Results for 'scientific revolutions'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn’s Philosophy of Science.Paul Hoyningen-Huene - 1993 - University of Chicago Press.
    Few philosophers of science have influenced as many readers as Thomas S. Kuhn. Yet no comprehensive study of his ideas has existed--until now. In this volume, Paul Hoyningen-Huene examines Kuhn's work over four decades, from the days before The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to the present, and puts Kuhn's philosophical development in a historical framework. Scholars from disciplines as diverse as political science and art history have offered widely differing interpretations of Kuhn's ideas, appropriating his notions of paradigm (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   97 citations  
  2. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1962 - University of Chicago Press.
  3. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas Samuel Kuhn - 1962 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    A scientific community cannot practice its trade without some set of received beliefs. These beliefs form the foundation of the "educational initiation that prepares and licenses the student for professional practice". The nature of the "rigorous and rigid" preparation helps ensure that the received beliefs are firmly fixed in the student's mind. Scientists take great pains to defend the assumption that scientists know what the world is like...To this end, "normal science" will often suppress novelties which undermine its foundations. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2692 citations  
  4. Scientific Revolutions and the Explosion of Scientific Evidence.Ludwig Fahrbach - 2017 - Synthese 194 (12):5039-5072.
    Scientific realism, the position that successful theories are likely to be approximately true, is threatened by the pessimistic induction according to which the history of science is full of suc- cessful, but false theories. I aim to defend scientific realism against the pessimistic induction. My main thesis is that our current best theories each enjoy a very high degree of predictive success, far higher than was enjoyed by any of the refuted theories. I support this thesis by showing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  5. Scientific Revolutions, Specialization and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA: Toward a New Picture of the Development of the Sciences.Politi Vincenzo - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):2267-2293.
    In his late years, Thomas Kuhn became interested in the process of scientific specialization, which does not seem to possess the destructive element that is characteristic of scientific revolutions. It therefore makes sense to investigate whether and how Kuhn’s insights about specialization are consistent with, and actually fit, his model of scientific progress through revolutions. In this paper, I argue that the transition toward a new specialty corresponds to a revolutionary change for the group of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  33
    The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.David Bohm - 1964 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (57):377-379.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1155 citations  
  7. The Scientific Revolution: A Historiographical Inquiry.H. F. Cohen & S. Gaukroger - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (5):503-508.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  8. The Cognitive Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Hanne Andersen, Peter Barker & Xiang Chen - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions became the most widely read book about science in the twentieth century. His terms 'paradigm' and 'scientific revolution' entered everyday speech, but they remain controversial. In the second half of the twentieth century, the new field of cognitive science combined empirical psychology, computer science, and neuroscience. In this book, the theories of concepts developed by cognitive scientists are used to evaluate and extend Kuhn's most influential ideas. Based on case studies of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  9. Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions. Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science.[author unknown] - 1994 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 56 (2):374-375.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  10.  42
    Scientific Revolutions.Ian Hacking (ed.) - 1981 - Oxford University Press.
    Bringing together important writings not easily available elsewhere, this volume provides a convenient and stimulating overview of recent work in the philosophy of science. The contributors include Paul Feyerabend, Ian Hacking, T.S. Kuhn, Imre Lakatos, Laurens Laudan, Karl Popper, Hilary Putnam, and Dudley Shapere. In addition, Hacking provides an introductory essay and a selective bibliography.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  11.  43
    The Scientific Revolution and The Death of Nature.Carolyn Merchant - 2006 - Isis 97:513-533.
    The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution, published in 1980, presented a view of the Scientific Revolution that challenged the hegemony of mechanistic science as a marker of progress. It argued that seventeenth‐century science could be implicated in the ecological crisis, the domination of nature, and the devaluation of women in the production of scientific knowledge. This essay offers a twenty‐five‐year retrospective of the book’s contributions to ecofeminism, environmental history, and reassessments of the (...) Revolution. It also responds to challenges to the argument that Francis Bacon’s rhetoric legitimated the control of nature. Although Bacon did not use terms such as “the torture of nature,” his followers, with some justification, interpreted his rhetoric in that light. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  12. The Scientific Revolution, 1500-1800 the Formation of the Modern Scientific Attitude.A. Rupert Hall - 1954 - Longmans.
  13.  56
    Scientific Revolutions Without Paradigm-Replacement and the Coexistence of Competing Paradigms: The Case of Generative Grammar and Construction Grammar. [REVIEW]Stephan Kornmesser - 2014 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 45 (1):91-118.
    In the Kuhnian and Post-Kuhnian Philosophy of Science, it is widely accepted that scientific revolutions always involve the replacement of an old paradigm by a new paradigm. This article attempts to refute this assumption by showing that there are paradigm-constellations that conform to the relation of a scientific revolution in a Kuhnian sense without a paradigm-replacement occurring. The paradigms investigated here are the linguistic paradigms of Generative Grammar and Construction Grammar that, contrary to Kuhn’s conception of a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Scientific Revolutions.Thomas Nickles - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  15. Was the Scientific Revolution Really a Revolution in Science?Gary Hatfield - 1996 - In Jamil Ragep & Sally Ragep (eds.), Tradition, Transmission, Transformation. Brill. pp. 489–525.
    This chapter poses questions about the existence and character of the Scientific Revolution by deriving its initial categories of analysis and its initial understanding of the intellectual scene from the writings of the seventeenth century, and by following the evolution of these initial categories in succeeding centuries. This project fits the theme of cross cultural transmission and appropriation -- a theme of the present volume -- if one takes the notion of a culture broadly, so that, say, seventeenth and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  16. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition.Thomas S. Kuhn & Ian Hacking - 2012 - University of Chicago Press.
    A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. _The Structure of Scientific Revolutions _is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  17. The Scientific Revolution.John A. Schuster - 1990 - In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. pp. 217--242.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  18. Reappraisals of the Scientific Revolution, Ed. By and (Cambridge:).David C. Lindberg & Robert S. Westman (eds.) - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    List of contributors; Acknowledgments; Introduction Robert S. Westman and David C. Lindberg; 1. Conceptions of the scientific revolution from Bacon to Butterfield: a preliminary sketch David C. Lindberg; 2. Conceptions of science in the scientific revolution Ernan McMullin; 3. Metaphysics and the new science Gary Hatfield; 4. Proof, portics, and patronage: Copernicus’s preface to De revolutionibus Robert S. Westman; 5. A reappraisal of the role of the universities in the scientific revolution John Gascoigne; 6. Natural magic, hermetism, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  19. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions and its Significance: An Essay Review of the Fiftieth Anniversary Edition. [REVIEW]Alexander Bird - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (4):859-883.
    Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions is one of the most cited books of the twentieth century. Its iconic and controversial nature has obscured its message. What did Kuhn really intend with Structure and what is its real significance? -/- 1 Introduction -/- 2 The Central Ideas of Structure -/- 3 The Philosophical Targets of Structure -/- 4 Interpreting and Misinterpreting Structure -/- 4.1 Naturalism -/- 4.2 World-change -/- 4.3 Incommensurability -/- 4.4 Progress and the nature of revolutionary change (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  20.  24
    Kuhn: Philosopher of Scientific Revolutions.W. W. Sharrock - 2002 - Polity.
    Thomas Kuhn's shadow hangs over almost every field of intellectual inquiry. His book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions has become a modern classic. His influence on philosophy, social science, historiography, feminism, theology, and (of course) the natural sciences themselves is unparalleled. His epoch-making concepts of 'new paradigm' and 'scientific revolution' make him probably the most influential scholar of the twentieth century. Sharrock and Read take the reader through Kuhn's work in a careful and accessible way, emphasizing Kuhn's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  21. Structure of Scientific Revolutions, the (Ch. 9 Only).Thomas Kuhn - unknown
  22.  44
    Rethinking the Scientific Revolution.Margaret J. Osler (ed.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This collection reconsiders canonical figures and the formation of disciplinary boundaries during the Scientific Revolution.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23.  23
    What Are Scientific Revolutions?Thomas S. Kuhn - 1981 - Center for Cognitive Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
  24. Galileo and the Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century.Alexandre Koyre - 1943 - Philosophical Review 52 (4):333-348.
  25. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Dudley Shapere - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (3):383-394.
  26. What Can Cognitive Science Tell Us About Scientific Revolutions?Alexander Bird - 2012 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 27 (3):293-321.
    Kuhn’s Structure of Scientific Revolutions is notable for the readiness with which it drew on the results of cognitive psychology. These naturalistic elements were not well received and Kuhn did not subsequently develop them in his pub- lished work. Nonetheless, in a philosophical climate more receptive to naturalism, we are able to give a more positive evaluation of Kuhn’s proposals. Recently, philosophers such as Nersessian, Nickles, Andersen, Barker, and Chen have used the results of work on case-based reasoning, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27.  2
    Representing Space in the Scientific Revolution.David Marshall Miller - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    The novel understanding of the physical world that characterized the Scientific Revolution depended on a fundamental shift in the way its protagonists understood and described space. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, spatial phenomena were described in relation to a presupposed central point; by its end, space had become a centerless void in which phenomena could only be described by reference to arbitrary orientations. David Marshall Miller examines both the historical and philosophical aspects of this far-reaching development, including (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  28. The Scientific Revolution Reasserted.Richard S. Westfall - 2000 - In Margaret J. Osler (ed.), Rethinking the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press. pp. 41--55.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29.  8
    The Scientific Revolution and The Death of Nature.Carolyn Merchant - 2006 - Isis 97 (3):513-533.
  30. On Classification of Scientific Revolutions.Ladislav Kvasz - 1999 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (2):201-232.
    The question whether Kuhn's theory of scientific revolutions could be applied to mathematics caused many interesting problems to arise. The aim of this paper is to discuss whether there are different kinds of scientific revolution, and if so, how many. The basic idea of the paper is to discriminate between the formal and the social aspects of the development of science and to compare them. The paper has four parts. In the first introductory part we discuss some (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  31.  35
    The Death of Nature: Women, Ecology, and the Scientific Revolution.Carolyn Merchant - 1980 - Harpercollins.
    An examination of the Scientific Revolution that shows how the mechanistic world view of modern science has sanctioned the exploitation of nature, unrestrained commercial expansion, and a new socioeconomic order that subordinates women.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   154 citations  
  32.  43
    Scientific Revolutions and Inference to the Best Explanation.Alexander Bird - 1999 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 34 (1):25--42.
  33. Kuhn's Theory of Scientific Revolutions and Cognitive Psychology.Xiang Chen, Hanne Andersen & Peter Barker - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (1):5 – 28.
    In a previous article we have shown that Kuhn's theory of concepts is independently supported by recent research in cognitive psychology. In this paper we propose a cognitive re-reading of Kuhn's cyclical model of scientific revolutions: all of the important features of the model may now be seen as consequences of a more fundamental account of the nature of concepts and their dynamics. We begin by examining incommensurability, the central theme of Kuhn's theory of scientific revolutions, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  34.  18
    The Scientific Revolution and the Protestant Reformation.—I: Calvin and Servetus in Relation to the New Astronomy and the Theory of the Circulation of the Blood.S. Mason - 1953 - Annals of Science 9 (1):64-87.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35.  27
    The Scientific Revolution: Five Books About ItSteven Weinberg. To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science. Xiv + 417 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. New York: HarperCollins, 2015. $28.99 .David Knight. Voyaging in Strange Seas: The Great Revolution in Science. Viii + 329 Pp., Figs., Index. New Haven, Conn./London: Yale University Press, 2014. $35 .William E. Burns. The Scientific Revolution in Global Perspective. Xv + 198 Pp., Illus., Figs., Tables, Bibl., Index. New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. £16.99 .David Wootton. The Invention of Science: A New History of the Scientific Revolution. Xiv + 769 Pp., Illus., Figs., Bibl., Index. London: Penguin Books, Allen Lane, 2015. £20.40 .H. Floris Cohen. The Rise of Modern Science Explained: A Comparative History. Vi + 296 Pp., Figs., Tables, Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. $89.99. [REVIEW]John Henry - 2016 - Isis 107 (4):809-817.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. The Scientific Revolution of the Seventeenth Century: The Construction of a New World View “.Richard S. Westfall - 1992 - In John Torrance (ed.), The Concept of Nature. Oxford University Press. pp. 63--93.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  25
    Scientific Revolutions and Scientific Rationality: The Case of the Elderly Holdout.John Worrall - 1990 - In C. Wade Savage (ed.), Scientific Theories. University of Minnesota Press. pp. 14--319.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  95
    Thought Experiments Since the Scientific Revolution.James Robert Brown - 1986 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 1 (1):1 – 15.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  39. “Do We Need a Scientific Revolution.Nicholas Maxwell - 2008 - Journal for Biological Physics and Chemistry 8 (3):95-105.
    Do We Need a Scientific Revolution? (Published in the Journal of Biological Physics and Chemistry, vol. 8, no. 3, September 2008) Nicholas Maxwell (Emeritus Reader in Philosophy of Science at University College London) www.nick-maxwell.demon.co.uk Abstract Many see modern science as having serious defects, intellectual, social, moral. Few see this as having anything to do with the philosophy of science. I argue that many diverse ills of modern science are a consequence of the fact that the scientific community has (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40.  80
    The Cognitive Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Peter Barker - 2011 - Erkenntnis 75 (3):445-465.
    For historical epistemology to succeed, it must adopt a defensible set of categories to characterise scientific activity over time. In historically orientated philosophy of science during the twentieth century, the original categories of theory and observation were supplemented or replaced by categories like paradigm, research program and research tradition. Underlying all three proposals was talk about conceptual systems and conceptual structures, attributed to individual scientists or to research communities, however there has been little general agreement on the nature of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  41. Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions - 50 Years On.William J. Devlin & Alisa Bokulich (eds.) - 2015 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science, vol. 311. Springer.
    In 1962, the publication of Thomas Kuhn’s Structure ‘revolutionized’ the way one conducts philosophical and historical studies of science. Through the introduction of both memorable and controversial notions, such as paradigms, scientific revolutions, and incommensurability, Kuhn argued against the traditionally accepted notion of scientific change as a progression towards the truth about nature, and instead substituted the idea that science is a puzzle solving activity, operating under paradigms, which become discarded after it fails to respond accordingly to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. Metaphysics and Measurement: Essays in the Scientific Revolution.Alexandre Koyré - 1968 - Gordon and Breach Science Publishers.
    This collection of six essays centers on Professor Koyre;'s great theme: the relative importance of metaphysics and observation, with controlled experiment a kind of marriage between the two. Professor Koyre;'s thesis might be summed up as a claim that when one is seeking to explain the scientific revolution, attention must be concentrated on the philosophical outlook of the scientist and away from speculative theories. At the time of his death, Alexandre Koyre; was a professor at the Ecole Pratique des (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   89 citations  
  43.  18
    The Scientific Revolution and the Protestant Reformation.—I.S. F. Mason PhD - 1953 - Annals of Science 9 (1):64-87.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Diagrammatic Reasoning and Modelling in the Imagination: The Secret Weapons of the Scientific Revolution.James Franklin - 2000 - In Guy Freeland & Anthony Corones (eds.), 1543 and All That: Image and Word, Change and Continuity in the Proto-Scientific Revolution. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Just before the Scientific Revolution, there was a "Mathematical Revolution", heavily based on geometrical and machine diagrams. The "faculty of imagination" (now called scientific visualization) was developed to allow 3D understanding of planetary motion, human anatomy and the workings of machines. 1543 saw the publication of the heavily geometrical work of Copernicus and Vesalius, as well as the first Italian translation of Euclid.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  45.  62
    Scientific Revolution for Ever?William Kneale - 1968 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (1):27-42.
  46.  59
    The Challenge of Scientific Revolutions: Van Fraassen's and Friedman's Responses.Vasso Kindi - 2011 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (4):327-349.
    This article criticizes the attempts by Bas van Fraassen and Michael Friedman to address the challenge to rationality posed by the Kuhnian analysis of scientific revolutions. In the paper, I argue that van Fraassen's solution, which invokes a Sartrean theory of emotions to account for radical change, does not amount to justifying rationally the advancement of science but, rather, despite his protestations to the contrary, is an explanation of how change is effected. Friedman's approach, which appeals to philosophical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  11
    Erratum To: Scientific Revolutions, Specialization and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA: Toward a New Picture of the Development of the Sciences.Vincenzo Politi - 2018 - Synthese 195 (11):5113-5113.
    Both in the bibliography and in the citation in the text, Michelle Gibbons’ article below has been mistakenly attributed to “Gibson.” The proper reference to the article should be: Gibbons, M.. Reassessing discovery: Rosalind Franklin, scientific visualization, and the structure of DNA. _Philosophy of Science, 79_, 63–80.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  9
    Structure of the Digital Scientific Revolution.Sławomir Grzegorz Leciejewski - 2018 - Philosophical Problems in Science 64:117-136.
    Nowadays, computers are in common use, both in experimental and theoretical research. It is worth considering if the implementation of a new, universal research tool has significantly changed the science of the end of 20th century. The crucial question which I will try to answer is if computers have revolutionized the scientific research. In order to find the answer, I will describe modern digitally aided science, taking into consideration the research conducted in the greatest elementary physics laboratory. Subsequently, I (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. We Are Not Witnesses to a New Scientific Revolution.Gregor Schiemann - 2014 - In A. Nordmann & H. Radder (eds.), Science Transformed? Debating Claims of an Epochal Break. Velbrück. pp. 31-42.
    Do the changes that have taken place in the structures and methods of the production of scientific knowledge and in our understanding of science over the past fifty years justify speaking of an epochal break in the development of science? Gregor Schiemann addresses this issues through the notion of a scientific revolution and claims that at present we are not witnessing a new scientific revolution. Instead, Schiemann argues that after the so-called Scientific Revolution in the sixteenth (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50.  60
    Scientific Revolution and the Evolution of Consciousness.Robert Artigiani - 1988 - World Futures 25 (3):237-281.
1 — 50 / 1000