Results for 'right to life'

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  1.  42
    Why a Right to Life Rules Out Infanticide: A Final Reply to Räsänen.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (8):965-967.
    Joona Räsänen has argued that pro‐life arguments against the permissibility of infanticide are not persuasive, and fail to show it to be immoral. We responded to Räsänen’s arguments, concluding that his critique of pro‐life arguments was misplaced. Räsänen has recently replied in ‘Why pro‐life arguments still are not convincing: A reply to my critics’, providing some additional arguments as to why he does not find pro‐life arguments against infanticide convincing. Here, we respond briefly to Räsänen’s critique (...)
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  2. Confusion About the Right to Life.Danny Frederick - 2011 - The Reasoner 5 (1):4-5.
    I defend the consistency of affirming the right to life while rejecting universal healthcare and liveable income programmes. I also defend the rationality of accepting inconsistency.
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  3. Animals, Predators, the Right to Life, and the Duty to Save Lives.Aaron Simmons - 2009 - Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 15-27.
    One challenge to the idea that animals have a moral right to life claims that any such right would require us to intervene in the wild to prevent animals from being killed by predators. I argue that belief in an animal right to life does not commit us to supporting a program of predator-prey intervention. One common retort to the predator challenge contends that we are not required to save animals from predators because predators are (...)
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  4.  74
    Do All Subjects of a Life Have an Equal Right to Life? The Challenge of the Comparative Value of Life.Aaron Simmons - 2016 - In Mylan Engel & Gary Lynn Comstock (eds.), The Moral Rights of Animals. Lexington Books. pp. 107-117.
    In The Case for Animal Rights, Tom Regan defends the view that all animals who are “subjects of a life” have an equal moral right to life. In this chapter, I consider whether it makes sense to think that animals have an equal right to life in light of the challenge that life has less value for animals than humans. This challenge raises two central questions: (1) does life have less value for animals (...)
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  5. Interpreting the Right to Life.J. O. Famakinwa - 2011 - Diametros 29:22-30.
    What does the right to life mean? The article considers three interpretations: (i) the right to life as the right to life-sustaining essentials, (ii) the right to life as the right not to be killed,s and (iii) the right to life as the right not to be killed unjustly. The article argues that (i) and (iii) accurately define the human right to life. The primary method is (...)
     
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  6. The Right to Life and Abortion Legislation in England and Wales: A Proposal for Change.Jan Deckers - 2010 - Diametros 26:1-22.
    In England and Wales, there is significant controversy on the law related to abortion. Recent discussions have focussed predominantly on the health professional's right to conscientious objection. This article argues for a comprehensive overhaul of the law from the perspective of an author who adopts the view that all unborn human beings should be granted the prima facie right to life. It is argued that, should the law be modified in accordance with this stance, it need not (...)
     
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  7.  60
    The Right to Life After Death.Evan Simpson - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (3):531-551.
    Imagining a future world in which people no longer die provides a helplul tool for understanding our present ethical views. It becomes evident that the cardinal virtues of prudence, temperance, and courage are options for reasonable people rather than rational requirements. On the assumption that the medical means to immortality are not universally available, even justice becomes detached from theories that tie the supposed virtue to the protection of human rights. Several stratagems are available for defending a categorical right (...)
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  8.  90
    Challenging Some Myths About the Right to Life at the End of Life. 1: Not an Absolute Right.E. Wicks - 2011 - Clinical Ethics 6 (4):167-171.
    This article, and a related one in the next issue, investigates some myths surrounding the application of the right to life at the end of life. The present article focuses upon the myth that the right to life is an absolute right, always requiring the preservation of life. It identifies three distinct situations in which state authorities may be justified in declining to take intervening action in order to save a life. It (...)
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  9.  98
    Life Extension, Overpopulation and the Right to Life: Against Lethal Ethics.D. E. Cutas - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e7-e7.
    Some of the objections to life-extension stem from a concern with overpopulation. I will show that whether or not the overpopulation threat is realistic, arguments from overpopulation cannot ethically demand halting the quest for, nor access to, life-extension. The reason for this is that we have a right to life, which entitles us not to have meaningful life denied to us against our will and which does not allow discrimination solely on the grounds of age. (...)
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  10. Challenging Some Myths About the Right to Life at the End of Life. 2: Reinstating the Ethically Excluded.E. Wicks - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (1):24-27.
    This article continues the rejection of certain myths about the right to life at the end of life commenced in an article in the previous issue of the journal Clinical Ethics. It focuses upon ethical arguments that seek to exclude two categories of human beings from the usual protection of human life: those described as ‘non-persons’ and those ‘designated for death’. The article argues that, while the protection offered to life by means of the (...) to life is far from absolute, the right remains applicable to all human beings, irrespective of their life expectancy or mental capacity. (shrink)
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  11.  90
    Thomson, the Right to Life, and Partial Birth Abortion or Two MULES for Sister Sarah.P. Alward - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):99-101.
    In this paper, I argue that Thomson's famous attempt to reconcile the fetus's putative right to life with robust abortion rights is not tenable. Given her view, whether or not an abortion violates the fetus's right to life depends on the abortion procedure utilised. And I argue that Thomson's view implies that any late term abortion that involves feticide is impermissible. In particular, this would rule out the partial birth abortion technique which has been so controversial (...)
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  12.  56
    The Right to Life.George P. Fletcher - 1980 - The Monist 63 (2):135-155.
    In the theory of rights we repeatedly encounter the problem of reconciling someone’s having a right, with his properly suffering damage to the interest protected by the right. In the case of right to life, we have to assess numerous cases in which individuals are killed or allowed to die, and yet we wish nonetheless to affirm their right to life. These cases include killing an aggressor in self-defense, accidental homicide, terminating life-sustaining therapy, (...)
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  13.  33
    The Right to Life, Voluntary Euthanasia, and Termination of Life on Request.Elias Moser - 2017 - Philosophy Study 7 (8):445-454.
    In this article, the logical implications of a right to life are examined. It is first argued that the prohibition of Termination of life on request confers an inalienable right to life. A right is inalienable if it cannot legitimately be waived or transferred. Since voluntary euthanasia entails waiver of the right to life, the inalienability yields that it cannot be justified. Therefore, any ethical position that is in favor of voluntary euthanasia (...)
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  14.  76
    The Right to Life.Hugo Bedau - 1968 - The Monist 52 (4):550-572.
    1. Of all the great natural or human rights, none has been so neglected by scholars and theorists as the right to life. Today, the salient fact about this right is the considerable disagreement over its scope, form and status. Everyone has noticed the general inflationary effect of talk about ‘human’ rights in our time, in contrast to the tidy list of ‘natural’ rights drawn up by Locke and others. Nowhere is this ballooning more noticeable than in (...)
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  15.  37
    A Right to Life for the Unborn? The Current Debate on Abortion in Germany and Norbert Hoerster's Legal-Philosophical Justification for the Right to Life.Alfred Simon - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):220 – 239.
    Rights to life for unborn humans and to abortion with impunity are incompatible. This observation by the German legal philosopher Norbert Hoerster contains a fundamental criticism of the state regulation on abortion in Germany. The regulation regards abortion as unlawful, but declines to prosecute if the abortion is conducted within the first three months of pregnancy and the pregnant woman received counseling at least three days prior to terminating the pregnancy. In contrast to the German legislature, Hoerster is in (...)
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  16.  19
    The Right to Life.K. M. Boyd - 1981 - Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (3):132-136.
    For much of human history the idea of a right to life has not seemed self-evident. The credibility of the idea appears to depend on a particular kind of intuition concerning the nature of the world. In this paper, the kind of intuition involved is related to the idea of a covenant, illustrated by that of marriage. The paper concludes by suggesting that talk about responsibilities may be more fruitful than talk about rights.
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  17.  9
    Children and the Right to Life in the Canon Law and the Magisterium of the Catholic Church: 1878 to the Present.Charles J. Reid Jr - manuscript
    This article considers the various emergence of an explicitly recognized right to life in papal teaching and the canon law of the last century and a quarter. The Church's opposition to abortion is deeply embedded within the tradition and law of the Church. It was, however, only in recent times, since the middle twentieth century, really, that the Church began to speak explicitly of a right to life. This paper explores the consequences for papal thought of (...)
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  18. An Ethical Right to Life: A Formulation From a Buberian Dialogical Perspective.Manfred H. Vogel - 2004 - Hamilton Books.
    This work focuses on the issue of an ethical right to life. Its aim is to formulate a persuasive answer the question: What attribute can endow an entity with an ethical right to not have its existence terminated? The issue of an ethical right to life is heavily politicized and divisive in Western societies. The reflections and analyses offered in An Ethical Right to Life contribute a much-needed clarification to the on-going discussion.
     
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  19.  60
    The Right to Life : Rethinking Universalism in Bioethics.Mary C. Rawlinson - 2010 - In Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel Baldwin-Ragaven & Petya Fitzpatrick (eds.), Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 107-129.
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  20.  5
    The 'French exception: the right to continuous deep sedation at the end of life.R. Horn - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (3):204-205.
    In 2016, a law came into force in France granting terminally ill patients the right to continuous deep sedation until death. This right was proposed as an alternative to euthanasia and presented as the ‘French response’ to problems at the end of life. The law draws a distinction between CDS and euthanasia and other forms of sympton control at the end of life. France is the first country in the world to legislate on CDS. This short (...)
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  21.  10
    The ‘French Exception’: The Right to Continuous Deep Sedation at the End of Life.Ruth Horn - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (3):204-205.
    In 2016, a law came into force in France granting terminally ill patients the right to continuous deep sedation until death. This right was proposed as an alternative to euthanasia and presented as the ‘French response’ to problems at the end of life. The law draws a distinction between CDS and euthanasia and other forms of sympton control at the end of life. France is the first country in the world to legislate on CDS. This short (...)
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  22.  25
    Reconsidering Resource Rights: The Case for a Basic Right to the Benefits of Life-Sustaining Ecosystem Services.Fabian Schuppert - 2012 - Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):215-225.
    In the presence of anthropogenic climate change, gross environmental degradation, and mass abject poverty, many political theorists currently debate issues such as people's right to water, the right to food, and the distribution of rights to natural resources more generally. However, thus far many theorists either focus (somewhat arbitrarily) only on one particular resource (e.g. water) or they treat all natural resources alike, meaning that many relevant distinctions within the group of natural resources are overlooked. Hence, the paper (...)
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  23. Autonomy, Life as an Intrinsic Value, and the Right to Die in Dignity.Raphael Cohen-Almagor - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):261-272.
    This paper examines two models of thinking relating to the issue of the right to die in dignity: one takes into consideration the rights and interests of the individual; the other supposes that human life is inherently valuable. I contend that preference should be given to the first model, and further assert that the second model may be justified in moral terms only as long as it does not resort to paternalism. The view that holds that certain patients (...)
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  24.  41
    Autonomy, Life as an Intrinsic Value, and the Right to Die in Dignity.Dr Raphael Cohen-Almagor - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (3):261-272.
    This paper examines two models of thinking relating to the issue of the right to die in dignity: one takes into consideration the rights and interests of the individual; the other supposes that human life is inherently valuable. I contend that preference should be given to the first model, and further assert that the second model may be justified in moral terms only as long as it does not resort to paternalism. The view that holds that certain patients (...)
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  25.  95
    “Sanctity-of-Life“—A Bioethical Principle for a Right to Life?Heike Baranzke - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):295 - 308.
    For about five decades the phrase "sanctity-of-life" has been part of the Anglo-American biomedical ethical discussion related to abortion and end-of-life questions. Nevertheless, the concept's origin and meaning are unclear. Much controversy is based on the mistaken assumption that the concept denotes the absolute value of human life and thus dictates a strict prohibition on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. In this paper, I offer an analysis of the religious and philosophical history of the idea of "sanctity-of-life." (...)
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  26. Study Guide to Jewish Ethics: A Reader's Companion to Matters of Life and Death, to Do the Right and the Good, Love Your Neighbor and Yourself.Paul Steinberg - 2003 - The Jewish Publication Society.
    This companion to Elliot Dorff's three books on Jewish ethics -- Matters of Life and Death , To Do the Right and the Good , and Love Your Neighbor and Yourself -- is designed for group as well as individual study. Through suggested readings from Dorff's books, probing questions, lively discussion topics, and simple writing exercises, readers will be able to analyze and clarify their own positions on a host of controversial issues: sex, surrogate motherhood, adoption, family abuse, (...)
     
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  27.  94
    Infanticide and the Right to Life.Alan Carter - 1997 - Ratio 10 (1):1–9.
    Michael Tooley defends infanticide by analysing ‘A has a right to X’ as roughly synonymous with ‘If A desires X, then others are under a prima facie obligation to refrain from actions that would deprive him [or her] of it.’ An infant who cannot conceive of himself or herself as a continuing subject of experiences cannot desire to continue existing. Hence, on Tooley’s analysis, killing the infant is not impermissible, for it does not go against any of the infant’s (...)
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  28.  6
    Infanticide and the Right to Life.Alan Carter - 1997 - Ratio 10 (1):1-9.
    Michael Tooley defends infanticide by analysing ‘A has a right to X’ as roughly synonymous with ‘If A desires X, then others are under a prima facie obligation to refrain from actions that would deprive him [or her] of it.’ An infant who cannot conceive of himself or herself as a continuing subject of experiences cannot desire to continue existing. Hence, on Tooley’s analysis, killing the infant is not impermissible, for it does not go against any of the infant’s (...)
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  29.  18
    “Sanctity-of-Life“—A Bioethical Principle for a Right to Life?Heike Baranzke - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):295-308.
    For about five decades the phrase “sanctity-of-life“ has been part of the Anglo-American biomedical ethical discussion related to abortion and end-of-life questions. Nevertheless, the concept’s origin and meaning are unclear. Much controversy is based on the mistaken assumption that the concept denotes the absolute value of human life and thus dictates a strict prohibition on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. In this paper, I offer an analysis of the religious and philosophical history of the idea of “sanctity-of-life.” (...)
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  30.  46
    Stem Cell Research on Other Worlds, or Why Embryos Do Not Have a Right to Life.R. Blackford - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):177-180.
    Anxieties about the creation and destruction of human embryos for the purpose of scientific research on embryonic stem cells have given a new urgency to the question of whether embryos have moral rights. This article uses a thought experiment involving two possible worlds, somewhat removed from our own in the space of possibilities, to shed light on whether early embryos have such rights as a right not to be destroyed or discarded . It is argued that early embryos do (...)
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  31. Moral Rights to Life, Both Natural and Non-Natural: Reflections on James Griffin's Account of Human Rights.Hugh V. McLachlan - 2010 - Diametros 26:58-76.
    Rather than to focus upon a particular ‘right to life’, we should consider what rights there are pertaining to our lives and to our living. There are different sorts. There are, for instance, rights that constitute absences of particular duties and rights that correspond to the duties of other agents or agencies. There are also natural and non-natural rights and duties. Different people in different contexts can have different moral duties and different moral rights including rights to (...). The question of the moral rights there are to and pertaining to life is considered with reference to James Griffin’s account of human rights. Also considered is the question of who or what can be a bearer of them. (shrink)
     
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  32.  28
    Foetuses, Famous Violinists, and the Right to Continued Aid.Michael Davis - 1983 - Philosophical Quarterly 33 (132):259-278.
    Critique of J.J. Thomson's well-known defense of abortion. Tries to show that Thomson is wrong that abortion is a violation of the fetus's right to life because there is an important difference between the way the fetus is dependent on the pregnant woman and the way the patient is dependent on the violinist.
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  33.  20
    Context-Dependent Preferences and the Right to Forgo Life-Saving Treatments.Torbjörn Tännsjö - 2015 - Social Theory and Practice 41 (4):716-733.
    A member of Jehovah’s Witnesses agreed to receive blood when alone, but rejected it once the elders were present. She insisted that the elders should stay, they were allowed to do so, and she bled to death. Was it all right to allow her to have the elders present when she made her final decision? Was it all right to allow her to bleed to death? It was, according to an anti-paternalist principle, which I have earlier defended on (...)
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  34. Logic, or, the Right Use of Reason in the Inquiry After Truth with a Variety of Rules to Guard Against Error in the Affairs of Religion and Human Life, as Well as in the Sciences.Isaac Watts - 1725 - Soli Deo Gloria Publications.
  35.  14
    Views on the Right to Withdraw From Randomised Controlled Trials Assessing Quality of Life After Mastectomy and Breast Reconstruction (QUEST): Findings From the QUEST Perspectives Study (QPS).N. Bidad, L. MacDonald, Z. E. Winters, S. J. L. Edwards & R. Horne - 2014 - Research Ethics 10 (1):47-57.
    The purpose of this study is to examine the importance that real patients attach to their right to withdraw from an on-going feasibility randomised trial (RCT) evaluating types and timings of breast reconstruction (two parallel trials) following mastectomy for breast cancer. Our results show that, while some respondents appreciated that exercising the right to withdraw would defeat the scientific objective of the trial, some patients with a surgical preference consented only given the knowledge they could withdraw if they (...)
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  36. Depression in the Context of Disability and the “Right to Die”.Carol J. Gill - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (3):171-198.
    Arguments in favor of legalized assisted suicide often center on issues of personal privacy and freedom of choice over one's body. Many disability advocates assert, however, that autonomy arguments neglect the complex sociopolitical determinants of despair for people with disabilities. Specifically, they argue that social approval of suicide for individuals with irreversible conditions is discriminatory and that relaxing restrictions on assisted suicide would jeopardize, not advance, the freedom of persons with disabilities to direct the lives they choose. This paper examines (...)
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  37.  4
    Oikopolitics, Regulation and Privacy: An Essay on the Governmental Nature of the Right to Private Life.Muhammad Ali Nasir - 2018 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 45 (3):334-355.
    This essay focuses on the interrelationship of regulation and private life in human rights. It argues three main points. Article 8 connects the question of protection of private lives and privacies with the question of their management. Thus, Article 8 orients regulatory practices to private lives and privacies. Article 8’s holders are autonomous to the extent that laws respect their private lives and privacies. They are not autonomous in a ‘pre-political’ sense, where we might expect legal rules to protect (...)
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  38.  21
    Why Should the Baby Live? Human Right to Life and the Precautionary Principle.Benedetto Rocchi - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):6-10.
    This paper discusses the issue of ‘post-birth abortion’ from an applied perspective. Three hypothetical situations where a newborn considered as a ‘potential person’ is at risk of being killed are proposed to highlight the potential controversial outcomes of post-birth abortion. The internal consistency of the argument proposed by Giubilini and Minerva to morally justify newborn killing is contested as well. Finally, an alternative moral strategy based on the precautionary principle and excluding any distinction between potential and actual persons is proposed (...)
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  39. The Right to Life of the Unborn in South African Law.J. D. van der Vyver - 1984 - In Ellison Kahn (ed.), The Sanctity of Human Life. University of the Witwatersrand.
     
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  40. Voluntary Euthanasia and the Inalienable Right to Life.Joel Feinberg - 1978 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 7 (2):93-123.
  41.  64
    Essential Properties and the Right to Life: A Response to Lee.Dean Stretton - 2004 - Bioethics 18 (3):264–282.
  42. Substantial Identity and the Right to Life: A Rejoinder to Dean Stretton.Patrick Lee - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (2):93-97.
  43. Dueling and the Right to Life.Lance K. Stell - 1979 - Ethics 90 (1):7-26.
  44.  9
    Terminating the Pregnancy of a Brain-Dead Mother: Does a Fetus Have a Right to Life? The Law in South Africa.David Jan McQuoid-Mason - 2014 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 7 (2):44.
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  45.  9
    Mongolism, Parental Desires, and the Right to Life.James M. Gustafson - 1973 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 16 (4):529-557.
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  46.  97
    The Right to Life.H. J. McCloskey - 1975 - Mind 84 (335):403-425.
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  47. Right to Life, Right to Die and Assisted Suicide.S. B. Chetwynd - 2004 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2):173–182.
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  48.  67
    Does the Fetus Have a Right to Life?Burleigh T. Wilkins - 1993 - Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):123-137.
  49.  28
    Abortion and the Right to Life.L. S. Carrier - 1975 - Social Theory and Practice 3 (Fall):381-401.
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  50.  12
    Substantial Identity and the Right to Life: A Rejoinder to Dean Stretton.L. E. E. Patrick - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (2):93–97.
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