Results for 'scapegoats'

26 found
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  1.  15
    Myths and Scapegoats: The Case of René Girard.R. Kearney - 1995 - Theory, Culture and Society 12 (4):1-14.
  2.  7
    ”Soldier Dolls, Little Adulteresses, Poor Scapegoats, Betraying Sisters and Perfect Meat”: The Gender of the Early Phase of the Troubles and the Politics of Punishments Against Women in Contemporary Irish Poetry.Katarzyna Ostalska - 2018 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 8 (8):84-106.
    This paper examines the literary representation of the beginnings of the Northern Irish Troubles with regard to a gender variable, in the selected poems by Heaney, Durcan, Boland, Meehan and Morrissey. The reading of Heaney’s “Punishment” will attempt to focus not solely on the poem’s repeatedly criticized misogyny but on analyzing it in a broader, historical context of the North’s conflict. In Durcan’s case, his prominent nationalist descent or his declared contempt for any form of paramilitary terrorism do not seem (...)
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  3.  23
    Scapegoats.Gregory Mellema - 2000 - Criminal Justice Ethics 19 (1):3-9.
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  4.  6
    Enemies, Scapegoats and Sacrifice: A Note on Palaver and Ulmen.D. Pan - 1992 - Télos 1992 (93):81-88.
  5.  5
    Scapegoats and Self-Pity? How Fragile is German Democracy?Edwina S. Campbell - 1994 - History of European Ideas 18 (4):577-582.
  6.  1
    Antitechnology RampantBlaming Technology: The Irrational Search for Scapegoats[REVIEW]Melvin Kranzberg & Samuel C. Florman - 1982 - Hastings Center Report 12 (4):41.
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  7.  36
    Theoretical and Material Discontinuities in René Girard’s Discussion of the Miracle of Apollonius of Tyana.Ibanga B. Ikpe - 2015 - Journal for Cultural Research 19 (4):365-378.
    In discussing his mimetic theory, René Girard seeks to show that the story concerning the miraculous curing of Ephesus by Apollonius of Tyana could be used to demonstrate how an epidemic of mimetic rivalry can be converted into a state of unanimous violence that has a cathartic effect on society. In doing so, Girard emphasizes the importance of the model in mimetic contagion and its power in channelling the frustrations and violence of the crowd towards a single victim. For him, (...)
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  8. Don’T Blame the Idealizations.Nicholaos Jones - 2013 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 44 (1):85-100.
    Idealizing conditions are scapegoats for scientific hypotheses, too often blamed for falsehood better attributed to less obvious sources. But while the tendency to blame idealizations is common among both philosophers of science and scientists themselves, the blame is misplaced. Attention to the nature of idealizing conditions, the content of idealized hypotheses, and scientists’ attitudes toward those hypotheses shows that idealizing conditions are blameless when hypotheses misrepresent. These conditions help to determine the content of idealized hypotheses, and they do so (...)
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  9.  20
    The Holocaust and the Henmaid's Tale: A Case for Comparing Atrocities.Karen Davis - 2005 - Lantern Books.
    Preface: Blurring the boundary between human and nonhuman beings -- Only one Holocaust? -- Evidence of things not seen -- The henmaid's tale -- Holocaust victimization imagery -- Procrustean solutions -- Scapegoats and surrogates : falsifying the fate of victims -- The 9/11 controversy -- An atrocity can be both unique and general.
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  10. The Devil's Insatiable Sex: A Genealogy of Evil Incarnate.Margaret Denike - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):10-43.
    : This paper traces the political economy of the Christian concept of "evil" incarnate and its concomitant operations of sexual abjection and the repudiation of femininity, beginning with the early church's inaugural struggles to impose its monotheistic Law against maternal paganism. With attention to how "evil" has been deployed to sanction and sanctify the persecution of scapegoats, and particularly of heretics and witches, I examine the masculinist struggles for jurisdiction and control over women.
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  11.  10
    The Influence of Immigration Terminology on Attribution and Empathy.Joshua F. Hoops & Keli Braitman - 2018 - Critical Discourse Studies 16 (2):149-161.
    ABSTRACTWe report the findings of an experimental study that tested the contributions of semiotic and critical discourse studies on immigration. Two-way analyses of variance were conducted to examine the effects of immigration terminology on measures of attribution and empathy. Our experiment revealed a statistically significant difference in attribution. Participants who received a narrative prompt with the term ‘illegal immigrant’ evaluated the character's situation with internal attribution, and thus deserving of any negative outcomes, such as racial profiling, deportation, and separation from (...)
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  12.  1
    Lótman Continua a Surpreender: Revoluções E Emoções Coletivas.Laura Gherlone - 2019 - Bakhtiniana 14 (4):170-191.
    Resumo Entre 1988 e 1993, Iúri M. Lótman formulou algumas proposições sobre “a voz da massa anônima”: uma voz coletiva que, em certas situacões ligadas a crises de caráter cultural, é portadora de paixões violentas que podem produzir interferências profundas no curso da história. Em seus últimos trabalhos, o semioticista russo postulou, diante disso, a noção de uma semiótica das emoções como objeto de estudo para entender a dinâmica cultural, em especial de períodos tidos como revolucionários ou de transição, a (...)
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  13.  17
    Hipponax Fragment 128W: Epic Parody or Expulsive Incantation?Christopher A. Faraone - 2004 - Classical Antiquity 23 (2):209-245.
    Scholars have traditionally interpreted Hipponax fragment 128 as an epic parody designed to belittle the grand pretensions and gluttonous habits of his enemy. I suggest, however, that this traditional reading ultimately falls short because of two unexamined assumptions: that the meter and diction of the fragment are exclusively meant to recall epic narrative and not any other early hexametrical genre, and that the descriptive epithets in lines 2 and 3 are the ad hoc comic creations of the poet and simply (...)
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  14.  58
    The Creativity of Resentment in Italian Society.Stefano Tomelleri - 2009 - World Futures 65 (8):589-595.
    This article focuses on a political use of resentment for establishing social order. Italian society is becoming more more competitive and individualistic, offering social actors many choices, but without promoting the conditions of equal opportunity necessary to fulfill their increasingly inflated desires. Social interactions come to be pervaded by frustration and resentment. In the modern era resentment was traditionally channelled against various scapegoats, both external—enemy nation-states—or internal: rival social classes; ethnic, religious, and cultural minorities. However, globalization and the declining (...)
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  15. Myth and Society in Ancient Greece.Janet Lloyd (ed.) - 1990 - Zone Books.
    In this groundbreaking study, Jean Pierre-Vernant delineates a compelling new vision of ancient Greece. Myth and Society in Ancient Greece takes us far from the calm and familiar images of Polykleitos and the Parthenon to reveal a fundamentally other culture one of slavery, of masks and death, of scapegoats, of ritual hunting and ecstasies.Vernant's provocative discussion of various institutions and practices including war, marriage, and sacrifice details the complex intersection of the religious, social, and political structures of ancient Greece. (...)
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  16.  38
    Simone Weil and René Girard.Marie Cabaud Meaney - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (3):565-587.
    Religion in the perverted form of idolatry/ideology is at the root of violence for Simone Weil and René Girard. For Girard, “mimetic desire” expresses the idolization of another and ultimately of the self: when the individual’s expectations of achieving autonomy through another remain unfulfilled, he seeksa scapegoat. For Weil, everyone is subject to “force” as recipient or perpetrator of violence which is catalyzed by ideology, a form of idolatry. While Weil focuseson the idolatry of ideas, both writers agree that the (...)
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  17.  22
    Myth and Society in Ancient Greece.Janet Lloyd (ed.) - 1988 - Zone Books.
    In this groundbreaking study, Jean Pierre-Vernant delineates a compelling new vision of ancient Greece. Myth and Society in Ancient Greece takes us far from the calm and familiar images of Polykleitos and the Parthenon to reveal a fundamentally other culture one of slavery, of masks and death, of scapegoats, of ritual hunting and ecstasies.Vernant's provocative discussion of various institutions and practices including war, marriage, and sacrifice details the complex intersection of the religious, social, and political structures of ancient Greece. (...)
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  18.  13
    The Devil's Insatiable Sex: A Genealogy of Evil Incarnate.Margaret Denike - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):10-43.
    This paper traces the political economy of the Christian concept of "evil" incarnate and its concomitant operations of sexual objection and the repudiation of femininity, beginning with the early church's inaugural struggles to impose its monotheistic Law against maternal paganism. With attention to how "evil" has been deployed to sanction and sanctify the persecution of scapegoats, and particularly of heretics and witches, I examine the masculinist struggles for jurisdiction and control over women.
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  19.  13
    Odio humani generis : Apocalypticiens messianistes et historiens intégrés à l’époque des Guerres des Judéens.Pierluigi Piovanelli - 2014 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 70 (3):459-474.
    Pierluigi Piovanelli | : Tacite est le seul témoin explicite d’une persécution des « chrétiens » de Rome à la suite du célèbre incendie de la capitale, en 64 de notre ère, une catastrophe dont la population aurait attribué la responsabilité criminelle à l’empereur Néron, si les adeptes de cette « superstition pernicieuse » originaire de la Judée n’avaient pas été opportunément identifiés comme les coupables. Si, d’un côté, il est facile de comprendre la nécessité pour le pouvoir impérial de (...)
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  20.  11
    Simone Weil and René Girard: Violence and the Sacred.Marie Cabaud Meaney - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (3):565-587.
    Religion in the perverted form of idolatry/ideology is at the root of violence for Simone Weil and René Girard. For Girard, “mimetic desire” expresses the idolization of another and ultimately of the self: when the individual’s expectations of achieving autonomy through another remain unfulfilled, he seeksa scapegoat. For Weil, everyone is subject to “force” as recipient or perpetrator of violence which is catalyzed by ideology, a form of idolatry. While Weil focuseson the idolatry of ideas, both writers agree that the (...)
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  21.  12
    On “Islamic Terrorism” A Reply to Pellicani.Ahmet Çiğdem - 2006 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2006 (134):161-167.
    The concepts of “Islamic Fundamentalism” and “Islamic Terrorism” are the usual suspects in the present political reality and discourse. After the tragic events in New York, Madrid, Istanbul, and London, one has every reason to think that Islam is somehow a part of the problem. But in terms of the issues that we currently face, we must be careful to distinguish between understanding and the creation of scapegoats. There is no doubt that a terrorist act is unjustifiable, and it (...)
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  22.  18
    Communitarianism and Patriotism.Antoon Vandevelde - 1997 - Ethical Perspectives 4 (3):180-190.
    The collapse of communism and the transition to a market economy and political democracy in Eastern and Central Europe have been accompanied by an outburst of nationalist and patriotic passions. Most commentators see this as a negative phenomenon, a narrow-minded reaction to the void after a long period in which politics was inspired by ideological excess, or a retreat toward a mythical past when confronted with a highly uncertain future. Others look at it in a more positive way: after all (...)
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  23.  11
    Glaube Und Vernunft. Ironie in der Conditio Humana?Charles Taylor & Hans-Peter Krüger - 2012 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 60 (5):763-784.
    Charles Taylor explains a broader understanding of faith as well as of reason in his philosophical anthropology. In leading one’s own life, faith contains more than having certain beliefs, and reason grasps more than having scientific methods. Taylor answers questions regarding the relation of his great narrative to the approaches of M. Heidegger, M. Merleau-Ponty, M. Foucault, K. Jaspers, and S. Eisenstadt . Insofar as the secularization of Christianity involves ironic reversals, all main directions in Western modernity are faced with (...)
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  24. Exploring Worldviews in Literature: From William Wordsworth to Edward Albee.Laura Inez Deavenport Barge - 2009 - Abilene Christian University Press.
    Numinous spaces in British literature from William Wordsworth to Samuel Beckett -- Jesus figures in American literature from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Edward Albee -- Using Bakhtin's definitions to discover ethical voices in Solzhenitsyn and Tolstoy -- René Girard's categories of scapegoats in literature of the American South -- Hopkins's metaphysics of nature as sacred disclosure -- The book of job as mirrored in Hopkins's metaphysics -- Beckett's mythos of the absence of God.
     
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  25.  3
    Unclean.Richard Allan Beck - 2012 - Lutterworth Press.
    Introduction: Mercy and sacrifice -- pt. 1. Unclean. Darwin and disgust -- Contamination and contagion -- pt. 2. Purity. Morality and metaphors -- Divinity and dumbfounding -- pt. 3. Hospitality. Love and boundaries -- Monsters and scapegoats -- Contempt and heresy -- Hospitality and embrace -- pt. 4. Mortality. Body and death -- Sex and privy -- Need and incarnation -- Conclusion: Elimination and regulation.
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  26. Psychopolitics: Conversations with Trevor Cribben Merrill.Jean-Michel Oughourlian - 2012 - Michigan State University Press.
    For thousands of years, political leaders have unified communities by aligning them against common enemies. However, today more than ever, the search for “common” enemies results in anything but unanimity. Scapegoats like Saddam Hussein, for example, led to a stark polarization in the United States. Renowned neuropsychiatrist and psychologist Jean-Michel Oughourlian proposes that the only authentic enemy is the one responsible for both everyday frustrations and global dangers, such as climate change—ourselves. Oughourlian, who pioneered an “interdividual” psychology with René (...)
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