Results for 'reasons for commanding worship'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  22
    Reasons for Worship: A Response to Bayne and Nagasawa: BENJAMIN D. CROWE.Benjamin D. Crowe - 2007 - Religious Studies 43 (4):465-474.
    Worship is a topic that is rarely considered by philosophers of religion. In a recent paper, Tim Bayne and Yujin Nagasawa challenge this trend by offering an analysis of worship and by considering some difficulties attendant on the claim that worship is obligatory. I argue that their case for there being these difficulties is insufficiently supported. I offer two reasons that a theist might provide for the claim that worship is obligatory: a divine command, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  2.  50
    Reasons for Worship: A Response to Bayne and Nagasawa.Benjamin D. Crowe - 2007 - Religious Studies 43 (4):465-474.
    Worship is a topic that is rarely considered by philosophers of religion. In a recent paper, Tim Bayne and Yujin Nagasawa challenge this trend by offering an analysis of worship and by considering some difficulties attendant on the claim that worship is obligatory. I argue that their case for there being these difficulties is insufficiently supported. I offer two reasons that a theist might provide for the claim that worship is obligatory: (1) a divine command, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3. Can a Worship-Worthy Agent Command Others to Worship It?Frederick Choo - 2022 - Religious Studies 58 (1):79-95.
    This article examines two arguments that a worship-worthy agent cannot command worship. The first argument is based on the idea that any agent who commands worship is egotistical, and hence not worship-worthy. The second argument is based on Campbell Brown and Yujin Nagasawa's (2005) idea that people cannot comply with the command to worship because if people are offering genuine worship, they cannot be motivated by a command to do so. One might then argue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  2
    Problems and Parables of Law: Maimonides and Nahmanides on Reasons for the Commandments.Josef Stern - 1998 - SUNY Press.
    A rigorous analysis of Maimonides' and Nahmanides' explanations of the Mosaic commandments that challenges received notions of the relation between these two seminal thinkers.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  66
    In Search of “Good Positive Reasons” For an Ethics of Divine Commands: A Catalogue of Arguments.Janine Marie Idziak - 1989 - Faith and Philosophy 6 (1):47-64.
    Recent proponents of a divine command ethics have chiefly defended the theory by refuting objections rather than by offering “positive reasons” to support it. We here offer a catalogue of such positive arguments drawn from historical discussions of the theory. We presentarguments which focus on various properties of the divine nature and on the unique status of God, as well as arguments which are analogical in character. Finally, we describe a particularform of the theory to which these arguments point, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  8
    A Dilemma for De Dicto Halakhic Motivation: Why Mitzvot Don’T Require Intention.Itamar Weinshtock Saadon - 2022 - Journal of Analytic Theology 10:76-97.
    According to a prominent view in Jewish-Halakhic literature, “mitzvot (commandments) require intention.” That is, to fulfill one’s obligation in performing a commandment, one must intend to perform the act because it’s a mitzvah; one must take the fact that one’s act is a mitzvah as her reason for doing the action. I argue that thus understood, this Halakhic view faces a revised version of Thomas Hurka’s recent dilemma for structurally similar views in ethics: either it makes it a necessary condition (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  9
    Does Reason Command Itself for its Own Sake?Frederick Kraenzel - 1991 - Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (3):263-270.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Moral Obligations of Reasonable Non-Believers: A Special Problem for Divine Command Metaethics.Wes Morriston - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (1):1 - 10.
    People who do not believe that there is a God constitute an obvious problem for divine command metaethics. They have moral obligations, and are often enough aware of having them. Yet it is not easy to think of such persons as “hearing” divine commands. This makes it hard to see how a divine command theory can offer a completely general account of the nature of moral obligation. The present paper takes a close look at this issue as it emerges in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  9.  57
    Divine Commands Are Unnecessary for Moral Obligation.Erik Wielenberg - 2022 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 21 (1).
    Divine command theory is experiencing something of a renaissance, inspired in large part by Robert Adams’s 1999 masterpiece Finite and Infinite Goods. I argue here that divine commands are not always necessary for actions to be morally obligatory. I make the case that the DCT-ist’s own commitments put pressure on her to concede the existence of some moral obligations that in no way depend on divine commands. Focusing on Robert Adams’s theistic framework for ethics, I argue that Adams’s views about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  2
    Divine Commands, Reason, and Authority.Jeffery L. Johnson - 1994 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 35 (1):39-55.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  31
    Adam Smith: Self-Command, Practical Reason and Deontological Insights.Maria A. Carrasco - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):391-414.
    In this paper, I argue that, in his Theory of Moral Sentiments, Adam Smith conflates two different meanings of ?self-command?, which is particularly puzzling because of the central role of this virtue in his theory. The first is the matrix of rational action, the one described in Part III of the TMS and learned in ?the great school of self-command?. The second is the particular moral virtue of self-command. Distinguishing between these two meanings allows us, on the one hand, to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  12.  6
    Adam Smith: Self-Command, Practical Reason and Deontological Insights.Maria Alejandra Carrasco - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):389 - 412.
    In this paper, I argue that, in his Theory of Moral Sentiments, Adam Smith conflates two different meanings of ‘self-command’, which is particularly puzzling because of the central role of this virtue in his theory. The first is the matrix of rational action, the one described in Part III of the TMS and learned in ‘the great school of self-command’. The second is the particular moral virtue of self-command. Distinguishing between these two meanings allows us, on the one hand, to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  3
    Erratum For: Can the Mind Command the Body, by Iris Berent, in Cognitive Science 45.Iris Berent - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (3):e13120.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 3, March 2022.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Meillassoux’s Virtual Future.Graham Harman - 2011 - Continent 1 (2):78-91.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15. Commands and Claims.Azevedo Marco Antonio - 2013 - In Bartosz Wojciechowski, Karolina M. Cern & Piotr W. Juchacz (eds.), DIA-LOGOS, VOL 15: Legal Rules, Moral Norms and Democratic Principles. Peter Lang.
    Notwithstanding the widely accepted view that rights establish normative constraints on authority’s powers, command is still a core notion in modern philosophical jurisprudence. Nevertheless, if Herbert Hart is correct in his analysis on the deficiencies of the traditional command theories, a command is binding only if there is a right of being obeyed implying authority. My main objective in this paper is to make explicit the semantical and normative relations between rights and commands. In the first part, after some remarks (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  93
    Commanding Intentions and Prize-Winning Decisions.Randolph Clarke - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 133 (3):391-409.
    It is widely held that any justifying reason for making a decision must also be a justifying reason for doing what one thereby decides to do. Desires to win decision prizes, such as the one that figures in Kavka’s toxin puzzle, might be thought to be exceptions to this principle, but the principle has been defended in the face of such examples. Similarly, it has been argued that a command to intend cannot give one a justifying reason to intend as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17. The Grounds of Worship.Tim Bayne & Yujin Nagasawa - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (3):299-313.
    Although worship has a pivotal place in religious thought and practice, philosophers of religion have had remarkably little to say about it. In this paper we examine some of the many questions surrounding the notion of worship, focusing on the claim that human beings have obligations to worship God. We explore a number of attempts to ground our supposed duty to worship God, and argue that each is problematic. We conclude by examining the implications of this (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  18.  9
    Nielsen, Ethics and God: OSMOND G. RAMBERAN.Osmond G. Ramberan - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (2):205-216.
    One of the central claims of most religious people is that morality is based upon religion or, more specifically, on a belief in God. A morality which is not God-centred not only cannot provide a genuine basis for moral beliefs but is really and truly groundless. For without a belief in the sovereignty of God, there can be no genuine adequate foundation for moral beliefs. In his recent book, Ethics Without God , Kai Nielsen claims that this view is grossly (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  56
    Did God Command Genocide? A Challenge to the Biblical Inerrantist.Wesley Morriston - 2009 - Philosophia Christi 11 (1):7-26.
    Thoughtful Christians who hold the Old Testament in high regard must at some point come to terms with those passages in which God is said to command what appear to be moral atrocities. In the present paper, I argue that the genocide passages in the Old Testament provide us with a strong prima facie reason to reject biblical inerrancy—that in the absence of better reasons for thinking that the Bible is inerrant, a Christian should conclude that God did not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20. The Euthyphro, Divine Command Theory and Moral Realism.Gerald K. Harrison - 2014 - Philosophy (1):107-123.
    Divine command theories of metaethics are commonly rejected on the basis of the Euthyphro problem. In this paper, I argue that the Euthyphro can be raised for all forms of moral realism. I go on to argue that this does not matter as the Euthyphro is not really a problem after all. I then briefly outline some of the attractions of a divine command theory of metaethics. I suggest that given one of the major reasons for rejecting such an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. On Worshipping an Embodied God.Grace M. Jantzen - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):511 - 519.
    Might God have a body? The overwhelming answer from within Christian orthodoxy is a resounding “No”. A concept of God adequate for sophisticated theism must, it is held, involve the notion of incorporeality: any being which had a body would, on that ground alone, be disqualified as a contender for the title “God” irrespective of other considerations.Part of the reason forth is insistence on God's incorporeality is that God is held to be the being who is supremely worthy of (...). Now, if God were embodied in the manner that the Greek gods were conceived to be, it is alleged that such a “Zeus-like” deity would not be worthy of worship. Therefore either we must dismiss all thought of an embodied God, it is urged, or else we must cease to worship him, thus in effect dismissing Christianity. And there is an additional ingredient: if we choose the former course, and declare the doctrine of the incorporeality of God, then although we preserve the concept of a God who is worthy of worship, we preserve it at a very great cost. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. A Plea for Reason, Evidence and Logic.Alan Sokal - unknown
    This affair has brought up an incredible number of issues, and I can't dream of addressing them all in 10 minutes, so let me start by circumscribing my talk. I don't want to belabor Social Text 's failings either before or after the publication of my parody: Social Text is not my enemy, nor is it my main intellectual target. I won't go here into the ethical issues related to the propriety of hoaxing. I won't address the obscurantist prose and (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23. Faith and Reason: Vistas and Horizons.Nigel Zimmermann, Sandra Lynch & Anthony Fisher (eds.) - 2021 - Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications.
    What is the fruit of a searching dialogue between faith and reason? This book collects theological and philosophical perspectives on the richness of the faith-reason dialogue, including examples from literature, continental and analytic philosophy, worship and liturgy, and radical approaches to issues of racism and prejudice. The authors strongly resist the temptations to either disregard the faith-reason dialogue or take it for granted. Through their explorations and reflections they open up new vistas and horizons on a topic more necessary (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  31
    Worship and Moral Autonomy.Joseph L. Lombardi - 1988 - Religious Studies 24 (2):101-119.
    A number of years ago, James Rachels presented an argument for the necessary non–existence of God. It was based upon a supposed inconsistency between worship and what might be called ‘autonomous moral agency’. In Rachels' view, one person's being the worshipper of another is partially determined by the way in which it is appropriate for the first to respond to the commands of the second. In brief, a worshipper's obedience to commands should be ‘ unqualified ’. Rachels thought that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  8
    Reasoning About Preference Dynamics.Fenrong Liu - 2011 - Dordrecht, Netherland: Springer Verlag.
    Our preferences determine how we act and think, but exactly what the mechanics are and how they work is a central cause of concern in many disciplines. This book uses techniques from modern logics of information flow and action to develop a unified new theory of what preference is and how it changes. The theory emphasizes reasons for preference, as well as its entanglement with our beliefs. Moreover, the book provides dynamic logical systems which describe the explicit triggers driving (...)
    No categories
  26. Omniscience and Worthiness of Worship.Wesley D. Cray - 2011 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (2):147-153.
    At first glance, the properties being omniscient and being worthy of worship might appear to be perfectly co-instantiable. But there are reasons to be worried about this co-instantiability, as it turns out that, depending on our commitments with respect to certain kinds of knowledge and notions of personhood, it might be the case that no being—God included—could instantiate both. In this paper, I lay out and motivate this claim before going on to consider a variety of responses—some more (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27.  49
    Normative Reasons and Theism.Gerald K. Harrison - 2018 - Cham: Palgrave MacMillan.
    Normative reasons are reasons to do and believe things. Intellectual inquiry seems to presuppose their existence, for we cannot justifiably conclude that we exist; that there is an external world; and that there are better and worse ways of investigating it and behaving in it, unless there are reasons to do and believe such things. But just what in the world are normative reasons? In this book a case is made for believing normative reasons are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  28
    Divine Command/Divine Law: A Biblical Perspective.Patrick D. Miller - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (1):21-34.
    The starting point for thinking about divine command is the reality of God, the initiating and effecting word of God and the character of God, reflected in Scripture especially in regard to goodness and justice.The necessity of social interaction as context for divine command is reflected in several ways; among those mentioned here are the divine council, the covenant, and the incarnation, the word made flesh and living among us. The covenant is central to thinking about divine commands as they (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Anscombe on Intentions and Commands.Graham Hubbs - 2016 - Klesis 35:90-107.
    The title of this essay describes its topic. I open by discussing the two-knowledges/one-object worry that Anscombe introduces through her famous example of the water-pumper. This sets the context for my main topic, viz., Anscombe’s remarks in _Intention_ on the similarities and differences between intentions and commands. These remarks play a key role in her argument’s shift from practical knowledge to the form of practical reasoning and in its subsequent shift back to practical knowledge. The remarks should be seen as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  39
    Moral Legislation: A Legal-Political Model for Indirect Consequentialist Reasoning.Conrad D. Johnson - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about moral reasoning: how we actually reason and how we ought to reason. It defends a form of 'rule' utilitarianism whereby we must sometimes judge and act in moral questions in accordance with generally accepted rules, so long as the existence of those rules is justified by the good they bring about. The author opposes the currently more fashionable view that it is always right for the individual to do that which produces the most good. Among (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  31. Faultless Disagreement, Cognitive Command, and Epistemic Peers.John K. Davis - 2015 - Synthese 192 (1):1-24.
    Relativism and contextualism are the most popular accounts of faultless disagreement, but Crispin Wright once argued for an account I call divergentism. According to divergentism, parties who possess all relevant information and use the same standards of assessment in the same context of utterance can disagree about the same proposition without either party being in epistemic fault, yet only one of them is right. This view is an alternative to relativism, indexical contextualism, and nonindexical contextualism, and has advantages over those (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  32.  28
    Commanded Love and Moral Autonomy.Merold Westphal - 1998 - Ethical Perspectives 5 (4):263-276.
    One way to read Kierkegaard’s Works of Love is as an all out assault on the Enlightenment ideal of moral autonomy from a religious point of view. Kant is the locus classicus of this ideal, just as Descartes and Locke are, respectively, for the correlative ideals of epistemic and political autonomy. Since these three components belong to the central core of what we have come to think of as the modern understanding of the subject, Kierkegaard’s critique has a distinctively postmodern (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  19
    Divine Commands, Natural Law, and the Authority of God.Jean Porter - 2014 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 34 (1):3-20.
    Does morality depend ultimately on the rationally compelling force of natural law, or on God's authoritative commands? These are not exclusive alternatives, of course, but they represent two widely influential ways of understanding the moral order seen in relation to divine wisdom, goodness, and power. Each alternative underscores some elements of theistic belief while deemphasizing others. Theories of the natural law emphasize the intrinsic goodness of the natural order to the potential detriment of divine freedom, whereas divine command theories underscore (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  26
    The Significance of Worship in the Thought of Thomas Aquinas.O. Kevin E. O’Reilly - 2013 - International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (4):453-462.
    This article appeals to Thomas Aquinas in order to offer a construal of the nature of reason arguably preferable to that prominent in the Enlightenment. Thomas’s account neither espouses the notion that reason is devoid of any appetitive influence nor so conflates reason and will as to suggest that thinking becomes essentially a form of willing. His view does respect that the activity of willing is of fundamental import for the life of reason. Since the ultimate object of the will (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Can Christian Worship Influence Attitudes and Behavior Toward Animals?Jennifer E. Brown - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (1):47-65.
    Both the Scriptures and the traditions of the Christian faith can be seen to promote animal welfare and, paradoxically, also to promote the idea of nonhuman animals existing only for human use. The result is that Christians can have mixed attitudes toward animals, and comparatively few Christians actively work toward improving animal welfare. It is possible that the behavior and activities of individual Christians reflect those values most strongly and frequently expressed in Christian liturgy and worship, which may be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  59
    On Reason: Rationality in a World of Cultural Conflict and Racism.Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze - 2008 - Duke University Press.
    Given that Enlightenment rationality developed in Europe as European nations aggressively claimed other parts of the world for their own enrichment, scholars have made rationality the subject of postcolonial critique, questioning its universality and objectivity. In _On Reason_, the late philosopher Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze demonstrates that rationality, and by extension philosophy, need not be renounced as manifestations or tools of Western imperialism. Examining reason in connection to the politics of difference—the cluster of issues known variously as cultural diversity, political correctness, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  37.  28
    Reasoning: A Social Picture.Anthony Simon Laden - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Anthony Simon Laden explores the kind of reasoning we engage in when we live together: when we are responsive to others and neither commanding nor deferring to them. He argues for a new, social picture of the activity of reasoning, in which reasoning is a species of conversation--social, ongoing, and governed by a set of characteristic norms.
  38. In Defence of the Epistemological Objection to Divine Command Theory.John Danaher - 2019 - Sophia 58 (3):381-400.
    Divine command theories come in several different forms but at their core all of these theories claim that certain moral statuses exist in virtue of the fact that God has commanded them to exist. Several authors argue that this core version of the DCT is vulnerable to an epistemological objection. According to this objection, DCT is deficient because certain groups of moral agents lack epistemic access to God’s commands. But there is confusion as to the precise nature and significance of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  1
    Practice Makes Perfect: Corporate Worship and the Formation of Spiritual Virtue.Scott Aniol - 2017 - Journal of Spiritual Formation and Soul Care 10 (1):93-104.
    This article argues that corporate worship is one of the primary means of making disciples through the ritual formation of spiritual virtue. It explains that a disciple is formed not only through transmission of doctrine, but also through cultivating the heart's inclinations. Christian disciples are not only “knowers”; they are “doers,” observing everything Christ has commanded. Since people act primarily according to their hearts’ desires, pastors who wish to make disciples must concern themselves with the heart's inclinations. Such inclinations (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Cultivating the Worshipful Self in an Algorithmic Age: Reflections on an Asadian Conclusion.Auwais Rafudeen - 00/2022 - HTS Theological Studies 78 (4):1-7.
    In a recent book, Secular Translations: Nation State, Modern State and Calculative Reason, Talal Asad is concerned with how the language of calculation and abstraction, inaugurated by modernity and accelerated by our current algorithmic reality, erodes the language of cultivated embodiment typical of religious worldviews and the virtues that such embodiment seeks to develop. These languages are predicated upon and cultivate different types of selves that are fundamentally at variance with each other. It is not that that one cannot cultivate (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  71
    On Justifying One’s Acceptance of Divine Command Theory.Dennis Plaisted - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 81 (3):315-334.
    It has been alleged against divine command theory that we cannot justify our acceptance of it without giving it up. For if we provide moral reasons for our acceptance of God’s commands, then those reasons, and not God’s commands, must be our ultimate moral standard. Kai Nielsen has offered the most forceful version of this objection in his book, Ethics Without God. My principal aim is to show that Nielsen’s charge does not succeed. His argument crucially relies upon (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Music as Atmosphere. Lines of Becoming in Congregational Worship.Friedlind Riedel - 2015 - Lebenswelt. Aesthetics and Philosophy of Experience 6:80-111.
    In this paper I offer critical attention to the notion of atmosphere in relation to music. By exploring the concept through the case study of the Closed Brethren worship services, I argue that atmosphere may provide analytical tools to explore the ineffable in ecclesial practices. Music, just as atmosphere, commonly occupies a realm of ineffability and undermines notions such as inside and outside, subject and object. For this reason I present music as a means of knowing the atmosphere. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43. The Power to Make Others Worship.Aaron Smuts - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (2):221 - 237.
    Can any being worthy of worship make others worship it? I think not. By way of an analogy to love, I argue that it is perfectly coherent to think that one could be made to worship. However, forcing someone to worship violates their autonomy, not because worship must be freely given, but because forced worship would be inauthentic—much like love earned through potions. For this reason, I argue that one cannot be made to (...) properly; forced worship would be unfitting. My principal claim is that no being worthy of worship could exercise the power to make others worship it, since the act of making another worship would necessarily make one unworthy of worship. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Divine Beauty and Our Obligation to Worship God.Mark K. Spencer - 2020 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 94:153-169.
    Some recent philosophers of religion have argued that no divine attribute sufficiently grounds an obligation to worship God. I argue that divine beauty grounds this obligation. This claim is immune to the objections that have been raised to claims that other divine attributes ground this obligation, and can be upheld even if, for the sake of argument, those objections are granted. First, I give an account of what worship is. Second, I consider reasons for and against the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Permissive Consent: A Robust Reason-Changing Account.Neil Manson - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3317-3334.
    There is an ongoing debate about the “ontology” of consent. Some argue that it is a mental act, some that it is a “hybrid” of a mental act plus behaviour that signifies that act; others argue that consent is a performative, akin to promising or commanding. Here it is argued that all these views are mistaken—though some more so than others. We begin with the question whether a normatively efficacious act of consent can be completed in the mind alone. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  46.  6
    Conversational Implicatures Cannot Save Divine Command Theory From the Counterpossible Terrible Commands Objection.Frederick Choo - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-7.
    Critics of Divine Command Theory (DCT) have advanced the counterpossible terrible commands objection. They argue that DCT implies the counterpossible ‘If a necessarily morally perfect God commanded us to perform a terrible act, then the terrible act would be morally obligatory.’ However, this counterpossible is false. Hence, DCT is false. Philipp Kremers has proposed that the intuition that the counterpossible above is false is due to conversational implicatures. By providing a pragmatic explanation for the intuition, he thinks that DCT proponents (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. God’s Commandments and Their Political Presence: Notes of a Tradition on the ‘Ground’ of Ethics.Hans G. Ulrich - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (1):42-58.
    The paper describes the biblical understanding of God’s commanded law in its indispensable political form, i.e. the law of God’s people. This is distinct from a confinement of God’s commandments to a moral code independent from that political context as it is present as the ‘political worship’ of God’s people.This worship has to be seen as the ground for ethics. From here follow consequences for human laws and legislation concerning human life forms. That disposition of theological ethics has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  89
    Divine Simplicity and Divine Command Ethics.Susan Peppers-Bates - 2008 - International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):361-369.
    In this paper I will argue that a false assumption drives the attraction of philosophers to a divine command theory of morality. Specifically, I suggest the idea that anything not created by God is independent of God is a misconception. The idea misleads us into thinking that our only choice in offering a theistic ground for morality is between making God bow to a standard independent of his will or God creating morality in revealing his will. Yet what is God (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  2
    What is the Best Jewish Account of the Grounds of Worship of God?Michael J. Harris - 2022 - Journal of Analytic Theology 10:21-38.
    This paper brings contemporary debate in analytic philosophy of religion regarding the notion of worship into conversation with Jewish sources and attempts to identify the most promising philosophical grounds for a Jewish account of the putative obligatoriness of worship. Some philosophers have recently debated the notion of worship, focusing in particular on the claim that human beings have an obligation to worship God and on whether and how such an obligation might be adequately grounded. I first (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. "Toulmin's Concept of" Reasonableness".David Simecek - 2011 - Filozofia 66 (5):458-462.
    The idea of „rationality“ is still dominating in modern philosophical thinking. On one hand, there are philosophers who worship algorithms and formal structures of logical procedures. On the other hand there are those who tend to subjectivism, skepticism or relativism because of the impossibility to capture „God's eye view“ . By substituting the concept of „reasonableness“ for the idea of the „rational“ Stephen Toulmin hopes to avoid the relativistic trap.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000