Results for 'replication'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Replicability or reproducibility? On the replication crisis in computational neuroscience and sharing only relevant detail.Marcin Miłkowski, Witold M. Hensel & Mateusz Hohol - 2018 - Journal of Computational Neuroscience 3 (45):163-172.
    Replicability and reproducibility of computational models has been somewhat understudied by “the replication movement.” In this paper, we draw on methodological studies into the replicability of psychological experiments and on the mechanistic account of explanation to analyze the functions of model replications and model reproductions in computational neuroscience. We contend that model replicability, or independent researchers' ability to obtain the same output using original code and data, and model reproducibility, or independent researchers' ability to recreate a model without original (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2. Why Replication is Overrated.Uljana Feest - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (5):895-905.
    Current debates about the replication crisis in psychology take it for granted that direct replication is valuable and focus their attention on questionable research practices in regard to statistical analyses. This paper takes a broader look at the notion of replication as such. It is argued that all experimentation/replication involves individuation judgments and that research in experimental psychology frequently turns on probing the adequacy of such judgments. In this vein, I highlight the ubiquity of conceptual and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  3.  46
    Replication, uncertainty and progress in comparative cognition.Alexandria Boyle - 2021 - Animal Behaviour and Cognition 8 (2):296-304.
    Replications are often taken to play both epistemic and demarcating roles in science: they provide evidence about the reliability of fields’ methods and, by extension, about which fields “count” as scientific. I argue that, in a field characterized by a high degree of theoretical openness and uncertainty, like comparative cognition, replications do not sit well in these roles. Like other experiments conducted under conditions of uncertainty, replications are often equivocal and open to interpretation. As a result, they are poorly placed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. The replicator in retrospect.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2000 - Biology and Philosophy 15 (3):403-423.
    The history and theoretical role of the concept of a ``replicator''is discussed, starting with Dawkins' and Hull's classic treatmentsand working forward. I argue that the replicator concept is still auseful one for evolutionary theory, but it should be revised insome ways. The most important revision is the recognition that notall processes of evolution by natural selection require thatsomething play the role of a replicator.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  5. Replicator II – judgement day.Paul E. Griffiths & Russell D. Gray - 1997 - Biology and Philosophy 12 (4):471-492.
    The Developmental Systems approach to evolution is defended against the alternative extended replicator approach of Sterelny, Smith and Dickison (1996). A precise definition is provided of the spatial and temporal boundaries of the life-cycle that DST claims is the unit of evolution. Pacé Sterelny et al., the extended replicator theory is not a bulwark against excessive holism. Everything which DST claims is replicated in evolution can be shown to be an extended replicator on Sterelny et al.s definition. Reasons are given (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  6. Replication without replicators.Bence Nanay - 2011 - Synthese 179 (3):455-477.
    According to a once influential view of selection, it consists of repeated cycles of replication and interaction. It has been argued that this view is wrong: replication is not necessary for evolution by natural selection. I analyze the nine most influential arguments for this claim and defend the replication–interaction conception of selection against these objections. In order to do so, however, the replication–interaction conception of selection needs to be modified significantly. My proposal is that replication (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  7. When “Replicability” is More than Just “Reliability”: The Hubble Constant Controversy.Vera Matarese & C. D. McCoy - manuscript
    We argue that the epistemic functions of replication in science are best understood by their role in assessing kinds of experimental error. Direct replications serve to assess the reliability of an experiment through its precision: the presence and degree of random error. Conceptual replications serve to assess the validity of an experiment through its accuracy: the presence and degree of systematic errors. To illustrate the aptness of this view, we examine the Hubble constant controversy in astronomy, showing how astronomers (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  24
    The replication crisis and philosophy.Wesley Buckwalter - 2022 - Philosophy and the Mind Sciences 3.
    The replication crisis is perceived by many as one of the most significant threats to the reliability of research. Though reporting of the crisis has emphasized social science, all signs indicate that it extends to many other fields. This paper investigates the possibility that the crisis and related challenges to conducting research also extend to philosophy. According to one possibility, philosophy inherits a crisis similar to the one in science because philosophers rely on unreplicated or unreplicable findings from science (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Replicability of Experiment.John D. Norton - 2015 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 30 (2):229.
    The replicability of experiment is routinely offered as the gold standard of evidence. I argue that it is not supported by a universal principle of replicability in inductive logic. A failure of replication may not impugn a credible experimental result; and a successful replication can fail to vindicate an incredible experimental result. Rather, employing a material approach to inductive inference, the evidential import of successful replication of an experiment is determined by the prevailing background facts. Commonly, these (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  10.  14
    Chromosome replication origins: Do we really need them?Bénédicte Michel & Rolf Bernander - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (6):585-590.
    Replication of the main chromosome in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii was recently reported to continue despite deletion of all active replication origins. Equally surprising, the deletion strain grew faster than the parent strain. It was proposed that origin‐less H. volcanii duplicate their chromosomes via recombination‐dependent replication. Here, we recall our present knowledge of this mode of chromosome replication in different organisms. We consider the likelihood that it accounts for the viability of H. volcanii deleted for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Replication Crisis is Less of a “Crisis” in Lakatos’ Philosophy of Science.Mark Rubin - manuscript
    Popper’s (1983, 2002) philosophy of science has enjoyed something of a renaissance in the wake of the replication crisis, offering a philosophical basis for the ensuing science reform movement. However, adherence to Popper’s approach may also be at least partly responsible for the sense of “crisis” that has developed following multiple unexpected replication failures. In this article, I contrast Popper’s approach with Lakatos’ (1978) approach and a related approach called naïve methodological falsificationism (NMF; Lakatos, 1978). The Popperian approach (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  65
    Replicability Crisis and Scientific Reforms: Overlooked Issues and Unmet Challenges.Mattia Andreoletti - 2020 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 33 (3):135-151.
    Nowadays, almost everyone seems to agree that science is facing an epistemological crisis – namely the replicability crisis – and that we need to take action. But as to precisely what to do or how...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13.  17
    Replication protein A prevents promiscuous annealing between short sequence homologies: Implications for genome integrity.Sarah K. Deng, Huan Chen & Lorraine S. Symington - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (3):305-313.
    Replication protein A (RPA) is the main eukaryotic single‐stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, having essential roles in all DNA metabolic reactions involving ssDNA. RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, thereby preventing the formation of secondary structures and protecting ssDNA from the action of nucleases, and directly interacts with other DNA processing proteins. Here, we discuss recent results supporting the idea that one function of RPA is to prevent annealing between short repeats that can lead to chromosome rearrangements by microhomology‐mediated (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  11
    DNA replication timing: Coordinating genome stability with genome regulation on the X chromosome and beyond.Amnon Koren - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (10):997-1004.
    Recent studies based on next‐generation DNA sequencing have revealed that the female inactive X chromosome is replicated in a rapid, unorganized manner, and undergoes increased rates of mutation. These observations link the organization of DNA replication timing to gene regulation on one hand, and to the generation of mutations on the other hand. More generally, the exceptional biology of the inactive X chromosome highlights general principles of genome replication. Cells may control replication timing by a combination of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  22
    Stalled replication forks: Making ends meet for recognition and stabilization.Hisao Masai, Taku Tanaka & Daisuke Kohda - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (8):687-697.
    In bacteria, PriA protein, a conserved DEXH‐type DNA helicase, plays a central role in replication restart at stalled replication forks. Its unique DNA‐binding property allows it to recognize and stabilize stalled forks and the structures derived from them. Cells must cope with fork stalls caused by various replication stresses to complete replication of the entire genome. Failure of the stalled fork stabilization process and eventual restart could lead to various forms of genomic instability. The low viability (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  35
    Replication, replication and replication: Some hard lessons from model alignment.Bruce Edmonds - unknown
    A published simulation model Riolo et al. 2001 ) was replicated in two independent implementations so that the results as well as the conceptual design align. This double replication allowed the original to be analysed and critiqued with confidence. In this case, the replication revealed some weaknesses in the original model, which otherwise might not have come to light. This shows that unreplicated simulation models and their results can not be trusted - as with other kinds of experiment, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  17.  12
    Replication and the Establishment of Scientific Truth.Seppo E. Iso-Ahola - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The idea of replication is based on the premise that there are permanent laws to be replicated and verified, and the scientific method is adequate for doing so. Scientific truth, however, is not absolute but relative to time and context, and the method used. Time and context are inextricably interwoven, in that time creates different contexts and contexts (e.g., Christmas Day vs. New Year’s Day) create different experiences of time, rendering psychological phenomena inherently variable. This means that internal and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Novelty versus Replicability: Virtues and Vices in the Reward System of Science.Felipe Romero - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):1031-1043.
    The reward system of science is the priority rule. The first scientist making a new discovery is rewarded with prestige, while second runners get little or nothing. Michael Strevens, following Philip Kitcher, defends this reward system, arguing that it incentivizes an efficient division of cognitive labor. I argue that this assessment depends on strong implicit assumptions about the replicability of findings. I question these assumptions on the basis of metascientific evidence and argue that the priority rule systematically discourages replication. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  19. The Replication Argument for Incompatibilism.Patrick Todd - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (6):1341-1359.
    In this paper, I articulate an argument for incompatibilism about moral responsibility and determinism. My argument comes in the form of an extended story, modeled loosely on Peter van Inwagen’s “rollback argument” scenario. I thus call it “the replication argument.” As I aim to bring out, though the argument is inspired by so-called “manipulation” and “original design” arguments, the argument is not a version of either such argument—and plausibly has advantages over both. The result, I believe, is a more (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20. Editorial: Replicability in Cognitive Science.Brent Strickland & Helen De Cruz - 2021 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 12 (1):1-7.
    This special issue on what some regard as a crisis of replicability in cognitive science (i.e. the observation that a worryingly large proportion of experimental results across a number of areas cannot be reliably replicated) is informed by three recent developments. -/- First, philosophers of mind and cognitive science rely increasingly on empirical research, mainly in the psychological sciences, to back up their claims. This trend has been noticeable since the 1960s (see Knobe, 2015). This development has allowed philosophers to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  21.  7
    DNA replication timing: Biochemical mechanisms and biological significance.Nicholas Rhind - 2022 - Bioessays 44 (11):2200097.
    The regulation of DNA replication is a fascinating biological problem both from a mechanistic angle—How is replication timing regulated?—and from an evolutionary one—Why is replication timing regulated? Recent work has provided significant insight into the first question. Detailed biochemical understanding of the mechanism and regulation of replication initiation has made possible robust hypotheses for how replication timing is regulated. Moreover, technical progress, including high‐throughput, single‐molecule mapping of replication initiation and single‐cell assays of replication (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  17
    Replicative nature of Indian research, essence of scientific temper, and future of scientific progress.A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh - 2003 - Mens Sana Monographs 1 (4):3.
    A lot of Indian research is replicative in nature. This is because originality is at a premium here and mediocrity is in great demand. But replication has its merit as well because it helps in corroboration. And that is the bedrock on which many a fancied scientific hypothesis or theory stands, or falls. However, to go from replicative to original research will involve a massive effort to restructure the Indian psyche and an all round effort from numerous quarters. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Changing order: replication and induction in scientific practice.Harry Collins - 1985 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    This fascinating study in the sociology of science explores the way scientists conduct, and draw conclusions from, their experiments. The book is organized around three case studies: replication of the TEA-laser, detecting gravitational rotation, and some experiments in the paranormal. "In his superb book, Collins shows why the quest for certainty is disappointed. He shows that standards of replication are, of course, social, and that there is consequently no outside standard, no Archimedean point beyond society from which we (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   356 citations  
  24.  16
    Replication protein A: Single‐stranded DNA's first responder.Ran Chen & Marc S. Wold - 2014 - Bioessays 36 (12):1156-1161.
    Replication protein A (RPA), the major single‐stranded DNA‐binding protein in eukaryotic cells, is required for processing of single‐stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates found in replication, repair, and recombination. Recent studies have shown that RPA binding to ssDNA is highly dynamic and that more than high‐affinity binding is needed for function. Analysis of DNA binding mutants identified forms of RPA with reduced affinity for ssDNA that are fully active, and other mutants with higher affinity that are inactive. Single molecule studies (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The extended replicator.Kim Sterelny, Kelly C. Smith & Michael Dickison - 1996 - Biology and Philosophy 11 (3):377-403.
    This paper evaluates and criticises the developmental systems conception of evolution and develops instead an extension of the gene's eye conception of evolution. We argue (i) Dawkin's attempt to segregate developmental and evolutionary issues about genes is unsatisfactory. On plausible views of development it is arbitrary to single out genes as the units of selection. (ii) The genotype does not carry information about the phenotype in any way that distinguishes the role of the genes in development from that other factors. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   130 citations  
  26.  17
    Replication dynamics in fission and budding yeasts through DNA polymerase tracking.Enrique Vázquez & Francisco Antequera - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (10):1067-1073.
    The dynamics of eukaryotic DNA polymerases has been difficult to establish because of the difficulty of tracking them along the chromosomes during DNA replication. Recent work has addressed this problem in the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the engineering of replicative polymerases to render them prone to incorporating ribonucleotides at high rates. Their use as tracers of the passage of each polymerase has provided a picture of unprecedented resolution of the organization of replicons and replication origins (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  10
    Replicability. Politics and Poetics of Accountability, Validation and Legitimation.Giampietro Gobo - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Replicability is a term that not only comes with different meanings in the literature of many domains but is often associated or confused with other terms such as ‘reproducibility,’ ‘repeatability,’ ‘reliability,’ ‘validity,’ and so on. To add to the confusion, it can even be used differently across diverse disciplines. Though all named concepts are important, what makes them barely advantageous is that they do not cover some peculiar aspects of the replicability and validation processes, i.e., appropriateness of conceptualization; trustworthiness of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  10
    Understanding replication fork progression, stability, and chromosome fragility by exploiting the Suppressor of Underreplication protein.Jared T. Nordman & Terry L. Orr-Weaver - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (8):856-861.
    There are many layers of regulation governing DNA replication to ensure that genetic information is accurately transmitted from mother cell to daughter cell. While much of the control occurs at the level of origin selection and firing, less is known about how replication fork progression is controlled throughout the genome. In Drosophila polytene cells, specific regions of the genome become repressed for DNA replication, resulting in underreplication and decreased copy number. Importantly, underreplicated domains share properties with common (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  24
    Replication stress, a source of epigenetic aberrations in cancer?Zuzana Jasencakova & Anja Groth - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (10):847-855.
    Cancer cells accumulate widespread local and global chromatin changes and the source of this instability remains a key question. Here we hypothesize that chromatin alterations including unscheduled silencing can arise as a consequence of perturbed histone dynamics in response to replication stress. Chromatin organization is transiently disrupted during DNA replication and maintenance of epigenetic information thus relies on faithful restoration of chromatin on the new daughter strands. Acute replication stress challenges proper chromatin restoration by deregulating histone H3 (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Epistemic Functions of Replicability in Experimental Sciences: Defending the Orthodox View.Michał Sikorski & Mattia Andreoletti - 2023 - Foundations of Science.
    Replicability is widely regarded as one of the defining features of science and its pursuit is one of the main postulates of meta-research, a discipline emerging in response to the replicability crisis. At the same time, replicability is typically treated with caution by philosophers of science. In this paper, we reassess the value of replicability from an epistemic perspective. We defend the orthodox view, according to which replications are always epistemically useful, against the more prudent view that claims that it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Evolution of Genetic Information without Error Replication.Guenther Witzany - 2020 - In Theoretical Information Studies. Singapur: pp. 295-319.
    Darwinian evolutionary theory has two key terms, variations and biological selection, which finally lead to survival of the fittest variant. With the rise of molecular genetics, variations were explained as results of error replications out of the genetic master templates. For more than half a century, it has been accepted that new genetic information is mostly derived from random error-based events. But the error replication narrative has problems explaining the sudden emergence of new species, new phenotypic traits, and genome (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. What is the Replication Crisis a Crisis of?Uljana Feest - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science:1-11.
    In recent debates about the replication crisis, two positions have been dominant: one that focuses on methodological reforms and one that focuses on theory building. This paper takes up the suggestion that there might be a deeper difference in play, concerning the ways the very subject matter of psychology is construed by opposing camps, i.e., in terms of stable effects versus in terms of complexity. I argue that each gets something right, but neither is sufficient. My analysis suggests that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  12
    Scientific Replicability: Two Cases of Study in Laser Physics.Vicente Aboites & Yuri Barmenkov - 2022 - Open Journal of Philosophy 12 (4):510-522.
    One of the most important characteristics of modern science is its replicability and objectivity. This means that a scientific result is taken as such only when it has been reproduced by other scientists. Indeed, the replicability of a scientific result in an objective and independent way by members of a scientific community is the cornerstone of science. Experimental laser physics is an example of “normal” science, where it is no doubt that the phenomenon could be replicated; however, the replication (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  12
    Replication Fork Barriers and Topological Barriers: Progression of DNA Replication Relies on DNA Topology Ahead of Forks.Jorge B. Schvartzman, Pablo Hernández & Dora B. Krimer - 2020 - Bioessays 42 (5):1900204.
    During replication, the topology of DNA changes continuously in response to well‐known activities of DNA helicases, polymerases, and topoisomerases. However, replisomes do not always progress at a constant speed and can slow‐down and even stall at precise sites. The way these changes in the rate of replisome progression affect DNA topology is not yet well understood. The interplay of DNA topology and replication in several cases where progression of replication forks reacts differently to changes in DNA topology (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  28
    Two Replication Studies of a Time-Reversed (Psi) Priming Task and the Role of Expectancy in Reaction Times.Marilyn Schlitz, Daryl Bem, David Marcusson-Clavertz, Etzel Cardena, Jennifer Lyke, Raman Grover, Susan Blackmore, Patrizio Tressoldi, Serena Roney-Dougal, Dick Bierman, Jacob Jolij, Eva Lobach, Glenn Hartelius, Thomas Rabeyron, William Bengston, Sky Nelson, Garret Moddel & Arnaud Delorme - 2021 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 35 (1):65-90.
    Two experiments involving an international collaboration of experimenters sought to replicate and extend a previously published psi experiment on precognition by Daryl Bem that has been the focus of extensive research. The experiment reverses the usual cause–effect sequence of a standard psychology experiment using priming and reaction times. The preregistered confirmatory hypothesis is that response times to incongruent stimuli will be longer than response times to congruent stimuli even though the prime has not yet appeared when the participant records their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  6
    Replicating Cortical Signatures May Open the Possibility for “Transplanting” Brain States via Brain Entrainment.Alexander Poltorak - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    Brain states, which correlate with specific motor, cognitive, and emotional states, may be monitored with noninvasive techniques such as electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography that measure macroscopic cortical activity manifested as oscillatory network dynamics. These rhythmic cortical signatures provide insight into the neuronal activity used to identify pathological cortical function in numerous neurological and psychiatric conditions. Sensory and transcranial stimulation, entraining the brain with specific brain rhythms, can effectively induce desired brain states correlated with such cortical rhythms. Because brain states have distinct (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Incentivizing Replication Is Insufficient to Safeguard Default Trust.Hugh Desmond - 2021 - Philosophy of Science 88 (5):906-917.
    Philosophers of science and metascientists alike typically model scientists’ behavior as driven by credit maximization. In this article I argue that this modeling assumption cannot account for how scientists have a default level of trust in each other’s assertions. The normative implication of this is that science policy should not focus solely on incentive reform.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. What Is a Replication?Edouard Machery - 2020 - Philosophy of Science 87 (4):545-567.
    This article develops a new, general account of replication. I argue that a replication is an experiment that resamples the experimental components of an ori...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  39.  18
    Replicability and replication in the humanities.Rik Peels - 2019 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 4 (1).
    A large number of scientists and several news platforms have, over the last few years, been speaking of a replication crisis in various academic disciplines, especially the biomedical and social sciences. This paper answers the novel question of whether we should also pursue replication in the humanities. First, I create more conceptual clarity by defining, in addition to the term “humanities,” various key terms in the debate on replication, such as “reproduction” and “replicability.” In doing so, I (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  61
    The replicative model of evolution: A general theory.V. Csanyi - 1987 - World Futures 23 (1):31-65.
    Formulation of a general model of evolution is presented which is based upon the recognition of the ?biosocial? entity, that is the biosphere and human society, as a component?system. It can be demonstrated that the interactions of the components (moleculas, cells, organisms, ecosystems in the biological realms and people, artifacts and ideas in the societies) have replicative organization. We suggest an explanation for the spontaneous emergence of replicative function and organization, a process called autogenesis. During autogenesis, hierarchical levels of replicative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  41. Replicating Paintings.Matteo Ravasio - 2018 - Contemporary Aesthetics 16.
    In this paper, I discuss cases of replication in the visual arts, with particular focus on paintings. In the first part, I focus on painted copies, that is, manual reproductions of paintings created by artists. Painted copies are sometimes used for the purpose of aesthetic education on the original. I explore the relation between the creation of painted copies and their use as aesthetic surrogates of the original artwork and draw a positive conclusion on the aesthetic benefits of replica (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. What can Recent Replication Failures tell us about the Theoretical Commitments of Psychology?Stan Klein - 2014 - Theory and Psychology 24:326-338.
    I suggest that the recent, highly visible, and often heated debate over failures to replicate the results in the social sciences reveals more than the need for greater attention to the pragmatics and value of empirical falsification. It also is a symptom of a serious issue -- the underdeveloped state of theory in many areas of psychology. While I focus on the phenomenon of “social priming” -- since it figures centrally in current debate -- it is not the only area (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  43.  22
    Replication and the Experimental Ethnography of Science.Ryan Tweney - 2004 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 4 (3-4):731-758.
    The present paper attempts to define an experimental ethnography as an approach to the understanding of scientific thinking. Such an ethnography relies upon the replication of contemporary and historical scientific practices as a means of capturing the cultural and cognitive meanings of the practices in question. The approach is contrasted to the typical kind of laboratory experiment in psychology, and it is argued that replications of scientific practices can reveal dimensions of the microstructure of science and of its context (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  44. Replicative forgery.John Zeimbekis - 2004 - Art and Cognition Workshops.
    I argue that there is no distinction between allographic and autographic representations. One consequence of this is that replicative forgeries have the same aesthetic and artistic value as originals, and are accurate records of actions. I end with some reflections on the pragmatic structure of forgery.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  24
    Data replication matters to an underpowered study, but replicated hypothesis corroboration counts.Erich H. Witte & Frank Zenker - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
    Before replication becomes mainstream, the potential for generating theoretical knowledge better be clear. Replicating statistically significant nonrandom data shows that an original study made a discovery; replicating a specified theoretical effect shows that an original study corroborated a theory. Yet only in the latter case is replication a necessary, sound, and worthwhile strategy.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  20
    A new concept of replication.Vera Matarese - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    The replication crisis has spawned discussions on the meaning of replication. In fact, in order to determine whether an experiment fails to replicate, it is necessary to establish what replication is. This is, however, a difficult task, as it is possible to attribute different meanings to it. This paper offers a solution to this problem of ambiguity by engineering a concept of replication that, if compared to other proposals, stands out for being not only broadly applicable (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  70
    Replicate after reading: on the extraction and evocation of cultural information.Maarten Boudry - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (3-4):27.
    Does cultural evolution happen by a process of copying or replication? And how exactly does cultural transmission compare with that paradigmatic case of replication, the copying of DNA in living cells? Theorists of cultural evolution are divided on these issues. The most important objection to the replication model has been leveled by Dan Sperber and his colleagues. Cultural transmission, they argue, is almost always reconstructive and transformative, while strict ‘replication’ can be seen as a rare limiting (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  48.  25
    Replication Is for Meta-Analysis.Samuel C. Fletcher - 2022 - Philosophy of Science 89 (5):960-969.
    The role or function of experimental and observational replication within empirical science has implications for how replication should be measured. Broadly, there seems to be consensus that replication’s central goal is to confirm or vouchsafe the reliability of scientific findings. I argue that if this consensus is correct, then most of the measures of replication used in the scientific literature are actually poor indicators of this reliability or confirmation. Only meta-analytic measures of replication align functionally (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  59
    Epigenomic replication: Linking epigenetics to DNA replication.Adrian J. McNairn & David M. Gilbert - 2003 - Bioessays 25 (7):647-656.
    The information contained within the linear sequence of bases (the genome) must be faithfully replicated in each cell cycle, with a balance of constancy and variation taking place over the course of evolution. Recently, it has become clear that additional information important for genetic regulation is contained within the chromatin proteins associated with DNA (the epigenome). Epigenetic information also must be faithfully duplicated in each cell cycle, with a balance of constancy and variation taking place during the course of development (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  6
    Replication origins in yeast chromosomes.Stephen Kearsey - 1986 - Bioessays 4 (4):157-161.
    DNA replication initiates at many sites in eukaryotic chromosomes. It has been difficult to isolate such replication origins, but a family of sequences from the yeast genome have properties which suggest that they may serve this function. The identification of these sequences together with sophisticated methods of genetic analysis, make yeast a useful organism for the study of eukaryotic DNA replication.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000