Results for 'school tests'

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  1.  3
    How Accurately Can Primary School Teachers Predict the Scores of Their Pupils in Standardised Tests of Attainment? A Study of Some Non‐Cognitive Factors That Influence Specific Judgements.Jim Doherty & Michael Conolly - 1985 - Educational Studies 11 (1):41-60.
    (1985). How Accurately can Primary School Teachers Predict the Scores of their Pupils in Standardised Tests of Attainment? A Study of some non‐Cognitive Factors that Influence Specific Judgements. Educational Studies: Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 41-60.
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  2.  16
    Some Recent School Books Adrian Spooner: Lingo: A Course on Words and How to Use Them. Pupils' Book and Teachers' Pack with Graded Tests [for Photocopying]. Pp. Vi + 167 (Pupils), 32 (Teachers); Many Black and White Illustrations, Some in Cartoon Form. Bristol Classical Press, 1988. Paper, £4.95 Each Vol. Lawrence Giangrande: Greek in English. Pp. Viii + 148. North York, Ontario: University Press of Canada (Captus Press Inc.), 1987. Paper, US $19.20 (Can $22.50). Michael Massey: Women in Ancient Greece and Rome. Pp. Iv + 36; 20 Black and White Illustrations. Cambridge University Press, 1988. Paper, £2.50. Robin Place: The Romans: Fact and Fiction. Adventures in Roman Britain. Pp. Iii + 32; 40 Black and White, and Colour, Illustrations. Cambridge University Press, 1988. £5.25 (Paper, £3.25). [REVIEW]S. J. Freebairn-Smith - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (02):367-368.
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  3.  2
    Individual Tests of School Children.E. A. Kirkpatrick - 1900 - Psychological Review 7 (3):274-280.
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  4.  1
    Manual of Mental and Physical Tests: A Book of Directions Compiled with Special Reference to the Experimental Study of School Children.Guy Montrose Whipple - 1911 - Mind 20 (78):268-270.
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  5. Assessing Concept Possession as an Explicit and Social Practice.Alessia Marabini & Luca Moretti - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):801-816.
    We focus on issues of learning assessment from the point of view of an investigation of philosophical elements in teaching. We contend that assessment of concept possession at school based on ordinary multiple-choice tests might be ineffective because it overlooks aspects of human rationality illuminated by Robert Brandom’s inferentialism––the view that conceptual content largely coincides with the inferential role of linguistic expressions used in public discourse. More particularly, we argue that multiple-choice tests at schools might fail to (...)
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  6.  17
    English Language Acquisition and Educational Attainment at the End of Primary School.Steve Strand & Feyisa Demie - 2005 - Educational Studies 31 (3):275-291.
    This paper analyses the national key stage 2 test results for 2300 11?year?old pupils in an inner London LEA. A range of concurrent pupil background data was also collected, including whether pupils spoke English as an additional language (EAL), and if so, their stage of fluency in English. EAL pupils at the early stages (1?3) of developing fluency had significantly lower KS2 test scores in all subjects than their monolingual peers. However, EAL pupils who were fully fluent in English achieved (...)
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  7.  3
    On the Road: Combining Possible Identities and Metaphor to Motivate Disadvantaged Middle-School Students.Mark J. Landau, Jesse Barrera & Lucas A. Keefer - 2017 - Metaphor and Symbol 32 (4):276-290.
    In America, White and affluent middle-school students outperform minority students and those of low socioeconomic status on measures of academic performance. This achievement gap is partly attributable to differences in academic engagement. A promising strategy for engaging students is to elicit an academic possible identity: an image of oneself in the future as an accomplished student. Tests of this strategy’s efficacy show mixed results, however. According to Identity-Based Motivation Theory, this is because a salient possible identity enhances goal (...)
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  8.  13
    Pupil Mobility, Attainment and Progress in Secondary School.Steve Strand & Feyisa Demie - 2007 - Educational Studies 33 (3):313-331.
    This paper is the second of two articles arising from a study of the association between pupil mobility and attainment in national tests and examinations in an inner London borough. Our first article examined the association of pupil mobility with attainment and progress during primary school. It concluded that pupil mobility had little impact on performance in national tests at age 11, once pupils? prior attainment at age 7 and other pupil background factors such as age, sex, (...)
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  9.  5
    Role‐Taking Ability and Altruistic Behaviour in Elementary School Children.Dennis Krebs & Bert Sturrup - 1982 - Journal of Moral Education 11 (2):94-100.
    Abstract Twenty?four second? and third?grade children were given two cognitively?based role?taking tests developed by Flavell et al. (1968). The children's social behaviour was observed over a two?month period. It was coded according to a scheme introduced by the anthropologists Whiting and Whiting (1975) which produces composite scores of egoism and altruism. Teachers rated the children's social behaviour and role?taking ability. IQ scores were obtained from school records. Tests of the reliability and validity of the measures of role?taking (...)
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  10.  1
    Profile of South African Secondary-School Teachers’ Teaching Quality: Evaluation of Teaching Practices Using an Observation Instrument.Thelma de Jager, Mattheus Jacobus Coetzee, Ridwan Maulana, Michelle Helms-Lorenz & Wim van de Grift - 2017 - Educational Studies 43 (4):410-429.
    The need for quality teaching is reflected in the poor performance of students in international tests. Teachers’ practices and contextual factors could contribute to substandard quality of teaching in South Africa. Several studies indicate that successful learning is largely dependent on the teachers’ practices in class. The focus of the present research was to profile the effective teaching practices of 424 secondary-school teachers in the Gauteng Province, South Africa. Teachers were observed by trained observers using a valid and (...)
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  11.  1
    Analysis of the Effects of School Variables Using Multilevel Models.I. P. Schagen - 1990 - Educational Studies 16 (1):61-73.
    Multilevel models allow data to be analysed which are hierarchical in nature; in particular, data which have been collected on pupils grouped into schools. Some of the associated variables may be measured at the pupil level, and others at the school level. The use of multilevel models produces estimates of variances between schools and pupils, as well as the effects of background variables in reducing or explaining these variances. One data set which has been analysed relates to the national (...)
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  12.  6
    Impact of a High School Graduation Examination on Social Studies Teachers' Instructional Practices.Kenneth E. Vogler - 2005 - Journal of Social Studies Research 29 (2):19-33.
  13. Phenomenological Argumentative Structure.Gilbert Plumer - 2001 - Argumentation 15 (2):173-189.
    The nontechnical ability to identify or match argumentative structure seems to be an important reasoning skill. Instruments that have questions designed to measure this skill include major standardized tests for graduate school admission, for example, the United States-Canadian Law School Admission Test (LSAT), the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), and the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Writers and reviewers of such tests need an appropriate foundation for developing such questions--they need a proper representation of phenomenological argumentative structure--for (...)
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  14. What Constitutes a Formal Analogy?Kenneth Olson & Gilbert Plumer - 2002 - In Hans V. Hansen, Christopher W. Tindale, J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson & Robert C. Pinto (eds.), Argumentation and its Applications [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation. pp. 1-8.
    There is ample justification for having analogical material in standardized tests for graduate school admission, perhaps especially for law school. We think that formal-analogy questions should compare different scenarios whose structure is the same in terms of the number of objects and the formal properties of their relations. The paper deals with this narrower question of how legitimately to have formal analogy test items, and the broader question of what constitutes a formal analogy in general.
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  15.  15
    Conceptual Gain and Successful Problem-Solving in Primary School Mathematics.Pamela Davenport - 1999 - Educational Studies 25 (1):55-78.
    This study investigated the effects of children solving addition and subtraction problems collaboratively in comparison with solving problems in the traditional manner of the classroom. Seventy-seven children were divided into experimental and control groups, the experimental children being assigned to groups of four with note taken of the ability and gender mix. Following a pre-test-intervention-post-test design, the experimental children worked together in their groups using problem-solving guidelines to solve a number of problems, thereafter 'teaching' their problem to a fellow pupil. (...)
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  16. Tilburg School of Humanities.Hans Lindahl - unknown
    I would like to use this seminar to have your views on the first draft of Part I of the monograph I am currently writing about the relation between boundaries and legal order. Part I falls into four chapters. Chapter 1 contextualizes the discussion by drawing on the findings of Saskia Sassen's empirically informed contribution to the sociology of globalisation to undermine the widely shared assumption that the uncoupling of law and state exposes the inside/outside distinction as a merely contingent (...)
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  17. The Unity of the Brentano School.Arnaud Dewalque - 2017 - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Franz Brentano and the Brentano School. London and New York: Routledge. pp. 236-248.
    Franz Brentano’s works are not just full of deep and innovative insights into mind, world and values. His views also turned out to be highly influential upon several generations of students, who made them the basis of their own philosophical investigations, giving rise to what is known as the Brentano School (Albertazzi et al. 1996; Fisette & Fréchette 2007). In this chapter, I give a bird’s eye view of the Brentano School from a rather historical perspective. My leading (...)
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  18. Symbolic Arithmetic Knowledge Without Instruction.Camilla K. Gilmore, Shannon E. McCarthy & Elizabeth S. Spelke - unknown
    Symbolic arithmetic is fundamental to science, technology and economics, but its acquisition by children typically requires years of effort, instruction and drill1,2. When adults perform mental arithmetic, they activate nonsymbolic, approximate number representations3,4, and their performance suffers if this nonsymbolic system is impaired5. Nonsymbolic number representations also allow adults, children, and even infants to add or subtract pairs of dot arrays and to compare the resulting sum or difference to a third array, provided that only approximate accuracy is required6–10. Here (...)
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  19.  26
    From “Old School” to “Farm-to-School”: Neoliberalization From the Ground Up. [REVIEW]Patricia Allen & Julie Guthman - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):401-415.
    Farm-to-school (FTS) programs have garnered the attentions and energies of people in a diverse array of social locations in the food system and are serving as a sort of touchstone for many in the alternative agrifood movement. Yet, unlike other alternative agrifood initiatives, FTS programs intersect directly with the long-established institution of the welfare state, including its vestiges of New Deal farm programs and public entitlement. This paper explores how FTS is navigating the liminal terrain of public and private (...)
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  20. Machiavelli Against Republicanism: On the Cambridge School's "Guicciardinian Moments".John P. McCormick - 2003 - Political Theory 31 (5):615-643.
    Scholars loosely affiliated with the "Cambridge School" (e.g., Pocock, Skinner, Viroli, and Pettit) accentuate rule of law, common good, class equilibrium, and non-domination in Machiavelli's political thought and republicanism generally but underestimate the Florentine's preference for class conflict and ignore his insistence on elite accountability. The author argues that they obscure the extent to which Machiavelli is an anti-elitist critic of the republican tradition, which they fail to disclose was predominantly oligarchic. The prescriptive lessons these scholars draw from republicanism (...)
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  21. Reason, Tradition, and the Good: Macintyre's Tradition-Constituted Reason and Frankfurt School Critical Theory.Jeffery Nicholas - 2012 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Introduction: the question of reason -- The Frankfurt School critique of reason -- Habermas's communicative rationality -- Macintyre's tradition-constituted reason -- A substantive reason -- Beyond relativism: reasonable progress and learning from -- Conclusion: toward a Thomistic-Aristotelian critical theory of society.
     
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  22. HMI and OFSTED : Evolution or Revolution in School Inspection.John Lee & Johh Fitz - 1997 - British Journal of Educational Studies 45 (1):39-52.
    HMI and Ofsted modes of school inpection are described and compared. The links between these modes are stressed. The information gathering capacity of Ofsted enables it to formulate specific and authoritative advice on good curriculum and pedagogic practice and thus to influence the direction of education policy and steer the system generally.
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  23.  14
    The Lvov–Warsaw School as a Source of Inspiration for Argumentation Theory.Marcin Koszowy & Michał Araszkiewicz - 2014 - Argumentation 28 (3):283-300.
    The thesis of the paper holds that some future developments of argumentation theory may be inspired by the rich logico-methodological legacy of the Lvov–Warsaw School (LWS), the Polish research movement that was most active from 1895 to 1939. As a selection of ideas of the LWS which exploit both formal and pragmatic aspects of the force of argument, we present: Ajdukiewicz’s account of reasoning and inference, Bocheński’s analyses of superstitions or dogmas, and Frydman’s constructive approach to legal interpretation. This (...)
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  24.  23
    Does Management Experience Change the Ethical Perceptions of Retail Professionals: A Comparison of the Ethical Perceptions of Current Students with Those of Recent Graduates? [REVIEW]Ann M. DuPont & Jane S. Craig - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (8):815 - 826.
    The purpose of this study was to extend the previous research on ethics in retailing. Prior research of Dornoff and Tankersley (1985–1976), Gifford and Norris (1987), Norris and Gifford (1988), and Burns and Rayman (1989) examined the ethics orientation of retail sales persons, sales managers, and business school students. These studies found the college students less ethically-oriented than retail sales people and retail managers. The present study attempts to extend the research on ethics formation to a geographically and academically (...)
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  25.  52
    The Just Price: Three Insights From the Salamanca School.Juan Manuel Elegido - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):29-46.
    In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, members of the Salamanca School engaged in a sustained and sophisticated discussion of the issue of just prices. This article uses their contribution as a point of departure for a consideration of justice in pricing which will be relevant to current-day circumstances. The key theses of members of this school were that fairness of exchanges should be assessed objectively, that the fair price of an article is one equal to its ‘value’, and (...)
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  26.  22
    Linguistic Influences on Mathematical Development: How Important is the Transparency of the Counting System?Ann Dowker, Sheila Bala & Delyth Lloyd - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (4):523 – 538.
    Wales uses languages with both regular (Welsh) and irregular (English) counting systems. Three groups of 6- and 8-year-old Welsh children with varying degrees of exposure to the Welsh language—those who spoke Welsh at both home and school; those who spoke Welsh only at home; and those who spoke only English—were given standardized tests of arithmetic and a test of understanding representations of two-digit numbers. Groups did not differ on the arithmetic tests, but both groups of Welsh speakers (...)
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  27.  57
    The Hatred of Public Schooling: The School as the Mark of Democracy.Maarten Simons - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (5-6):666-682.
    This article takes up a text that Rancière published shortly after The Ignorant School Master appeared in French, 'École, production, égalité'[School, Production, Equality] (1988), in which he sketched the school as being preeminently the place of equality. In this vein, and opposed to the story of the school as the place where inequality is reproduced and therefore in need of reform, the article wants to recount the story of the school as the invention of a (...)
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  28.  45
    The Relationships Between School Inspections, School Characteristics and School Improvement.M. C. M. Ehren & A. J. Visscher - 2008 - British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (2):205-227.
    The effects of school inspections on school improvement have been investigated only to a limited degree. The investigation reported on in this article is meant to expand our knowledge base regarding the impact of school inspections on school improvement. The theoretical framework for this research is partly based on the policy theory behind the Dutch Educational School Supervision Act (the latter includes assumptions about how school inspections lead to school improvement). Interviews and a (...)
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  29. A Review of the LSAT Using Literature on Legal Reasoning.Gilbert E. Plumer - 2000 - Law School Admission Council Computerized Testing Report 97 (8):1-19.
    Research using current literature on legal reasoning was conducted with the goals of (a) determining what skills are most important in good legal reasoning according to such literature, (b) determining the extent to which existing Law School Admission Test item types and subtypes are designed to assess those skills, and (c) suggesting test specifications or new or refined item types and formats that could be developed in the future to assess any important skills that appear [by (a) and (b)] (...)
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  30.  39
    Validation of a Measure of Ethical Sensitivity and Examination of the Effects of Previous Multicultural and Ethics Courses on Ethical Sensitivity.Selcuk R. Sirin, Mary M. Brabeck, Anmol Satiani & Lauren Rogers-Serin - 2003 - Ethics and Behavior 13 (3):221 – 235.
    This article describes the development of a computerized version of a measure of ethical sensitivity to racial and gender intolerance, the Racial Ethical Sensitivity Test (REST; Brabeck et al., 2000). The REST was based on James Rest's (1983) 4-component model of moral development and the professional codes of ethics from school-based professions. The new version, Racial and Ethical Sensitivity Test-Compact Disk (REST-CD), consists of 5 videotaped scenarios (used in the original REST) followed by an interactive "interview" presented on compact (...)
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  31.  8
    Selection for Delayed Maturity.Nicholas Blurton Jones & Frank W. Marlowe - 2002 - Human Nature 13 (2):199-238.
    Humans have a much longer juvenile period (weaning to first reproduction, 14 or more years) than their closest relatives (chimpanzees, 8 years). Three explanations are prominent in the literature. (a) Humans need the extra time to learn their complex subsistence techniques. (b) Among mammals, since length of the juvenile period bears a constant relationship to adult lifespan, the human juvenile period is just as expected. We therefore only need to explain the elongated adult lifespan, which can be explained by the (...)
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  32. What Can Philosophers Offer Social Scientists?; or The Frankfurt School and its Relevance to Social Science: From the History of Philosophical Sociology to an Examination of Issues in the Current EU.Mason Richey - 2008 - International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences 3 (6):63-72.
    This paper presents the history of the Frankfurt School’s inclusion of normative concerns in social science research programs during the period 1930-1955. After examining the relevant methodology, I present a model of how such a program could look today. I argue that such an approach is both valuable to contemporary social science programs and overlooked by current philosophers and social scientists.
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  33.  28
    Commentary on the Concept of Brain Death Within the Catholic Bioethical Framework.Joseph L. Verheijde & Michael Potts - 2010 - Christian Bioethics 16 (3):246-256.
    Since the introduction of the concept of brain death by the Ad Hoc Committee of the Harvard Medical School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death in 1968, the validity of this concept has been challenged by medical scientists, as well as by legal, philosophical, and religious scholars. In light of increased criticism of the concept of brain death, Stephen Napier, a staff ethicist at the National Catholic Bioethics Center, set out to prove that the whole-brain death criterion serves (...)
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  34.  22
    Farm to School Programs: Exploring the Role of Regionally-Based Food Distributors in Alternative Agrifood Networks. [REVIEW]Betty T. Izumi, D. Wynne Wright & Michael W. Hamm - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (3):335-350.
    Farm to school programs are at the vanguard of efforts to create an alternative agrifood system in the United States. Regionally-based, mid-tier food distributors may play an important role in harnessing the potential of farm to school programs to create viable market opportunities for small- and mid-size family farmers, while bringing more locally grown fresh food to school cafeterias. This paper focuses on the perspectives of food distributors. Our findings suggest that the food distributors profiled have the (...)
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  35.  23
    Impact of Mba Education on Students' Values: Two Longitudinal Studies. [REVIEW]Venkat R. Krishnan - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):233 - 246.
    The impact of 2-year residential fulltime MBA program on students’ values was studied using a longitudinal design and data collected over 7 years from a business school in India. Values were measured when students entered the program, and again when they graduated. Sample in Study 1 consisted of 229 students from three consecutive graduating classes. Rank-order or ipsative measure of values was used. Results of matched sample t-tests show that self-oriented values like a comfortable life and pleasure become (...)
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  36.  35
    You Can Know Your School and Feed It Too: Vermont Farmers' Motivations and Distribution Practices in Direct Sales to School Food Services.David Conner, Benjamin King, Jane Kolodinsky, Erin Roche, Christopher Koliba & Amy Trubek - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):321-332.
    Farm to School (FTS) programs are increasingly popular as methods to teach students about food, nutrition, and agriculture by connecting students with the sources of the food that they eat. They may also provide opportunity for farmers seeking to diversify market channels. Food service buyers in FTS programs often choose to procure food for school meals directly from farmers. The distribution practices required for such direct procurement often bring significant transaction costs for both school food service professionals (...)
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  37.  31
    The Emergence and Framing of Farm-to-School Initiatives: Civic Engagement, Health and Local Agriculture. [REVIEW]Jessica M. Bagdonis, C. Clare Hinrichs & Kai A. Schafft - 2009 - Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):107-119.
    Interest in and initiation of farm-to-school (FTS) programs have increased in recent years, spurred on by converging public concerns about child obesity trends and risks associated with industrialization and distancing in the modern food system. A civic agriculture framework that more specifically considers civic engagement and problem solving offers insights about variations in the development and prospects for FTS programs. Drawing on comparative case studies of two emerging FTS initiatives in Pennsylvania—one in a rural setting and one in an (...)
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  38.  37
    Taking School Contexts More Seriously: The Social Justice Challenge.Martin Thrupp & Ruth Lupton - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (3):308-328.
    Research is increasingly highlighting the influence of school contexts on school processes and student achievement. This article reviews a range of social justice rationales for taking school contexts into better account, and highlights the challenges contextualisation currently poses for practice and for policy. It notes important constraints on contextualised practice and limited developments in contextualising policy. There is now increasing concern to recognise and understand context in school effectiveness and school improvement research but such research (...)
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  39.  16
    Does the School Composition Effect Matter? Evidence From Belgian Data.Xavier Dumay & Vincent Dupriez - 2008 - British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (4):440-477.
    Even if the literature on the effects of pupil composition has been extensive, no clear consensus has been reached concerning the significance and magnitude of this effect. The first objective of this article is to estimate the magnitude of the school composition effect in primary schools (6th grade) in French-speaking Belgium. Different indicators of school composition are used: academic, socio-cultural, 'language' and sex composition. Except for sex composition, the results show that the school composition effect explains significant (...)
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  40.  34
    Distinguishing Genetic From Nongenetic Medical Tests: Some Implications for Antidiscrimination Legislation.Joseph S. Alper & Jon Beckwith - 1998 - Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):141-150.
    Genetic discrimination is becoming an increasingly important problem in the United States. Information acquired from genetic tests has been used by insurance companies to reject applications for insurance policies and to refuse payment for the treatment of illnesses. Numerous states and the United States Congress have passed or are considering passage of laws that would forbid such use of genetic information by health insurance companies. Here we argue that much of this legislation is severely flawed because of the difficulty (...)
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  41. School and the Future of Schole: A Preliminary Dialogue.Walter Omar Kohan & David Knowles Kennedy - 2014 - Childhood and Philosophy 10 (19):199-216.
    This conversation offers a discussion of the meaning, sense and social function of school, both as an institution and as a time-space for the practice of schole . It also discusses the different types of Greek time : Schole is, as aion or childhood, a further emergence, a radicalization of school as an experimental zone of subjectivity and of collectivity. Schole is, as aion or childhood, a further emergence, a radicalization of school as an experimental zone of (...)
     
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  42. A Frankfurti Iskola és 1968 (The Frankfurt School and 1968).Attila Tanyi - 2009 - Fordulat 3 (2):9-33.
    The aim of the paper is to investigate the connection between the Frankfurt School and the events of 1968. Accordingly, the paper focuses only on those important members of the School whose philosophical, ideological or practical influence on the events is clearly detectable. This means dealing with four thinkers in three sections: the influence of Adorno and Horkheimer is treated in the same section, whereas the work of Marcuse and Habermas is examined in separate sections. The three sections (...)
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  43.  31
    Lost in Space? Located in Place: Geo‐Phenomenological Exploration and School.Ruyu Hung & Andrew Stables - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):193-203.
    This paper aims at revealing the various meanings of schools as more than built physical environments from a geographical-phenomenological (or ‘geo-phenomenological’) perspective. This paper consists of five sections: the first explicates the meaning of ‘geo-phenomenology’; the second reveals the meaning of ‘environment’ and a dialectics of strangeness and intimacy through geo-phenomenological analysis; the third examines the meanings of environment as ‘space’ and ‘place’ and the act of naming as the process of constructing meaning between humans and environment; the fourth section (...)
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  44.  11
    The Chicago School.William James - unknown
    he rest of the world has made merry over the Chicago man's legendary saying that 'Chicago hasn't had time: to get round to culture yet, but when she does strike her, she'll make her hum.' Already the prophecy is fulfilling itself in a dazzling manner. Chicago has a School of Thought! -- a school of thought which, it is safe to predict, will figure in literature as the School of Chicago for twenty-five years to come. Some universities (...)
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  45.  11
    School Admissions: Increasing Equity, Accountability and Transparency.Anne West, Hazel Pennell & Philip Noden - 1998 - British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (2):188 - 200.
    This paper examines the impact of education reforms on school admissions policies and practices. It discusses the changes that are needed to improve the current system, especially in areas where the market is highly developed. It is concluded that the new legislation to be enacted by the current Labour Government should be beneficial, but that more far-reaching changes are needed for the admissions process to be equitable, transparent and accountable.
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  46.  1
    Impact of MBA Education on Students’ Values: Two Longitudinal Studies.Venkat R. Krishnan - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):233-246.
    The impact of 2-year residential fulltime MBA program on students' values was studied using a longitudinal design and data collected over 7 years from a business school in India. Values were measured when students entered the program, and again when they graduated. Sample in Study 1 consisted of 229 students from three consecutive graduating classes. Rank-order or ipsative measure of values was used. Results of matched sample t-tests show that self-oriented values like a comfortable life and pleasure become (...)
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  47.  10
    The Objectivity of Subjective Bayesianism.Jan Sprenger - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 8 (3):539-558.
    Subjective Bayesianism is a major school of uncertain reasoning and statistical inference. It is often criticized for a lack of objectivity: it opens the door to the influence of values and biases, evidence judgments can vary substantially between scientists, it is not suited for informing policy decisions. My paper rebuts these concerns by connecting the debates on scientific objectivity and statistical method. First, I show that the above concerns arise equally for standard frequentist inference with null hypothesis significance (...). Second, the criticisms are based on specific senses of objectivity with unclear epistemic value. Third, I show that Subjective Bayesianism promotes other, epistemically relevant senses of scientific objectivity—most notably by increasing the transparency of scientific reasoning. (shrink)
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  48.  25
    Towards a Theory on the Impact of School Inspections.M. C. M. Ehren & A. J. Visscher - 2006 - British Journal of Educational Studies 54 (1):51-72.
    This article describes a theory about the ambition of most Inspectorates to realise 'school improvement through inspection'. Literature about a number of direct and indirect interventions, such as reciprocity, communication and feedback is used to build a theoretical model stating the relations between working methods of school inspectors, reactions of schools and resulting effects and side effects. Finally two types of inspections strategies are described that can be used in different types of schools. We expect schools with a (...)
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  49.  77
    Critical Thinking: Teaching and Assessing It.Alec Fisher - 2014 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 29 (1):4-16.
    I have long been fascinated by the process of argument, so it seemed natural to study philosophy and logic at university, then, as a University teacher, to teach them. Since I gradually realised these subjects didn’t help students to reason and argue well, I tried to devise materials which would. This led first to my writing The Logic of Real Arguments and later, Critical Thinking: An Introduction. If you wish to teach thinking skills it is important to assess whether your (...)
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  50.  10
    Reorienting the Business School Agenda: The Case for Relevance, Rigor, and Righteousness.Andreas Birnik & Jon Billsberry - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):985-999.
    This article contributes to the current debate regarding management education and research. It frames the current business school critique as a paradox regarding the arguments for ‘self-interest’ versus ‘altruism’ as human motives. Based on this, a typology of management with four representative types labeled: unguided, altruistic, egoistic, and righteous is developed. It is proposed that the path to the future of management education and research might be found by relegitimizing the ‘altruistic’ spirit of the classics of the great Axial (...)
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