Results for 'science communication'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Science Communication and the Problematic Impact of Descriptive Norms.Uwe Peters - forthcoming - British Journal for Philosophy of Science.
    When scientists or science reporters communicate research results to the public, this often involves ethical and epistemic risks. One such a risk arises when scientific claims cause cognitive or behavioral changes in the audience that contribute to the self-fulfillment of these claims. Focusing on such effects, I argue that the ethical and epistemic problem that they pose is likely to be much broader than hitherto appreciated. Moreover, it is often due to a psychological phenomenon that has been neglected in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  86
    Science Communication, Cultural Cognition, and the Pull of Epistemic Paternalism.Alex Davies - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    There is a correlation between positions taken on some scientific questions and political leaning. One way to explain this correlation is the Cultural Cognition Hypothesis (CCH): people’s political leanings are causing them to process evidence to maintain fixed answers to the questions, rather than to seek the truth. Another way is the Different Background Belief Hypothesis (DBBH): people of different political leanings have different background beliefs which rationalize different positions on these scientific questions. In this paper I argue for two (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  78
    Science Communication and Epistemic Injustice.Jonathan Matheson & Valerie Joly Chock - 2019 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 8 (1):1-9.
    Epistemic injustice occurs when someone is wronged in their capacity as a knower.[1] More and more attention is being paid to the epistemic injustices that exist in our scientific practices. In a recent paper, Fabien Medvecky argues that science communication is fundamentally epistemically unjust. In what follows we briefly explain his argument before raising several challenges to it.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  20
    Science Communication and the Problematic Impact of Descriptive Norms.Uwe Peters - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
  5. Science Communication.Annette Leßmöllmann, Marcelo Dascal & Thomas Gloning (eds.) - 2020
    For this handbook, we decided to combine a first strategy that looks at different research approaches and asks for their specific contribution to the study of science communication. This is the aim of section I. A second and third strategy is to describe main topics and central aspects of internal and external science communication. This is the aim of sections II and III, respectively: In section II the authors deal with text types, media, and practices of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  47
    Science, Community, and the Transformation of American Philosophy, 1860-1930.Daniel J. Wilson - 1990 - University of Chicago Press.
    In the first book-length study of American philosophy at the turn of the century, Daniel J. Wilson traces the formation of philosophy as an academic discipline. Wilson shows how the rise of the natural and physical sciences at the end of the nineteenth century precipitated a "crisis of confidence" among philosophers as to the role of their discipline. Deftly tracing the ways in which philosophers sought to incorporate scientific values and methods into their outlook and to redefine philosophy itself, Wilson (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  7. Science, Community and the Transformation of American Philosophy 1860-1930.Daniel J. Wilson - 1991 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 27 (3):376-389.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  8. Extended Cognition in Science Communication.David Ludwig - 2014 - Public Understanding of Science 23 (8):982-995.
    The aim of this article is to propose a methodological externalism that takes knowledge about science to be partly constituted by the environment. My starting point is the debate about extended cognition in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science. Externalists claim that human cognition extends beyond the brain and can be partly constituted by external devices. First, I show that most studies of public knowledge about science are based on an internalist framework that excludes the environment we usually (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  11
    Nanoethics, Science Communication, and a Fourth Model for Public Engagement.Andy Miah - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (2):139-152.
    This paper develops a fourth model of public engagement with science, grounded in the principle of nurturing scientific agency through participatory bioethics. It argues that social media is an effective device through which to enable such engagement, as it has the capacity to empower users and transforms audiences into co-producers of knowledge, rather than consumers of content. Social media also fosters greater engagement with the political and legal implications of science, thus promoting the value of scientific citizenship. This (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  53
    Fairness in Knowing: Science Communication and Epistemic Justice.Fabien Medvecky - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (5):1393-1408.
    Science communication, as a field and as a practice, is fundamentally about knowledge distribution; it is about the access to, and the sharing of knowledge. All distribution brings with it issues of ethics and justice. Indeed, whether science communicators acknowledge it or not, they get to decide both which knowledge is shared, and who gets access to this knowledge. As a result, the decisions of science communicators have important implications for epistemic justice: how knowledge is distributed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11.  13
    Science Communication: Challenges and Dilemmas in the Age of COVID-19.Konstantina Antiochou - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (3):1-4.
    A pandemic of misinformation is said to spread alongside the COVID-19 pandemic. The need to properly inform the public is stronger than ever in the fight against misinformation, but what ‘properly’ means in this context is a quite controversial issue. In what follows, I discuss the challenges we face in communicating COVID-19 health information to the public, with the aim to shed light on some ethical and policy issues emerging in science in times of crises.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  1
    Science Communication as a Boundary Space: An Interactive Installation About the Social Responsibility of Science.Maja Horst - 2022 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 47 (3):459-482.
    Science communication has traditionally been seen as a means of crossing the boundary of science: moving scientific knowledge into the public. This paper presents an alternative understanding. Drawing upon a particular case of social science communication in the form of an interactive installation about the social responsibility of science, it develops the concept of boundary space where phenomena can simultaneously belong to science and nonscience. In addition, the paper describes how the installation functions (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The Transformation of Science Communication in the Age of Social Media.Emanuel Kulczycki - 2013 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 35 (1):3-28.
    The aim of the present article is to discuss several consequences of the Open Science from a perspective of science communication and philosophy of communication. Apart from the purely communicative and philosophical issues, the paper deals with the questions that concern the science popularization process through social media. The article consists of three sections: the first one suggests a definition of science communication and social media, the second examines the transformation of science (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Values and Credibility in Science Communication.Janet Michaud & John Turri - 2018 - Logos and Episteme 9 (2):199-214.
    Understanding science requires appreciating the values it presupposes and its social context. Both the values that scientists hold and their social context can affect scientific communication. Philosophers of science have recently begun studying scientific communication, especially as it relates to public policy. Some have proposed “guiding principles for communicating scientific findings” to promote trust and objectivity. This paper contributes to this line of research in a novel way using behavioural experimentation. We report results from three experiments (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  13
    INTRODUCTION Science Communication in a Changing World Stephanie Suhr.S. Suhr - 2009 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 9 (1):1-4.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Science Communication on the Internet: Old Genres Meet New Genres.[author unknown] - 2019
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  10
    Science Communication in the Soviet Union: Science as Vocation and Profession.Svetlana V. Shibarshina & Evgeny V. Maslanov - 2019 - Social Epistemology 34 (2):174-183.
    ABSTRACTThis study reconsiders scientists’ identity in terms of vocation vs. profession, proceeding from Max Weber’s differentiation between science as profession and science as an inner calling fo...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  18
    Science, Community and the Transformation of American Philosophy, 1860-1930.Michael Raposa - 1991 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 19 (59):32-34.
  19.  10
    Science Communication: A Growth Area in Science and Technology Studies. [REVIEW]Rosaleen Love - 1998 - Metascience 7 (2):281-289.
  20.  4
    Persuasion in Science Communication : Empirical Findings on Scientific Weblogs.Monika Hanauska & Annette Leßmöllmann - 2021 - Interaction Studies 22 (3):343-372.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  11
    Neurodharma Self-Help: Personalized Science Communication as Brain Management.Jenny Eklöf - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (3):303-317.
    Over the past ten to fifteen years, medical interventions, therapeutic approaches and scientific studies involving mindfulness meditation have gained traction in areas such as clinical psychology, psychotherapy, and neuroscience. Simultaneously, mindfulness has had a very strong public appeal. This article examines some of the ways in which the medical and scientific meaning of mindfulness is communicated in public and to the public. In particular, it shows how experts in the field of mindfulness neuroscience seek to communicate to the public at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  56
    Taking Our Own Medicine: On an Experiment in Science Communication.Maja Horst - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):801-815.
    In 2007 a social scientist and a designer created a spatial installation to communicate social science research about the regulation of emerging science and technology. The rationale behind the experiment was to improve scientific knowledge production by making the researcher sensitive to new forms of reactions and objections. Based on an account of the conceptual background to the installation and the way it was designed, the paper discusses the nature of the engagement enacted through the experiment. It is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23.  48
    Philosophy of Science for Science Communication in Twenty-Two Questions.Gregor Betz & David Lanius - 2020 - In Annette Leßmöllmann, Marcelo Dascal & Thomas Gloning (eds.), Science Communication. pp. 3-28.
    Philosophy of science attempts to reconstruct science as a rational cognitive enterprise. In doing so, it depicts a normative ideal of knowledge acquisition and does not primarily seek to describe actual scientific practice in an empirically adequate way. A comprehensive picture of what good science consists in may serve as a standard against which we evaluate and criticize actual scientific practices. Such a normative picture may also explain why it is reasonable for us to trust scientists – (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Epistemic Trust and the Ethics of Science Communication: Against Transparency, Openness, Sincerity and Honesty.Stephen John - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (2):75-87.
  25.  2
    Persuasion in Science Communication.Monika Hanauska & Annette Leßmöllmann - 2021 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 22 (3):343-372.
    Science communication has gained high importance in the current knowledge and risk society. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of qualitative studies on how non-experts and experts engage in opinionated scientific debates and which linguistic devices they use to gain influence on other people’s attitudes toward a scientific issue. In our study, we examine dialogical modes of science communication used by bloggers and audiences to engage into opinionated discourse about scientific endeavors. As those exchanges easily lead (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  72
    Assumptions of the Deficit Model Type of Thinking: Ignorance, Attitudes, and Science Communication in the Debate on Genetic Engineering in Agriculture. [REVIEW]Marko Ahteensuu - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):295-313.
    This paper spells out and discusses four assumptions of the deficit model type of thinking. The assumptions are: First, the public is ignorant of science. Second, the public has negative attitudes towards (specific instances of) science and technology. Third, ignorance is at the root of these negative attitudes. Fourth, the public’s knowledge deficit can be remedied by one-way science communication from scientists to citizens. It is argued that there is nothing wrong with ignorance-based explanations per se. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  27.  5
    Science as Experience: A Deweyan Model of Science Communication.Megan K. Halpern & Kevin C. Elliott - 2022 - Perspectives on Science 30 (4):621-656.
    The field of science communication is plagued by challenges. Communicators face the difficulty of responding to unjustified public skepticism over issues like climate change and COVID-19 while also acknowledging the fallibility and limitations of scientific knowledge. Our goal in this paper is to suggest a new model for science communication that can help foster more productive, respectful relationships among all those involved in science communication. Inspired by the pragmatist philosophy of John Dewey, we develop (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. How Do Science Communication Practitioners View Scientists and Audiences in Relation to Public Engagement Activities? A Research Note Concerning the Marine Sciences in Portugal.Henrique N. Cabral, José L. Costa & Bruno M. L. Pinto - 2017 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 37 (3):159-166.
    This exploratory study is focused on the perceptions of science communication practitioners about the activities of scientists and the audiences of the marine sciences outreach in Portugal. Using the qualitative method of thematic analysis and collecting data through semistructured interviews of 14 practitioners of diverse professions, backgrounds, ages, and stages of career, it was found that the role of marine scientists in this area is traditionally viewed as reduced, but with a slight improvement in the past 5 to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. The Organization of Academic Science: Communication and Control.Barry Barnes & David Edge - 1982 - In Barry Barnes & David O. Edge (eds.), Science in Context: Readings in the Sociology of Science. MIT Press. pp. 13--20.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30.  11
    Two-Sided Science: Communicating Scientific Uncertainty Increases Trust in Scientists and Donation Intention by Decreasing Attribution of Communicator Bias.Jonathan Van’T. Riet, Gabi Schaap & Mickey J. Steijaert - 2021 - Communications 46 (2):297-316.
    Previous research has shown that uncertainty communication by scientists increases the public’s trust in their work. The reasons for this have not been elucidated, however. In the present study, we provide a theoretical explanation for this phenomenon. Specifically, we expected that attributed communicator bias would mediate the effect of uncertainty communication on trust. Results from a mixed-design experiment, using modified science news articles, revealed support for this hypothesis. Positive effects of uncertainty communication on trust and donation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  38
    Ad Hominem Arguments, Rhetoric, and Science Communication.Carlo Martini - 2018 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 55 (1):151-166.
    In this paper, I contend that evidence-focused strategies of science communication may be complemented by possibly more effective rhetorical arguments in current public debates on vaccines. I analyse the case of direct science communication - that is, communication of evidence - and show that it is difficult to effectively communicate evidential standards of science in the presence of well-equipped anti-science movements. Instead, I argue that effective rhetorical tools involve ad hominem strategies, that is, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  1
    Symbiosis Evolution of Science Communication Ecosystem Based on Social Media: A Lotka–Volterra Model-Based Simulation.Ming Xia, Xiangwu He & Yubin Zhou - 2021 - Complexity 2021:1-12.
    Social media has become an important way for science communication. Some scholars have examined how to help scientists engage with social media from operational training, policy guidance, and social media services improving. The main contribution of this study is to construct a symbiosis evolution model of science communication ecosystem between scientists and social media platforms based on the symbiosis theory and the Lotka–Volterra model to discuss the evolution of their symbiotic patterns and population size under different (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  53
    Expert Trespassing Testimony and the Ethics of Science Communication.Mikkel Gerken - 2018 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 49 (3):299-318.
    Scientific expert testimony is crucial to public deliberation, but it is associated with many pitfalls. This article identifies one—namely, expert trespassing testimony—which may be characterized, crudely, as the phenomenon of experts testifying outside their domain of expertise. My agenda is to provide a more precise characterization of this phenomenon and consider its ramifications for the role of science in society. I argue that expert trespassing testimony is both epistemically problematic and morally problematic. Specifically, I will argue that scientific experts (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34. Daniel J. Wilson, Science, Community, and the Transformation of American Philosophy, 1860-1930. [REVIEW]Leslie Armour - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (6):436-438.
  35. Environmental Pollution and Professional Responsibility: Ibsen's A Public Enemy as a Seminar on Science Communication and Ethics.Hub Zwart - 2004 - Environmental Values 13 (3):349-372.
    Dr Stockmann, the principal character in Henrik Ibsen's A Public Enemy, is a classic example of a whistle-blower who, upon detecting and disclosing a serious case of environmental pollution, quickly finds himself transformed from a public benefactor into a political outcast by those in power. If we submit the play to a 'second reading', however, it becomes clear that the ethical intricacies of whistle-blowing are interwoven with epistemological issues. Basically, the play is about the complex task of communicating scientific data (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36.  19
    Rhetorical Citizenship and the Science of Science Communication.Jeanne Fahnestock - 2020 - Argumentation 34 (3):371-387.
    Public policy decisions often require rhetorically-engaged citizens to have some understanding of the science and technology involved. On many current issues sectors of the public hold views differing from those of most scientists, and they often do not support proposals based on the scientists’ views. The overall cultural authority of science has also been challenged in the last decade by several negative trends in the sciences themselves, including widely-reported cases of fraud and failures in replication. With the support (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Ethics of Science Communication on the Web.M. Clarke - 2009 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 9 (1):9-12.
  38.  49
    Making the Audience a Key Participant in the Science Communication Process.Carol L. Rogers - 2000 - Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):553-557.
    The public communication of science and technology has become increasingly important over the last several decades. However, understanding the audience that receives this information remains the weak link in the science communication process. This essay provides a brief review of some of the issues involved, discusses results from an audience-based study, and suggests some strategies that both scientists and journalists can use to modify media coverage in ways that can help audiences better understand major public issues (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39. Motivating Science: Science Communication From a Philosophical, Educational and Cultural Perspective.N. Sanitt (ed.) - 2005 - Pantaneto Press.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  18
    Daniel J. Wilson, "Science, Community, and the Transformation of American Philosophy, 1860-1930". [REVIEW]C. F. Delaney - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):152.
  41. Daniel J. Wilson, "Science, Community and the Transformation of American Philosophy 1860-1930". [REVIEW]Thomas Mathien - 1991 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 27 (3):376.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  8
    Science of Science Communication: Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Dan Kahan, Dietram A. Scheufele : The Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, 512 Pp, £ 115 HB.Kristian Nielsen - 2019 - Metascience 28 (1):85-87.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  10
    Mode 2 Science and Science Communication: From an Epistemological Perspective.Tetsuji Iseda - 2010 - Kagaku Tetsugaku 43 (2):1-17.
  44.  27
    A New Model for Science Communication That Takes Ethical Considerations Into Account: The Three-E Model: Entertainment, Emotion and Education.Patricia Osseweijer - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):591-593.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  5
    Second-Order Assessment of Scientific Expert Claims and Sharing Epistemic Burdens in Science Communication.George Kwasi Barimah - forthcoming - Episteme:1-17.
    When laypersons are presented with scientific information which seeks to modify their way of life, they are expected to believe, suspend belief, or reject it. Second-order assessment of scientific experts helps laypersons to make an informed decision in such situations. This is an assessment of the trustworthiness of the person making the scientific claim. In this paper I challenge the optimistic view of Anderson, regarding the ease with which laypersons can perform second-order assessment of experts, by pointing out some of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  29
    Testing for Implicit Bias: Values, Psychometrics, and Science Communication.Nick Byrd & Morgan Thompson - 2022 - WIREs Cognitive Science.
    Our understanding of implicit bias and how to measure it has yet to be settled. Various debates between cognitive scientists are unresolved. Moreover, the public’s understanding of implicit bias tests continues to lag behind cognitive scientists’. These discrepancies pose potential problems. After all, a great deal of implicit bias research has been publicly funded. Further, implicit bias tests continue to feature in discourse about public- and private-sector policies surrounding discrimination, inequality, and even the purpose of science. We aim to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  4
    Crossing Boundaries in Social Science Communications.Margaret Mead - 1969 - Social Science Information 8 (1):7-15.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  12
    To Share or Not to Share…Incentivizing Data Sharing in Life Science Communities.Louise Bezuidenhout - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    Most scientists recognize the importance of sharing data online in an open fashion. Nonetheless, many studies have documented the concerns that accompany data sharing activities, including loss of credit or IP, misuse and the time needed to curate interoperable data. To this end, discussions around data sharing often identify incentives that could potentially ameliorate these disincentivising concerns. Nonetheless, current Open Data discussions often rely on evidence-based studies to identify the disincentives to overcome. This results in highly specific and directed interventions. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Interactive Communication in Pharmacogenomics Innovations: User-Producer Interaction From an Innovation and Science Communication Perspective.R. Verhoeff, E. Moors & P. Osseweijer - 2008 - Genomics, Society and Policy 4 (2):53-69.
    Pharmacogenomics is a quickly evolving field of research that increasingly impacts individuals and society. As some innovations in biotechnology have experienced strong public opposition during the 1990s, interaction between producers and users of these innovations may help in increasing their success in social and economic terms. However, conditions for effective interaction have so far remained under-explored. This paper explores user-producer interactions in pharmacogenomics from an innovation and science communication perspective in the Netherlands. To find possible ways of engaging (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. A Teacher and Researcher: A Scratch on the Science Community and Meaning of Evaluation with the Research Doctoral Programs Ranking.Kiyoung Kim - 2015 - International Journal of Philosophy 3 (4):34.
    The epistemology and phenomenology of contemporary society tend to be deepened, and the philosophical challenges never are minimal that we may be called to face with the kind of post-modern chaos from the rapidly changing phenomena of the global community. The ballast held on the identity of faculty members as a teacher and researcher now turns due so as to be recast with our intrinsic of routine performance. I considered their quality as bent on the intellectual strife on the method (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000