Results for 'safety'

988 found
Order:
  1. "My Place in the Sun": Reflections on the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas.Committee of Public Safety - 1996 - Diacritics 26 (1):3-10.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Martin Heidegger and OntologyEmmanuel Levinas (bio)The prestige of Martin Heidegger 1 and the influence of his thought on German philosophy marks both a new phase and one of the high points of the phenomenological movement. Caught unawares, the traditional establishment is obliged to clarify its position on this new teaching which casts a spell over youth and which, overstepping the bounds of permissibility, is already in vogue. For once, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  2. Beverly C. Moore Jr.Product Safety - 2001 - In Chris Moon (ed.), Business Ethics. Economist. pp. 468.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  12
    Media Release.Monsoon Safety - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  14
    Subject Index accuracy, 97-101 action theory, 21n A IBS code, 123 analytic philosophy, 119.Consumer Product Safety Act - 2005 - In Wenceslao J. González (ed.), Science, Technology and Society: A Philosophical Perspective. Netbiblo. pp. 207.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Sensitivity, safety, and impossible worlds.Guido Melchior - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (3):713-729.
    Modal knowledge accounts that are based on standards possible-worlds semantics face well-known problems when it comes to knowledge of necessities. Beliefs in necessities are trivially sensitive and safe and, therefore, trivially constitute knowledge according to these accounts. In this paper, I will first argue that existing solutions to this necessity problem, which accept standard possible-worlds semantics, are unsatisfactory. In order to solve the necessity problem, I will utilize an unorthodox account of counterfactuals, as proposed by Nolan, on which we also (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  6. Sensitivity, safety, and anti-luck epistemology.Duncan Pritchard - 2008 - In John Greco (ed.), The Oxford handbook of skepticism. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This paper surveys attempts in the recent literature to offer a modal condition on knowledge as a way of resolving the problem of scepticism. In particular, safety-based and sensitivity-based theories of knowledge are considered in detail, along with the anti-sceptical prospects of an explicitly anti-luck epistemology.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  7. Safety and Dream Scepticism in Sosa’s Epistemology.J. Adam Carter & Robert Cowan - 2024 - Synthese.
    A common objection to Sosa’s epistemology is that it countenances, in an objectionable way, unsafe knowledge. This objection, under closer inspection, turns out to be in far worse shape than Sosa’s critics have realised. Sosa and his defenders have offered two central response types to the idea that allowing unsafe knowledge is problematic: one response type adverts to the animal/reflective knowledge distinction that is characteristic of bi-level virtue epistemology. The other less-discussed response type appeals to the threat of dream scepticism, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  48
    Safety and Unawareness of Error-Possibility.Haicheng Zhao - 2021 - Philosophical Papers 50 (1-2):309-337.
    In this paper, I first seek a relatively plausible formulation of the safety principle. To this end, I refute a recent form of safety by Duncan Pritchard and then defend another weaker form of safe...
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Temporary Safety Hazards.Jeffrey Sanford Russell - 2016 - Noûs 50 (4):152-174.
    The Epistemic Objection says that certain theories of time imply that it is impossible to know which time is absolutely present. Standard presentations of the Epistemic Objection are elliptical—and some of the most natural premises one might fill in to complete the argument end up leading to radical skepticism. But there is a way of filling in the details which avoids this problem, using epistemic safety. The new version has two interesting upshots. First, while Ross Cameron alleges that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  10. Saving safety from counterexamples.Thomas Grundmann - 2018 - Synthese 197 (12):5161-5185.
    In this paper I will offer a comprehensive defense of the safety account of knowledge against counterexamples that have been recently put forward. In Sect. 2, I will discuss different versions of safety, arguing that a specific variant of method-relativized safety is the most plausible. I will then use this specific version of safety to respond to counterexamples in the recent literature. In Sect. 3, I will address alleged examples of safe beliefs that still constitute Gettier (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  11. Safety and Necessity.Niall J. Paterson - 2022 - Erkenntnis 87 (3):1081-1097.
    Can epistemic luck be captured by modal conditions such as safety from error? This paper answers ‘no’. First, an old problem is cast in a new light: it is argued that the trivial satisfaction associated with necessary truths and accidentally robust propositions is a symptom of a more general disease. Namely, epistemic luck but not safety from error is hyperintensional. Second, it is argued that as a consequence the standard solution to deal with this worry, namely the invocation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  12. Safety, Closure, and Extended Methods.Simon Goldstein & John Hawthorne - 2024 - Journal of Philosophy 121 (1):26-54.
    Recent research has identified a tension between the Safety principle that knowledge is belief without risk of error, and the Closure principle that knowledge is preserved by competent deduction. Timothy Williamson reconciles Safety and Closure by proposing that when an agent deduces a conclusion from some premises, the agent’s method for believing the conclusion includes their method for believing each premise. We argue that this theory is untenable because it implies problematically easy epistemic access to one’s methods. Several (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13. Safety, content, apriority, self-knowledge.David Manley - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy 104 (8):403-423.
    This essay motivates a revised version of the epistemic condition of safety and then employs the revision to (i) challenge traditional conceptions of apriority, (ii) refute ‘strong privileged access’, and (iii) resolve a well-known puzzle about externalism and self-knowledge.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  14. Safety, fairness, and inclusion: transgender athletes and the essence of Rugby.Jon Pike - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (2):155-168.
    In this paper, I link philosophical discussion of policies for trans inclusion or exclusion, to a method of policy making. I address the relationship between concerns about safety, fairness, and inclusion in policy making about the inclusion of transwomen athletes into women’s sport. I argue for an approach based on lexical priority rather than simple ‘balancing’, considering the different values in a specific order. I present justifying reasons for this approach and this lexical order, based on the special obligations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  15. Safety’s swamp: Against the value of modal stability.Georgi Gardiner - 2017 - American Philosophical Quarterly 54 (2):119-129.
    An account of the nature of knowledge must explain the value of knowledge. I argue that modal conditions, such as safety and sensitivity, do not confer value on a belief and so any account of knowledge that posits a modal condition as a fundamental constituent cannot vindicate widely held claims about the value of knowledge. I explain the implications of this for epistemology: We must either eschew modal conditions as a fundamental constituent of knowledge, or retain the modal conditions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16. Sensitivity, safety, and the law: A reply to Pardo.David Enoch & Levi Spectre - 2019 - Legal Theory 25 (3):178-199.
    ABSTRACTIn a recent paper, Michael Pardo argues that the epistemic property that is legally relevant is the one called Safety, rather than Sensitivity. In the process, he argues against our Sensitivity-related account of statistical evidence. Here we revisit these issues, partly in order to respond to Pardo, and partly in order to make general claims about legal epistemology. We clarify our account, we show how it adequately deals with counterexamples and other worries, we raise suspicions about Safety's value (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  17. Yes, Safety is in Danger.Tomas Bogardus & Chad Marxen - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (2):321-334.
    In an essay recently published in this journal (“Is Safety in Danger?”), Fernando Broncano-Berrocal defends the safety condition on knowledge from a counterexample proposed by Tomas Bogardus (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 2012). In this paper, we will define the safety condition, briefly explain the proposed counterexample, and outline Broncano-Berrocal’s defense of the safety condition. We will then raise four objections to Broncano-Berrocal’s defense, four implausible implications of his central claim. In the end, we conclude that Broncano-Berrocal’s (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  18. Safety, Explanation, Iteration.Daniel Greco - 2016 - Philosophical Issues 26 (1):187-208.
    This paper argues for several related theses. First, the epistemological position that knowledge requires safe belief can be motivated by views in the philosophy of science, according to which good explanations show that their explananda are robust. This motivation goes via the idea—recently defended on both conceptual and empirical grounds—that knowledge attributions play a crucial role in explaining successful action. Second, motivating the safety requirement in this way creates a choice point—depending on how we understand robustness, we'll end up (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  19. Why safety doesn’t save closure.Marc Alspector-Kelly - 2011 - Synthese 183 (2):127-142.
    Knowledge closure is, roughly, the following claim: For every agent S and propositions P and Q, if S knows P, knows that P implies Q, and believes Q because it is so implied, then S knows Q. Almost every epistemologist believes that closure is true. Indeed, they often believe that it so obviously true that any theory implying its denial is thereby refuted. Some prominent epistemologists have nevertheless denied it, most famously Fred Dretske and Robert Nozick. There are closure advocates (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  20. Safety and epistemic luck.Avram Hiller & Ram Neta - 2007 - Synthese 158 (3):303 - 313.
    There is some consensus that for S to know that p, it cannot be merely a matter of luck that S’s belief that p is true. This consideration has led Duncan Pritchard and others to propose a safety condition on knowledge. In this paper, we argue that the safety condition is not a proper formulation of the intuition that knowledge excludes luck. We suggest an alternative proposal in the same spirit as safety, and find it lacking as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  21. Safety-Based Epistemology: Wither Now?Duncan Pritchard - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Research 34:33-45.
    This paper explores the prospects for safety-based theories of knowledge in the light of some recent objections.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  22. Safety, Sensitivity and “Distant” Epistemic Luck.Wolfgang Freitag - 2013 - Theoria 80 (1):44-61.
    Prominent instances of anti-luck epistemology, in particular sensitivity and safety accounts of knowledge, introduce a modal condition on the pertinent belief in terms of closeness or similarity of possible worlds. Very roughly speaking, a belief must continue to be true in close possibilities in order to qualify as knowledge. Such closeness-accounts derive much support from their (alleged) ability to eliminate standard instances of epistemic luck as they appear in prominent Gettier-type examples. The article argues that there are new Gettier-type (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  23. Safety-Based Epistemology.Duncan Pritchard - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Research 34:33-45.
    This paper explores the prospects for safety-based theories of knowledge in the light of some recent objections.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   92 citations  
  24.  14
    AI safety: necessary, but insufficient and possibly problematic.Deepak P. - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-3.
  25. Safety, The Lottery Puzzle, and Misprinted Lottery Results.Mark McEvoy - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Research 34:47-49.
    Duncan Pritchard's version of the safety analysis of knowledge has it that for all contingent propositions, p, S knows that p iff S believes that p, p is true, and (the “safety principle”) in most nearby worlds in which S forms his belief in the same way as in the actual world, S believes that p only if p is true. Among the other virtues claimed by Pritchard for this view is its supposed ability to solve a version (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26. Is Safety In Danger?Fernando Broncano-Berrocal - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (1):1-19.
    In “Knowledge Under Threat” (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 2012), Tomas Bogardus proposes a counterexample to the safety condition for knowledge. Bogardus argues that the case demonstrates that unsafe knowledge is possible. I argue that the case just corroborates the well-known requirement that modal conditions like safety must be relativized to methods of belief formation. I explore several ways of relativizing safety to belief-forming methods and I argue that none is adequate: if methods were individuated in those ways, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  27. Global safety: how to deal with necessary truths.Jaakko Hirvelä - 2019 - Synthese 196 (3):1167-1186.
    According to the safety condition, a subject knows that p only if she would believe that p only if p was true. The safety condition has been a very popular necessary condition for knowledge of late. However, it is well documented that the safety condition is trivially satisfied in cases where the subject believes in a necessary truth. This is for the simple reason that a necessary truth is true in all possible worlds, and therefore it is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  28. Sensitivity, Safety, and Epistemic Closure.Bin Zhao - 2022 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 30 (1):56-71.
    It has been argued that an advantage of the safety account over the sensitivity account is that the safety account preserves epistemic closure, while the sensitivity account implies epistemic closure failure. However, the argument fails to take the method-relativity of the modal conditions on knowledge, viz., sensitivity and safety, into account. In this paper, I argue that the sensitivity account and the safety account are on a par with respect to epistemic closure once the method-relativity of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29.  82
    Cultural safety and the challenges of translating critically oriented knowledge in practice.Annette J. Browne, Colleen Varcoe, Victoria Smye, Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham, M. Judith Lynam & Sabrina Wong - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (3):167-179.
    Cultural safety is a relatively new concept that has emerged in the New Zealand nursing context and is being taken up in various ways in Canadian health care discourses. Our research team has been exploring the relevance of cultural safety in the Canadian context, most recently in relation to a knowledge-translation study conducted with nurses practising in a large tertiary hospital. We were drawn to using cultural safety because we conceptualized it as being compatible with critical theoretical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  30. Workplace Safety.Jonathan Broder - 2020 - In David Weitzner (ed.), Issues in business ethics and corporate social responsibility: selections from SAGE business researcher. Los Angeles: SAGE reference.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  19
    Just culture: balancing safety and accountability.Sidney Dekker - 2012 - Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
    What is the right thing to do? -- "You have nothing to fear if you've done nothing wrong" -- Between culpable and blameless -- Are all mistakes equal? -- Report, disclose, protect, learn -- A just culture in your organization -- The criminalization of human error -- Is criminalization bad for safety? -- Without prosecutors, there would be no crime -- Three questions for your just culture -- Why do we blame?
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32. Sensitivity, Safety, and Closure.Sven Bernecker - 2012 - Acta Analytica 27 (4):367-381.
    It is widely thought that if knowledge requires sensitivity, knowledge is not closed because sensitivity is not closed. This paper argues that there is no valid argument from sensitivity failure to non-closure of knowledge. Sensitivity does not imply non-closure of knowledge. Closure considerations cannot be used to adjudicate between safety and sensitivity accounts of knowledge.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  33. Safety, Virtue, Scepticism: Remarks on Sosa.Peter Baumann - 2015 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy (45):295-306.
    Ernest Sosa has made and continues to make major contributions to a wide variety of topics in epistemology. In this paper I discuss some of his core ideas about the nature of knowledge and scepticism. I start with a discussion of the safety account of knowledge – a view he has championed and further developed over the years. I continue with some questions concerning the role of the concept of an epistemic virtue for our understanding of knowledge. Safety (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34. Seeking safety in knowledge.Jennifer Nagel - 2023 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 97:186-214.
    Knowledge demands more than accuracy: epistemologists are broadly agreed that those who know are non-accidentally right, satisfying some kind of safety condition. However, it is hard to formulate any adequate account of safety, and harder still to explain exactly why we care about it. This paper approaches the problem by looking at a concrete human cognitive capacity, face recognition, to see where epistemic safety shows up in it. Drawing on new models in artificial intelligence, and making a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Safety, risk acceptability, and morality.James A. E. Macpherson - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):377-390.
    The primary aim of this article is to develop and defend a conceptual analysis of safety. The article begins by considering two previous analyses of safety in terms of risk acceptability. It is argued that these analyses fail because the notion of risk acceptability is more subjective than safety, as risk acceptability takes into account potential benefits in a way that safety does not. A distinction is then made between two different kinds of safetysafety (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  36. Safety Engineering for Artificial General Intelligence.Roman Yampolskiy & Joshua Fox - 2013 - Topoi 32 (2):217-226.
    Machine ethics and robot rights are quickly becoming hot topics in artificial intelligence and robotics communities. We will argue that attempts to attribute moral agency and assign rights to all intelligent machines are misguided, whether applied to infrahuman or superhuman AIs, as are proposals to limit the negative effects of AIs by constraining their behavior. As an alternative, we propose a new science of safety engineering for intelligent artificial agents based on maximizing for what humans value. In particular, we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  37.  11
    Patient safety ethics: how vigilance, mindfulness, compliance, and humility can make healthcare safer.John D. Banja - 2019 - Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Ethical foundations of patient safety -- Vigilance -- Mindfulness -- Compliance -- Humility -- Some theoretical aspects of vigilance and risk acceptability -- Fifty shades of error -- The standard care and medical malpractice law as an ethical achievement -- The present and the future.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  34
    Patient Safety and the Question of Dignitary Harms.Polly Mitchell, Alan Cribb & Vikki Entwistle - 2023 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 48 (1):33-49.
    Patient safety is a central aspect of healthcare quality, focusing on preventable, iatrogenic harm. Harm, in this context, is typically assumed to mean physical injury to patients, often caused by technical error. However, some contributions to the patient safety literature have argued that disrespectful behavior towards patients can cause harm, even when it does not lead to physical injury. This paper investigates the nature of such dignitary harms and explores whether they should be included within the scope of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. The Safety Condition for Knowledge.Dani Rabinowitz - 2011 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A number of epistemologists have defended a necessary condition for knowledge that has come to be labeled as the “safety” condition. Timothy Williamson, Duncan Pritchard, and Ernest Sosa are the foremost defenders of safety. According to these authors an agent S knows a true proposition P only if S could not easily have falsely believed P. Disagreement arises, however, with respect to how they capture the notion of a safe belief. This article is a treatment of the different (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  40.  83
    Safety vs. sensitivity: Possible worlds and the law of evidence.Michael S. Pardo - 2018 - Legal Theory 24 (1):50-75.
    ABSTRACTThis article defends the importance of epistemic safety for legal evidence. Drawing on discussions of sensitivity and safety in epistemology, the article explores how similar considerations apply to legal proof. In the legal context, sensitivity concerns whether a factual finding would be made if it were false, and safety concerns how easily a factual finding could be false. The article critiques recent claims about the importance of sensitivity for the law of evidence. In particular, this critique argues (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  41.  29
    Safety-Related Moral Disengagement in Response to Job Insecurity: Counterintuitive Effects of Perceived Organizational and Supervisor Support.Tahira M. Probst, Laura Petitta, Claudio Barbaranelli & Christopher Austin - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 162 (2):343-358.
    The purpose of this study was to examine individual and organizational antecedents and consequences of safety-related moral disengagement. Using Conservation of Resources theory, social exchange theory, and psychological contract breach as a theoretical foundation, this study tested the proposition that higher job insecurity is associated with greater levels of subsequent safety-related moral disengagement, which in turn is related to reduced safety performance. Moreover, we examined whether perceived organizational and supervisor support buffered or intensified the impact of job (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  42. Knowledge, Safety, and Questions.Brian Ball - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (1):58-62.
    Safety-based theories of knowledge face a difficulty surrounding necessary truths: no subject could have easily falsely believed such a proposition. Failing to predict that ill-grounded beliefs in such propositions do not constitute knowledge, standard safety theories are therefore less informative than desired. Some have suggested that the subjects at issue could easily have believed some related false proposition; but they have given no indication as to what makes a proposition related. I suggest a solution to this problem: a (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  43. Safety, Skepticism, and Lotteries.Dylan Dodd - 2012 - Erkenntnis 77 (1):95-120.
    Several philosophers have claimed that S knows p only if S’ s belief is safe, where S's belief is safe iff (roughly) in nearby possible worlds in which S believes p, p is true. One widely held intuition many people have is that one cannot know that one's lottery ticket will lose a fair lottery prior to an announcement of the winner, regardless of how probable it is that it will lose. Duncan Pritchard has claimed that a chief advantage of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  44. Safety perspectives of medicinal products.Rishi Kumar, Nishith Keserwani & Parveen Kumar Goyal - 2024 - In Faraat Ali & Leo M. L. Nollet (eds.), Global regulations of medicinal, pharmaceutical, and food products. Boca Raton: CRC Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Safety and the True–True Problem.Jon Cogburn & Jeffrey W. Roland - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):246-267.
    Standard accounts of semantics for counterfactuals confront the true–true problem: when the antecedent and consequent of a counterfactual are both actually true, the counterfactual is automatically true. This problem presents a challenge to safety-based accounts of knowledge. In this paper, drawing on work by Angelika Kratzer, Alan Penczek, and Duncan Pritchard, we propose a revised understanding of semantics for counterfactuals utilizing machinery from generalized quantifier theory which enables safety theorists to meet the challenge of the true–true problem.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  46.  33
    Do Safety Failures Preclude Knowledge?J. R. Fett - 2018 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 22 (2):301-319.
    The safety condition on knowledge, in the spirit of anti-luck epistemology, has become one of the most popular approaches to the Gettier problem. In the first part of this essay, I intend to show one of the reasons the anti-luck epistemologist presents for thinking that the safety theory, and not the sensitivity theory, offers the proper anti-luck condition on knowledge. In the second part of this essay, I intend to show that the anti-luck epistemologist does not succeed, because (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  61
    Achievements, Safety and Environmental Epistemic Luck.Benoît Gaultier - 2014 - Dialectica 68 (4):477-497.
    Theories of knowledge as credit for true belief, or as cognitive achievement, have to face the following objection: in the famous Barn façades case, it seems that the truth of Barney's belief that he is in front of a barn is to be explained by the correct functioning of his cognitive capacities, although we are reluctant to say that he knows he is in front of a barn. Duncan Pritchard concludes from this that a safety clause, irreducible to the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  48.  29
    Safety, The Lottery Puzzle, and Misprinted Lottery Results.Mark McEvoy - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Research 34:47-49.
    The safety analysis of knowledge, due to Duncan Pritchard, has it that for all contingent propositions, p, S knows that p iff S believes that p, p is true, and (the “safety principle”) in most nearby worlds in which S forms his belief in the same way as in the actual world, S believes that p only if p is true. Among the other virtues claimed by Pritchard for this view is its supposed ability to solve a version (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49.  21
    Safety by simulation: theorizing the future of robot regulation.Mika Viljanen - 2024 - AI and Society 39 (1):139-154.
    Mobility robots may soon be among us, triggering a need for safety regulation. Robot safety regulation, however, remains underexplored, with only a few articles analyzing what regulatory approaches could be feasible. This article offers an account of the available regulatory strategies and attempts to theorize the effects of simulation-based safety regulation. The article first discusses the distinctive features of mobility robots as regulatory targets and argues that emergent behavior constitutes the key regulatory concern in designing robot (...) regulation regimes. In contrast to many accounts, the article posits that emergent behavior dynamics do not arise from robot autonomy, learning capability, or code unexplainability. Instead, they emerge from the complexity of robot technological constitutions coupled with near-infinite environmental variability and non-linear performance dynamics of the machine learning components. Second, the article reviews rules-based and performance-based regulation and argues that both will fail adequately constrain emergent robot behaviors. The article claims that controlling mobility robots requires a simulation-based regulatory approach. Simulation-based regulation is a novelty with significant theoretical and practical implications. The article argues that the approach signifies a radical break in regulatory forms of knowledge and temporalities. Simulations enact virtual futures to create a new regulatory knowledge type. Practically, the novel safety knowledge type may destabilize the existing conceptual space of safety politics and liability allocation patterns. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  51
    Safety Issues In Cell-Based Intervention Trials.Liza Dawson, Alison S. Bateman-House, Dawn Mueller Agnew, Hilary Bok, Dan W. Brock, Aravinda Chakravarti, Mark Greene, Patricia King, Stephen J. O'Brien, David H. Sachs, Kathryn E. Schill, Andrew Siegel & Davor Solter - 2003 - Fertility and Sterility 80 (5):1077-1085.
    We report on the deliberations of an interdisciplinary group of experts in science, law, and philosophy who convened to discuss novel ethical and policy challenges in stem cell research. In this report we discuss the ethical and policy implications of safety concerns in the transition from basic laboratory research to clinical applications of cell-based therapies derived from stem cells. Although many features of this transition from lab to clinic are common to other therapies, three aspects of stem cell biology (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 988