Results for 'sexual harassment'

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  1.  80
    Sexual Harassment: A Matter of Individual Ethics, Legal Definitions, or Organizational Policy? [REVIEW]Joann Keyton & Steven C. Rhodes - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (2):129-146.
    Although interest in business ethics has rapidly increased, little attention has been drawn to the relationship between ethics and sexual harassment. While most companies have addressed the problem of sexual harassment at the organizational level with corporate codes of ethics or sexual harassment policies, no research has examined the ethical ideology of individual employees. This study investigates the relationship between the ethical ideology of individual employees and their ability to identify social-sexual behaviors in (...)
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  2. Sexual Harassment in Public Places.Margaret Crouch - 2009 - Social Philosophy Today 25:137-148.
    Most discussions of sexual harassment and laws addressing sexual harassment focus solely on sexual harassment in the workplace and/or in academe. In this paper, I will explore sexual harassment in public spaces such as streets and public transportation. Street and/or transportation harassment is a major problem for women in a number of countries. These forms of harassment constrain women’s freedom of movement, preventing them from taking advantage of opportunities at school, (...)
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  3.  1
    Sexual Harassment and Masculinity: The Power and Meaning of “Girl Watching”.Beth A. Quinn - 2002 - Gender and Society 16 (3):386-402.
    That women tend to see harassment where men see harmless fun or normal gendered interaction is one of the more robust findings in sexual harassment research. Using in-depth interviews with employed men and women, this article argues that these differences may be partially explained by the performative requirements of masculinity. The ambiguous practice of “girl watching” is centered, and the production of its meaning analyzed. The data suggest that men's refusal to see their behavior as harassing may (...)
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  4.  24
    Sexual Harassment in Public Places.Margaret Crouch - 2009 - Social Philosophy Today 25:137-148.
    Most discussions of sexual harassment and laws addressing sexual harassment focus solely on sexual harassment in the workplace and/or in academe. In this paper, I will explore sexual harassment in public spaces such as streets and public transportation. Street and/or transportation harassment is a major problem for women in a number of countries. These forms of harassment constrain women’s freedom of movement, preventing them from taking advantage of opportunities at school, (...)
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  5. Sexual Harassment and Wrongful Communication.Edmund Wall - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (4):525-537.
  6.  42
    Justice, Sexual Harassment, and the Reasonable Victim Standard.Deborah L. Wells & Beverly J. Kracher - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (6):423 - 431.
    In determining when sexual behavior in the workplace creates a hostile working environment, some courts have asked, Would a reasonableperson view this as a hostile environment? Two recent court decisions, recognizing male-female differences in the perception of social sexual behavior at work, modified this standard to ask, Would a reasonablevictim view this as a hostile environment? As yet, there is no consensus in the legal community regarding which of these standards is just.We propose that moral theory provides the (...)
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  7.  39
    Sexual Harassment in the Public Accounting Profession?Brian B. Stanko & Mark Schneider - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 18 (2):185 - 200.
    Federal discrimination laws have defined two distinct types of activity that constitute sexual harassment – "hostile environment" and "quid pro quo." The Civil Rights Act of 1991 and more recent Supreme Court rulings make it easier for workers to win lawsuits claiming they were sexually harassed in the work environment.While the public accounting profession continues to address gender-related problems, it remains vulnerable to claims of sexual harassment. In an attempt to better understand the underlying risk the (...)
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  8.  31
    The Sexual Harassment Coercive Offer.James Rocha - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):203-216.
    There is disagreement in the coercion literature over whether an offer, which necessarily lacks a threat, could be coercive, which tends to imply at least some affinity with coercion, which, in paradigm cases, includes a threat. In one difficult sexual harassment case, someone is offered a promotion in exchange for sex, but there is, due to the arrangement of the case, no implied threat or repercussion for refusal. I argue this case counts as coercive since the offer-making attempts (...)
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  9.  98
    Sexual Harassment and Sadomasochism.Christine L. Williams - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):99-117.
    : Although many women experience harmful behaviors that fit the legal definition of sexual harassment, very few ever label their experiences as such. I explore how psychological ambivalence expressed as sadomasochism may account for some of this gap. Following Lynn Chancer, I argue that certain structural circumstances characteristic of highly stratified bureaucratic organizations may promote these psychological responses. After discussing two illustrations of this dynamic, I draw out the implications for sexual harassment theory and policy.
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  10.  2
    Boundary Lines: Labeling Sexual Harassment in Restaurants.Christine L. Williams & Patti A. Giuffre - 1994 - Gender and Society 8 (3):378-401.
    Research has shown that a majority of employed women experience sexual harassment and suffer negative repercussions because of it; yet only a minority of these women label their experiences “sexual harassment.” To investigate how people identify sexual harassment, in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 waitpeople in restaurants in Austin, Texas. Most respondents worked in highly sexualized work environments. Respondents labeled sexual advances as sexual harassment only in four specific contexts: when perpetrated (...)
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  11.  13
    Sexual Harassment: Trust and the Ethic of Care.Thomas I. White - 1998 - Business and Society Review 100 (1):9-20.
  12.  90
    Can Sexual Harassment Be Salvaged?M. J. Booker - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (11):1171-1177.
    Cases of sexual harassment have become increasingly common in the courts, but there is at present no coherent definition of just what sexual harassment is supposed to consist. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines ultimately focus on issues of subjective victimization, a standard which is overly broad and prescriptively empty. In order to salvage the concept of sexual harassment, it is argued here that the element of unwelcomeness must be removed from it. Instead of (...)
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  13. Sexual Harassment: Why the Corporate World Still Doesn't “Get It”. [REVIEW]Vaughana Macy Feary - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (8):649 - 662.
    This paper shows that in order to understand and to resolve the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace, the corporate world will have to relinquish some myths. Sexual harassment does not result from ignorance about fact or law. It is not merely a cultural, gender, or communication problem. It is a problem which will be resolved only when the corporate world recognizes that sexual harassment is a moral problem and provides moral education for (...)
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  14.  25
    Sexual Harassment in the Law: The Demarcation Problem.Mane Hajdin - 1994 - Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (3):102-122.
  15. Sexual Harassment: A Debate.Linda LeMoncheck & Mane Hajdin - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The question of what constitutes sexual harassment—from suggestive remarks to outright threats, from off-color jokes to lewd posters on office walls—is contentious, as is the question of how to address sexual harassment. Do all instances of sexual harassment constitute sex discrimination? Are some instances merely sexual attraction gone wrong? Do social policies aimed at eliminating sexual harassment in the workplace violate freedom of expression or do they make working relationships possible between (...)
     
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  16.  49
    Sexual Harassment as "Wrongful Communication".Iddo Landau - 2003 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (2):225-234.
  17.  35
    Sexual Harassment: Offers and Coercion.Nancy Tuana - 1988 - Journal of Social Philosophy 19 (2):30-42.
  18. On the Persistence of Sexual Harassment in the Workplace.S. Gayle Baugh - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (9):899-908.
    The persistence of sexual harassment in the workplace, despite the general abhorrence for the behavior and programs designed to eradicate it, is puzzling. This paper proposes that gender differences in perceptions of sexual harassment and power differentials in the workplace which permit men to legitimize and institutionalize their perspective are implicated. These two phenomena combine to result in blaming the victim of sexual harassment for her own plight. Shifting attention to the target of (...) harassment facilitates the persistence of sexual harassment because the institutionalized responses to the problem remain unquestioned. (shrink)
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  19. Recent Thinking About Sexual Harassment: A Review Essay.Elizabeth Anderson - 2006 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (3):284-312.
  20. Sexual Harassment and Solidarity.Sexual Intimidation - 2008 - In Tom L. Beauchamp, Norman E. Bowie & Denis Gordon Arnold (eds.), Ethical Theory and Business. Pearson/Prentice Hall. pp. 227.
     
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  21.  36
    Sexual Harassment.Susan M. Dodds, Lucy Frost, Robert Pargetter & Elizabeth W. Prior - 1988 - Social Theory and Practice 14 (2):111-130.
  22. A Feminist Definition of Sexual Harassment.Anita M. Superson - 1993 - Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):46-64.
  23.  24
    Sexual Harassment Proclivities in Men and Women.Carl A. Bartling & Russell Eisenman - 1993 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (3):189-192.
  24.  15
    Sexual Harassment, Seduction, and Mutual Respect: An Attempt at Sorting It Out.William L. McBride - 2000 - In Linda Fisher & Lester E. Embree (eds.), Feminist Phenomenology. Kluwer Academic Publishers, C. pp. 249--266.
  25.  26
    Work–Family Spillover and Crossover Effects of Sexual Harassment: The Moderating Role of Work–Home Segmentation Preference.Jie Xin, Shouming Chen, Ho Kwong Kwan, Randy K. Chiu & Frederick Hong-kit Yim - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 147 (3):619-629.
    This study examined the relationship between workplace sexual harassment as perceived by female employees and the family satisfaction of their husbands. It also considered the mediating roles of employees’ job tension and work-to-family conflict and the moderating role of employees’ work–home segmentation preference in this relationship. The results, based on data from 210 Chinese employee–spouse dyads collected at four time points, indicated that employees’ perceptions of sexual harassment were positively related to their job tension, which in (...)
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  26.  27
    Sexual Harassment at the Workplace: Converging Ideologies.Georgina Gabor - 2006 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):102-111.
    The present study endeavors to give a description of a famous case of sexual harass- ment at the workplace and critique it in terms of its embedment of an intertwined relationship between two pervasive ideologies prevalent in our society: patriarchy and consumerism. By focusing on the favorable conditions, ways of resolution, and outcomes of the lawsuit, this essay approaches the organization- al culture of Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America through the lens of critical theory. Selective literature review on (...) harassment, as well as general coverage of the event by the media and the parties involved demonstrate the validity of the claim that this study has made. (shrink)
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  27. Implementing Business Ethics: Sexual Harassment[REVIEW]Karen A. Crain & Kenneth A. Heischmidt - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (4):299 - 308.
    Sexual harassment is a problem for many organizations. Organizations must understand that sexual harassment lies within the broader context of sex discrimination and inequality of opportunity in the workplace. Sexual harassment is both an illegal and unethical practice. Companies need to implement a policy which respects the rights of individual employees by prohibiting sexual harassment. This policy need to be clearly stated in the company Code of Ethics and enforced rigorously.
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  28.  47
    Understanding Sexual Harassment a Little Better Reed and Bull Information Systems Ltd V. Stedman.Giorgio Monti - 2000 - Feminist Legal Studies 8 (3):367-377.
    This case note reviews the guidelines issued by Morison J. in the Employment Appeal Tribunal at the end of the decision in Reed and Bull Information Systems Ltd v. Stedman [1999] I.R.L.R.299. The author argues that while the judge’s decision is to be welcomed in adopting an approach more sympathetic to victims of sexual harassment, it also raises a number of problems by placing a burden on the victim to place the harasser on notice that she does not (...)
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  29.  36
    The Definition of Sexual Harassment.Edmund Wall - 1991 - Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (4):371-385.
  30.  26
    Enhancing Civil Remedies for (Sexual) Harassment: S.3 of the Protection From Harassment Act 1997. [REVIEW]Joanne Conaghan - 1999 - Feminist Legal Studies 7 (2):203-214.
    This commentary explores the scope and content of the Protection from Harassment Act, recently introduced in the UK, focusing in particular on s.3 which creates a civil cause of action for harassment. The author considers the strategic possibilities for feminists concerned with enhancing remedies for sexual harassment as well as the drawbacks of the Act, particularly its capacity to be deployed in a wide range of contexts not all of which necessarily promote justice or enhance civil (...)
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  31. Sexual Harassment: A Threat To Gradual Women Emancipation.Shamreeza Riaz - 2012 - Pakistan Journal of Gender Studies 6 (1):233-249.
    This article is an attempt to highlight gender-based attitude of society towards women. Women comprise approximately 50% of the total population of Pakistan; Pakistan cannot afford to keep half of its citizens inactive and their potential as participants in development and progress untapped. Nothing more than the misogynist view of women as weak in physical power and deficient in mental faculties has marred the upward movement of societies. Women who defy this erroneous obscurantist conceptualisation and step into public domain are (...)
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  32.  9
    Sexual Harassment and Sadomasochism.Christine L. Williams - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):99-117.
    Although many women experience harmful behaviors that fit the legal definition of sexual harassment, very few ever label their experiences as such. I explore how psychological ambivalence expressed as sadomasochism may account for some of this gap. Following Lynn Chancer, I argue that certain structural circumstances characteristic of highly stratified bureaucratic organizations may promote these psychological responses. After discussing two illustrations of this dynamic, I draw out the implications for sexual harassment theory and policy.
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  33.  2
    Sexual Harassment At Work Place: A Study Of Women Political Workers In Pakistan.Aliyah Ali & Rukhsana Rukhsana - 2019 - Pakistan Journal of Applied Social Sciences 10 (1):1-20.
    Sexual harassment in the work place including political sphere is widespread in Pakistan but actual number of cases are not available, issue is still under the carpet. This unwanted and annoying sex-related behaviour and concealing phenomena is the part of all professions. The present study explored the contemporary status of harassment in Pakistani women political workers. For this exploratory research the data has collected from 200 women political workers through survey method with purposive and snow ball sampling (...)
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  34.  1
    Sexual Harassment At Work Place: A Study Of Women Political Workers In Pakistan.Aliyah Ali & Rukhsana Siddiqi - 2019 - Pakistan Journal of Applied Social Sciences 10 (1):1-20.
    Sexual harassment in the work place including political sphere is widespread in Pakistan but actual number of cases are not available, issue is still under the carpet. This unwanted and annoying sex-related behaviour and concealing phenomena is the part of all professions. The present study explored the contemporary status of harassment in Pakistani women political workers. For this exploratory research the data has collected from 200 women political workers through survey method with purposive and snow ball sampling (...)
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  35. Sexual Harassment: An Introduction to the Conceptual and Ethical Issues.Keith Dromm - 2012 - Broadview Press.
    _Sexual Harassment: An Introduction to the Conceptual and Ethical Issues_ covers the most important normative, conceptual, and legal issues associated with sexual harassment. Keith Dromm provides an insightful introduction to the theoretical and practical discussion, examining the most influential approaches to sexual harassment and offering his own analyses. Each chapter ends with review questions, discussion questions, and suggestions for group activities.
     
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  36.  64
    Sexual Harassment and the University.Robert L. Holmes - 1996 - The Monist 79 (4):499-518.
    Sexual harassment is a serious and insufficiently recognized problem for universities. But while virtually everyone can agree that sexual harassment is wrong, there is little agreement as to what precisely it is. Here one finds a proliferating array of definitions. They include the following.
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  37. "Sexual Harassment: An Introduction to the Conceptual and Ethical Issues," by Keith Dromm. [REVIEW]Debra Jackson - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (1):85-88.
  38. Making Sense of Sexual Harassment Law.Andrew Altman - 1996 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 25 (1):36-50.
  39.  1
    Perceptions of Sexual Harassment in the Florida Legal System: A Comparison of Dominance and Spillover Explanations.James D. Orcutt & Irene Padavic - 1997 - Gender and Society 11 (5):682-698.
    This article applies two explanations of sexual harassment—gender dominance and sex-role spillover—in multivariate analyses of perceptions of two forms of harassment of women in legal settings by male judges and attorneys. Regression analyses of data from statewide samples of Florida judges and attorneys support the age/spillover hypothesis: Older cohorts of men are markedly less likely than are other respondents to perceive male judges' and attorneys' gender-typing behavior. Some support is also found for the age/dominance hypothesis, which predicts (...)
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  40. The Definition of Sexual Harassment.Jan Crosthwaite & Graham Priest - 1996 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 74 (1):66 – 82.
  41.  4
    Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence and CSR: Radical Feminist Theory and a Human Rights Perspective.Kate Grosser & Meagan Tyler - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    This paper extends Corporate Social Responsibility scholarship to focus on issues of sexual harassment and sexual violence. Despite a significant body of work on gender and CSR from a variety of feminist perspectives, long-standing evidence of sexual harassment and sexual violence in business, particularly in global value chains, and the rise of the #MeToo movement, there has been little scholarship focused specifically on these issues in the context of CSR. Our conceptual paper addresses this (...)
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  42.  5
    Sexual Harassment and the “Repetition Requirement”.Landau Iddo - 2004 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (1):79-83.
    In his “Reply to Iddo Landau,” Edmund Wall responds to the author’s critique of some of the views expressed in his “Sexual Harassment and Wrongful Communication.” The present article concentrates on what the author takes to be the main problem in Wall’s definition: by requiring that any act, even if intentional and cruel in nature, needs to be repeated to count as sexual harassment, Wall allows too much leeway and renders permissible a wide range of intentional, (...)
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  43.  54
    Sexual Harassment and the "Repetition Requirement".Iddo Landau - 2004 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 34 (1):79-83.
    In his "Reply to Iddo Landau," Edmund Wall responds to the author’s critique of some of the views expressed in his "Sexual Harassment and Wrongful Communication." The present article concentrates on what the author takes to be the main problem in Wall’s definition: by requiring that any act, even if intentional and cruel in nature, needs to be repeated to count as sexual harassment, Wall allows too much leeway and renders permissible a wide range of intentional, (...)
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  44. Sexual Harassment: Issues and Answers.Linda LeMoncheck & James P. Sterba (eds.) - 2001 - Oup Usa.
    This a collection of contemporary popular and scholarly writing on the subject of sexual harassment. The book is designed to clarify and enrich understanding of a topic that in recent years, especially in the United States, has been the subject of contentious debate in the media, the law, and the academy. The book's variety of political analysis, legal theory, philosophical debate, multicultural and international perspectives, regulatory documents, and Supreme Court case law is unprecedented in any single volume on (...)
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  45. Stop Thinking So Much About ‘Sexual Harassment’.Jennifer Saul - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (3):307-321.
    This article explores two related widespread mistakes in thinking about sexual harassment. One is a mistake made by philosophers doing philosophical work on the topic of sexual harassment: an excessive focus on attempting to define the term ‘sexual harassment’. This is a perfectly legitimate topic for discussion and indeed a necessary one, but its dominance of the literature has tended to prevent philosophers from adequately exploring other topics that are of at least equal importance, (...)
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  46.  35
    NaFTA Students' Whistle-Blowing Perceptions: A Case of Sexual Harassment[REVIEW]Lucia Peek, Maria Roxas, George Peek, Yves Robichaud, Blanca E. Covarrubias Salazar & Jose N. Barragan Codina - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):219 - 231.
    Business students from the three NAFTA countries were shown a possible Sexual Harassment scenario from Arthur Andersen’s Business Ethics Program. They were asked to respond to a pre-questionnaire concerning the three characters’ behaviors and possible actions and a post-questionnaire after writing a report from the points of view of the three characters in the scenario. The students were asked to consider whether the characters should report the possible harasser to their supervisor, and thus engage in whistle-blowing behavior, as (...)
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  47.  62
    Why Is Sexual Harassment Wrong?Vrinda Dalmiya - 1999 - Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):46-64.
  48.  41
    Sexual Harassment.Mattie Scott - 1996 - Semiotics:26-37.
  49. Sexual Harassment Online: Shaming and Silencing Women in the Digital Age.[author unknown] - 2018
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  50.  5
    Sexual Harassment: Insight and Abatement.John Stanley - 1984 - Business and Society 23 (1):32-36.
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