Results for 'self-ownership'

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  1. Yu kam Por.Self-Ownership & Its Implications for Bioethics 197 - 2002 - In Julia Lai Po-Wah Tao (ed.), Cross-Cultural Perspectives on the (Im) Possibility of Global Bioethics. Kluwer Academic.
     
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  2. Backing Away from Libertarian Self-Ownership.David Sobel - 2012 - Ethics 123 (1):32-60.
    Libertarian self-ownership views have traditionally maintained that we enjoy very powerful deontological protections against any infringement upon our property. This stringency yields very counter-intuitive results when we consider trivial infringements such as very mildly toxic pollution or trivial risks such having planes fly overhead. Maintaining that other people's rights against all infringements are very powerful threatens to undermine our liberty, as Nozick saw. In this paper I consider the most sophisticated attempts to rectify this problem within a libertarian (...)
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  3. Against self-ownership: There are no fact-insensitive ownership rights over one's body.Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen - 2008 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 36 (1):86–118.
  4. Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality.Gerald Allan Cohen - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book G. A. Cohen examines the libertarian principle of self-ownership, which says that each person belongs to himself and therefore owes no service or product to anyone else. This principle is used to defend capitalist inequality, which is said to reflect each person's freedom to do as as he wishes with himself. The author argues that self-ownership cannot deliver the freedom it promises to secure, thereby undermining the idea that lovers of freedom should embrace (...)
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  5. Self-ownership and disgust: why compulsory body part redistribution gets under our skin.Christopher Freiman & Adam Lerner - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (12):3167-3190.
    The self-ownership thesis asserts, roughly, that agents own their minds and bodies in the same way that they can own extra-personal property. One common strategy for defending the self-ownership thesis is to show that it accords with our intuitions about the wrongness of various acts involving the expropriation of body parts. We challenge this line of defense. We argue that disgust explains our resistance to these sorts of cases and present results from an original psychological experiment (...)
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  6. Self-Ownership and the Limits of Libertarianism.Robert S. Taylor - 2005 - Social Theory and Practice 31 (4):465-482.
    In the longstanding debate between liberals and libertarians over the morality of redistributive labor taxation, liberals such as John Rawls and Ronald Dworkin have consistently taken the position that such taxation is perfectly compatible with individual liberty, whereas libertarians such as Robert Nozick and Murray Rothbard have adopted the (very) contrary position that such taxation is tantamount to slavery. In this paper, I argue that the debate over redistributive labor taxation can be usefully reconstituted as a debate over the incidents (...)
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  7.  16
    Self-Ownership, the Conflation Problem, and Presumptive Libertarianism: Can the Market Model Support Libertarianism Rather than the Other Way Around?Marcus Agnafors - 2015 - Libertarian Papers 7.
    David Sobel has recently argued that libertarian theories that accept full and strict self-ownership as foundational confront what he calls the conflation problem: if transgressing self-ownership is strictly and stringently forbidden, it is implied that the normative protection against one infringement is precisely as strong as against any other infringement. But this seems to be an absurd consequence. In defense of libertarianism, I argue that the conflation problem can be handled in a way that allows us (...)
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  8. Self-ownership, freedom, and autonomy.George G. Brenkert - 1998 - The Journal of Ethics 2 (1):27-55.
    The libertarian view of freedom has attracted considerable attention in the past three decades. It has also been subjected to numerous criticisms regarding its nature and effects on society. G. A. Cohen''s recent book, Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality, continues this attack by linking libertarian views on freedom to their view of self-ownership. This paper formulates and evaluates Cohen''s major arguments against libertarian freedom and self-ownership. It contends that his arguments against the libertarian rights definition (...)
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  9. Self-Ownership and the Conflation Problem.David Sobel - forthcoming - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics.
    Libertarian self-ownership views in the tradition of Locke, Nozick, and the left-libertarians have supposed that we enjoy very powerful deontological protections against infringing upon our property. Such a conception makes sense when we are focused on property that is very important to its owner, such as a person’s kidney. However, this stringency of our property rights is harder to credit when we consider more trivial infringements such as very mildly toxic pollution or trivial risks such having planes fly (...)
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  10. Self-ownership and world ownership: Against left-libertarianism.Richard J. Arneson - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):168-194.
    Left-libertarianism is a version of Lockean libertarianism that combines the idea that each person is the full rightful owner of herself and the idea that each person should have the right to own a roughly equal amount of the world's resources. This essay argues against left-libertarianism. The specific target is an interesting form of left-libertarianism proposed by Michael Otsuka that is especially stringent in its equal world ownership claim. One criticism advanced is that there is more tension than Otsuka (...)
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  11. Self-Ownership, World Ownership, and Equality: Part II: G. A. COHEN.G. A. Cohen - 1986 - Social Philosophy and Policy 3 (2):77-96.
    1. The present paper is a continuation of my “Self-Ownership, World Ownership, and Equality,” which began with a description of the political philosophy of Robert Nozick. I contended in that essay that the foundational claim of Nozick's philosophy is the thesis of self-ownership, which says that each person is the morally rightful owner of his own person and powers, and, consequently, that each is free to use those powers as he wishes, provided that he does (...)
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  12. Self-ownership and non-culpable proviso violations.Preston J. Werner - 2015 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 14 (1):67-83.
    Left and right libertarians alike are attracted to the thesis of self-ownership because, as Eric Mack says, they ‘believe that it best captures our common perception of the moral inviolability of persons’. Further, most libertarians, left and right, accept that some version of the Lockean Proviso restricts agents’ ability to acquire worldly resources. The inviolability of SO purports to make libertarianism more appealing than its egalitarian counterparts, since traditional egalitarian theories cannot straightforwardly explain why, e.g. forced organ donation (...)
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  13. The self-ownership proviso: A new and improved Lockean proviso*: Eric makc.Eric Mack - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (1):186-218.
    In this essay I propose to explicate and defend a new and improved version of a Lockean proviso—the self-ownership proviso . I shall presume here that individuals possess robust rights of self-ownership. I shall take it that each individual has strong moral claims over the elements which constitute her person, e.g., her body parts, her talents, and her energies. However, in the course of the essay, I shall be challenging what I take to be the standard (...)
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  14.  33
    Self-ownership as personal sovereignty.John Thrasher - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (2):116-133.
    :Self-ownership has fallen out of favor as a core moral and political concept. I argue that this is because the most popular conception of self-ownership, what I call the property conception, is typically linked to a libertarian political program. Seeing self-ownership and libertarianism as being necessarily linked leads those who are not inclined toward libertarianism to reject the idea of self-ownership altogether. This, I argue, is a mistake. Self-ownership is a (...)
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  15.  48
    Self-ownership and agent-centered options.Seth Lazar - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (2):36-50.
    I argue that agent-centered options to favor and sacrifice one’s own interests are grounded in a particular aspect of self-ownership. Because you own your interests, you are entitled to a say over how they are used. That is, whether those interests count for or against some action is, at least in part, to be determined by your choice. This is not the only plausible argument for agent-centered options. But it has some virtues that other arguments lack.
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  16. Self-ownership, marxism, and egalitarianism: Part I: Challenges to historical entitlement.Eric Mack - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):75-108.
    This two-part article offers a defense of a libertarian doctrine that centers on two propositions. The first is the self-ownership thesis according to which each individual possesses original moral rights over her own body, faculties, talents, and energies. The second is the anti-egalitarian conclusion that, through the exercise of these rights of self-ownership, individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings. The self-ownership thesis remains in the background during Part I of this (...)
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  17. Self-Ownership and Property in the Person: Democratization and a Tale of Two Concepts.Carole Pateman - 2002 - Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (1):20-53.
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  18. Self-ownership, marxism, and egalitarianism: Part II: Challenges to the self-ownership thesis.Eric Mack - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (2):237-276.
    Part I of this essay supports the anti-egalitarian conclusion that individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings by criticizing end-state and pattern theories of distributive justice and defending the historical entitlement doctrine of justice in holdings. Part II of this essay focuses on a second route to the anti-egalitarian conclusion. This route combines the self-ownership thesis with a contention that is especially advanced by G.A. Cohen. This is the contention that the anti-egalitarian conclusion can be (...)
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  19.  19
    Self-ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part I: Challenges to Historical Entitlement.Eric Mack - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):75-108.
    This two-part article offers a defense of a libertarian doctrine that centers on two propositions. The first is the self-ownership thesis according to which each individual possesses original moral rights over her own body, faculties, talents, and energies. The second is the anti-egalitarian conclusion that, through the exercise of these rights of self-ownership, individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings. The self-ownership thesis remains in the background during Part I of this (...)
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  20.  71
    Freedom, self-ownership, and equality in Steiner’s left-libertarianism.Ronen Shnayderman - 2013 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (3):219-227.
    Hillel Steiner’s left-libertarian theory of justice is the most serious recent attempt to reconcile the ideals of equality and freedom. This attempt consists in an argument that a universal right to equal freedom, which in Steiner’s view means also a universal right to maximal freedom, implies a universal right to self-ownership and to an egalitarian share of the world’s natural resources. In this article, I argue that this argument fails on Steiner’s own terms. I argue that, on Steiner’s (...)
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  21.  14
    Self-ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part II: Challenges to the Self-ownership Thesis.Eric Mack - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (2):237-276.
    Part I of this essay supports the anti-egalitarian conclusion that individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings by criticizing end-state and pattern theories of distributive justice and defending the historical entitlement doctrine of justice in holdings. Part II of this essay focuses on a second route to the anti-egalitarian conclusion. This route combines the self-ownership thesis with a contention that is especially advanced by G.A. Cohen. This is the contention that the anti-egalitarian conclusion can be (...)
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  22. Self-Ownership and Transplantable Human Organs.Robert S. Taylor - 2007 - Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (1):89-107.
    Philosophers have given sustained attention to the controversial possibility of (legal) markets in transplantable human organs. Most of this discussion has focused on whether such markets would enhance or diminish autonomy, understood in either the personal sense or the Kantian moral sense. What this discussion has lacked is any consideration of the relationship between self-ownership and such markets. This paper examines the implications of the most prominent and defensible conception of self-ownership--control self-ownership (CSO)--for both (...)
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  23. Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality.Eric Mack - 1995 - Philosophy 72 (281):478-482.
  24.  75
    Self-Ownership, Autonomy, and Property Rights.Alan Ryan - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (2):241-258.
    Writers of very different persuasions have relied on arguments about self-ownership; in recent years, it is libertarians who have rested their political theory on self-ownership, but Grotian authoritarianism rested on similar foundations, and, even though it matters a good deal that Hegel did not adopt a full-blown theory of self-ownership, so did Hegel's liberal-conservatism. Whether the high tide of the idea has passed it is hard to say. One testimony to its popularity was the (...)
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  25.  17
    Self-Ownership and Moral Relations to Self in Early Modern Britain.Colin Heydt - 2016 - History of European Ideas 42 (2).
    SummaryThis paper scrutinises early modern thinking about our moral relations to ourselves. It begins by reiterating the too-often-ignored point that full self-ownership was not a position defended in Britain—by Locke or anyone else. In fact, the actual early modern positions about the moral relations we have to ourselves have been obscured by our present-day interest in self-ownership. The paper goes on to organise the moral history of the self by examining the reasons available for prohibiting (...)
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  26.  4
    Property, liberty, and self-ownership in seventeenth-century England.Lorenzo Sabbadini - 2020 - Chicago: McGill-Queen's University Press.
    The concept of self-ownership was first articulated in anglophone political thought in the decades between the outbreak of the English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution. This book traces the emergence and evolution of self-ownership over the course of this period, culminating in a reinterpretation of John Locke's celebrated but widely misunderstood idea that "every Man has a Property in his own Person." Often viewed through the prism of libertarian political thought, self-ownership has its (...)
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  27.  24
    Self-ownership and despotism: Locke on property in the person, divine dominium of human life, and rights-forfeiture.Johan Olsthoorn - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (2):242-263.
    :This essay explores the meaning and normative significance of Locke’s depiction of individuals as proprietors of their own person. I begin by reconsidering the long-standing puzzle concerning Locke’s simultaneous endorsement of divine proprietorship and self-ownership. Befuddlement vanishes, I contend, once we reject concurrent ownership in the same object: while God fully owns our lives, humans are initially sole proprietors of their own person. Locke employs two conceptions of “personhood”: as expressing legal independence vis-à-vis humans and moral accountability (...)
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  28.  53
    Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality.Nancy Holmstrom - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (4):583.
    In the first two chapters, Cohen deals with justice, freedom, and equality without mention of self-ownership, offering a devastating critique of the libertarian claim that despite great economic inequality, laissez-faire capitalism is the most just society because it is the most free. The assumption, made by liberals as well as libertarians, that we have to choose between liberty and equality fails to acknowledge that a system based on large-scale private property entails the unfreedom of the majority without property. (...)
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  29. Self-ownership and the state: A democratic critique.Lea Ypi - 2011 - Ratio 24 (1):91-106.
    Libertarians often invoke the principle of self-ownership to discredit distributive interventions authorized by the more-than-minimal state. But if one takes a democratic approach to the justification of ownership claims, including claims of ownership over oneself, the validity of the self-ownership principle is theoretically inseparable from the normative justification of the state. Since the idea of the state is essential to the very assertion (not just the positive enforcement) of the principle of self-ownership, (...)
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  30.  2
    A Third Conception of Self-Ownership - With Reference to the Identity of Democratic Decision-Makers -. 김동일 - 2023 - Journal of the New Korean Philosophical Association 114:29-52.
    이 글의 목적은 자기 소유권에 관한 기존 자유주의 전통의 재산 개념과 공화주의 전통의 평등 개념에 더해 세 번째 개념으로서 책임 개념을 제안하고 그 의미를 보여주는 것이다. 이 제안과 의미에 관한 논의는 민주적 의사결정 주체의 정체성과 관련하여 이루어진다. 민주적 의사결정 주체란 자기가 따라야 하는 정치 공동체의 의사결정을 스스로 만들어 내는 주체를 말한다. 자유주의와 공화주의 전통은 자기 소유권을 각각 재산 개념과 평등 개념으로 해석하고, 나름대로 민주적 의사결정의 주체를 발전시키는 데 이바지해 왔다. 그러나 민주적 의사결정 주체의 이상적 정체성을 완성하는 일에는 일정한 한계를 보이고 (...)
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  31.  34
    Selfownership, relational dignity, and organ sales.David Hershenov - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (7):430-436.
    Material property has traditionally been conceived of as separable from its owner and thus alienable in an exchange. So it seems that you could sell your watch or even your kidney because it can be removed from your wrist or abdomen and transferred to another. However, if we are each identical to a living human animal, selfownership is impossible for self‐separation is impossible. We thus cannot sell our parts if we don't own the whole that they compose. (...)
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  32. Self-ownership and equality: a lockean reconciliation.Michael Otsuka - 1998 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (1):65-92.
    I thank the members of the Law and Philosophy Discussion Group in Los Angeles and those who attended a talk sponsored by the philosophy department at New York University, where I presented earlier versions of this paper. I would also like to thank G. A. Cohen, Stephen Munzer, Seana Shiffrin, Peter Vallentyne, Andrew Williams, and the editors of Philosophy & Public Affairs, who read and provided written commentary on earlier drafts.
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  33. The Self-Ownership Proviso: A New and Improved Lockean Proviso.Eric Mack - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (1):186-218.
  34.  44
    A Problem of Self-Ownership for Reproductive Justice.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):312-327.
    This paper raises three concerns regarding self-ownership rhetoric to describe autonomy within healthcare in general and reproductive justice in specific. First, private property and the notion of “ownership” embedded in “self-ownership,” rely on and replicate historical injustices related to the initial acquisition of property. Second, not all individuals are recognized as selves with equal access to self-ownership. Third, self-ownership only justifies negative liberties. To fully protect healthcare access and reproductive care in (...)
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  35.  21
    Self-ownership and the importance of the human body.Ian Carter - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (2):94-115.
    :In this essay I attempt to vindicate the “asymmetry thesis,” according to which ownership of one’s own body is intrinsically different from ownership of other objects, and the view that self-ownership, as libertarians normally understand the concept, enjoys a special “fact-insensitive” status as a fundamental right. In particular, I argue in favor of the following claims. First, the right of self-ownership is most plausibly understood as based on the more fundamental notion of respect for (...)
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  36. Self-ownership, Equality, and the Structure of Property Rights.John Christman - 1991 - Political Theory 19 (1):28-46.
  37.  36
    Self-Ownership, Liberal Neutrality and the Realm of Freedom: New Reflections on the Justification of Basic Income.Simon Birnbaum - 2013 - Jurisprudence 4 (2):344-357.
    Self-Ownership, Liberal Neutrality and the Realm of Freedom: New Reflections on the Justification of Basic Income. A review of Axel Gosseries and Yannick Vanderborght (eds), Arguing about Justice: Essays for Philippe Van Parijs.
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  38.  36
    Justice, Self-Ownership, and Natural Assets.Michael Gorr - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):267-291.
    A question that has recently attracted considerable attention is this: What is the nature and significance of the normative relationship a person bears to herself ? On one view, it is held that persons are self-owners : as Locke put it in one of the more famous passages in the Second Treatise : [E]very man has a property in his own person : this no body has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work (...)
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  39.  59
    The self-ownership proviso: A critique.Peter Bornschein - 2018 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 17 (4):339-355.
    Recently, Eric Mack, Edward Feser, and Daniel Russell have argued that self-ownership justifies a constraint on the use of property such that an owner’s use of property may not severely negate the ability of others to interact with the world. Mack has labeled this constraint the self-ownership proviso. Adopting this proviso promises right-libertarians a way of avoiding the extreme implications of a no-proviso view, while maintaining a consistent and cohesive position. Nevertheless, I argue that self- (...) cannot ground the constraint on property use that Mack, Feser, and Russell think that it can. (shrink)
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  40. Self-ownership and paternalism.Steven Wall - 2009 - Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (4):399-417.
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  41.  67
    Self-Ownership and Equality: Brute Luck, Gifts, Universal Dominance, and Leximin:Real Freedom for All Philippe Van Parijs's.Peter Vallentyne - 1997 - Ethics 107 (2):321-.
  42. Self-Ownership and the Right of Property.Eric Mack - 1990 - The Monist 73 (4):519-543.
  43.  93
    The Appeal of Self-Ownership.Brian McElwee - 2010 - Social Theory and Practice 36 (2):213-232.
    In this paper, I argue that the appeal of a principle of self-ownership is grounded in the specially intimate relationship that each of us has with our body. I argue that once we appreciate the source of the appeal of a claim of self-ownership, we can see how a differently shaped set of strong rights over our body can do justice to the considerations that ground this appeal, without committing us to the most controversial implications of (...)
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  44. A Kantian Defense of SelfOwnership.Robert S. Taylor - 2004 - Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (1):65-78.
    Many scholars, including G. A. Cohen, Daniel Attas, and George Brenkert, have denied that a Kantian defense of self-ownership is possible. Kant's ostensible hostility to self-ownership can be resolved, however, upon reexamination of the Groundwork and the Metaphysics of Morals. Moreover, two novel Kantian defenses of self-ownership (narrowly construed) can be devised. The first shows that maxims of exploitation and paternalism that violate self-ownership cannot be universalized, as this leads to contradictions in (...)
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  45. Self-ownership, abortion and infanticide.E. F. Paul & J. Paul - 1979 - Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (3):133-138.
    Doctors have been placed in an anomalous position by abortion laws which sanction the termination of a fetus while in a woman's womb, yet call it murder when a physician attempts to end the life of a fetus which has somehow survived such a procedure. This predicament, the doctors' dilemma, can be resolved by adopting a strategy which posits the right to ownership of one's own body for human beings. Such an approach will generate a consistent policy prescription, one (...)
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  46.  1
    Selfownership, Begetting, and Germline Information.Hillel Steiner - 2004 - In Justine Burley & John Harris (eds.), A Companion to Genethics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 317–324.
    The prelims comprise: Introduction The Selfownership Paradox Solving the Paradox Acknowledgments.
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  47.  5
    Self-ownership, labor, and licensing.Daniel C. Russell - 2019 - Social Philosophy and Policy 36 (2):174-195.
    :In this essay I examine restrictions on labor as takings of property: a liberty to work is property, and restrictions of that liberty are takings. I set property in one’s labor within a unified framework for all forms of property, understood as a social institution for balancing two freedoms: freedom to act even if it interferes with someone else, and freedom from interference. As such, property includes not only possession but also use and disposition. To restrict use or disposition is (...)
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  48. Self-ownership.Peter Vallentyne - 2001 - In Laurence Becker & Charlotte Becker (eds.), Encyclopedia of Ethics, 2nd edition. Garland Publishing.
    John Locke (1690), libertarians, and others have held that agents are self-owners in the sense that they have private property rights over themselves in the same way that people can have private property rights over inanimate objects. This private ownership is typically taken to include (1) control rights over (power to grant and deny permission for) the use of their persons (e.g., what things are done to them), (2) rights to transfer the rights they have to others (by (...)
     
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  49. Self-Ownership, World-Ownership, and Initial Acquisition.Tristan Rogers - 2010 - Libertarian Papers 2:36.
    G.A. Cohen was perhaps libertarianism’s most formidable critic. In Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality he levels several strong criticisms against Robert Nozick’s theory put forth in Anarchy, State, and Utopia. In this paper, I counter several of Cohen’s criticisms. The debate operates at three stages: self-ownership, world-ownership, and initial acquisition. At the first stage, Cohen does not attempt to refute self-ownership, but weaken its force in providing moral grounds for capitalism. Here I argue that (...)
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  50.  49
    Why self-ownership is prescriptively impotent.Evan Fox-Decent - 1998 - Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (4):489-506.
    The self-ownserhip thesis claims that people are the rightful owners of themselves, and that as a consequence that are entitled to do as they please, and appropriate what they will, just so long as they do not harm others. I argue that this no-harm proviso is problematic in that our best conception of harm is not that A harms B if, and only if, A makes B worse off, but rather that A harms B if, and only if, A's (...)
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