Results for 'rehabilitation'

750 found
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  1.  55
    Voluntary Rehabilitation? On Neurotechnological Behavioural Treatment, Valid Consent and (In)Appropriate Offers.Lene Bomann-Larsen - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):65-77.
    Criminal offenders may be offered to participate in voluntary rehabilitation programs aiming at correcting undesirable behaviour, as a condition of early release. Behavioural treatment may include direct intervention into the central nervous system (CNS). This article discusses under which circumstances voluntary rehabilitation by CNS intervention is justified. It is argued that although the context of voluntary rehabilitation is a coercive circumstance, consent may still be effective, in the sense that it can meet formal criteria for informed consent. (...)
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  2.  63
    Criminal Rehabilitation Through Medical Intervention: Moral Liability and the Right to Bodily Integrity.Thomas Douglas - 2014 - Journal of Ethics 18 (2):101-122.
    Criminal offenders are sometimes required, by the institutions of criminal justice, to undergo medical interventions intended to promote rehabilitation. Ethical debate regarding this practice has largely proceeded on the assumption that medical interventions may only permissibly be administered to criminal offenders with their consent. In this article I challenge this assumption by suggesting that committing a crime might render one morally liable to certain forms of medical intervention. I then consider whether it is possible to respond persuasively to this (...)
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  3.  18
    Neuro-Interventions as Criminal Rehabilitation: An Ethical Review.Jonathan Pugh & Thomas Douglas - 2017 - In Jonathan D. Jacobs & Jonathan Jackson (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Criminal Justice Ethics. London: Routledge.
    According to a number of influential views in penal theory, 1 one of the primary goals of the criminal justice system is to rehabilitate offenders. Rehabilitativemeasures are commonly included as a part of a criminal sentence. For example, in some jurisdictions judges may order violent offenders to attend anger management classes or to undergo cognitive behavioural therapy as a part of their sentences. In a limited number of cases, neurointerventions — interventions that exert a direct biological effect on the brain (...)
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  4.  4
    Goals in Their Setting: A Normative Analysis of Goal Setting in Physical Rehabilitation.Rita Struhkamp - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (2):131-155.
    Goal setting is an important professional method and one of the key concepts that structure a practical field such as physical rehabilitation. However, the actual use of goals in rehabilitation practice is much less straightforward than the general acceptance of the method suggests as goals are frequently unattained, modified or contested. In this paper, I will argue that the difficulties of goal setting in day-to-day medical practice can be understood by unravelling the normative assumptions of goal setting, in (...)
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  5.  22
    Can Medical Interventions Serve as ‘Criminal Rehabilitation’?Gulzaar Barn - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-12.
    ‘Moral bioenhancement’ refers to the use of pharmaceuticals and other direct brain interventions to enhance ‘moral’ traits such as ‘empathy,’ and alter any ‘morally problematic’ dispositions, such as ‘aggression.’ This is believed to result in improved moral responses. In a recent paper, Tom Douglas considers whether medical interventions of this sort could be “provided as part of the criminal justice system’s response to the commission of crime, and for the purposes of facilitating rehabilitation : 101–122, 2014).” He suggests that (...)
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  6.  78
    A Review of Awareness Interventions in Brain Injury Rehabilitation[REVIEW]J. M. Fleming & T. Ownsworth - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):474-500.
  7.  40
    Awareness and Knowing: Implications for Rehabilitation.Peter W. Halligan - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):456-473.
  8.  8
    The 'Empowered Client'in Vocational Rehabilitation: The Excluding Impact of Inclusive Strategies.Lineke Be van Hal, Agnes Meershoek, Frans Nijhuis & Klasien Horstman - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):213-230.
    In vocational rehabilitation, empowerment is understood as the notion that people should make an active, autonomous choice to find their way back to the labour process. Following this line of reasoning, the concept of empowerment implicitly points to a specific kind of activation strategy, namely labour participation. This activation approach has received criticism for being paternalistic, disciplining and having a one-sided orientation on labour participation. Although we share this theoretical criticism, we want to go beyond it by paying attention (...)
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  9.  5
    Rehabilitation of Impaired Awareness.Mark Sherer - 2005 - In Walter M. Jr. High, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.), Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press. pp. 31-46.
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  10.  5
    Experiences of Being Tested: A Critical Discussion of the Knowledge Involved and Produced in the Practice of Testing in Children's Rehabilitation.Wenche S. Bjorbækmo & Gunn H. Engelsrud - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):123-131.
    Intensive professional testing of children with disabilities is becoming increasingly prominent within the field of children’s rehabilitation. In this paper we question the high quality ascribed to standardized assessment procedures. We explore testing practices using a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach analyzing data from interviews and participant observations among 20 children with disabilities and their parents. All the participating children have extensive experience from being tested. This study reveals that the practices of testing have certain limitations when confronted with the lived experience (...)
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  11.  9
    The Unique Ethical Challenges of Conducting Research in the Rehabilitation Medicine Population.Jeff Blackmer - 2003 - BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-6.
    Background The broad topic of research ethics is one which has been relatively well-investigated and discussed. Unique ethical issues have been identified for such populations as pediatrics, where the issues of consent and assent have received much attention, and obstetrics, with concerns such as the potential for research to cause harm to the fetus. However, little has been written about ethical concerns which are relatively unique to the population of patients seen by the practitioner of rehabilitation medicine. Discussion This (...)
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  12.  5
    The 'Empowered Client' in Vocational Rehabilitation: The Excluding Impact of Inclusive Strategies. [REVIEW]Lineke B. E. Hal, Agnes Meershoek, Frans Nijhuis & Klasien Horstman - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):213-230.
    In vocational rehabilitation, empowerment is understood as the notion that people should make an active, autonomous choice to find their way back to the labour process. Following this line of reasoning, the concept of empowerment implicitly points to a specific kind of activation strategy, namely labour participation. This activation approach has received criticism for being paternalistic, disciplining and having a one-sided orientation on labour participation. Although we share this theoretical criticism, we want to go beyond it by paying attention (...)
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  13.  11
    Quality of Stroke Rehabilitation Clinical Practice Guidelines.Amanda Hurdowar, Ian D. Graham, Mark Bayley, Margaret Harrison, Sharon Wood‐Dauphinee & Sanjit Bhogal - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):657-664.
  14.  22
    Analysis of Scientific Truth Status in Controlled Rehabilitation Trials.Roger Kerry, Aurélien Madouasse, Antony Arthur & Stephen D. Mumford - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (4):617-625.
  15.  17
    A Moral and Ethical Assemblage in Russian Orthodox Drug Rehabilitation.Jarrett Zigon - 2011 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (1):30-50.
  16.  8
    The Right to Bodily Integrity and the Rehabilitation of Offenders Through Medical Interventions: A Reply to Thomas Douglas.Elizabeth Shaw - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-10.
    Medical interventions such as methadone treatment for drug addicts or “chemical castration” for sex offenders have been used in several jurisdictions alongside or as an alternative to traditional punishments, such as incarceration. As our understanding of the biological basis for human behaviour develops, our criminal justice system may make increasing use of such medical techniques and may become less reliant on incarceration. Academic debate on this topic has largely focused on whether offenders can validly consent to medical interventions, given the (...)
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  17.  3
    The Effects of a Back Rehabilitation Programme for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain.Lynne Gaskell, Stephanie Enright & Sarah Tyson - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (5):795-800.
  18.  4
    New Roles in Rehabilitation – the Implications for Nurses and Other Professionals.Emma Stanmore, Susan Ormrod & Heather Waterman - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (6):656-664.
  19.  17
    A Feminist Perspective on Stroke Rehabilitation: The Relevance of de Beauvoir's Theory.Kari Kvigne & Marit Kirkevold - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):79-89.
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  20.  25
    Who Knows Best? Awareness of Divided Attention Difficulty in a Neurological Rehabilitation Setting.Josephine Cock, Claire Fordham, Janet Cockburn & Patrick Haggard - 2003 - Brain Injury 17 (7):561-574.
  21.  6
    Heart Rate Response and Factors Affecting Exercise Performance During Home‐ or Class‐Based Rehabilitation for Knee Replacement Recipients: Lessons for Clinical Practice.Justine M. Naylor & Victoria Ko - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):449-458.
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  22.  7
    Knowledge Translation and Improving Practices in Neurological Rehabilitation: Managers' Viewpoint.Anik Girard, Annie Rochette & Barbara Fillion - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (1):60-67.
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  23.  6
    Introductory Insights Into Patient Preferences for Outpatient Rehabilitation After Knee Replacement: Implications for Practice and Future Research.Justine M. Naylor, Rajat Mittal, Katherine Carroll & Ian A. Harris - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):586-592.
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  24.  7
    A Feminist Perspective on Stroke Rehabilitation: The Relevance of de Beauvoir's Theory.R. N. Kvigne & Ed D. Marit Kirkevold RN - 2002 - Nursing Philosophy 3 (2):79–89.
  25.  2
    Rehabilitation Services Following Total Joint Replacement: A Qualitative Analysis of Key Processes and Structures to Decrease Length of Stay and Increase Surgical Volumes in Ontario, Canada.Carol Fancott, Susan Jaglal, Victoria Quan, Katherine Berg, Cheryl A. Cott, Aileen Davis, John Flannery, Gillian Hawker, Michel D. Landry, Nizar N. Mahomed & Elizabeth Badley - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (4):724-730.
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  26.  2
    Braces, Wheelchairs, and Iron Lungs: The Paralyzed Body and the Machinery of Rehabilitation in the Polio Epidemics.Daniel J. Wilson - 2005 - Journal of Medical Humanities 26 (2-3):173-190.
    The successful fund raising appeals of the March of Dimes employed images of cute crippled children standing on braces and forearm crutches, sitting in wheelchairs, or confined to iron lungs. Those who had to use these devices as a result of polio, however, were often stigmatized as cripples. American cultural antipathy to these assistive devices meant that polio survivors often had to overcome an emotional and psychological resistance to using them. Whatever their fears, polio survivors quickly discovered the functionality of (...)
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  27.  1
    The Influence of Objective Measurement Tools on Communication and Clinical Decision Making in Neurological Rehabilitation.Sarah F. Tyson, Joanne Greenhalgh, Andrew F. Long & Robert Flynn - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):216-224.
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  28.  9
    Embodiment and Chronic Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation Practice. [REVIEW]Jennifer Bullington - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (2):100-109.
    Throughout the Western world people turn towards the health care system seeking help for a variety of psychosomatic/psychosocial health problems. They become “patients” and find themselves within a system of practises that conceptualizes their bodies as “objective” bodies, treats their ill health in terms of the malfunctioning machine, and compartmentalizes their lived experiences into medically interpreted symptoms and signs of underlying biological dysfunction. The aim of this article is to present an alternative way of describing ill health and rehabilitation (...)
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  29.  52
    Patients' Dignity in a Rehabilitation Ward: Ethical Challenges for Nursing Staff.Aase Stabell & Dagfinn Nåden - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (3):236-248.
    The purpose of this study was to explore the challenges met by nursing staff in a rehabilitation ward. The overall design was qualitative: data were derived from focus interviews with groups of nurses and analyzed from a phenomenological-hermeneutic perspective. The main finding was that challenges emerge on two levels of ethics and rationality: an economic/administrative level and a level of care. An increase in work-load and the changing potential for patient rehabilitation influence the care that nurses can provide (...)
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  30.  2
    Criminal Rehabilitation Through Medical Intervention : Moral Liability and the Right to Bodily Integrity.Thomas Douglas - unknown
    Criminal offenders are sometimes required, by the institutions of criminal justice, to undergo medical interventions intended to promote rehabilitation. Ethical debate regarding this practice has largely proceeded on the assumption that medical interventions may only permissibly be administered to criminal offenders with their consent. In this article I challenge this assumption by suggesting that committing a crime might render one morally liable to certain forms of medical intervention. I then consider whether it is possible to respond persuasively to this (...)
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  31.  5
    Justifications for Non-­Consensual Medical Intervention: From Infectious Disease Control to Criminal Rehabilitation.Jonathan Pugh & Thomas Douglas - 2016 - Criminal Justice Ethics 35 (3):205-229.
    A central tenet of medical ethics holds that it is permissible to perform a medical intervention on a competent individual only if that individual has given informed consent to the intervention. However, in some circumstances it is tempting to say that the moral reason to obtain informed consent prior to administering a medical intervention is outweighed. For example, if an individual’s refusal to undergo a medical intervention would lead to the transmission of a dangerous infectious disease to other members of (...)
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  32.  4
    The Beautiful Jew is a Moneylender: Money and Individuality in Simmel's Rehabilitation of the `Jew'.Amos Morris-Reich - 2003 - Theory, Culture and Society 20 (4):127-142.
    This article contends that Georg Simmel attempted a rehabilitation of the Jewish stereotype in a singular way: via his theory of modernity and the quintessential place held therein by money. The first part of the article, based almost entirely on Simmel's The Philosophy of Money, seeks to demonstrate that Simmel intended to overturn the negative Aristotelian and Marxist assessments of money and of those who deal with it. The second part of the article is based on Simmel's unique theory (...)
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  33.  21
    Offender Rehabilitation: Current Problems and Ethically Informed Approaches to Intervention.Andrew Day - 2011 - Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (4):348-360.
    Rehabilitation programmes are widely offered to offenders in custodial and community settings around the world. Despite the existence of a large evidence base that identifies features of effective practice, levels of programme integrity remain low and are widely believed to undermine successful rehabilitation. In this paper it is suggested that conceptualising rehabilitation as a moral activity which involves assisting offenders to make better ethical decisions is one way to address some of the difficulties in the delivery of (...)
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  34.  11
    The Rehabilitation of Indigenous Environmental Ethics in Africa.W. Kelbessa - 2005 - Diogenes 52 (3):17-34.
    This article explores the rehabilitation of the ethical dimension of human interactions with nature, using cross-cultural perspectives in Africa. Cross-cultural comparison of indigenous concepts of the relationship between people and nature with contemporary environmental and scientific issues facilitate the rehabilitation, renewal and validation of indigenous environmental ethics. Although increasing attention is being given to the environmental concerns of non-western traditions, most of the related research has centered on Asia, Native American Indians and Australian Aborigines with little attention being (...)
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  35.  2
    Self-Control in Responsibility Enhancement and Criminal Rehabilitation.Polaris Koi, Susanne Uusitalo & Jarno Tuominen - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-18.
    Ethicists have for the past 20 years debated the possibility of using neurointerventions to improve intelligence and even moral capacities, and thereby create a safer society. Contributing to a recent debate concerning neurointerventions in criminal rehabilitation, Nicole Vincent and Elizabeth Shaw have separately discussed the possibility of responsibility enhancement. In their ethical analyses, enhancing a convict’s capacity responsibility may be permissible. Both Vincent and Shaw consider self-control to be one of the constituent mental capacities of capacity responsibility. In this (...)
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  36.  2
    Rehabilitation of Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.Joseph T. Giacino - 2005 - In Walter M. High Jr, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.), Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press. pp. 305--337.
  37.  27
    Rancière, Kristeva and the Rehabilitation of Political Life.Georganna Ulary - 2011 - Thesis Eleven 106 (1):23-38.
    The start of the 21st century has seen the very concept of the political become devalued, and the body-politic has become a casualty of the nihilism and neurosis afflicting western cultures. Kristeva’s call for the rehabilitation of public life, of the political, and for the rethinking of freedom, it seems, comes at the right time. Her proposed politics of revolt and Rancière’s radically democratic politics of the no-part are valuable attempts to effect such a rehabilitation. By turning to (...)
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  38.  49
    Gadamer, Aesthetic Modernism, and the Rehabilitation of Allegory: The Relevance of Paul Klee.Stephen H. Watson - 2004 - Research in Phenomenology 34 (1):45-72.
    Paul Klee's art found broad impact upon philosophers of varying commitments, including Hans-Georg Gadamer. Moreover, Klee himself was not only one of the most important artists of aesthetic modernism but one of its leading theoreticians, and much in his work, as in Gadamer's, originated in post-Kantian literary theory's explications of symbol and allegory. Indeed at one point in Truth and Method, Gadamer associates his project for a general "theory of hermeneutic experience" not only with Goethe's metaphysical account of the symbolic (...)
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  39.  19
    History of Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury.Corwin Boake & Leonard Diller - 2005 - In Walter M. High Jr, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.), Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press.
  40.  7
    Ethical & Policy Issues in Rehabilitation Medicine.Arthur L. Caplan, Daniel Callahan & Janet Haas - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (4):1-20.
    The field of medical rehabilitation is relatively new.... Until recently, the ethical problems of this new field were neglected. There seemed to be more pressing concerns as rehabilitation medicine struggled to establish itself, sometimes in the face of considerable skepticism or hostility. There also seemed no pressing moral questions of the kind and intensity to be encountered, say, in high-technology acute care medicine or genetic engineering.... Those in biomedical ethics could and did easily overlook the quiet, less obtrusive (...)
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  41.  28
    A Postscript to Max Scheler's “On the Rehabilitation of Virtue”.Eugene Kelly - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):39-43.
    The translator of Scheler’s essay, “On the Rehabilitation of Virtue,” presents an account of the context of this essay in Scheler’s work and of its relevance to his concept of the ordo amoris and to his critique of Kant. The translator discusses the intended audience of the essay, its moral purpose, and the method of its procedure. The postscript further reflects on the essay’s central themes of humility and reverence, suggesting avenues for a critical assessment of Scheler’s conclusions. It (...)
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  42.  11
    Innovation: A Study in the Rehabilitation of a Concept.Benoît Godin - 2015 - Contributions to the History of Concepts 10 (1):45-68.
    For centuries, _innovation_ was a political and contested concept and linguistic weapon used against one's enemy. To support their case, opponents of innovation made use of arguments from ethos and pathos to give power and sustenance to their criticisms and to challenge the innovators. However, since the nineteenth century the arguments have changed completely. _Innovation_ gradually got rehabilitated. This article looks at one type of rehabilitation: the semantic rehabilitation. People started to reread history and to redescribe what _innovation_ (...)
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  43.  16
    The Emergence of Logical Formalization in the Philosophy of Religion: Genesis, Crisis, and Rehabilitation.Anders Kraal - 2013 - History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (4):351 - 366.
    The paper offers a historical survey of the emergence of logical formalization in twentieth-century analytically oriented philosophy of religion. This development is taken to have passed through three main ?stages?: a pioneering stage in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (led by Frege and Russell), a stage of crisis in the 1920s and early 1930s (occasioned by Wittgenstein, logical positivists such as Carnap, and neo-Thomists such as Maritain), and a stage of rehabilitation in the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s (...)
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  44.  9
    Ability, Dis-Ability and Rehabilitation: A Phenomenological Description.Robert S. Williams Jr - 1984 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):93-112.
    "Uprightness" was termed the "leitmotiv in the formation of the human organism" by Erwin Straus (1966, p. 139). He felt that without it the human being was certainly doomed to die. Yet, what happens with those who are deprived of their "uprightness" in either the literal or moral sense (as in "not to stoop to anything"), through becoming Dis-abled? Getting up, rising in opposition to the "other" (Allon) implies a moral dimension in the case of human Dis-ability which is tied (...)
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  45.  32
    The Importance of Environmental Justice in Stream Rehabilitation.Mick Hillman - 2004 - Ethics, Place and Environment 7 (1 & 2):19 – 43.
    New forms of river management have emerged following widespread recognition of the environmental damage caused by attempts to harness and control rivers for navigation, consumptive water use and power generation. A dominant top-down engineering-based paradigm is being challenged by catchment-framed, ecosystem-based approaches which claim to place greater emphasis on participation and equity. However, there has been limited attention given to examining these claims, and principles of justice are frequently left unarticulated or embedded in what is still presented as an essentially (...)
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  46.  7
    Image-Politics: Jean-Luc Nancy's Ontological Rehabilitation of the Image.Alison Ross - unknown
    Nancy's writing on the image may be understood as a critical engagement with the traditions of modern aesthetics and classical theories of art. However, the starting point for his approach to the image indicates that his writing on this topic has much wider ambitions than the treatment of a regional aesthetic topic. Nancy defines the image as a mode of access to sense. Nancy attempts an ontological rehabilitation of the image, which reiterates the precepts of his conception of being (...)
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  47.  1
    Help-Search Practices in Rehabilitation Team Meetings: A Sacksian Analysis.Hiroaki Izumi - 2017 - Human Studies 40 (3):439-468.
    Using Harvey Sacks’s concept of membership categorization devices, this article examines the help-search sequences in which Japanese rehabilitation team members use a set of categories to locate the availability of stroke family caregivers. Specifically, based on an analysis of audiovisual data from rehabilitation team conferences in Japan, the article illustrates the ways in which participants at the meetings: evaluate the expectable behaviors of various category incumbents; classify which category of person is proper to turn to for help; and (...)
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  48.  7
    Rehabilitation of Executive Function Impairments.Keith D. Cicerone - 2005 - In Walter M. High Jr, Angelle M. Sander, Margaret A. Struchen & Karen A. Hart (eds.), Rehabilitation for Traumatic Brain Injury. Oxford University Press. pp. 71--87.
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  49.  7
    Jaspers' Try of the Rehabilitation of the Idea of University.Marinko Lolic - 2009 - Filozofija I Društvo 20 (3):41-59.
    Author is into discussion of Jaspers' perception of the crisis idea of university and his try to mane a rehabilitation of his idea in his texts from 1923 and 1945. Author shows that Jaspers in his discussing idea of university count on while derive from implicit sociology German idealism. For Jaspers the institutions are forms of objective spirit which can function only in live form of the achievement of idea which is interesting. As soon as spirit disappear, institution starts (...)
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  50.  4
    Heidegger and Derrida on the Nature of Questioning: Towards the Rehabilitation of Questioning in Contemporary Philosophy.Vincent Blok - 2015 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 46 (4):307-322.
    In this article, the Heidegger and Derrida controversy about the nature of questioning is revisited in order to rehabilitate questioning as an essential characteristic of contemporary philosophy. After exploring Heidegger's characterization of philosophy as questioning and Derrida's criticism of the primacy of questioning, we will evaluate Derrida's criticism and articulate three characteristics of Heidegger's concept of questioning. After our exploration of Heidegger's concept of questioning, we critically evaluate Heidegger's later rejection of questioning. With this, we not only contribute to the (...)
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