Results for 'reflexivity theories'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  19
    Theories of Consciousness as Reflexivity.Frederic Peters - 2013 - Philosophical Forum 44 (4):341-372.
  2.  2
    Language or Experience? – That’s Not the Question: A Case for Reflexivity.Jörg Volbers - 2014 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 6 (2):175-199.
    Analytic philosophy of language has often criticized classical pragmatism for holding to an unwarranted notion of experience which lapses into epistemological foundationalism; defenders of the classics have denied such a consequence. The paper tries to move this debate forward by pointing out that the criticism of the empiricist “given” is not wedded to a specific philosophical method, be it linguistic or pragmatist. From a broader historical perspective drawing in particular on Kant, antifoundationalism turns out to be deeply rooted in modern (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  24
    Dignāga’s Argument for the Awareness Principle: An Analytic Refinement.Uriah Kriegel - forthcoming - Philosophy East and West 69 (2).
    Contemporary theories of consciousness can be divided along several major faultlines, but one of the most prominent concerns the question of whether they accept the principle that a mental state’s being conscious involves essentially its subject being aware of it. Call this the awareness principle: -/- (Awareness) For any mental state M of a subject S (at a time t), M is conscious (at t) only if S is aware of M (at t). -/- Although analytic philosophers divide sharply (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  9
    Pragmatic Reflexivity in Self-Defeating and Self-Justifying Expressions.Jeremy Morris - 2008 - Argumentation 22 (2):205-216.
    Self-defeating and self-justifying expressions are reflexive insofar as they pertain to themselves. However, the reflexivity involved is often pragmatic, i.e., does not entirely depend upon the logical properties of what is expressed but also upon the expressive act. In this paper I present a general account of pragmatic reflexivity and apply it to some familiar self-defeating and self-justifying expressions in epistemology. This application indicates some important, if often neglected features of the epistemological issues involved. The account I defend (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  47
    The Return of the Subject?: Power, Reflexivity and Agency.David S. Stern - 2000 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (5):109-122.
    The deconstruction of the subject associated with postmodernism cannot be said to have simply carried the day. Opponents and critics of postmodernism have held that we must return to the subject and to autonomy as a necessary condition of thinking about ethics, politics, agency and responsibility. Indeed, Peter Dews has recently argued that efforts to displace the subject repeat rather than dissolve the problems generated by subject-centered theories, a charge he takes to be devastating. The implications of this return (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  6.  12
    Cybernetics, Reflexivity and Second-Order Science.L. H. Kauffman - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):489-497.
    Context: Second-order cybernetics and its implications have been understood within the cybernetics community for some time. These implications are important for understanding the structure of scientific endeavor, and for researchers in other fields to see the reflexive nature of scientific research. This article is about the role of context in the creation and exploration of our experience. Problem: The purpose of this article is to point out the fundamental nature of the circularity in cybernetics and in scientific work in general. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  22
    Intransitive Accomplishments and the Lexicon: The Role of Implicit Arguments, Definiteness, and Reflexivity in Aspectual Composition.S. Engelberg - 2002 - Journal of Semantics 19 (4):369-416.
    Theories of aspectual composition assume that accomplishments arise when a transitive verb has an incremental theme argument which is realized as a quantized NP—foremost, an NP which is not a mass noun or a bare plural—in direct object position. A problem confronting this assumption is the large number of intransitive, unergative verbs in German and English that occur in accomplishment expressions. The paper argues that this problem can be solved within a standard theory of aspectual composition if additional, independently (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  3
    Periodicity and Reflexivity in Revision Sequences.Edoardo Rivello - 2015 - Studia Logica 103 (6):1279-1302.
    Revision sequences were introduced in 1982 by Herzberger and Gupta as a mathematical tool in formalising their respective theories of truth. Since then, revision has developed in a method of analysis of theoretical concepts with several applications in other areas of logic and philosophy. Revision sequences are usually formalised as ordinal-length sequences of objects of some sort. A common idea of revision process is shared by all revision theories but specific proposals can differ in the so-called limit rule, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  2
    The Indispensability of Reflexivity to Practice: The Case of Home Energy Efficiency.Oliver Bonnington - 2015 - Journal of Critical Realism 14 (5):461-484.
    This article offers new theoretical and empirical insights into decision-making with regard to the domestication and incorporation of home energy efficiency artefacts. These items, such as insulation and heating systems, are currently of high social, political and environmental importance. Researchers investigating energy consumption and related topics have recently turned to theories of practice — especially that proposed by Shove and colleagues — which treat humans as ‘carriers’. In contrast, this article uses realist social theory to afford a pivotal role (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  92
    Self-Intimation.Galen Strawson - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):1-31.
    Aristotle, Dignāga, Descartes, Arnauld, Locke, Brentano, Sartre and many others are right about the nature of conscious awareness: all such awareness comports—somehow carries within itself—awareness of itself . This is a necessary condition of awareness being awareness at all: no ‘higher-order’ account of what makes conscious states conscious can be correct. But is very paradoxical: it seems to require that awareness be somehow already present, in such a way as to be available to itself as object of awareness, in order (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Self-Reference: Reflections on Reflexivity.Steven James Bartlett & Peter Suber (eds.) - 1987 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    From the Editor’s Introduction: -/- THE INTERNAL LIMITATIONS OF HUMAN UNDERSTANDING -/- We carry, unavoidably, the limits of our understanding with us. We are perpetually confined within the horizons of our conceptual structure. When this structure grows or expands, the breadth of our comprehensions enlarges, but we are forever barred from the wished-for glimpse beyond its boundaries, no matter how hard we try, no matter how much credence we invest in the substance of our learning and mist of speculation. -/- (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12. Reflexivity: A Source-Book in Self-Reference.Steven James Bartlett (ed.) - 1992 - Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co..
    From the Editor’s Introduction: "The Internal Limitations of Human Understanding." We carry, unavoidably, the limits of our understanding with us. We are perpetually confined within the horizons of our conceptual structure. When this structure grows or expands, the breadth of our comprehensions enlarges, but we are forever barred from the wished-for glimpse beyond its boundaries, no matter how hard we try, no matter how much credence we invest in the substance of our learning and mist of speculation. -/- The limitations (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  53
    Gender, Habitus and the Field: Pierre Bourdieu and the Limits of Reflexivity.L. McNay - 1999 - Theory, Culture and Society 16 (1):95-117.
    This article argues that the failure of certain theories of reflexive identity transformation to consider more fully issues connected to gender identity leads to an overemphasis on the expressive possibilities thrown up by processes of detraditionalization. By ignoring certain deeply embedded aspects, some theories of reflexive change reproduce the `disembodied and disembedded' subject of masculinist thought. The issues of disembodiment and disembeddedness are explored through a study of the work of Pierre Bourdieu on `habitus' and the `field'. The (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  14.  25
    Token-Reflexivity and Indirect Discourse.Manuel García-Carpintero - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:37-56.
    According to a Reichenbachian treatment, indexicals are token-reflexive. That is, a truth-conditional contribution is assigned to tokens relative to relational properties which they instantiate. By thinking of the relevant expressions occurring in “ordinary contexts” along these lines, I argue that we can give a more accurate account of their semantic behavior when they occur in indirect contexts. The argument involves the following: (1) A defense of theories of indirect discourse which allows that a reference to modes of presentation associated (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  33
    Accounting for Consciousness: Epistemic and Operational Issues.Frederic Peters - 2014 - Axiomathes 24 (4):441-461.
    Within the philosophy of mind, consciousness is currently understood as the expression of one or other cognitive modality, either intentionality , transparency , subjectivity or reflexivity . However, neither intentionality, subjectivity nor transparency adequately distinguishes conscious from nonconscious cognition. Consequently, the only genuine index or defining characteristic of consciousness is reflexivity, the capacity for autonoetic or self-referring, self-monitoring awareness. But the identification of reflexivity as the principal index of consciousness raises a major challenge in relation to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  16
    Autonomy, Reflexivity, Tragedy: Notions of Democracy in Camus and Castoriadis.Matthew Sharpe - 2002 - Critical Horizons 3 (1):103-129.
    This paper looks at two 20th century theories of tragedy: those of Cornelius Castoriadis and Albert Camus. The theories that each proffer of this ancient cultural form are striking. Against more standard views, both theorists stress that tragedy is a cultural form that has only arisen historically in cultures whose forms of religious thought have been laid open to question. In this way, both argue that tragedy is an important democratic cultural form, which stages the confrontation between a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  27
    Modernity's Frail Climate: A Climate History of Environmental Reflexivity.Jean-Baptiste Fressoz & Fabien Locher - 2012 - Critical Inquiry 38 (3):579-598.
    Last paragraphe: Finally, we need to take on board the strange and disturbing fact that the modern destruction of environments has occurred not as if nature counted for nothing but, on the contrary, has occurred in a world of longstanding climatic theories that have earmarked environmental objects as the very things that produce humankind. Modern man, oblivious of the impact of his actions and blinded by his faith in progress and polarized vision of the world? Our postmodernity also has (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  29
    The Strong Programme for the Sociology of Science, Reflexivity and Relativism.Robert Nola - 1990 - Inquiry 33 (3):273 – 296.
    David Bloor has advocated a bold hypothesis about the form any sociology of science should take in setting out the four central tenets of his ?strong programme? (SP). The first section of this paper discusses how three of these tenets are best formulated and how they relate to one another. The second section discusses how reasons can be causes of belief and how such reasons raise a serious difficulty for SP. The third section discusses how SP is committed to a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  27
    Neither Relativism nor Imperialism: Theories and Practices for a Global Information Ethics. [REVIEW]Charles Ess & May Thorseth - 2006 - Ethics and Information Technology 8 (3):91-95.
    We highlight the important lessons our contributors present in our collective project of fostering dialogues both between applied ethics and computer science and between cultures. These include: critical reflexivity; procedural (partly Habermasian) approaches to establishing such central norms as “emancipation”; the importance of local actors in using ICTs both for global management and in development projects – especially as these contribute the trust essential for the social context of use of new technologies; and pluralistic approaches that preserve local cultural (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  2
    Discourse and Reflexivity.Sue White - 2012 - In Mel Gray & Stephen A. Webb (eds.), Social Work Theories and Methods. Sage Publications. pp. 218.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Self, Belonging, and Conscious Experience: A Critique of Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness.Timothy Lane - 2015 - In Rocco Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed consciousness: New essays on psychopathology and theories of consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 103-140.
    Subjectivity theories of consciousness take self-reference, somehow construed, as essential to having conscious experience. These theories differ with respect to how many levels they posit and to whether self-reference is conscious or not. But all treat self-referencing as a process that transpires at the personal level, rather than at the subpersonal level, the level of mechanism. -/- Working with conceptual resources afforded by pre-existing theories of consciousness that take self-reference to be essential, several attempts have been made (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. The Role of Reflexivity in Understanding Human Understanding.Steven James Bartlett - 1992 - In Steven J. Bartlett (ed.), Reflexivity: A Source-Book in Self-Reference. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co.. pp. 3--18.
    The Introduction to the collection of papers, _Reflexivity: A Source-book in Self-reference_. The Introduction studies the limits of our understanding that we carry unavoidably with us. We are perpetually confined within the horizons of our conceptual structure. When this structure grows or expands, the breadth of our comprehensions enlarges, but we are forever barred from the wished-for glimpse beyond its boundaries, no matter how hard we try, no matter how much credence we invest in the substance of our learning and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. What Scientific Theories Could Not Be.Hans Halvorson - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (2):183-206.
    According to the semantic view of scientific theories, theories are classes of models. I show that this view -- if taken seriously as a formal explication -- leads to absurdities. In particular, this view equates theories that are truly distinct, and it distinguishes theories that are truly equivalent. Furthermore, the semantic view lacks the resources to explicate interesting theoretical relations, such as embeddability of one theory into another. The untenability of the semantic view -- as currently (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  24. Naturalizing Intentionality: Tracking Theories Versus Phenomenal Intentionality Theories.Angela Mendelovici & David Bourget - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (5):325-337.
    This paper compares tracking and phenomenal intentionality theories of intentionality with respect to the issue of naturalism. Tracking theories explicitly aim to naturalize intentionality, while phenomenal intentionality theories generally do not. It might seem that considerations of naturalism count in favor of tracking theories. We survey key considerations relevant to this claim, including some motivations for and objections to the two kinds of theories. We conclude by suggesting that naturalistic considerations may in fact support phenomenal (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25. Reliable Misrepresentation and Tracking Theories of Mental Representation.Angela Mendelovici - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (2):421-443.
    It is a live possibility that certain of our experiences reliably misrepresent the world around us. I argue that tracking theories of mental representation have difficulty allowing for this possibility, and that this is a major consideration against them.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  26.  38
    The Reflexive Nature of Consciousness.Greg Janzen - 2008 - John Benjamins.
    Combining phenomenological insights from Brentano and Sartre, but also drawing on recent work on consciousness by analytic philosophers, this book defends the view that conscious states are reflexive, and necessarily so, i.e., that they have a built-in, implicit awareness of their own occurrence, such that the subject of a conscious state has an immediate, non-objectual acquaintance with it. As part of this investigation, the book also explores the relationship between reflexivity and the phenomenal, or what-it-is-like, dimension of conscious experience, (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  27.  65
    Two Non-Counterexamples to Truth-Tracking Theories of Knowledge.Fred Adams & Murray Clarke - 2016 - Logos and Episteme 7 (1):67-73.
    In a recent paper, Tristan Haze offers two examples that, he claims, are counterexamples to Nozick's Theory of Knowledge. Haze claims his examples work against Nozick's theory understood as relativized to belief forming methods M. We believe that they fail to be counterexamples to Nozick's theory. Since he aims the examples at tracking theories generally, we will also explain why they are not counterexamples to Dretske's Conclusive Reasons Theory of Knowledge.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  28. Relative Blindsight Arises From a Criterion Confound in Metacontrast Masking: Implications for Theories of Consciousness.Ali Jannati & Vincent Di Lollo - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):307-314.
    Relative blindsight is said to occur when different levels of subjective awareness are obtained at equality of objective performance. Using metacontrast masking, Lau and Passingham reported relative blindsight in normal observers at the shorter of two stimulus-onset asynchronies between target and mask. Experiment 1 replicated the critical asymmetry in subjective awareness at equality of objective performance. We argue that this asymmetry cannot be regarded as evidence for relative blindsight because the observers’ responses were based on different attributes of the stimuli (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  29.  24
    Reconciling Archer and Bourdieu in an Emergentist Theory of Action.Dave Elder-Vass - 2007 - Sociological Theory 25 (4):325 - 346.
    Margaret Archer and Pierre Bourdieu have advanced what seem at first sight to be incompatible theories of human agency. While Archer places heavy stress on conscious reflexive deliberation and the consequent choices of identity and projects that individuals make, Bourdieu's concept of habitus places equally heavy stress on the role of social conditioning in determining our behavior, and downplays the contribution of conscious deliberation. Despite this, I argue that these two approaches, with some modification, can be reconciled in a (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  30.  19
    Unified Theories of Cognition.Allen Newell - 1990 - Harvard University Press.
    In this book, Newell makes the case for unified theories by setting forth a candidate.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   380 citations  
  31.  85
    Contemporary Theories of Knowledge.John L. Pollock - 1986 - Hutchinson.
    This new edition of the classic Contemporary Theories of Knowledge has been significantly updated to include analyses of the recent literature in epistemology.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   288 citations  
  32. The Ontological Commitments of Inconsistent Theories.Mark Colyvan - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 141 (1):115 - 123.
    In this paper I present an argument for belief in inconsistent objects. The argument relies on a particular, plausible version of scientific realism, and the fact that often our best scientific theories are inconsistent. It is not clear what to make of this argument. Is it a reductio of the version of scientific realism under consideration? If it is, what are the alternatives? Should we just accept the conclusion? I will argue (rather tentatively and suitably qualified) for a positive (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  33. More on The Decidability of Mereological Theories.Hsing-Chien Tsai - 2011 - Logic and Logical Philosophy 20 (3):251-265.
    Quite a few results concerning the decidability of mereological theories have been given in my previous paper. But many mereological theories are still left unaccounted for. In this paper I will refine a general method for proving the undecidability of a theory and then by making use of it, I will show that most mereological theories that are strictly weaker than CEM are finitely inseparable and hence undecidable. The same results might be carried over to some extensions (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34.  13
    Conspiracy Theories and Their Investigator(S).R. X. Dentith Matthew - 2017 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 6 (4):4-11.
    A reply to Patrick Stokes' 'Reluctance and Suspicion'—itself a reply to an early piece by myself replying to Stokes—in which I clarify what it is I intend when talking about how we should investigate conspiracy theories.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  38
    What Can Synesthesia Teach Us About Higher Order Theories of Consciousness?Fred Adams & Charlotte Shreve - 2016 - Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (3):251-257.
    In this article, we will describe higher order thought theories of consciousness. Then we will describe some examples from synesthesia. Finally, we will explain why the latter may be relevant to the former.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  71
    The Relation Between Policies Concerning Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr) and Philosophical Moral Theories – an Empirical Investigation.Claus Strue Frederiksen - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (3):357 - 371.
    This article examines the relation between policies concerning Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and philosophical moral theories. The objective is to determine which moral theories form the basis for CSR policies. Are they based on ethical egoism, libertarianism, utilitarianism or some kind of common-sense morality? In order to address this issue, I conducted an empirical investigation examining the relation between moral theories and CSR policies, in companies engaged in CSR. Based on the empirical data I collected, I start (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  37. Conspiracy Theories and the Conventional Wisdom Revisited.Charles Pigden - forthcoming - In Olli Loukola (ed.), Secrets and Conspiracies. Rodopi.
    Conspiracy theories should be neither believed nor investigated - that is the conventional wisdom. I argue that it is sometimes permissible both to investigate and to believe. Hence this is a dispute in the ethics of belief. I defend epistemic ‘oughts’ that apply in the first instance to belief-forming strategies that are partly under our control. I argue that the policy of systematically doubting or disbelieving conspiracy theories would be both a political disaster and the epistemic equivalent of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. Hybrid Theories.Christopher Woodard - 2015 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge. pp. 161-174.
    This chapter surveys hybrid theories of well-being. It also discusses some criticisms, and suggests some new directions that philosophical discussion of hybrid theories might take.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  56
    Toward a Critical Ethical Reflexivity: Phenomenology and Language in Maurice Merleau‐Ponty.Stuart J. Murray & Dave Holmes - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (6):341-347.
    Working within the tradition of continental philosophy, this article argues in favour of a phenomenological understanding of language as a crucial component of bioethical inquiry. The authors challenge the ‘commonsense’ view of language, in which thinking appears as prior to speaking, and speech the straightforward vehicle of pre-existing thoughts. Drawing on Maurice Merleau-Ponty's (1908–1961) phenomenology of language, the authors claim that thinking takes place in and through the spoken word, in and through embodied language. This view resituates bioethics as a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  40.  66
    A New Generation of Corporate Codes of Ethics.Cynthia Stohl, Michael Stohl & Lucy Popova - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):607-622.
    Globalization theories posit organizational convergence, suggesting that Codes of Ethics will become commonplace and include greater consideration of global issues. This study explores the degree to which the Codes of Ethics of 157 corporations on the Global 500 and/or Fortune 500 lists include the "third generation" of corporate social responsibility. Unlike first generation ethics, which focus on the legal context of corporate behavior, and second generation ethics, which locate responsibility to groups directly associated with the corporation, third generation ethics (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  41.  25
    On Emergence in Gauge Theories at the ’T Hooft Limit‘.Nazim Bouatta & Jeremy Butterfield - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5 (1):55-87.
    Quantum field theories are notoriously difficult to understand, physically as well as philosophically. The aim of this paper is to contribute to a better conceptual understanding of gauge quantum field theories, such as quantum chromodynamics, by discussing a famous physical limit, the ’t Hooft limit, in which the theory concerned often simplifies. The idea of the limit is that the number N of colours goes to infinity. The simplifications that can happen in this limit, and that we will (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42. Two Visual Systems and Two Theories of Perception: An Attempt to Reconcile the Constructivist and Ecological Approaches.Joel Norman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):73-96.
    The two contrasting theoretical approaches to visual perception, the constructivist and the ecological, are briefly presented and illustrated through their analyses of space and size perception. Earlier calls for their reconciliation and unification are reviewed. Neurophysiological, neuropsychological, and psychophysical evidence for the existence of two quite distinct visual systems, the ventral and the dorsal, is presented. These two perceptual systems differ in their functions; the ventral system's central function is that of identification, while the dorsal system is mainly engaged in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  43. Theories of Reference and Experimental Philosophy.James Genone - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (2):152-163.
    In recent years, experimental philosophers have questioned the reliance of philosophical arguments on intuitions elicited by thought experiments. These challenges seek to undermine the use of this methodology for a particular domain of theorizing, and in some cases to raise doubts about the viability of philosophical work in the domain in question. The topic of semantic reference has been an important area for discussion of these issues, one in which critics of the reliance on intuitions have made particularly strong claims (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  44.  19
    Statistical Theories of Functions and the Problem of Epidemic Disease.Daniel M. Kraemer - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):423-438.
    Several decades ago, Christopher Boorse formulated an influential statistical theory of normative biological functions but it has often been claimed that his theory suffers from insuperable problems such as an inability to handle cases of epidemic and universal diseases. This paper develops a new statistical theory of normative functions that is capable of dealing with the notorious problem of epidemic and universal diseases. The theory is also more detailed than its predecessors and offers other important advantages over them. It is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  45. Decidability of Mereological Theories.Hsing-Chien Tsai - 2009 - Logic and Logical Philosophy 18 (1):45-63.
    Mereological theories are theories based on a binary predicate ‘being a part of’. It is believed that such a predicate must at least define a partial ordering. A mereological theory can be obtained by adding on top of the basic axioms of partial orderings some of the other axioms posited based on pertinent philosophical insights. Though mereological theories have aroused quite a few philosophers’ interest recently, not much has been said about their meta-logical properties. In this paper, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46. Théories à processus duaux et théories de l’éducation : Le cas de l’enseignement de la pensée critique et de la logique.Guillaume Beaulac & Serge Robert - 2011 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 6 (1):63-77.
    Many theories about the teaching of logic and critical thinking take for granted that theoretical learning, the learning of formal rules for example, and its practical application are sufficient to master the tools taught and to take the habit of using them. However, this way of teaching is not efficient, a conclusion supported by much work in cognitive science. Approaching cognition evolutionarily with dual-process theories allows for an explanation of these insufficiencies and offers clues on how we could (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Sketch for a Self-Analysis.Pierre Bourdieu - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    Over the past four decades, French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu produced one of the most imaginative and subtle bodies of social theory of the postwar era. When he died in 2002, he was considered to be the most influential sociologist in the world and a thinker on a par with Foucault and Le;vi-Strauss—a public intellectual as important to his generation as Sartre was to his. Sketch for a Self-Analysis is the ultimate outcome of Bourdieu’s lifelong preoccupation with reflexivity. Vehemently not (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  48. The Missing-Desires Objection to Hybrid Theories of Well-Being.William Lauinger - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):270-295.
    Many philosophers have claimed that we might do well to adopt a hybrid theory of well-being: a theory that incorporates both an objective-value constraint and a pro-attitude constraint. Hybrid theories are attractive for two main reasons. First, unlike desire theories of well-being, hybrid theories need not worry about the problem of defective desires. This is so because, unlike desire theories, hybrid theories place an objective-value constraint on well-being. Second, unlike objectivist theories of well-being, hybrid (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Popper Revisited, or What is Wrong with Conspiracy Theories?Charles Pigden - 1995 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (1):3-34.
    Conpiracy theories are widely deemed to be superstitious. Yet history appears to be littered with conspiracies successful and otherwise. (For this reason, "cock-up" theories cannot in general replace conspiracy theories, since in many cases the cock-ups are simply failed conspiracies.) Why then is it silly to suppose that historical events are sometimes due to conspiracy? The only argument available to this author is drawn from the work of the late Sir Karl Popper, who criticizes what he calls (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50. Conspiracy Theories and the Conventional Wisdom.Charles R. Pigden - 2007 - Episteme 4 (2):219-232.
    Abstract Conspiracy theories should be neither believed nor investigated - that is the conventional wisdom. I argue that it is sometimes permissible both to investigate and to believe. Hence this is a dispute in the ethics of belief. I defend epistemic “oughts” that apply in the first instance to belief-forming strategies that are partly under our control. But the beliefforming strategy of not believing conspiracy theories would be a political disaster and the epistemic equivalent of selfmutilation. I discuss (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000