Results for 'recreational drug use'

999 found
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  1. A Moral Defense of Recreational Drug Use.Rob Lovering - 2015 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    Why does American law allow the recreational use of some drugs, such as alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine, but not others, such as marijuana, cocaine, and heroin? The answer lies not simply in the harm the use of these drugs might cause, but in the perceived morality—or lack thereof—of their recreational use. Despite strong rhetoric from moral critics of recreational drug use, however, it is surprisingly difficult to discern the reasons they have for deeming the recreational (...)
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  2. On Moral Arguments Against Recreational Drug Use.Rob Lovering - 2016 - Philosophy Now (113):22-4.
    There is a wide array of arguments for the immorality of recreational drug use, ranging from the philosophically rudimentary to the philosophically sophisticated. But the vast majority of these arguments are unsuccessful, and those that succeed are quite limited in scope. In this article, I present and evaluate a few examples of such arguments.
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  3.  62
    Why Recreational Drug Use Is Immoral.Timothy Hsiao - 2017 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 17 (4):605-614.
    This paper argues for two claims. First, recreational drug use is immoral because it undermines cognitive functioning. Second, for similar reasons, the state has a prima facie public policy interest in enacting legal restrictions on recreational drug use. In this context, “recreational drug use” refers to activities in which a person uses some intoxicating substance to impair, destroy, or otherwise frustrate the functioning of his cognitive faculties for the sake of pleasure or enjoyment.
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  4.  33
    Individual Differences in Reproductive Strategy Are Related to Views About Recreational Drug Use in Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan.Katinka J. P. Quintelier, Keiko Ishii, Jason Weeden, Robert Kurzban & Johan Braeckman - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (2):196-217.
    Individual differences in moral views are often explained as the downstream effect of ideological commitments, such as political orientation and religiosity. Recent studies in the U.S. suggest that moral views about recreational drug use are also influenced by attitudes toward sex and that this relationship cannot be explained by ideological commitments. In this study, we investigate student samples from Belgium, The Netherlands, and Japan. We find that, in all samples, sexual attitudes are strongly related to views about (...) drug use, even after controlling for various ideological variables. We discuss our results in light of reproductive strategies as determinants of moral views. (shrink)
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  5.  72
    The Centralized-Use Compromise on Recreational Drug Policy.Jeffrey Glick - 2014 - Res Publica 20 (4):359-376.
    The current debate on recreational drug policy is roughly a contest between prohibition advocates and legalization advocates. This paper offers a third alternative that is a compromise between those two. The centralized-use compromise can secure the autonomy interests that are important to defenders of legalization, and it can prevent harms to others that are the focus of prohibition arguments. The centralized-use compromise also offers a possible way to reduce the black market while also reducing the rate of addiction (...)
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  6.  99
    Drugs, Morality and the Law.Paul Smith - 2002 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):233–244.
    A critical survey of arguments for and against the morality and the legality of recreational drug use, deploying Feinberg's analysis of liberty-limiting principles.
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  7.  16
    Off-Label Drug Use as a Consent and Health Regulation Issue in New Zealand.Rebecca Julia Cook - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):251-258.
    The term “off-label drug use” refers to drugs that have not yet acquired “approved” status or drugs that have acquired “approved” status but are used with a different dosage, route, or administration method other than that for which the drug has been approved. In New Zealand, the Medicines Act 1981 specifically allows for off-label drug use. However, this authority is limited by the Health and Disability Commissioner Regulations 1996 and the common law, which require that off-label (...) use is of an acceptable standard, that the patient should be fully informed, and that the patient should give informed consent. Off-label drug use is an important issue because the current law provides medical practitioners very wide discretionary power, without providing clarification for what is required of the practitioner in exercising his or her discretion in prescribing off-label. This paper discusses possible solutions to this issue, for example, establishing protocol for off-label use, an electronic database of off-label use, and the amendment of legal provisions. (shrink)
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  8. Drugs as Instruments: A New Framework for Non-Addictive Psychoactive Drug Use.Christian P. Müller & Gunter Schumann - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):293-310.
    Most people who are regular consumers of psychoactive drugs are not drug addicts, nor will they ever become addicts. In neurobiological theories, non-addictive drug consumption is acknowledged only as a prerequisite for addiction, but not as a stable and widespread behavior in its own right. This target article proposes a new neurobiological framework theory for non-addictive psychoactive drug consumption, introducing the concept of Psychoactive drugs are consumed for their effects on mental states. Humans are able to learn (...)
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  9.  23
    The Fundamental Right of Medical Necessity and Genetic Intervention for Substance Abuse.William Kitchin - 2006 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 15 (1):1.
    Genetic intervention is on the near horizon for the treatment of substance abu se. Genetic intervention involves a reprogramming of a person’s own genetic instructions so that that person will no longer have the physical craving for the drug of choice. Unlike pharmacologic intervention, genetic intervention will change the genetic identity of the person, albeit slightly. The legal issue is whether one has a fundamental right to this medical procedure. A fundamental right is one that the government cannot deny (...)
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  10.  19
    Rooting Out Institutional Corruption to Manage Inappropriate Off‐Label Drug Use.Marc A. Rodwin - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):654-664.
    Prescribing drugs for uses that the FDA has not approved — off-label drug use — can sometimes be justified but is typically not supported by substantial evidence of effectiveness. At the root of inappropriate off-label drug use lie perverse incentives for pharmaceutical firms and flawed oversight of prescribing physicians. Typical reform proposals such as increased sanctions for manufacturers might reduce the incidence of unjustified off-label use, but they do not remove the source of the problem. Public policy should (...)
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  11.  84
    Just Say No (For Now): The Ethics of Illegal Drug Use.Mathieu Doucet - 2017 - Law Ethics and Philosophy 5:9-29.
    The war on drugs is widely criticized as unjust. The idea that the laws prohibiting drugs are unjust can easily lead to the conclusion that those laws do not deserve our respect, so that our only moral reason to obey them flows from a general moral obligation to obey the law, rather than from anything morally troubling about drug use itself. In this paper, I argue that this line of thinking is mistaken. I begin by arguing that the (...) laws are indeed unjust. However, so long as they remain prohibited, I argue that we have strong moral reasons to avoid drug use. First, drug users are partly responsible for the violent and exploitative conditions in which many drugs are produced and distributed. Second, the unequal ways in which drug laws are enforced make drug use by many an unethical exercise of privilege. These reasons do not depend on the existence of a general moral obligation to obey the law; we ought to refrain from illegal drug use even if prohibition is unjust and even if we have no general obligation to obey the law. In fact, drug laws turn out to represent an interesting exception case within the broader debate about this obligation, and I argue that it is the very injustice of the law that generates the reasons not to violate it. (shrink)
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  12.  61
    Adolescent and Parent Perspectives on Ethical Issues in Youth Drug Use and Suicide Survey Research.Celia B. Fisher - 2003 - Ethics and Behavior 13 (4):303-332.
    The contributions of adolescent and parent perspectives to ethical planning of survey research on youth drug use and suicide behaviors are highlighted through an empirical examination of 322 7th-12th graders' and 160 parents' opinions on questions related to 4 ethical dimensions of survey research practice: evaluating research risks and benefits, establishing guardian permission requirements, developing confidentiality and disclosure policies, and using cash incentives for recruitment. Generational and ethnic variation in response to questionnaire items developed from discussions within adolescent and (...)
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  13.  92
    Responding to Vulnerability: The Case of Injection Drug Use.Elizabeth Ben-Ishai - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):39-63.
    "Before they were 'junkies,' they were kids." The words appear on a poster, beneath a montage of photographs of children and the text: "Save Insite." Insite, located in Vancouver, Canada, is North America's first and only supervised injection facility (SIF). At Insite, people who use injection drugs can inject previously obtained drugs, such as heroin and cocaine, under medical supervision, using sterile equipment provided by this government-run facility. Opened under the auspices of a three-year exemption from federal drug laws (...)
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  14.  75
    Effect of Ethnicity, Gender and Drug Use History on Achieving High Rates of Affirmative Informed Consent for Genetics Research: Impact of Sharing with a National Repository.Brenda Ray, Colin Jackson, Elizabeth Ducat, Ann Ho, Sara Hamon & Mary Jeanne Kreek - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):374-379.
    Aim Genetic research representative of the population is crucial to understanding the underlying causes of many diseases. In a prospective evaluation of informed consent we assessed the willingness of individuals of different ethnicities, gender and drug dependence history to participate in genetic studies in which their genetic sample could be shared with a repository at the National Institutes of Health. Methods Potential subjects were recruited from the general population through the use of flyers and referrals from previous participants and (...)
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  15.  33
    Drug Use as Consumer Behavior.Gordon Robert Foxall & Valdimar Sigurdsson - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):313-314.
    Seeking integration of drug consumption research by a theory of memory function and emphasizing drug consumption rather than addiction, Müller & Schumann (M&S) treat drug self-administration as part of a general pattern of consumption. This insight is located within a more comprehensive framework for understanding drug use as consumer behavior that explicates the reinforcement contingencies associated with modes of drug consumption.
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  16.  23
    Governing Drug Use Through Neurobiological Subject Construction: The Sad Loss of the Sociocultural.Kevin Chien-Chang Wu - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):327-328.
    Based on their framework, Müller & Schumann (M&S) propose a staged drug policy that matches well the neoliberal governance scheme. To mend the sad loss of the sociocultural dimension in their model, I propose three such considerations: first, sociocultural interactions with the brain; second, sociocultural context and justice of drug use; and third, sociocultural preparedness for implementing their drug policy.
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  17.  19
    Non-Addictive Psychoactive Drug Use: Implications for Behavioral Addiction.Mark D. Griffiths - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):315-316.
    The newly proposed framework for non-addictive psychoactive substances postulated by Müller & Schumann (M&S) provides an interesting and plausible explanation for non-addictive drug use. However, with specific reference to the relevant behavioral addiction literature, this commentary argues that the model may unexpectedly hold utility not only for non-addictive use of drugs, but also for non-addictive use of other potentially addictive behaviors.
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  18.  26
    Optimal Drug Use and Rational Drug Policy.Geoffrey F. Miller - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):318-319.
    The Müller & Schumann (M&S) view of drug use is courageous and compelling, with radical implications for drug policy and research. It implies that most nations prohibit most drugs that could promote happiness, social capital, and economic growth; that most individuals underuse rather than overuse drugs; and that behavioral scientists could use drugs more effectively in generating hypotheses and collaborating empathically.
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  19.  20
    Nonaddictive Instrumental Drug Use: Theoretical Strengths and Weaknesses.Andrew J. Goudie, Matthew J. Gullo, Abigail K. Rose, Paul Christiansen, Jonathan C. Cole, Matt Field & Harry Sumnall - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):314-315.
    The potential to instrumentalize drug use based upon the detection of very many different drug states undoubtedly exists, and such states may play a role in psychiatric and many other drug uses. Nevertheless, nonaddictive drug use is potentially more parsimoniously explained in terms of sensation seeking/impulsivity and drug expectations. Cultural factors also play a major role in nonaddictive drug use.
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  20.  18
    Good Intentions and Dangerous Assumptions: Research Ethics Committees and Illicit Drug Use Research.Kirsten Bell & Amy Salmon - 2012 - Research Ethics 8 (4):191-199.
    Illicit drug users are frequently identified as a ‘vulnerable population’ requiring ‘special protection’ and ‘additional safeguards’ in research. However, without specific guidance on how to enact these special protections and safeguards, research ethics committee (REC) members sometimes fall back on untested assumptions about the ethics of illicit drug use research. In light of growing calls for ‘evidence-based research ethics’, this commentary examines three common assumptions amongst REC members about what constitutes ethical research with drug users, and whether (...)
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  21.  12
    Psychoactive Drug Use: Expand the Scope of Outcome Assessment.Alfonso Troisi - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):324-325.
    The and models of psychoactive drug use predict opposite outcomes in terms of adaptive behavior and fitness benefits. Which is the range of applicability of each model? To answer this question, we need more data than those reported by studies focusing on medical, psychiatric, and legal problems in addicted users. An evolutionary analysis requires a much wider focus.
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  22. Collective Action and Individual Choice.Jonny Anomaly - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):752-756.
    Governments across the globe have squandered treasure and imprisoned millions of their own citizens by criminalising the use and sale of recreational drugs. But use of these drugs has remained relatively constant, and the primary victims are the users themselves. Meanwhile, antimicrobial drugs that once had the power to cure infections are losing their ability to do so, compromising the health of people around the world. The thesis of this essay is that policymakers should stop wasting resources trying to (...)
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  23.  25
    Wanting and Drug Use: A Biocultural Approach to the Analysis of Addiction.Daniel H. Lende - 2005 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 33 (1):100-124.
  24.  40
    A Multi‐Intervention Approach on Drug Therapy Can Lead to a More Appropriate Drug Use in the Elderly. LIMM‐Landskrona Integrated Medicines Management.Anna Bergkvist, Patrik Midlöv, Peter Höglund, Lisa Larsson & Tommy Eriksson - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (4):660-667.
  25.  29
    To Use or Not to Use: Expanding the View on Non-Addictive Psychoactive Drug Consumption and its Implications.Christian P. Müller & Gunter Schumann - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (6):328-347.
    Proposing a change to the view on psychoactive drug use in non-addicts touches a sensitive issue because of its potential implications to addiction prevention, therapeutic practice, and drug policy. Commentators raised nine questions that ranged from clarifications, suggested extensions of the model to supporting data previously not regarded, to assumptions on the implications of the model. Here, we take up the suggestions of the commentators to expand the model to behavioral addictions, discuss additional instrumentalization goals, and review the (...)
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  26.  53
    Machinic Assemblages: Deleuze, Guattari and an Ethico-Aesthetics of Drug Use.Peta Malins - 2004 - Janus Head 7 (1):84-104.
    The body conceived of as a machinic assemblage becomes a body that is multiple. Its function or meaning no longer depends on an interior truth or identity, but on the particular assemblages it forms with other bodies. In this paper I draw on the work of Deleuze and Guattari to explore what happens to the drug using body when it is rethought as a machinic assemblage. Following an exploration of how the body of the drug user is put (...)
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  27. Performance-Enhancing Drug Use in Baseball: The Impact of Culture.Joe Solberg & Richard Ringer - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (2):91-102.
    Few sports-related events have generated as much controversy as the steroid crisis in baseball. Both ardent fans and casual observers wonder why professional baseball players would choose to use such substances when their use was viewed as outside the bounds of fair play. This article attempts to answer that question by applying concepts from the area of organizational culture. Understanding the culture of baseball and the ways leaders embedded and strengthened that culture adds insight into the decisions by athletes to (...)
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  28.  28
    'Normalising' Drug Use?: What Does the 'Pro-Drug' Lobby's Law Reform Agenda Affirm and Reinforce in Their Current Endeavours to 'Normalise' Drug Use? [REVIEW]Shane Varcoe - 2011 - Bioethics Research Notes 23 (4):56.
    Varcoe, Shane Until recently, there has been a largely unnoticed contingent of stakeholders who have not merely abandoned the ideal scenario of a drug free culture, but have quickly stepped through a phase of passive indifference, into what is a 'pro-drug' position in active pursuit of rights for individuals to be protected and supported in their consumption of currently illicit drugs. The players engaged in attempting to bring about this disturbing cultural shift are varied, but certainly these advocates (...)
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  29.  15
    Human Stakeholders and the Use of Animals in Drug Development.Lisa A. Kramer & Ray Greek - 2018 - Business and Society Review 123 (1):3-58.
    Pharmaceutical firms seek to fulfill their responsibilities to stakeholders by developing drugs that treat diseases. We evaluate the social and financial costs of developing new drugs relative to the realized benefits and find the industry falls short of its potential. This is primarily due to legislation-mandated reliance on animal test results in early stages of the drug development process, leading to a mere 10 percent success rate for new drugs entering human clinical trials. We cite hundreds of biomedical studies (...)
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  30.  18
    When Are Medical Apps Medical? Off-Label Use and the Food and Drug Administration.William H. Krieger - unknown
    People have a love/hate relationship with rapidly changing healthcare technology. While consumer demand for medical apps continues to grow as rapidly as does supply, healthcare professionals and safety experts worry about the impact of these apps on the health consumer. In response to the rapidly growing mobile healthcare sector, the Food and Drug Administration has put forth guidelines to regulate ‘mobile medical apps’, those health-related apps that are designated as medical devices. In this article, I argue that this decision, (...)
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  31.  15
    Analyses of Acceptability Judgments Made Toward the Use of Nanocarrier-Based Targeted Drug Delivery: Interviews with Researchers and Research Trainees in the Field of New Technologies.Vanessa Chenel, Patrick Boissy, Jean-Pierre Cloarec & Johane Patenaude - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (3):199-215.
    The assessment of nanotechnology applications such as nanocarrier-based targeted drug delivery has historically been based mostly on toxicological and safety aspects. The use of nanocarriers for TDD, a leading-edge nanomedical application, has received little study from the angle of experts’ perceptions and acceptability, which may be reflected in how TDD applications are developed. In recent years, numerous authors have maintained that TDD assessment should also take into account impacts on ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social issues in order to (...)
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  32.  19
    A Cognitive Model of Drug Urges and Drug-Use Behavior: Role of Automatic and Nonautomatic Processes.Stephen T. Tiffany - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (2):147-168.
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  33.  3
    Rooting Out Institutional Corruption to Manage Inappropriate Off-Label Drug Use.Marc A. Rodwin - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):654-664.
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  34. A Moral Basis for Prohibiting Performance Enhancing Drug Use in Competitive Sport.Sean McKeever - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):243-257.
    A strong moral reason for prohibiting doping in sport is to be found in the bad choices that would be faced by clean athletes in a sporting world that tolerated doping. The case against doping is not, however, to be grounded in the concept of coercion. Instead, it is grounded in a general duty of sport to afford fair opportunity to the goods that are distinctively within sport's sphere of control. The moral reason to prohibit doping need not be balanced (...)
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  35. Psychotropic Drug Use: Between Healing and Enhancing the Mind.Toine Pieters & Stephen Snelders - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (2):63-73.
    The making and taking of psychotropic drugs, whether on medical prescription or as self-medication, whether marketed by pharmaceutical companies or clamoured for by an anxious population, has been an integral part of the twentieth century. In this modern era of speed, uncertainty, pleasure and anguish the boundaries between healing and enhancing the mind by chemical means have been redefined. Long before Prozac would become a household name for an ‘emotional aspirin’ did consumers embrace the idea and practice of taking psychotropics (...)
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  36.  12
    Understanding Appearance-Enhancing Drug Use in Sport Using an Enactive Approach to Body Image.Denis Hauw & Jean Bilard - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  37.  5
    Wanting and Drug Use: A Biocultural Approach to the Analysis of Addiction.Daniel H. Lende - 2005 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 33 (1):100-124.
  38.  28
    Addiction as an Attachment Disorder: White Matter Impairment Is Linked to Increased Negative Affective States in Poly-Drug Use.Eva Z. Reininghaus, Human-Friedrich Unterrainer, Michaela Hiebler-Ragger, Karl Koschutnig, Jürgen Fuchshuber, Sebastian Tscheschner, Maria Url, Jolana Wagner-Skacel, Ilona Papousek, Elisabeth M. Weiss & Andreas Fink - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  39.  85
    Drug Use in Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Edited by Margaret P Battin and Arthur G Lipman, New York, Pharmaceutical Products Press, 1996, 360 Pages, US$36.00. [REVIEW]Rebecca Bennett - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):222-223.
  40.  9
    Research on Controlled Drug Use: A Paradigm for Public Health Research in Sustainable Health.Evert van Leeuwen - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (4):50-52.
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  41.  4
    “It Was Me on a Good Day”: Exploring the Smart Drug Use Phenomenon in England.Elisabeth J. Vargo & Andrea Petróczi - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  42. The Morality of Drug Use.Paul MacDonald - 2000 - The Philosophers' Magazine (9):23-26.
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  43.  31
    Culture, Drugs, and Society: A Social Science Approach to Drug Use:Culture, Drugs, and Society: A Social Science Approach to Drug Use.Michael Winkelman - 1997 - Anthropology of Consciousness 8 (4):160-161.
  44.  4
    Measurement of Motivation for Drug Use With Emphasis on Startle Tests.Ronald F. Mucha, Paul Pauli & Peter Weyers - 2006 - In Reinout W. Wiers & Alan W. Stacy (eds.), Handbook of Implicit Cognition and Addiction. Sage Publications. pp. 201.
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  45.  10
    Understanding the Paths to Appearance- and Performance-Enhancing Drug Use in Bodybuilding.Ronan Coquet, Peggy Roussel & Fabien Ohl - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  46. City Folds : Injecting Drug Use and Urban Space.Peta Malins - 2008 - In Anna Hickey-Moody & Peta Malins (eds.), Deleuzian Encounters: Studies in Contemporary Social Issues. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  47.  13
    Comments on “Strategies for Reduction in the Duration of Intravenous Drug Use: Interest of Drug Tracers as Quality Indicators to Improve Intravenous to Oral Switch”.Maryam Taghizadeh-Ghehi & Alireza Ahmadvand - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (2):454-455.
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  48.  21
    Paid Protection? Ethics of Incentivised Long-Acting Reversible Contraception in Adolescents with Alcohol and Other Drug Use: Table 1.Tiana Won, Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby & Mariam Chacko - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2015-103176.
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  49.  24
    Intrusive Thoughts, Sensation Seeking, and Drug Use in College Students.Annie M. Hines & Geraldine A. Shaw - 1993 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (6):541-544.
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  50.  22
    The Morality of Drug Use: An Open Debate.Paul S. MacDonald - 1999 - The Philosophers' Magazine 7:21-24.
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