Defining Mental Illness in Early 20th-Century Psychiatry.Allegra R. P. Fryxell - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (2):3-31.
    This article examines the role of time as a methodological tool and pathological focus of clinical psychiatry and psychology in the first half of the 20th century. Contextualizing ‘psychopathologies of time’ developed by practitioners in Europe and North America with reference to the temporal theories implicit in Freudian psychoanalysis and Henri Bergson’s philosophy of durée, it illuminates how depression, schizophrenia, and other mental disorders such as obsessive-compulsive behaviours and aphasia were understood to be symptomatic of an altered or disturbed ‘time-sense’. (...)
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  15.  9
    The Psychopathology of Everyday Things.Donald A. Norman - 2002 - In Daniel Levitin (ed.), Foundations of Cognitive Psychology: Core Readings. MIT Press. pp. 417--442.
  16. Watsuji, Intentionality, and Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):757-780.
    Despite increasing interest in the work of Tetsuro Watsuji, his discussion of intentionality remains underexplored. I here develop an interpretation and application of his view. First, I unpack Watsuji’s arguments for the inherently social character of intentionality, consider how they connect with his more general discussion of embodiment and betweenness, and then situate his view alongside phenomenologists like Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Next, I argue that Watsuji’s characterization of the social character of intentionality is relevant to current discussions in phenomenological (...)
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  17. Jaspers' Dilemma: The Psychopathological Challenge to Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness.Alexandre Billon & Uriah Kriegel - 2015 - In R. Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed Consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 29-54.
    According to what we will call subjectivity theories of consciousness, there is a constitutive connection between phenomenal consciousness and subjectivity: there is something it is like for a subject to have mental state M only if M is characterized by a certain mine-ness or for-me-ness. Such theories appear to face certain psychopathological counterexamples: patients appear to report conscious experiences that lack this subjective element. A subsidiary goal of this chapter is to articulate with greater precision both subjectivity theories and the (...)
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  18. Psychopathology of Common Sense.Giovanni Stanghellini - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):201-218.
  19.  60
    Psychopathology and Causal Explanation in Practice. A Critical Note on Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars.Gerben Meynen & Jacco Verburgt - 2009 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):57-66.
    From 1959 until 1969, Heidegger lectured to psychiatrists and psychiatry students at the University of Zurich Psychiatric Clinic and in Zollikon. The transcriptions of these lectures were published as the Zollikon Seminars. In these seminars Heidegger is highly critical of psychoanalysis, because of its causal and objectifying approach to the human being. In general, Heidegger considers it an objectification or even an elimination of the human being to approach a patient from a causal perspective. In our view Heidegger has overlooked (...)
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  20. Psychopathology and Two Kinds of Narrative Accounts of the Self.Timothy Thornton - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):361-367.
  21.  7
    The Psychopathology of Hyperreflexivity.Thomas Fuchs - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (3):239.
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  22. Plutarch's Advice on Keeping Well a Lecture Delivered at the International Congress of Psychopathology of Expression and Art Therapy Which Met in September 2000 at Mclean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts, Together with an Anthology of Relevant Texts From Plutarch's Works.Constantine Cavarnos & American Society of Psychopathology of Expression - 2001
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  23.  20
    The Network Approach to Psychopathology: A Review of the Literature 2008–2018 and an Agenda for Future Research.Donald J. Robinaugh, Ria H. A. Hoekstra, Emma R. Toner & Denny Borsboom - 2019 - Psychological Medicine:1-14.
    The network approach to psychopathology posits that mental disorders can be conceptualized and studied as causal systems of mutually reinforcing symptoms. This approach, first posited in 2008, has grown substantially over the past decade and is now a full-fledged area of psychiatric research. In this article, we provide an overview and critical analysis of 363 articles produced in the first decade of this research program, with a focus on key theoretical, methodological, and empirical contributions. In addition, we turn our (...)
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  24.  29
    Phenomenological Psychopathology, Profundity, and Schizophrenia.Giovanni Stanghellini - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):163-166.
  25.  30
    Psychopathology and the Narrative Self.James Phillips - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):313-328.
  26.  11
    Psychopathology and Politics.Harold D. Lasswell - 1933 - International Journal of Ethics 43 (4):462-465.
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  27.  14
    Psychopathological Processes Involved in Social Comparison, Depression, and Envy on Facebook.Aurel Pera - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  28. Towards Externalist Psychopathology.Andrew Sneddon - 2002 - Philosophical Psychology 15 (3):297-316.
    The "width" of the mind is an important topic in contemporary philosophical psychology. Support for active externalism derives from theoretical, engineering, and observational perspectives. Given the history of psychology, psychopathology is notable in its absence from the list of avenues of support for the idea that some cognitive processes extend beyond the physical bounds of the organism in question. The current project is to defend the possibility, plausibility, and desirability of externalist psychopathology. Doing so both adds to the (...)
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  29.  57
    ""The Psychopathology of" Sex Reassignment" Surgery: Assessing Its Medical, Psychological, and Ethical Appropriateness.Richard P. Fitzgibbons, Philip M. Sutton & Dale O'Leary - 2009 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9 (1):97-125.
    Is it ethical to perform a surgery whose purpose is to make a male look like a female or a female to appear male? Is it medically appropriate? Sexual reassignment surgery violates basic medical and ethical principles and is therefore not ethically or medically appropriate. SRS mutilates a healthy, non-diseased body. To perform surgery on a healthy body involves unnecessary risks; therefore, SRS violates the principle primum non nocere, “first, do no harm.” Candidates for SRS may believe that they are (...)
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  30.  19
    Philosophical Psychopathology and Self-Consciousness.G. Lynn Stephens & George Graham - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 194--208.
  31.  12
    Psychopathology Arises From Intertemporal Bargaining as Well as From Emotional Trauma.George Ainslie - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  32.  9
    The History of Mental Symptoms: Descriptive Psychopathology Since the Nineteenth Century.G. E. Berrios - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Since psychiatry remains a descriptive discipline, it is essential for its practitioners to understand how the language of psychiatry came to be formed. This important book, written by a psychiatrist-historian, traces the genesis of the descriptive categories of psychopathology and examines their interaction with the psychological and philosophical context within which they arose. The author explores particularly the language and ideas that have characterised descriptive psychopathology from the mid-nineteenth century to the present day. He presents a masterful survey (...)
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  33. Spiritual Experience and Psychopathology.K. W. M. Fulford & Mike Jackson - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):41-65.
  34.  87
    The “Minimal Self” in Psychopathology: Re-Examining the Self-Disorders in the Schizophrenia Spectrum☆.Michel Cermolacce, Jean Naudin & Josef Parnas - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):703-714.
    The notion of minimal, basic, pre-reflective or core self is currently debated in the philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences and developmental psychology. However, it is not clear which experiential features such a self is believed to possess. Studying the schizophrenic experience may help exploring the following aspects of the minimal self: the notion of perspective and first person perspective, the ‘mineness’ of the phenomenal field, the questions of transparency, embodiment of point of view, and the issues of agency and ownership, (...)
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  35.  14
    Discrete Emotions and Developmental Psychopathology: The Alchemical Legacy of Carroll Izard.Eric A. Youngstrom - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (2):131-135.
    Carroll Izard completed his dissertation in 1952, beginning a career spanning more than six decades that coincided with clinical psychology maturing as a profession, and the birth of clinical science and cognitive neuroscience. Izard’s focus on discrete emotions as evolved systems that organize information, prepare responses, and shape the development of personality and relationships persisted through his career, despite “emotions” often being overshadowed by psychodynamic, behavioral, or cognitive perspectives. His theoretical work anticipated and now integrates contemporary neuroscience and relational perspectives. (...)
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  36. Radical Enactivism and Narrative Practice: Implications for Psychopathology.Daniel D. Hutto - 2010 - In T. Fuchs, P. Henningsen & H. Sattel (eds.), Coherence and Disorders of the Embodied Self. Schattauer.
    Many psychopathological disorders – clinical depression, borderline personality disorder, schizophrenia and autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) – are commonly classified as disorders of the self. In an intuitive sense this sort of classification is unproblematic. There can be no doubt that such disorders make a difference to one’s ability to form and maintain a coherent sense of oneself in various ways. However, any theoretically rigourous attempt to show that they relate to underlying problems with say, such things as minimal selves or, (...)
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  37. Psychopathological Symptoms and Religious Experience: A Critique of Jackson and Fulford.Marek Marzanski & Mark Bratton - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):359-371.
  38. On the Subject Matter of Phenomenological Psychopathology.Anthony Vincent Fernandez & Allan Køster - 2019 - In Giovanni Stanghellini, Matthew Broome, Anthony Vincent Fernandez, Paolo Fusar-Poli, Andrea Raballo & René Rosfort (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Phenomenological Psychopathology. Oxford: pp. 191–204.
    “On the Subject Matter of Phenomenological Psychopathology” provides a framework for the phenomenological study of mental disorders. The framework relies on a distinction between (ontological) existentials and (ontic) modes. Existentials are the categorial structures of human existence, such as intentionality, temporality, selfhood, and affective situatedness. Modes are the particular, concrete phenomena that belong to these categorial structures, with each existential having its own set of modes. In the first section, we articulate this distinction by drawing primarily on the work (...)
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  39. Anorexia Nervosa: Psychopathology as the Crystallization of Culture.Susan Bordo - 1985 - Philosophical Forum 17 (2):73.
     
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  40.  43
    Lived Time and Psychopathology.Martin Wyllie - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):173-185.
  41.  12
    Psychopathology, Freedom, and the Experience of Externality.George Graham - 1996 - Philosophical Topics 24 (2):159-182.
  42.  46
    Existential Feeling and Psychopathology.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (2):179-194.
  43.  77
    First Steps Toward a Psychopathology of "Common Sense&Quot.Wolfgang Blankenburg & Aaron L. Mishara - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):303-315.
  44.  52
    Brain Disorders? Not Really: Why Network Structures Block Reductionism in Psychopathology Research.Denny Borsboom, Angélique O. J. Cramer & Annemarie Kalis - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42:1-54.
    In the past decades, reductionism has dominated both research directions and funding policies in clinical psychology and psychiatry. The intense search for the biological basis of mental disorders, however, has not resulted in conclusive reductionist explanations of psychopathology. Recently, network models have been proposed as an alternative framework for the analysis of mental disorders, in which mental disorders arise from the causal interplay between symptoms. In this target article, we show that this conceptualization can help explain why reductionist approaches (...)
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  45. Large-Scale Brain Networks and Psychopathology: A Unifying Triple Network Model.Vinod Menon - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (10):483-506.
  46.  6
    Exploring the Fringes of Psychopathology: Boundary Entities, Category Work and Other Borderline Phenomena in the History of 20th Century Psychopathology.Nicolas Henckes, Volker Hess & Marie Reinholdt - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (2):3-21.
    This special issue of History of the Humane Sciences intends to shed light on a series of psychopathological entities that do not target well defined conditions and experiences, but rather aim at delimiting zones of uncertainty that defy psychopathology’s order of things: mild diagnoses or subthreshold disorders, borderline conditions, culture bound syndromes, or ideas of dimensions and dimensionality. While these categories have come to play an increasingly central role in psychiatric and psychological thinking during the last 50 years, historians (...)
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  47.  11
    Affective Dynamics in Psychopathology.Timothy J. Trull, Sean P. Lane, Peter Koval & Ulrich W. Ebner-Priemer - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (4):355-361.
    We discuss three varieties of affective dynamics. In each case, we suggest how these affective dynamics should be operationalized and measured in daily life using time-intensive methods, like ecological momentary assessment or ambulatory assessment, and recommend time-sensitive analyses that take into account not only the variability but also the temporal dependency of reports. Studies that explore how these affective dynamics are associated with psychological disorders and symptoms are reviewed, and we emphasize that these affective processes are within a nexus of (...)
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  48.  25
    Neural Networks and Psychopathology: Connectionist Models in Practice and Research.Dan J. Stein & J. Ludick (eds.) - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    Reviews the contribution of neural network models in psychiatry and psychopathology, including diagnosis, pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy.
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  49.  13
    Risk for Psychopathology in the Children of Depressed Mothers: A Developmental Model for Understanding Mechanisms of Transmission.Sherryl H. Goodman & Ian H. Gotlib - 1999 - Psychological Review 106 (3):458-490.
  50.  6
    The Psychopathology of Time.N. Israeli - 1932 - Psychological Review 39 (5):486-491.
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