Results for 'reproductive ethics'

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  1.  74
    Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India.Malene Tanderup, Sunita Reddy, Tulsi Patel & Birgitte Bruun Nielsen - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):491-501.
    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical (...)
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  2. Reproduction, Ethics and the Law: Feminist Perspectives.D. Dickenson - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (5):329-329.
    Review of Joan Callahan, Reproduction, Ethics and the Law: Feminist Perspectives.
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  3.  8
    Reproductive Ethics: Introduction.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher - 2018 - In Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher (eds.), Reproductive Ethics Ii: New Ideas and Innovations. Springer Verlag. pp. 1-5.
    Until quite recently human reproduction was considered an entirely natural process, and the ethics of reproduction were governed more by cultural mores and religious strictures than by any serious philosophical or empirical inquiry. However, more recently reproductive ethics has exploded as a field for several reasons. At a cultural level, many things taken for granted a generation ago, including the increasing medicalization of birth and the heteronormative two-parent nuclear family, have been challenged, and new possibilities have arisen (...)
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  4.  7
    Reproductive Ethics: New Challenges and Conversations.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher (eds.) - 2017 - Springer.
    This book summarizes the contributions at an April 2016 conference held at Albany Medical College, Reproductive Ethics: New Challenges and Conversations. Reproductive ethics does not suffer from a lack of challenging issues, yet a few "hot button" issues such as abortion and surrogacy seem to attract most of the attention, while other issues and dilemmas remain relatively underdeveloped in bioethics literature. The goal of this book is to explore and expand the range of topics addressed in (...)
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  5.  7
    Reproductive Ethics Ii: New Ideas and Innovations.Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Paul Burcher (eds.) - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    This book is the second collection of essays on reproductive ethics from Drs. Campo-Engelstein and Burcher. This volume is unique in that it is both timely and includes several essays on new technologies, while also being a comprehensive review of most of the major questions in the field, from racial disparities in reproductive healthcare to gene editing and the possibility of the creation of a transhuman species. The scholars writing these essays are pre-eminent in their fields, and (...)
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  6.  20
    Women and new reproductive.New Reproductive - 1992 - In Helen B. Holmes & Laura Martha Purdy (eds.), Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press. pp. 695--167.
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  7. The King Was Pregnant: Reproductive Ethics and Transgender Pregnancy.Jill Drouillard - 2021 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 14 (1):120-140.
    Using Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness as an inspirational backdrop, a novel whose story unfolds on a genderless planet that nevertheless relies on reproductive sex for the sake of generativity, this paper tackles the sex/gender debate, its entanglements with procreation, and its consequences for transgender pregnancies. More specifically, I analyze three issues that pose barriers to thinking about a more inclusive reproductive ethics: state-sanctioned sterilization, non-reproductive futurism, and access to assisted reproductive (...)
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  8. Human Enhancement and Reproductive Ethics on Generation Ships.Steven Umbrello & Maurizio Balistreri - forthcoming - Argumenta:1-15.
    The past few years has seen a resurgence in the public interest in space flight and travel. Spurred mainly by the likes of technology billionaires like Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, the topic poses both unique scientific as well as ethical challenges. This paper looks at the concept of generation ships, conceptual behemoth ships whose goal is to bring a group of human settlers to distant exoplanets. These ships are designed to host multiple generations of people who will be born, (...)
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  9.  71
    Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law: Feminist Perspectives.Joan C. Callahan (ed.) - 1995 - Indiana University Press.
    The. Metamorphosis. of. Motherhood. Patricia. Smith. Motherhood, as traditionally understood, is obsolete. It is not yet as obsolete as, say, knighthood, but it is moving just as inevitably in the same direction. No one wants to admit that, but it is ...
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  10. Reproductive ethics-Reply.T. Murray - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (1):5-5.
     
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  11. The metaphysical foundations of reproductive ethics.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):190-204.
    Many bioethicists working in reproductive ethics tacitly assume some theory of diachronic personal identity. For example, Peter Singer argues that there is no identity relation between a foetus and a future individual because the former shares no robust mental connections with the latter. Consequently, abortion prevents the existence of an individual; it does not destroy an already existing individual. Singer's argument implicitly appeals to the psychological account of personal identity, which, although endorsed by many philosophers such as Derek (...)
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  12.  18
    Reproductive ethics and the family.J. L. Nelson - 2000 - New Zealand Bioethics Journal 1 (1):4-10.
  13.  29
    Reproductive Ethics[REVIEW]C. Keith Boone, R. Snowden, G. D. Mitchell, E. M. Snowden, Robert H. Blank & Michael D. Bayles - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (4):46.
    Book reviewed in this article: Artificial Reproduction: A Social Investigation. By R. Snowden, G.D. Mitchell, and E. M. Snowden. Redefining Human Life: Reproductive Technologies and Social Policy. By Robert H. Blank. Reproductive Ethics. By Michael D. Bayles.
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  14.  18
    Reproduction, Ethics, and Public Policy: The Federal Sterilization Regulations.Rosalind Pollack Petchesky - 1979 - Hastings Center Report 9 (5):29-41.
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  15.  38
    Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law.Joan Callahan, Laura Purdy & Kathy Rudy - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  16.  18
    Lessons of Reproductive Ethics for Principlism.Morten Dige - 2019 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 1:5-20.
    This article brings together two debates in bioethics more substantively than has been the case until now. One is the methodological debate over "principlism," i.e., the theoretical framework for analyzing and solving ethical problems proposed by Beauchamp and Childress in Principles of Biomedical Ethics. The other is the normative debate about reproductive ethics, i.e., procreative rights and obligations in a time of pervasive opportunities for making detailed choices about the properties and capacities of future people. The obvious (...)
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  17.  35
    Catholic 'natural law' and reproductive ethics.Edward Collins Vacek - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (3):329-346.
    Catholic natural law has had a long and evolving interest in bioethics. Thomas Aquinas left natural law a legacy of great flexibility in evaluating goods within a whole life. He also bequeathed to the Church the basis for an abolutism on sexual issues. Modern reproductive medicine and a deeper understanding of human freedom have reopened these issues. The Vatican has developed new, holistic arguments to proscribe reproductive interventions, but critics remain unconvinced that marital relationships and goods have been (...)
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  18.  15
    Reproductive Ethics: Adaequatio and Dialogical Virtues.Stephen Napier - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 4 (S1).
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  19.  31
    The future of human reproduction : ethics, choice, and regulation.John Harris & Søren Holm (eds.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    The Future of Human Reproduction brings together new work, by an international group of contributors from various fields and perspectives, on ethical, social, and legal issues raised by recent advances in reproductive technology. These advances have put us in a position to choose what kindsof children and parents there should be; the aim of the essays is to illuminate how we should deal with these possibilities for choice. Topics discussed include gender and race selection, genetic engineering, fertility treatment, ovarian (...)
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  20.  31
    Reproduction, ethics, and the law: Feminist perspectives (book).Laura Benkov - 1996 - Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):265 – 267.
  21. Reproductive Ethics: Feminist and Non Feminist Approaches.Christine Overall - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Women and the Law 1 (2):271-278.
     
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  22.  27
    Global Principles, Local Obligations: Reproductive Ethics in Affluent Societies and Developing Countries.Peter F. Omonzejele - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):32-47.
    This essay is an intercultural dialogue in reproductive ethics. The paper, which argues from both developed and developing world perspectives, addresses the question of what should be done when confronted with the possibility of giving birth to a severely disabled child. The author argues that such a life should not be considered because of the economic circumstances in most developing countries. This is contrary to the view sometimes advanced in affluent societies that the prevention of such a birth (...)
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  23.  14
    The Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics.Leslie Francis (ed.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press.
    Intimate and medicalized, natural and technological, reproduction poses some of the most challenging ethical dilemmas of our time. This volume brings together scholars from multiple perspectives to address both traditional and novel questions about the rights and responsibilities of human reproducers, their caregivers, and the societies in which they live.
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  24.  7
    Reproductive Ethics.John A. Robertson - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (1):4.
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  25.  7
    The Metaphysical Foundations of Reproductive Ethics.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):190-204.
    abstract Many bioethicists working in reproductive ethics tacitly assume some theory of diachronic personal identity. For example, Peter Singer argues that there is no identity relation between a foetus and a future individual because the former shares no robust mental connections with the latter. Consequently, abortion prevents the existence of an individual; it does not destroy an already existing individual. Singer's argument implicitly appeals to the psychological account of personal identity, which, although endorsed by many philosophers such as (...)
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  26.  78
    What Does Queer Family Equality Have to Do with Reproductive Ethics?Amanda Roth - 2016 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (1):27-67.
    In this paper, I attempt to bring together two topics that are rarely put into conversation in the philosophical bioethics literature: lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer family equality on one hand, and, on the other, the morality of such alternative reproductive practices as artificial insemination by donor, egg donation, and surrogacy.2 In contrast to most of the philosophical bioethics literature on ARP, which has little to say about queer families, I will suggest that the ethics of ARP and (...)
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  27.  14
    Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law. [REVIEW]Jo Trigilio - 1997 - Teaching Philosophy 20 (3):343-346.
  28.  54
    What Are Parents For?: Reproductive Ethics after the Nonidentity Problem.Bernard G. Prusak - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (2):37-47.
    Bioethicists often use the “nonidentity problem”—the idea that a child born with a disability would actually be a different child if she were born without the disability—to defend parents' rights to have whatever children they want. After all, a child is not harmed by being brought into the world with a disability; without the disability, she would not be brought into the world at all. But what happens if we turn the moral question around and ask, not about the benefits (...)
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  29.  29
    Reproductive ethics in clinical practice: Preventing, initiating and managing pregnancy and delivery. Essays inspired by the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics Lecture Series. Chor, Julie and Watson, Katie. New York: Oxford University Press, 2021. 261 pp. $29.95 (Paperback), $99.00 (Hardcover). [REVIEW]Anne Drapkin Lyerly - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (9):999-1000.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 9, Page 999-1000, November 2022.
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  30.  38
    Reproductive Ethics and Frameworks for Ethics Education. [REVIEW]David T. Ozar - 1991 - Teaching Philosophy 14 (3):305-311.
  31.  33
    Reproductive Ethics Michael Bayles Philosophy of Medicine Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1984. Pp. 144. $9.95 paper. [REVIEW]Arthur Schafer - 1985 - Dialogue 24 (4):731-.
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  32.  57
    How useful is the concept of the ‘harm threshold’ in reproductive ethics and law?Anna Smajdor - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):321-336.
    In his book Reasons and Persons, Derek Parfit suggests that people are not harmed by being conceived with a disease or disability if they could not have existed without suffering that particular condition. He nevertheless contends that entities can be harmed if the suffering they experience is sufficiently severe. By implication, there is a threshold which divides harmful from non-harmful conceptions. The assumption that such a threshold exists has come to play a part in UK policy making. I argue that (...)
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  33. Overview: a framework for reproductive ethics.Carson Strong - 2002 - In Donna Dickenson (ed.), Ethical Issues in Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Cambridge University Press. pp. 17--36.
     
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  34.  19
    A trial of a reproductive ethics and law curriculum for obstetrics and gynaecology residents.Kavita Shah Arora - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (12):854-856.
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  35.  13
    Joan C. Callahan, Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law: Feminist Perspectives. [REVIEW]Anne Donchin - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (4):459-466.
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  36.  48
    Book review: Joan Callahan. Reproduction, ethics, and the law. Bloomington, in: Indiana university press, 1995 and Laura Purdy. Reproducing persons: Issues in feminist bioethics. And Kathy Rudy. Beyond pro-life and pro-choice. [REVIEW]Anita LaFrance Allen - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  37. Unintended Morally Determinative Aspects (UMDAs): Moral Absolutes, Moral Acts and Physical Features in Sexual and Reproductive Ethics.Anthony McCarthy - 2015 - Studia Philosophiae Christianae 51:47-65.
    Catholic sexual ethics proposes a number of exceptionless moral norms. This distinguishes it from theories which deny the possibility of any exceptionless moral norms (e.g. the proportionalist approach proposed in the aftermath of "Humanae Vitae" and condemned in "Veritatis Splendor"). I argue that Catholic teaching on sexual ethics refers to chosen physical structures in such a way as to make ‘new natural law’ theory inherently unstable. I outline a theory of “the moral act” (Veritatis Splendor 78) which emphasises (...)
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  38. AYLES, M. D.: "Reproductive Ethics". [REVIEW]H. Kuhse - 1985 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 63:249.
     
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  39.  54
    Ethics and Human Reproduction: A Feminist Analysis.Christine Overall - 1987 - Allen & Unwin.
    This book should be essential reading for anyone interested in the new reproductive technologies, biomedical ethics, and women's health.
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  40.  70
    Balancing animal welfare and assisted reproduction: ethics of preclinical animal research for testing new reproductive technologies.Verna Jans, Wybo Dondorp, Ellen Goossens, Heidi Mertes, Guido Pennings & Guido de Wert - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (4):537-545.
    In the field of medically assisted reproduction (MAR), there is a growing emphasis on the importance of introducing new assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) only after thorough preclinical safety research, including the use of animal models. At the same time, there is international support for the three R’s (replace, reduce, refine), and the European Union even aims at the full replacement of animals for research. The apparent tension between these two trends underlines the urgency of an explicit justification of the (...)
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  41.  22
    Reproduction and parenthood among lesbian couples in China: Legal and ethical perspectives.Huixian Fu & Yue Zhao - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    In China, neither reproduction and parenthood by lesbian couples nor their marital status are regulated or protected by law. In 2020, the first legal dispute in China involving a lesbian couple over custody of their joint baby was heard in court. This study examines the legal and ethical issues that lesbian couples confront when they decide to give birth to a child of their own. These challenges begin with regulatory restrictions on their lawful access to assisted reproductive technology and (...)
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  42. Sheila McLean and Gerry Maher, Medicine, Morals, and the Law; Michael Bayles, Reproductive Ethics; Douglas N. Walton, Ethics of Withdrawal of Life-Support Systems Reviewed by.Francis Myrna Kamm - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5 (4):168-173.
    Title: Medicine, Morals, and the LawPublisher: Gower Pub CoISBN: 0566005336Author: Sheila McLean and Gerry MaherTitle: Reproductive EthicsPublisher: Prentice HallISBN: 0137739044Author: Michael BaylesTitle: Ethics of Withdrawal of Life-Support SystemsPublisher: Praeger PaperbackISBN: 0275927105Author: Douglas N. Walton.
     
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  43.  26
    Creation Ethics: Reproduction, Genetics, and Quality of Life.David DeGrazia - 2012 - , US: Oxford University Press.
    Creation Ethics illuminates an array of issues in "reprogenetics" through the lens of moral philosophy. With novel frameworks for understanding prenatal moral status and human identity, David DeGrazia tackles the ethics of abortion and embryo research, genetic enhancement and prenatal genetic interventions, procreation and parenting, and obligations to future generations.
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  44.  35
    The return of the Inseminator: Eutelegenesis in past and contemporary reproductive ethics.John McMillan - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (2):393-410.
    Eugenicists in the 1930s and 1940s emphasised our moral responsibilities to future generations and the importance of positively selecting traits that would benefit humanity. In 1935 Herbert Brewer recommended ‘Eutelegenesis’ so that that future generations are not only protected from hereditary disease but also become more intelligent and fraternal than us. The development of these techniques for human use and animal husbandry was the catalyst for the cross fertilization of moral ideas and the development of a critical procreative morality. While (...)
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  45. Ethical Analysis of the Application of Assisted Reproduction Technologies in Biodiversity Conservation and the Case of White Rhinoceros ( Ceratotherium simum ) Ovum Pick-Up Procedures.Pierfrancesco Biasetti - 2022 - Frontiers in Veterinary Science 9.
    Originally applied on domestic and lab animals, assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) have also found application in conservation breeding programs, where they can make the genetic management of populations more efficient, and increase the number of individuals per generation. However, their application in wildlife conservation opens up new ethical scenarios that have not yet been fully explored. This study presents a frame for the ethical analysis of the application of ART procedures in conservation based on the Ethical Matrix (EM), and discusses (...)
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  46.  11
    The return of the Inseminator: Eutelegenesis in past and contemporary reproductive ethics.John Mcmillan - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (2):393-410.
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  47.  45
    Joan C. Callahan, reproduction, ethics, and the law: Feminist perspectives. [REVIEW]Anne Donchin - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (4):459-466.
  48.  6
    The Future of Human Reproduction: Ethics, Choice and Regulation: Edited by John Harris and Soren Holm, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1998, 254 pages, pound35.00. [REVIEW]Juliet Tizzard - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (4):294-295.
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  49.  55
    Commanding the “Be Fruitful and Multiply” Directive: Reproductive Ethics, Law, and Policy in Israel.Daniel Sperling - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (3):363-371.
    As of June 2009, Israel’s population was 7,424,400 people, 5,604,900 of which were Jewish, 1,502,400 were Arabs, and approximately 317,200 had no religion or are non-Arab Christians. Established in 1948, Israel is a highly urban and industrialized country. Its gross domestic product per capita is US$23,257, positioning it among the European developed countries. Life expectancy is 79 years for males and 82 years for females, with infant mortality rate of 4 cases per 1,000 live births. Of Israel’s GDP, 7.7% is (...)
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  50.  25
    The Moment One Begins to Have Parental Obligations and How this Matters to Reproductive Ethics.Alvin Chew - 2010 - Asian Bioethics Review 2 (1):82-86.
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