Results for 'resource allocation'

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  1.  7
    Fair Resource Allocation to Health Research: Priority Topics for Bioethics Scholarship.Pratt Bridget & A. Hyder Adnan - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):454-466.
    This article draws attention to the limited amount of scholarship on what constitutes fairness and equity in resource allocation to health research by individual funders. It identifies three key decisions of ethical significance about resource allocation that research funders make regularly and calls for prioritizing scholarship on those topics – namely, how health resources should be fairly apportioned amongst public health and health care delivery versus health research, how health research resources should be fairly allocated between (...)
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  2.  25
    What is so Important About Completing Lives? A Critique of the Modified Youngest First Principle of Scarce Resource Allocation.Espen Gamlund - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (2):113-128.
    Ruth Tallman has recently offered a defense of the modified youngest first principle of scarce resource allocation [1]. According to Tallman, this principle calls for prioritizing adolescents and young adults between 15–40 years of age. In this article, I argue that Tallman’s defense of the modified youngest first principle is vulnerable to important objections, and that it is thus unsuitable as a basis for allocating resources. Moreover, Tallman makes claims about the badness of death for individuals at different (...)
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  3.  27
    Understanding the Role of “the Hidden Curriculum” in Resource Allocation—The Case of the UK NHS.Veronika Wirtz, Alan Cribb & Nick Barber - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (4):295-300.
    In this paper we want to briefly illustrate the ways in which technical, ethical and political judgements of various kinds are interwoven in the processes of healthcare decision-making in the UK. Drawing upon the research for the “Choices in Health Care” project we will borrow the notion of the hidden curriculum from education to illuminate the nature of resource allocation decision processes. In particular we will indicate some of the fundamental but largely hidden political factors in play in (...)
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  4.  36
    Ethics of Resource Allocation: Instruments for Rational Decision Making in Support of a Sustainable Health Care.Claudia Wild - 2005 - Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):296-309.
    In all western countries health care budgets are under considerable constraint and therefore a reflection process has started on how to gain the most health benefit for the population within limited resource boundaries. The field of ethics of resource allocation has evolved only recently in order to bring some objectivity and rationality in the discussion. In this article it is argued that priority setting is the prerequisite of ethical resource allocation and that for purposes of (...)
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  5.  12
    Law, Patient's Rights and NHS Resource Allocation: Is Eurostar the Answer?Jean V. McHale - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (3):169-183.
    Historically attempts to use the courts as a means of challenging decisions to refuse NHS resources have met with little success. However two recent developments, that of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the development of European Union law through the application of Article 49 of the EC Treaty have provided the prospect for a challenge to this position. This article examines the impact of a recent case that of Watts v Bedford PCT in which a woman sought to by-pass (...)
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  6.  13
    Resource Allocation Towards Socioeconomic Rights: Lessons From Domestic Courts.Waruguru Kaguongo - 2012 - Human Rights Review 13 (1):85-105.
    The question of resource allocation is particularly pertinent to the realisation of socioeconomic rights. Perceptions of the place of resource allocation impact the adjudication of these rights. This article departs from the premise that with the adoption of the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural rights allowing individual communications and the establishment of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, there will be an increase in resource allocation questions (...)
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  7. Resource Allocation and the Duty to Give Reasons.John Stanton-Ife - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (3):145-156.
    In a much cited phrase in the famous English ‘Child B’ case, Mr Justice Laws intimated that in life and death cases of scarce resources it is not sufficient for health care decision-makers to ‘toll the bell of tight resources’: they must also explain the system of priorities they are using. Although overturned in the Court of Appeal, the important question remains of the extent to which health-care decision-makers have a duty to give reasons for their decisions. In this paper, (...)
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  8. Justified Commitments? Considering Resource Allocation and Fairness in Medecins Sans Frontieres-Holland.Lisa Fuller - 2006 - Developing World Bioethics 6 (2):59–70.
    Non-governmental aid programs are an important source of health care for many people in the developing world. Despite the central role non-governmental organizations (NGOs) play in the delivery of these vital services, for the most part they either lack formal systems of accountability to their recipients altogether, or have only very weak requirements in this regard. This is because most NGOs are both self-mandating and self-regulating. What is needed in terms of accountability is some means by which all the relevant (...)
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  9.  25
    Resource Allocation and Project Selection: Control of R & D Under Dynamic Process of Data Improvement.V. Z. Belenky & A. M. Belostotsky - 1989 - Theory and Decision 26 (1):1-35.
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  10.  33
    Vertical Equity in Health Care Resource Allocation.Gavin Mooney - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (3):203-215.
    This paper introduces this mini-series on vertical equity in health care. It reflects on the fact that by and large equity policies in health care have failed and that there is a need for positive discriminationto promote equity better in future. This positive discrimination is examined under the heading of`vertical equity'. The paper considers Varian's notion of 'envy' as a basis for equity in health care but concludes that this is not a helpful route to go down. Better it would (...)
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  11.  17
    Resource Allocation Within Australian Indigenous Communities: A Program for Implementing Vertical Equity. [REVIEW]Virginia Wiseman & Stephen Jan - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (3):217-233.
    Given the significant disparities in health and health related disadvantage between Aboriginal andnon-Aboriginal Australians, the application of somenotion of equity has a role to play in the formulationof policy with respect to Aboriginal health. Aboriginal andTorres Strait Islander has been abbreviated to Aboriginal. There has been considerable debate in Australia as to what the principles of equity should be. This paper discussesthe relevance of the principle of vertical equity (theunequal, but equitable, treatment of unequals) toAboriginal health funding. In particular, the (...)
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  12.  12
    Culture, Self-Rated Health and Resource Allocation Decision-Making.Virginia L. Wiseman - 1999 - Health Care Analysis 7 (3):207-223.
    It has been observed that some groups in society tend to report their health to be better than would be expected through more objective measures. The available evidence suggests that while variations in self-assessed measures of health may act as good proxies of mortality and morbidity in homogeneous populations, in some groups, such as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities of Australia, these subjective measures may provide a misleading picture. Useful insights into the formation of health perceptions can be (...)
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  13. On the Relevance of the Median Voter to Resource Allocation Amongst Jurisdictions.Santanu Gupta - 2003 - Gokhale Institute of Politics and Economics.
     
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  14.  16
    Health Care Resource Allocation: Complicating Ethical Factors at the Macro-Allocation Level. [REVIEW]Eike-Henner W. Kluge & Kimberley Tomasson - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (2):209-220.
    It is generally assumed that allocation problems in a socialized health care system result from limited resources and too much demand. Attempts at solutions have therefore centered in increasing efficiency, using evidence-based decision-making and on developing ways of balancing competing demands within the existing resource limitation. This article suggests that some of the difficulties in macro-allocation decision-making may result from the use of conflicting ethical perspectives by decision-makers. It presents evidence from a preliminary Canadian study to this (...)
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  15.  58
    Public Healthcare Resource Allocation and the Rule of Rescue.R. Cookson, C. McCabe & A. Tsuchiya - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):540-544.
    In healthcare, a tension sometimes arises between the injunction to do as much good as possible with scarce resources and the injunction to rescue identifiable individuals in immediate peril, regardless of cost (the “Rule of Rescue”). This tension can generate serious ethical and political difficulties for public policy makers faced with making explicit decisions about the public funding of controversial health technologies, such as costly new cancer drugs. In this paper we explore the appropriate role of the Rule of Rescue (...)
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  16.  28
    Reconstructionist Confucianism and Health Care: An Asian Moral Account of Health Care Resource Allocation.Ruiping Fan - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (6):675 – 682.
    In this article, I offer an abridged reconstruction of the foundational elements of Confucian moral commitments, which, I will argue, still provide the background moral substance for moral reflection in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, and Korea. The essay presents implications of Confucianism for establishing an appropriate health care system and critically assesses the features of current health polices in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. The goal is to offer a family-oriented, non-individualist account of resource allocation (...)
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  17.  6
    Accountability for Reasonableness: The Relevance, or Not, of Exceptionality in Resource Allocation.Amy Ford - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (2):217-227.
    Accountability for Reasonableness has gained international acceptance as a framework to assist with resource allocation within healthcare. Despite this, one of the four conditions, the relevance condition, has not been widely adopted. In this paper I will start by examining the relevance condition, and the constraints placed on it by Daniels and Sabin. Following this, I review the theoretical limitations of the condition identified to date, by prominent critics such as Rid, Friedman, Lauridsen and Lippert—Rasmussen. Finally, I respond (...)
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  18.  24
    'Economic Imperialism' in Health Care Resource Allocation – How Can Equity Considerations Be Incorporated Into Economic Evaluation?Andrea Klonschinski - 2014 - Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (2):158-174.
    That the maximization of quality-adjusted life years violates concerns for fairness is well known. One approach to face this issue is to elicit fairness preferences of the public empirically and to incorporate the corresponding equity weights into cost-utility analysis (CUA). It is thereby sought to encounter the objections by means of an axiological modification while leaving the value-maximizing framework of CUA intact. Based on the work of Lübbe (2005, 2009a, 2009b, 2010, forthcoming), this paper questions this strategy and scrutinizes the (...)
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  19.  9
    Paper One: Resource Allocation in Cancer Medicine: Invest Where the Benefits Are Clear. [REVIEW]John A. Green - 1996 - Health Care Analysis 4 (1):19-28.
    The future clearly lies in restricting the introduction of new treatments into medical practice unless they are beneficial and an improvement over existing compounds, together with a stepwise re-evaluation of current therapies. The days of analogue development which give 10% or 15% improvement in toxicity over existing compounds are no longer acceptable, and resources should be preserved for real advances. These may require support in their development, particularly at the randomised controlled trial level, by government or research institutions in collaboration (...)
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  20.  47
    Resource Allocation: A Plea for a Touch of Realism.P. Whitaker - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (3):129-131.
    The problem of resource allocation in health has stimulated much thought and research, in attempts to provide objective, rational methods by which necessary choices can be made. One such method was proposed in a paper in this journal. The authors argued for a utilitarian approach, which they claimed to demonstrate was acceptable to society at large. This paper argues that the evidence supporting such a claim was flawed; such a utilitarian approach is not socially acceptable, and is therefore (...)
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  21.  17
    Resource Allocation, Welfare Rights - Mapping the Boundaries of Judicial Control in Public Administrative Law.E. Palmer - 2000 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 20 (1):63-88.
    In a recent line of cases, senior judges in the UK have been called upon to adjudicate in complaints over the failure of health and local authorities to meet the welfare needs of citizens. Local authorities claimed that the disputes had been precipitated by a lack of resources allocated by central government to meet local demand. This article examines the role of the courts in resolving a fundamental tension between central government policy of financial cost-cutting on the one hand and (...)
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  22.  34
    The Veil of Ignorance and Health Resource Allocation.Carlos Soto - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (4):387-404.
    Some authors view the veil of ignorance as a preferred method for allocating resources because it imposes impartiality by stripping deliberators of knowledge of their personal identity. Using some prominent examples of such reasoning in the health care sector, I will argue for the following claims. First, choice behind a veil of ignorance often fails to provide clear guidance regarding resource allocation. Second, regardless of whether definite results could be derived from the veil, these results do not in (...)
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  23.  48
    Determining Public Policy and Resource Allocation Priorities for Mitigating Natural Hazards: A Capabilities-Based Approach.Colleen Murphy & Paolo Gardoni - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):489-504.
    This paper proposes a Capabilities -based Approach to guide hazard mitigation efforts. First, a discussion is provided of the criteria that should be met by an adequate framework for formulating public policy and allocating resources. This paper shows why a common decision-aiding tool, Cost-benefit Analysis, fails to fulfill such criteria. A Capabilities -based Approach to hazard mitigation is then presented, drawing on the framework originally developed in the context of development economics and policy. The focus of a Capabilities -based Approach (...)
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  24.  36
    Healthcare Resource Allocation and the 'Recovery of Virtue'.N. Messer - 2005 - Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (1):89-108.
    This paper maps the different levels of the problem of healthcare resource allocation — micro, macro and international — with reference to three cases. It is argued that two standard approaches to the issue of distributive justice in healthcare, the QALY (quality-adjusted life year) approach and the social-contract approach developed by Norman Daniels, are fundamentally unsatisfactory for reasons identified by Alasdair MacIntyre. Although the virtue theory articulated by MacIntyre and others has been influential in many areas of healthcare (...)
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  25.  5
    Substance in Bureaucratic Procedures for Healthcare Resource Allocation: A Reply to Smith.Gabriele Badano - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):75-76.
    William Smith’s recent article criticises the so-called orthodox approaches to the normative analysis of healthcare resource allocation, associated to the requirement that decision-makers should abide by strictly procedural principles of legitimacy defining a deliberative democratic process. Much of the appeal of Smith’s argument goes down to his awareness of real-world processes and, in particular, to the large gap he identifies between well-led democratic deliberation and the messiness of the process through which the intuitively legitimate Affordable Care Act was (...)
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  26.  29
    Quality of Life: The Contested Rhetoric of Resource Allocation and End-of-Life Decision Making.David Nantais & Mark Kuczewski - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):651 – 664.
    The term "quality of life" has a long history in the bioethics literature. It is usually used in one of two contexts: in resource allocation discussions in the hope of arriving at an objective measure of the worth of an intervention; and in end-of-life discussions as a concept that can justify the forgoing of life-sustaining treatment. In both contexts, the term has valid uses as it is meant to measure the efficacy of a treatment. However, the term has (...)
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  27.  25
    An Integrated Approach to Resource Allocation.Louise M. Terry - 2004 - Health Care Analysis 12 (2):171-180.
    Resource allocation decisions are often made on the basis of clinical and cost effectiveness at the expense of ethical inquiry into what is acceptable. This paper proposes that a more compassionate model of resource allocation would be achieved through integrating ethical awareness with clinical, financial and legal input. Where a publicly-funded healthcare system is involved, it is suggested that having an agency that focuses solely on cost-effectiveness leaving medical, legal and ethical considerations to others would help (...)
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  28.  51
    Ethics and Politics of Resource Allocation: The Role of Nursing.Margaret Keatings & Diana Dick - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (2-3):187 - 192.
    The use of ethics in everyday nursing practice will become increasingly important to the individual nurse, and nursing as a profession, as technology has a greater impact on health status and the provision of health care. Resource allocation is only one example of an ethical issue in which nursing must have input. Nursing can expand its contribution to society by ensuring that it plays a major role in shaping public policy and legislation. If nursing is to continue to (...)
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  29.  40
    Public Health Ethics: Resource Allocation and the Ethics of Legitimacy.Kristine Bærøe - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 4 (1).
    Public health ethics is a relatively new academic field. Crucially, it is distinguished from traditional medical ethics by its focus on populations rather than individuals. Still, the ethics of public health cannot be perceived completely detached from the ethics of individuals, as populations are made up of individuals. One issue that clearly falls within the intersection of a population- and an individual based perspective on ethics is resource allocation. Resource allocation takes place at various stages within (...)
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  30.  27
    Simple Rationality? The Law of Healthcare Resource Allocation in England.C. Foster - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (7):404-407.
    This paper examines the law relating to healthcare resource allocation in England. The National Health Service Act 1977 does not impose an absolute duty to provide specified healthcare services. The courts will only interfere with a resource allocation decision made by an NHS body if that decision is frankly irrational is engaged). Such irrationality is very difficult to establish. The ECHR has made no significant contribution to domestic English law in the arena of healthcare provision. The (...)
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  31.  26
    "Socialized Medicine", Resource Allocation and Two-Tiered Health Care – the Danish Experience.Søren Holm - 1995 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (6):631-637.
    This paper describes the present resource allocation problems in the Danish tax-based public health care system and presents an analysis of the two policy options put forward as a solution to these problems: (1) explicit rationing of services, and (2) the introduction of two-tiered health care. It is argued that a two-tiered system with a private second tier is unlikely to be acceptable and viable in Denmark, whereas an introduction of a second tier within the public system may (...)
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  32.  26
    Technology Assessment and Resource Allocation for Predictive Genetic Testing: A Study of the Perspectives of Canadian Genetic Health Care Providers.Alethea Adair, Robyn Hyde-Lay, Edna Einsiedel & Timothy Caulfield - 2009 - BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):6-.
    With a growing number of genetic tests becoming available to the health and consumer markets, genetic health care providers in Canada are faced with the challenge of developing robust decision rules or guidelines to allocate a finite number of public resources. The objective of this study was to gain Canadian genetic health providers' perspectives on factors and criteria that influence and shape resource allocation decisions for publically funded predictive genetic testing in Canada. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with (...)
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  33.  5
    Clinical Ethics as Partnership-or How an Ethical Guideline on Fair Resource-Allocation Can Be Developed and Implemented in the Clinic.Stella Reiter-Theil, Marcel Mertz, Heidi Albisser Schleger, Barbara Meyer-Zehnder, Reto W. Kressig & Hans Pargger - 2011 - Ethik in der Medizin 23 (2):93-105.
    Recently, ethical guidelines for clinical practice have gained increased popularity, but in order to become useful they require more pioneer’s work. Clinical-ethical guidelines need to be based on a scientific foundation and their practicability must be improved. We present and put to discussion the initial steps of the METAP Project about the development and practical implementation of a clinical-ethical guideline dedicated to a fair resource-allocation at the bedside. -/- With its methodological orientation, the project represents a guideline which (...)
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  34.  6
    Resource Expenditure Not Resource Allocation: Response to McDougall on Cloning and Dignity.M. J. Williams - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (5):330-334.
    This paper offers some comments on bioethical debates about resource allocation in healthcare. It is stimulated by Rosalind McDougall’s argument that it is an affront to the human dignity of people with below “liberties-level” health to fund human reproductive cloning. McDougall is right to underline the relevance of resource prioritisation to the ethics of research and provision of new biomedical technologies. This paper argues that bioethicists should be careful when offering comments about such issues. In particular, it (...)
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  35. Resource Allocation Mechanisms.Donald E. Campbell - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    Resource Allocation Mechanisms derives the general welfare properties of systems in which individuals are motivated by self-interest. Satisfactory outcomes will emerge only if individual incentives are harnessed by means of a communication and payoff process, or mechanism, involving every agent. Professor Campbell employs a formal and abstract model of a mechanism that brings into prominence the criteria by which the performance of an economy is to be judged. The mechanism approach is used to prove some fundamental theorems about (...)
     
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  36. The Economics of Resource Allocation in Health Care: Cost-Utility, Social Value, and Fairness.Andrea Klonschinski - 2016 - Routledge.
    The question of how to allocate scarce medical resources has become an important public policy issue in recent decades. Cost-Utility Analysis is the most commonly used method for determining the allocation of these resources, but this book counters the argument that overcoming its inherent imbalances is simply a question of implementing methodological changes. The Economics of Resource-Allocation in Healthcare represents the first comprehensive analysis of equity weighting in health care resource allocation that offers a fundamental (...)
     
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  37.  16
    Randomisation and Resource Allocation: A Missed Opportunity for Evaluating Health Care and Social Interventions.T. Toroyan - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (5):319-322.
    Equipoise is widely regarded to be an essential prerequisite for the ethical conduct of a randomised controlled trial. There are some circumstances however, under which it is acceptable to conduct a randomised controlled trial in the absence of equipoise. Limited access to the preferred intervention is one such circumstance. In this paper we present an example of a randomised trial in which access to the preferred intervention, preschool education, was severely limited by resource constraints. The ethical issues that arise (...)
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  38.  5
    Evaluation of Resource Allocation and Supply–Demand Balance in Clinical Practice with High‐Cost Technologies.Tetsuya Otsubo, Yuichi Imanaka, Jason Lee & Kenshi Hayashida - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (6):1114-1121.
    Japan has one of the highest numbers of high-cost medical devices installed relative to its population. While evaluations of the distribution of these devices traditionally involve simple population-based assessments, an indicator that includes the demand of these devices would more accurately reflect the situation. The purpose of this study was to develop an indicator of the supply–demand balance of such devices, using examples of magnetic resonance imaging scanners (MRI) and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripters (ESWL), and to investigate the relationship between this (...)
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  39.  41
    On the Axiomatics of Resource Allocation: Interpreting the Consistency Principle.William Thomson - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):385-421.
    An allocation rule is ‘consistent’ if the recommendation it makes for each problem ‘agrees’ with the recommendation it makes for each associated reduced problem, obtained by imagining some agents leaving with their assignments. Some authors have described the consistency principle as a ‘fairness principle’. Others have written that it is not about fairness, that it should be seen as an ‘operational principle’. We dispute the particular fairness interpretations that have been offered for consistency, but develop a different and important (...)
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  40.  23
    Which Orphans Will Find a Home? The Rule of Rescue in Resource Allocation for Rare Diseases.Emily A. Largent & Steven D. Pearson - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 42 (1):27-34.
    The rule of rescue describes the moral impulse to save identifiable lives in immediate danger at any expense. Think of the extremes taken to rescue a small child who has fallen down a well, a woman pinned beneath the rubble of an earthquake, or a submarine crew trapped on the ocean floor. No effort is deemed too great. Yet should this same moral instinct to rescue, regardless of cost, be applied in the emergency room, the hospital, or the community clinic? (...)
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  41. Quality of Life and Resource Allocation.Michael Lockwood - 1988 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 23:33-55.
    A new word has recently entered the British medical vocabulary. What it stands for is neither a disease nor a cure. At least, it is not a cure for a disease in the medical sense. But it could, perhaps, be thought of as an intended cure for a medicosociological disease: namely that of haphazard or otherwise ethically inappropriate allocation of scarce medical resources. What I have in mind is the term ‘QALY’, which is an acronym standing for quality adjusted (...)
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  42.  5
    The Soft Constraints Hypothesis: A Rational Analysis Approach to Resource Allocation for Interactive Behavior.Wayne D. Gray, Chris R. Sims, Wai-Tat Fu & Michael J. Schoelles - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (3):461-482.
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  43.  27
    Evidence-Based Medicine: A New Tool for Resource Allocation?Rui Nunes - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):297-301.
    Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is defined as the conscious, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. The greater the level of evidence the greater the grade of recommendation. This pioneering explicit concept of EBM is embedded in a particular view of medical practice namely the singular nature of the patient-physician relation and the commitment of the latter towards a specific goal: the treatment and the well being of his or her client. Nevertheless, (...)
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  44.  17
    Resource Allocation in Health Care: Health Economics and Beyond.Craig Mitton & Cam Donaldson - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (3):245-257.
    As resources in health care are scarce, managers and clinicians must make difficult choices about what to fund and what not to fund. At the level of a regional health authority, limited approaches to aid decision makers in shifting resources across major service portfolios exist. A participatory action research project was conducted in the Calgary Health Region. Through five phases of action, including observation of senior management meetings, as well as two sets of one-on-one interviews and two focus groups, an (...)
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  45.  11
    Rectifying Social Inequalities in a Resource Allocation Task.Laura Elenbaas, Michael T. Rizzo, Shelby Cooley & Melanie Killen - 2016 - Cognition 155:176-187.
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  46.  23
    Courts, Expertise and Resource Allocation: Is There a Judicial 'Legitimacy Problem'?Keith Syrett - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (2):112-122.
    Courts are increasingly obliged to adjudicate upon challenges to allocative decisions in healthcare, but their involvement continues to be regarded with unease, imperilling the legitimacy of the judicial role in this context. A central reason for this is that judges are perceived to lack sufficient expertise to determine allocative questions. This article critically appraises the claim of lack of judicial expertise through an examination of the various components of a limit-setting decision. It is argued that the inexpertise argument is weak (...)
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  47.  90
    Disability, Status Enhancement, Personal Enhancement and Resource Allocation.Jonathan Wolff - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):49-68.
    It often appears that the most appropriate form of addressing disadvantage related to disability is through policies that can be called “status enhancements”: changes to the social, cultural and material environment so that the difficulties experienced by those with impairments are reduced, even eradicated. However, status enhancements can also have their limitations. This paper compares the relative merits of policies of status enhancement and “personal enhancement”: changes to the disabled person. It then takes up the question of how to assess (...)
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  48.  4
    Asymmetrical Reasons, Newborn Infants, and Resource Allocation.Dominic Wilkinson & Dean Hayden - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (8):13-15.
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  49.  22
    Attentional Resource Allocation to Emotional Events: An ERP Study.Jörg Meinhardt & Reinhard Pekrun - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (3):477-500.
  50.  19
    Ageing, Justice and Resource Allocation.Tom Walker - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (6):348-352.
    Around the world, the population is ageing in ways that pose new challenges for healthcare providers. To date these have mostly been formulated in terms of challenges created by increasing costs, and the focus has been squarely on life-prolonging treatments. However, this focus ignores the ways in which many older people require life-enhancing treatments to counteract the effects of physical and mental decline. This paper argues that in doing so it misses important aspects of what justice requires when it comes (...)
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