Results for 'right not to be a mother'

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  1. Is There a Right to the Death of the Foetus?Eric Mathison & Jeremy Davis - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):313-320.
    At some point in the future – perhaps within the next few decades – it will be possible for foetuses to develop completely outside the womb. Ectogenesis, as this technology is called, raises substantial issues for the abortion debate. One such issue is that it will become possible for a woman to have an abortion, in the sense of having the foetus removed from her body, but for the foetus to be kept alive. We argue that while there is a (...)
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  2. What’s Love Got to Do with It? Why a Child Does Not Have a Right to Be Loved.Mhairi Cowden - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):325-345.
    It is often stated in international and domestic legal documents that children have a right to be loved. Yet there is very little explanation of why this right exists or what it entails. Matthew Liao has recently sought to provide such an explanation by arguing that children have a right to be loved as a human right. I will examine Liao?s explanation and in turn argue that children do not have a right to be loved. (...)
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  3.  26
    The Right Not to Be a Genetic Parent?I. Glenn Cohen - manuscript
    Should the law recognize an individual's right not to be a genetic parent when genetic parenthood does not carry with it legal or gestational parenthood? If so, should we allow individuals to waive that right in advance, either by contract or a less formal means? How should the law's treatment of gestational and legal parenthood inform these questions? Developments in reproductive technology have brought these questions to the fore, most prominently in the preembryo disposition cases a number of (...)
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  4.  22
    Is There a "Right Not to Be Born"? Reproductive Decision Making, Options and the Right to Information.J. Savulescu - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):65-67.
    An Indian Court recently awarded 50,000 rupees damages to a couple who gave birth to their fourth daughter. The couple were mistakenly told they were carrying a male fetus. The doctor mistook a section of the umbilical cord for a penis. The husband said: “We are already struggling to raise three children. This was a big sacrifice for us to have a fourth child. We would have had an abortion if we had known it was a girl”. The cost of (...)
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  5.  53
    A Human Right Not to Be Punished? Punishment as Derogation of Rights.J. D. Shepherd - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (1):31-45.
    In this essay, I apply international human rights theory to the domestic discussion of criminalization. The essay takes as its starting point the “right not to be punished” that Douglas Husak posited in his recent book Overcriminalization . By reviewing international human rights norms, I take up Husak’s challenge to imbue this right with further normative content. This process reveals additional relationships between the criminal law and human rights theory, and I discuss one analogy: the derogation by states (...)
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  6.  29
    The Right to Refuse Treatment is Not a Right to Be Killed.S. L. Lowe - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):154-163.
    It is widely accepted now that a patient's right to refuse treatment extends to circumstances in which the exercise of that right may lead to the patient's death. However, it is also often effectively assumed, without argument, that this implies a patient's right to request another agent to intervene so as to bring about his or her death, in a way which would render that agent guilty of murder in the absence of such a request. But the (...)
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  7.  5
    Do We Have a Right Not to Be Treated? A Psychiatrist‐Lawyer Discusses Recent Decisions: The Right to Die.Jonas B. Robitscher - 1972 - Hastings Center Report 2 (4):11-14.
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  8. Could There Be a Right Not to Be Born an Octuplet?Laura Purdy - 2007 - In Samantha Brennan & Robert Noggle (eds.), Taking Responsibility for Children. Wilfrid Laurier Press.
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  9.  59
    Is There a Right Not to Know One's Sex? The Ethics of 'Gender Verification' in Women's Sports Competitions.Claudia Wiesemann - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):216-220.
    The paper discusses the current medical practice of "gender verification" in sports from an ethical point of view. It takes the recent public discussion about 800-meter runner Caster Semenya as a starting point. At the World Championships in Athletics 2009 in Berlin, Germany, Semenya was challenged by competitors as being a so called "sex impostor". A medical examination to verify her sex ensued. The author analyses whether athletes like Semenya could claim a right not to know that is generally (...)
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  10. Tractatus Theologico-Politicus a Critical Inquiry Into the History, Purpose and Authenticity of the Hebrew Scriptureswith the Right to Free Thought and Free Discussion Asserted, and Shown to Be Not Only Consistent but Necessarily Bound Up with True Pie.Benedictus de Spinoza & Robert Willis - 1862 - Trübner.
     
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  11.  7
    In Nearly Every Survey of Public Opinion and the Media, Privacy is a Premiere Issue If the Press Wishes to Main its Credibility. The Laws Safeguarding Privacy Are Impressive, but Legal Prescriptions Are an Inadequate Foundation for the News Business. Privacy is Not a Legal Right Only but a Moral Good. For All of the Sophistication of Case Law and Tort Law in Protecting Privacy, Legal Definitions Do Not Match Today's Challenges. Merely Following the Letter of the Law Presumes the Law Can Be Determined ... [REVIEW]Clifford G. Christians - 2010 - In Christopher Meyers (ed.), Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. pp. 203.
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  12. To Be or Not to Be – A Research Subject.Eric M. Meslin & Peter H. Schwartz - 2010 - In Thomasine Kushner (ed.), Surviving Health Care: A Manual for Patients and their Families. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 146-162.
    Most people do not know there are different kinds of medical studies; some are conducted on people who already have a disease or medical condition, and others are performed on healthy volunteers who want to help science find answers. No matter what sort of research you are invited to participate in, or whether you are a patient when you are asked, it’s entirely up to you whether or not to do it. This decision is important and may have many implications (...)
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  13.  25
    A Further Defence of the Right Not to Vote.Ben Saunders - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (1):93-108.
    Opponents of compulsory voting often allege that it violates a ‘right not to vote’. This paper seeks to clarify and defend such a right against its critics. First, I propose that this right must be understood as a Hohfeldian claim against being compelled to vote, rather than as a mere privilege to abstain. So construed, the right not to vote is compatible with a duty to vote, so arguments for a duty to vote do not refute (...)
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  14.  24
    The Perruche Judgment and the "Right Not to Be Born".M. Spriggs - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):63-64.
    Overruling of law said to establish the “right not to be born”The French government has given in to public pressure and overturned a controversial legal ruling which recognised the right of a disabled chld to seek damaages. Most notably, the ruling, widely described as establishing a child's right “not to be born”, had provoked “outrage” amongst groups defending the rights of the disabled and led to a ban on prenatal scans by French gynaecologists. Once again, only parents (...)
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  15.  24
    The Right Not to Be Eaten.Thomas Auxter - 1979 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):221 – 230.
    The current debate over the rights of animals has not been wholly satisfactory. Those who believe that animals have no rights argue that it is not conceivable that creatures without human capabilities could possess rights. Those who defend the rights of animals argue that such claims are 'speciesist', resemble racist and sexist claims, and bear the marks of moral complacency. Both sides have assumed that the issue can ultimately be settled through an analysis of the concept of rights in isolation (...)
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  16.  25
    Is There a Right Time to Know?: The Right Not to Know and Genetic Testing in Children.Pascal Borry, Mahsa Shabani & Heidi Carmen Howard - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (1):19-27.
    The increasing implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies in the clinical context and the expanding commercial offer of genetic tests directly-toconsumers has increased the availability of previously inaccessible genetic information. A particular concern in both situations is how the volume of novel information will affect the processing of genetic and genomic information from minors. For minors, it is argued that in the provision of genetic testing, their “right not to know” should be respected as much as possible. Testing a minor (...)
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  17.  25
    Autonomy is a Right, Not a Feat: How Theoretical Misconceptions Have Muddled the Debate on Dynamic Consent to Biobank Research.Linus Johnsson & Stefan Eriksson - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (7):471-478.
    Should people be involved as active participants in longitudinal medical research, as opposed to remaining passive providers of data and material? We argue in this article that misconceptions of ‘autonomy’ as a kind of feat rather than a right are to blame for much of the confusion surrounding the debate of dynamic versus broad consent. Keeping in mind two foundational facts of human life, freedom and dignity, we elaborate three moral principles – those of autonomy, integrity and authority – (...)
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  18. Could There Be a Right to Own Intellectual Property?James Wilson - 2009 - Law and Philosophy 28 (4):393 - 427.
    Intellectual property typically involves claims of ownership of types, rather than particulars. In this article I argue that this difference in ontology makes an important moral difference. In particular I argue that there cannot be an intrinsic moral right to own intellectual property. I begin by establishing a necessary condition for the justification of intrinsic moral rights claims, which I call the Rights Justification Principle. Briefly, this holds that if we want to claim that there is an intrinsic moral (...)
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  19.  27
    Is There a Right Not to Vote?Heather Lardy - 2004 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 24 (2):303-321.
    When the possibility of instituting compulsory voting arises for consideration by politicians and by the public it is commonly met with the assertion that there is a right not to vote, which would be violated by the introduction of some form of legal obligation to vote. This claim, rather than being regarded as a contribution to the debate, often functions instead to foreclose it, trumping the arguments of those who advocate compulsion with the presentation of a protected right (...)
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  20.  39
    The Right to Be Publicly Naked: A Defence of Nudism.Bouke de Vries - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (3):407-424.
    Many liberal democracies have legal restrictions on nudism. This article argues that when public nudity does not pose a health threat, such restrictions are unjust. To vindicate this claim, I start by showing that there are two weighty interests served by the freedom to be naked in public. First, it promotes individual well-being; not only can nudist activities have great recreational value, recent studies have found that exposure to non-idealised naked bodies has a positive impact on body image, and, ultimately, (...)
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  21.  39
    Is There a Right to Be Wrong?David S. Oderberg - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (4):517-537.
    Freedom of belief is one of the entrenched values in modern society. Interpreted as the right not to be coerced into believing something, it is surely correct. But most people take it to mean that there is a right to false belief, a right to be wrong. People think that freedom of thought is a good thing, and this must include the freedom to make mistakes. It is also often thought that making mistakes is a life-enhancing and (...)
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  22.  17
    Can There Be a Right to Secede?R. E. Ewin - 1995 - Philosophy 70 (273):341 - 362.
    ‘There is a moral right to secede.’It is not, perhaps, always entirely clear what Buchanan means with his reference to a right to secede, and that is a matter we shall have to deal with in due course, but, anyway, the claim that there is a moral right to secede is a good deal more complex than is apparent from Buchanan's ground-breaking work and involves a number of assumptions that need to be gone into if Buchanan's work (...)
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  23.  79
    Ectogenesis, Abortion and a Right to the Death of the Fetus.Joona Räsänen - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (9):697-702.
    Many people believe that the abortion debate will end when at some point in the future it will be possible for fetuses to develop outside the womb. Ectogenesis, as this technology is called, would make possible to reconcile pro-life and pro-choice positions. That is because it is commonly believed that there is no right to the death of the fetus if it can be detached alive and gestated in an artificial womb. Recently Eric Mathison and Jeremy Davis defended this (...)
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  24.  42
    Stem Cell Research on Other Worlds, or Why Embryos Do Not Have a Right to Life.R. Blackford - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):177-180.
    Anxieties about the creation and destruction of human embryos for the purpose of scientific research on embryonic stem cells have given a new urgency to the question of whether embryos have moral rights. This article uses a thought experiment involving two possible worlds, somewhat removed from our own in the space of possibilities, to shed light on whether early embryos have such rights as a right not to be destroyed or discarded . It is argued that early embryos do (...)
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  25.  23
    Can a Right to Health Care Be Justified by Linkage Arguments?James Nickel - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (4):293-306.
    Linkage arguments, which defend a controversial right by showing that it is indispensable or highly useful to an uncontroversial right, are sometimes used to defend the right to health care. This article evaluates such arguments when used to defend RHC. Three common errors in using linkage arguments are neglecting levels of implementation, expanding the scope of the supported right beyond its uncontroversial domain, and giving too much credit to the supporting right for outcomes in its (...)
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  26. Abortion and the Right to Not Be Pregnant.James Mahon - 2016 - In Allyn Fives & Keith Breen (eds.), Philosophy and Political Engagement: Reflection in the Public Sphere. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 57-77.
    In this paper I defend Judith Jarvis Thomson's 'Good Samaritan Argument' (otherwise known as the 'feminist argument') for the permissibility of abortion, first advanced in her important, ground-breaking article 'A Defense of Abortion' (1971), against objections from Joseph Mahon (1979, 1984). I also highlight two problems with Thomson's argument as presented, and offer remedies for both of these problems. The article begins with a short history of the importance of the article to the development of practical ethics. Not alone did (...)
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  27.  9
    The Middle Does Not Hold: Why It’s Always Better to Be Right with the Right-Wing-Sellarsians.William A. Rottschaefer - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:361-369.
    This paper continues the dialogue between my right-wing-Sellars and James O’Shea’s middle-Sellars. In it, I reply to O’Shea’s middle-Sellars critique of my right-wing-Sellarsian criticism of his recent attempt to develop an understanding of Sellars’s overall view that avoids the problems of both right and left-wing-Sellarsians. In his contribution to this issue O’Shea argues that Sellars follows a middle way between left and right-wing-Sellarsians by advocating a refined Kantian naturalist account of human knowledge. In so doing he (...)
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  28.  57
    The Mystery of the Triceratops’s Mother: How to Be a Realist About the Species Category.Adrian Currie - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (4):795-816.
    Can we be realists about a general category but pluralists about concepts relating to that category? I argue that paleobiological methods of delineating species are not affected by differing species concepts, and that this underwrites an argument that species concept pluralists should be species category realists. First, the criteria by which paleobiologists delineate species are ‘indifferent’ to the species category. That is, their method for identifying species applies equally to any species concept. To identify a new species, paleobiologists show that (...)
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  29.  8
    The Right Not to Be Normal as the Essence of Freedom.Anita Silvers - 2008 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 18 (1):79-85.
    Proponents of using medical technology for enhancement sometimes misunderstand how the biology of enhancement works. Appreciation of biological diversity supports a program of enhancement. Acknowledging a liberty right to be biologically different addresses worries abut enhancement’s being undemocratic. Doing so also suggests changes in emphasis to strengthen the case for enhancement.
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  30.  14
    Is There a Right to Access Innovative Surgery?Denise Meyerson - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (5):342-352.
    Demands for access to experimental therapies are frequently framed in the language of rights. This article examines the justifiability of such demands in the specific context of surgical innovations, these being promising but non-validated and potentially risky departures from standard surgical practices. I argue that there is a right to access innovative surgery, drawing analogies with other generally accepted rights in medicine, such as the right not to be forcibly treated, to buy contraceptives, and to choose to have (...)
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  31.  31
    Accepting a Helping Hand Can Be the Right Thing to Do.A. Caplan - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):367-368.
    The underappreciated moral theorist Benjamin Franklin in his youth made up a list of virtues he felt ought to be followed as sound guides for living one's life. Some of the virtues he prescribed relate to personal behaviour: temperance, order, resolution, frugality, moderation, industry, cleanliness and tranquillity. The rest are social character traits: sincerity, justice, silence, chastity and humility. He never abandoned his faith in those values, teaching them to his son and anyone who cared to read his Poor Richard's (...)
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  32.  17
    Standard of Living as a Right, Not a Privilege: Is It Time to Change the Dialogue From Minimum Wage to Living Wage?Ronald Adams - 2017 - Business and Society Review 122 (4):613-639.
    Dating back to the 1930s, President Franklin D. Roosevelt argued that workers were entitled to a wage that allowed them to enjoy a decent standard of living—a conviction that led the president to propose the first federally-mandated minimum wage. Mr. Roosevelt’s proposal was met with highly partisan resistance in congress and the courts—reactions not different in kind from the highly partisan resistance former President Obama experienced in his proposal to increase the federal minimum wage from its current level of $7.25 (...)
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  33.  22
    I- The Lonely Heart Breaks: On the Right to Be a Social Contributor.Kimberley Brownlee - 2016 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 90 (1):27-48.
    This paper uncovers a distinctively social type of injustice that lies in the kinds of wrongs we can do to each other specifically as social beings. In this paper, social injustice is not principally about unfair distributions of socio-economic goods among citizens. Instead, it is about the ways we can violate each other’s fundamental rights to lead socially integrated lives in close proximity and relationship with other people. This paper homes in on a particular type of social injustice, which we (...)
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  34.  18
    What Can We Learn From Patients’ Ethical Thinking About the Right ‘Not to Know’ in Genomics? Lessons From Cancer Genetic Testing for Genetic Counselling.Lorraine Cowley - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (8):628-635.
    This article is based on a qualitative empirical project about a distinct kinship group who were among the first identified internationally as having a genetic susceptibility to cancer. 50 were invited to participate. 15, who had all accepted testing, were interviewed. They form a unique case study. This study aimed to explore interviewees’ experiences of genetic testing and how these influenced their family relationships. A key finding was that participants framed the decision to be tested as ‘common sense’; the idea (...)
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  35.  84
    Fairness to Idleness is There A Right Not to Work?Andrew Levine - 1995 - Economics and Philosophy 11 (2):255.
    It is universally agreed that involuntary unemployment is an evil for unemployed individuals, who lose both income and the non-pecuniary benefits of paid employment, and for society, which loses the productive labor that the unemployed are unable to expend. It is nearly as widely agreed that there is at least a prima-facie case for alleviating this evil – for reasons of justice and/or benevolence and/or social order. Finally, there is little doubt that the evils of involuntary unemployment cannot be adequately (...)
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  36.  2
    Conscientious Objection Should Not Be Equated with Moral Objection: A Response to Ben-Moshe.Nathan Emmerich - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):673-674.
    In his recent article, Ben-Moshe offers an account of conscientious objection in terms of the truth of the underlying moral objections, as judged by the standards of an impartial spectator. He seems to advocate for the view that having a valid moral objection to X is the sole criteria for the instantiation of a right to conscientiously object to X, and seems indifferent to the moral status of the prevailing moral attitudes. I argue that the moral status of the (...)
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  37.  10
    Epistemic Injustice’ and the ‘Right to Not Be Poor’: Bringing Recognition Into the Debate.Valentina Gentile - 2013 - Global Policy 4 (4):425-27.
    Poverty and inequality are not the sole sources of (global) injustices. And the latter are not only a matter of fair distribution. Identity and cultural asymmetries, often articulated along political and economic lines, relocate and reshape the struggle against subordination to include new areas of contestation, such as gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, culture, religion and nationality.
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  38.  13
    Socialism Through Convergence, Or: Why a Socialist Society Does Not Need to Be a Fraternal Community.Eleonora Piromalli - 2019 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (6):665-672.
    In this article, first of all, I point out the difference I perceive between the conception of social freedom Honneth delineates in Freedom’s Right and the one, inspired by the proto-socialists’ pr...
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  39. How Not to Be a Hypocrite: School Choice for the Morally Perplexed Parent.Adam Swift - 2005 - British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (2):213-215.
    _How not to be a hypocrite: _the indispensable guide to school choice that morally perplexed parents have been waiting for. Many of us believe in social justice and equality of opportunity - but we also want the best for our kids. How can we square our political principles with our special concern for our own children? This marvellous book takes us through the moral minefield that is school choice today. Does a commitment to social justice mean you have to send (...)
     
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  40.  83
    Should Access to Credit Be a Right?Marek Hudon - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):17-28.
    Discussion on financial ethics increasingly includes the problem of exclusion of the poorer segments of society from the financial system and access to credit. This paper explores the ethical dimensions surrounding the concept of a human right to credit. If access to credit is directly instrumental to economic development, poverty reduction and the improved welfare of all citizens, then one can proclaim, as Nobel Prize Laureate M. Yunus has done, that it is a moral necessity to establish credit as (...)
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  41. Too Odd (Not) to Be True? A Reply to Olsson.Luc Bovens, Branden Fitelson, Stephan Hartmann & Josh Snyder - 2002 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):539-563.
    Corroborating Testimony, Probability and Surprise’, Erik J. Olsson ascribes to L. Jonathan Cohen the claims that if two witnesses provide us with the same information, then the less probable the information is, the more confident we may be that the information is true (C), and the stronger the information is corroborated (C*). We question whether Cohen intends anything like claims (C) and (C*). Furthermore, he discusses the concurrence of witness reports within a context of independent witnesses, whereas the witnesses in (...)
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  42.  61
    How (Not) to Be a Reductionist in a Complex Universe.Karola Stotz - unknown
    This paper understands reductionism as a relation between explanations, not theories. It argues that knowledge of the micro-level behavior of the components of systems is necessary, but only combined with a full specification of the contingent context sufficient for a full explanation of systems phenomena. The paper takes seriously fundamental principles independent and transcendent of the laws of quantum mechanics that govern most of real-world phenomena. It will conclude in showing how the recent postgenomic revolution, taking seriously the physical principle (...)
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  43.  35
    Reasons Why Post-Trial Access to Trial Drugs Should, or Need Not Be Ensured to Research Participants: A Systematic Review.N. Sofaer & D. Strech - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (2):160-184.
    Background : researchers and sponsors increasingly confront the issue of whether participants in a clinical trial should have post-trial access (PTA) to the trial drug. Legislation and guidelines are inconsistent, ambiguous or silent about many aspects of PTA. Recent research highlights the potential importance of systematic reviews (SRs) of reason-based literatures in informing decision-making in medicine, medical research and health policy. Purpose: to systematically review reasons why drug trial participants should, or need not be ensured PTA to the trial drug (...)
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  44.  39
    To Waive or Not to Waive: The Right to Trial and Plea Bargaining. [REVIEW]Richard L. Lippke - 2008 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (2):181-199.
    Criminal defendants in many countries are faced with a dilemma: If they waive their right to trial and plead guilty, they typically receive charge or sentence reductions in exchange for having done so. If they exercise their right to trial and are found guilty, they often receive stiffer sanctions than if they had pled guilty. I characterize the former as ‘waiver rewards’ and the latter as ‘non-waiver penalties.’ After clarifying the two and considering the relation between them, I (...)
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  45.  88
    How Not to Be a Moral Relativist.Robin Attfield - 1979 - The Monist 62 (4):510-523.
    Believers in the objectivity of morals are required some time or another to reply to their opponents’ objections, to supply an acceptable account of the evidence deployed by their opponents consistent with their own view, and to bring to light reasons for rejecting their opponents’ case. This paper is intended to go some of the way towards carrying out these objectives. Moral objectivists must also, of course, furnish a positive and defensible account of the status of moral judgments; and, as (...)
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  46. The Right to Health Care as a Right to Basic Human Functional Capabilities.Efrat Ram-Tiktin - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):337 - 351.
    A just social arrangement must guarantee a right to health care for all. This right should be understood as a positive right to basic human functional capabilities. The present article aims to delineate the right to health care as part of an account of distributive justice in health care in terms of the sufficiency of basic human functional capabilities. According to the proposed account, every individual currently living beneath the sufficiency threshold or in jeopardy of falling (...)
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  47.  15
    How to Be a Terrible Teacher: Kierkegaard’s Philosophical Fragments on What Education is Not.Stuart Dalton - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (3):241-264.
    I argue for an approach to Philosophical Fragments that allows it to be philosophical and fragmentary, and that pays particular attention to the fragments, or crumbs, that seem least important. One such overlooked crumb is the theory of merely human education in the book—education that does not enlist God as the teacher, where humans simply try to teach and learn from each other. I argue that Philosophical Fragments defends this theory of education with several reductio ad absurdum proofs that are (...)
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  48.  74
    How Not to Be Muddled by a Meddlesome Muggletonian.John Bigelow & Michael Smith - 1997 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (4):511 – 527.
    Holton, we acknowledge, has given a good counter-example to a theory, and that theory is interesting and worth refuting. The theory we have in mind is like Smith's, but is more reductionist in spirit. It is a theory that ties value to Reason and to processes of reasoning, or inference - not to the recognition of reasons and acting on reasons. Such a theory overestimates the importance of logic, truth, inference, and thinking things through for yourself independently of any ideas (...)
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  49.  17
    The Right Not to Have Rights: A New Perspective on Irregular Immigration.Nanda Oudejans - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (4):447-474.
    In recent years irregular immigration has attracted increasing scholarly attention. Current academic debate casts the irregular immigrant in the role of the new political subject who acts out a right to have rights and/or as the rightless victim who is subjected to violence and abuse. However, the conception of the irregular immigrant as harbinger of political change and/or victim reifies the persistent dichotomy between inclusion and exclusion. It ignores that irregular immigrants are not by definition excluded from a normal (...)
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  50. To Be Killed or Not to Be Killed? On McMahan’s Failure to Draw a Line Between Combatants and Civilians.Uwe Steinhoff - manuscript
    In a recent paper, McMahan argues that his ‘Responsibility Account’, according to which ‘the criterion of liability to attack in war is moral responsibility for an objectively unjustified threat of harm’, can meet the challenge of explaining why most combatants on the unjustified side of a war are liable to attack while most civilians (even on the unjustified side) are not. It should be added, however, that in the light of his rejection of the ‘moral equality of combatants’, McMahan would (...)
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