Results for 'slavery'

999 found
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  1.  18
    Slavery and Freedom in Theory and Practice.David J. Watkins - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (6):846-870.
    Slavery has long stood as a mirror image to the conception of a free person in republican theory. This essay contends that slavery deserves this central status in a theory of freedom, but a more thorough examination of slavery in theory and in practice will reveal additional insights about freedom previously unacknowledged by republicans. Slavery combines imperium and dominium in a way that both destroys freedom today and diminishes opportunities to achieve freedom tomorrow. Dominium and imperium (...)
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  2.  5
    Modern Slavery in Business: The Sad and Sorry State of a Non-Field.Genevieve LeBaron, Stefan Gold, Andrew Crane & Robert Caruana - 2021 - Business and Society 60 (2):251-287.
    “Modern slavery,” a term used to describe severe forms of labor exploitation, is beginning to spark growing interest within business and society research. As a novel phenomenon, it offers potential for innovative theoretical and empirical pathways to a range of business and management research questions. And yet, development into what we might call a “field” of modern slavery research in business and management remains significantly, and disappointingly, underdeveloped. To explore this, we elaborate on the developments to date, the (...)
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  3.  88
    Voluntary Slavery.Danny Frederick - 2014 - Las Torres de Lucca: Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 3 (4):115-137.
    The permissibility of actions depends upon facts about the flourishing and separateness of persons. Persons differ from other creatures in having the task of discovering for themselves, by conjecture and refutation, what sort of life will fulfil them. Compulsory slavery impermissibly prevents some persons from pursuing this task. However, many people may conjecture that they are natural slaves. Some of these conjectures may turn out to be correct. In consequence, voluntary slavery, in which one person welcomes the duty (...)
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  4.  30
    Hobbesian Slavery.Daniel Luban - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (5):726-748.
    Although Thomas Hobbes’s critics have often accused him of espousing a form of extreme subjection that differs only in name from outright slavery, Hobbes’s own striking views about slavery have attracted little notice. For Hobbes repeatedly insists that slaves, uniquely among the populace, maintain an unlimited right of resistance by force. But how seriously should we take this doctrine, particularly in the context of the rapidly expanding Atlantic slave trade of Hobbes’s time? While there are several reasons to (...)
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  5.  34
    Greek Slavery: From Domination to Property and Back Again.Kostas Vlassopoulos - 2011 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 131:115-130.
    Modern historians of Greek slavery seem to agree, despite other differences, on an understanding of slavery as a relationship of property. This understanding of slavery essentially goes back to Aristotle's theory of natural slavery. An examination of the Greek vocabulary of slavery though shows that the vast majority of Greeks had a very different understanding of slavery as a relationship of domination. This article argues that this alternative Greek understanding of slavery can account (...)
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  6.  75
    Slavery, Carbon, and Moral Progress.Dale Jamieson - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (1):169-183.
    My goal in this paper is to shed light on how moral progress actually occurs. I begin by restating a conception of moral progress that I set out in previous work, the “Naïve Conception,” and explain how it comports with various normative and metaethical views. I go on to develop an index of moral progress and show how judgments about moral progress can be made. I then discuss an example of moral progress from the past—the British abolition of the Atlantic (...)
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  7. A Liberal Argument for Slavery.Stephen Kershnar - 2003 - Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (4):510-536.
    The slavery contract is not a rights violation since the right not to be enslaved and the right not to give out a benefit are waivable and the conjunction of their voluntary waiver is not itself a rights violation. The case for the contract being pejoratively exploitative is not clear. Hence given the general presumption in favor of liberty of contract, such a transaction ought to be permitted. The contract is also not invalid on the grounds that the wrongdoer’s (...)
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  8. Slavery in Plato's Thought.Gregory Vlastos - 1941 - Philosophical Review 50 (3):289-304.
  9.  40
    Freedom, Slavery and the Passions.Susan James - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 223--241.
    Book synopsis: Since its publication in 1677, Spinoza’s Ethics has fascinated philosophers, novelists, and scientists alike. It is undoubtedly one of the most exciting and contested works of Western philosophy. Written in an austere, geometrical fashion, the work teaches us how we should live, ending with an ethics in which the only thing good in itself is understanding. Spinoza argues that only that which hinders us from understanding is bad and shows that those endowed with a human mind should devote (...)
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  10. A Liberal Argument for Slavery.Stephen Kershnar - 2003 - Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (4):510–536.
    The slavery contract is not a rights violation since the right not to be enslaved and the right not to give out a benefit are waivable and the conjunction of their voluntary waiver is not itself a rights violation. The case for the contract being pejoratively exploitative is not clear. Hence given the general presumption in favor of liberty of contract, such a transaction ought to be permitted. The contract is also not invalid on the grounds that the wrongdoer’s (...)
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  11.  7
    Slavery Andjouissance: Analysing Complaints of Suffering in UK and Australian Nurses' Talk About Their Work.Michael Traynor & Alicia Evans - 2014 - Nursing Philosophy 15 (3):192-200.
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  12. Autonomy, Slavery, and Mill's Critique of Paternalism.Alan E. Fuchs - 2001 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (3):231-251.
    Critics have charged that John Stuart Mill''s discussion as of paternalism in On Liberty is internally inconsistent, noting, for example, the numerous instances in which Mill explicitly endorses examples of paternalistic coercion. Similarly, commentators have noted an apparent contradiction between Mill''s political liberalism – according to which the state should be neutral among competing conceptions of the good – and Mill''s condemnation of non-autonomous ways of life, such as that of a servile wife. More generally, critics have argued that while (...)
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  13.  16
    Vessels of Evil: American Slavery and the Holocaust.Laurence Thomas - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):424-448.
    Two profound atrocities in the history of Western culture form the subject of this moving philosophical exploration: American Slavery and the Holocaust. An African American and a Jew, Laurence Mordekhai Thomas denounces efforts to place the suffering of one group above the other. Rather, he pronounces these two defining historical experiences as profoundly evil in radically different ways and points to their logically incompatible aims. The author begins with a discussion of the nature of evil, exploring the fragility of (...)
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  14.  30
    Leibniz on Slavery and the Ownership of Human Beings.Julia Jorati - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (10):1–18.
    Leibniz puts forward an intriguing argument against the moral permissibility of chattel slavery in a text from 1703. This argument has three independent layers or sub-arguments. The first is that slavery violates natural rights. The second is that moral laws such as the principles of equity and piety oppose slavery, or at least severely limit the permissible actions toward slaves. The third and final layer is that slavery can at most be justified if the slave is (...)
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  15. Slavery and Human Progress.David Brion Davis & John T. Noonan - 1986 - Ethics 96 (2):429-430.
  16.  93
    Slavery and Justice: Williams and Wiggins.Cora Diamond - 2017 - In Katharina Neges, Josef Mitterer, Sebastian Kletzl & Christian Kanzian (eds.), Realism - Relativism - Constructivism: Proceedings of the 38th International Wittgenstein Symposium in Kirchberg. De Gruyter. pp. 313-326.
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  17. What is Wrong with Slavery.R. M. Hare - 1979 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (2):103-121.
    This article discusses the definition of slavery as a status in society and a relation to an owner. an imaginary case in which utilitarian arguments could justify slavery. this case, just because it is highly unlikely to occur in the actual world, does not provide an argument against utilitarianism. if it did occur, slavery would be justified in this case, but that is no reason for abandoning our intuitive principle condemning slavery. the adoption of this principle (...)
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  18. Talent, Slavery and Envy in Dworkin's Equality of Resources.Miriam Cohen Christofidis - 2004 - Utilitas 16 (3):267-287.
    In this article I argue against Ronald Dworkin's rejection of the labour auction in his ‘Equality of Resources’. I criticize Dworkin's claims that the talented would envy the untalented in such an auction, and that the talented in particular would be enslaved by it. I identify some ways in which the talent auction is underdescribed and I compare the results for the condition of the talented of different further descriptions of it. I conclude that Dworkin's deviation from the ‘envy test’ (...)
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  19.  40
    Is Trafficking Slavery? Anti-Slavery International in the Twenty-First Century.Wendy H. Wong - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (3):315-328.
    Why was Anti-Slavery International (ASI) so effective at changing norms slavery and even mobilizing the support that ended the transatlantic slave trade at the end of the nineteenth century, and why has that success not continued on into subsequent eras? This article claims that ASI's organizational structure is the key to understanding why its accomplishments in earlier eras have yet to be replicated, and why today it struggles to make modern forms of slavery, such as human trafficking, (...)
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  20.  41
    The Concept of Modern Slavery: Definition, Critique, and the Human Rights Frame.Janne Mende - 2019 - Human Rights Review 20 (2):229-248.
    Modern slavery is a major topic of concern in international law and global governance, in civil society, and in academic debates. Yet, what does modern slavery mean, and can its highly different forms be covered in a single concept? This paper discusses these questions in three steps: First, it develops common definitions of modern slavery. Second, it discusses critical rejections of these definitions. The two camps that adhere to the definitions of modern slavery, and that reject (...)
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  21.  37
    Slavery in Plato's Republic.Brian Calvert - 1987 - Classical Quarterly 37 (02):367-.
    For a number of years, in the not too distant past, there was a lively debate between Plato's defenders and critics over the question of whether his Republic contained slaves. However, since the appearance of an article by Gregory Vlastos1 some twenty years ago, it seems to have been generally felt that the issue has been resolved, and the controversy has died down. Vlastos argued that the evidence admits of no doubt - Plato included slaves in his ideal state. In (...)
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  22. Aristotle on Natural Slavery.Malcolm Heath - 2008 - Phronesis 53 (3):243-270.
    Aristotle's claim that natural slaves do not possess autonomous rationality (Pol. 1.5, 1254b20-23) cannot plausibly be interpreted in an unrestricted sense, since this would conflict with what Aristotle knew about non-Greek societies. Aristotle's argument requires only a lack of autonomous practical rationality. An impairment of the capacity for integrated practical deliberation, resulting from an environmentally induced excess or deficiency in thumos (Pol. 7.7, 1327b18-31), would be sufficient to make natural slaves incapable of eudaimonia without being obtrusively implausible relative to what (...)
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  23.  3
    Slavery in Early Christianity.J. A. Glancy - 2008 - Hts Theological Studies 64 (3):1560-1563.
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  24. Slavery and Freedom.Nikolaĭ Berdi͡aev - 2009 - Semantron Press.
     
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  25.  8
    Historicizing Modern Slavery: Free-Grown Sugar as an Ethics-Driven Market Category in Nineteenth-Century Britain.Andrew Smith & Jennifer Johns - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 166 (2):271-292.
    The modern slavery literature engages with history in an extremely limited fashion. Our paper demonstrates to the utility of historical research to modern slavery researchers by explaining the rise and fall of the ethics-driven market category of “free-grown sugar” in nineteenth-century Britain. In the first decades of the century, the market category of “free-grown sugar” enabled consumers who were opposed to slavery to pay a premium for a more ethical product. After circa 1840, this market category disappeared, (...)
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  26. Voluntary Slavery and the Limits of the Market.Debra Satz - 2009 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 3 (1):87-109.
    This paper considers the normative assessment of bonded labor from the perspectives of libertarianism and Paretian welfare economics. I argue that neither theory can account for our objections to bonded labor arrangements; moreover, they fail in interesting ways. Reflecting on their normative failures focuses us on other considerations besides individual choice and efficiency. Such considerations include: the effects of labor markets on workers' preferences and capacities; the exploitation of the vulnerabilities of the poor; and the permanent binding of one person (...)
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  27. The Possibility of Contractual Slavery.Danny Frederick - 2016 - Philosophical Quarterly 66 (262):47-64.
    In contrast to eminent historical philosophers, almost all contemporary philosophers maintain that slavery is impermissible. In the enthusiasm of the Enlightenment, a number of arguments gained currency which were intended to show that contractual slavery is not merely impermissible but impossible. Those arguments are influential today in moral, legal and political philosophy, even in discussions that go beyond the issue of contractual slavery. I explain what slavery is, giving historical and other illustrations. I examine the arguments (...)
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  28.  17
    Slavery Discourse Before the Restoration: The Barbary Coast, Justinian's Digest, and Hobbes's Political Theory.Deborah Baumgold - 2010 - History of European Ideas 36 (4):412-418.
    Seventeenth-century natural-law philosophers participated in colonizing and slave-trading companies, yet they discussed slavery as an abstraction. This dispassionate approach is commonly explained with the “distance thesis” that the practice of slavery was at some remove from Northwest Europe. I contest the thesis, with a specific focus on pre-Restoration English discourse and Hobbes's political theory. By laying out the salient context — English experience of Barbary-coast slavery and an inherited neo-Roman intellectual frame — I argue, first, that (...) was hardly a distant phenomenon and, second, that Hobbes's discussion of slavery expressed ideas familiar in ordinary discourse. The conclusion contrasts the English neo-Roman outlook with Spanish neo-Aristotelianism. (shrink)
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  29. Marital Slavery and Friendship: John Stuart Mill's the Subjection of Women.Mary Lyndon Shanley - 1981 - Political Theory 9 (2):229-247.
  30. Equality, Responsibility and Talent Slavery.Nicole A. Vincent - 2006 - Imprints 9 (2):118-39.
    Egalitarians must address two questions: i. What should there be an equality of, which concerns the currency of the ‘equalisandum’; and ii. How should this thing be allocated to achieve the so-called equal distribution? A plausible initial composite answer to these two questions is that resources should be allocated in accordance with choice, because this way the resulting distribution of the said equalisandum will ‘track responsibility’ — responsibility will be tracked in the sense that only we will be responsible for (...)
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  31.  20
    Slavery, Contentment, and Social Freedom.G. W. Smith - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (108):236-248.
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  32. Ideas of Slavery From Aristotle to Augustine.Peter Garnsey - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    This study, unique of its kind, asks how slavery was viewed by the leading spokesmen of Greece and Rome. There was no movement for abolition in these societies, nor a vigorous debate, such as occurred in antebellum America, but this does not imply that slavery was accepted without question. Dr Garnsey draws on a wide range of sources, pagan, Jewish and Christian, over ten centuries, to challenge the common assumption of passive acquiescence in slavery, and the associated (...)
     
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  33.  24
    Colonial Slave Trade and Slavery and Structural Racial Injustice in France: Using Iris Young’s Social Connection Model of Responsibility.Magali Bessone - 2019 - Critical Horizons 20 (2):161-177.
    ABSTRACTThe incorrect conceptualization and evaluation of reparations for colonial slave trade and slavery within the legal, as opposed to the political, domain, produces an interpretation of the demands in France that views them as morally absurd and politically deleterious. I’ll use Iris Marion Young’s distinction between a liability model and a social connection model of responsibility to suggest that the moral claim according to which we can be held responsible today for redressing the structural injustices inherited from slave trade (...)
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  34.  29
    Between Slavery and Freedom: Philosophy and American Slavery. McGary Jr & Bill E. Lawson - 1993 - Indiana University Press.
    Using the writings of slaves and former slaves, as well as commentaries on slavery, Between Slavery and Freedom explores the American slave experience to gain a better understanding of six moral and political concepts—oppression, paternalism, resistance, political obligation, citizenship, and forgiveness. The authors use analytical philosophy as well as other disciplines to gain insight into the thinking of a group of people prevented from participating in the social/political discourse of their times. Between Slavery and Freedom rejects the (...)
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  35.  19
    Anti-Slavery International.Mary Cunneen - 2005 - Journal of Global Ethics 1 (1):85 – 92.
    Despite the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade, slavery is not confined to the past. Many forms of slavery exist worldwide today, as highlighted by increased recent awareness of trafficking. International, and some national, legislation to combat contemporary slavery and trafficking exists, yet these practices continue. As important as legislation is its effective and sensitive implementation. With trafficking, we need to recognise the complexities of forced labour within a global context and move policy beyond its current restricted (...)
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  36. Enforcing Slavery Contracts: A Liberal View.Joan C. Callahan - 1985 - Philosophical Forum 16 (3):223.
     
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  37. Is Natural Slavery Beneficial?Thornton Lockwood - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):207-221.
    Aristotle's account of natural slavery appears to be internally inconsistent concerning whether slavery is advantageous to the natural slave. Whereas the Politics asserts that slavery is beneficial to the slave, the ethical treatises deny such a claim. Examination of Aristotle's arguments suggests a distinction which resolves the apparent contradiction. Aristotle distinguishes between the common benefit between two people who join together in an association And the same benefit which exists between a whole and its parts. Master and (...)
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  38.  17
    Arbitrary Rule: Slavery, Tyranny, and the Power of Life and Death.Mary Nyquist - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    Arbitrary Rule is the first book to tackle political slavery’s discursive complexity, engaging Eurocolonialism, political philosophy, and literary studies, areas of study too often kept apart.
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  39.  4
    Slavery in Plato's Republic.Brian Calvert - 1987 - Classical Quarterly 37 (2):367-372.
    For a number of years, in the not too distant past, there was a lively debate between Plato's defenders and critics over the question of whether his Republic contained slaves. However, since the appearance of an article by Gregory Vlastos1 some twenty years ago, it seems to have been generally felt that the issue has been resolved, and the controversy has died down. Vlastos argued that the evidence admits of no doubt - Plato included slaves in his ideal state. In (...)
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  40.  12
    'Not Slavery, But Salvation': Aristotle on Constitution and Government.Adriel M. Trott - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):115-135.
    This paper argues that Aristotle challenges the view of Athenian democrats that all rule is master rule – the imposition of the will of the powerful on the powerless – by arguing that the politeuma, or government, should be identical with the politeia, understood both as the constitution and the collectivity of citizens. I examine Aristotle’s analysis and response to democrats’ skepticism of the law that the constitution embodies. Aristotle argues that democrats think law limits license even when the source (...)
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  41.  12
    Not Slavery, but Salvation.Adriel M. Trott - 2017 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 34 (1):115-135.
    This paper argues that Aristotle challenges the view of Athenian democrats that all rule is master rule – the imposition of the will of the powerful on the powerless – by arguing that the politeuma, or government, should be identical with the politeia, understood both as the constitution and the collectivity of citizens. I examine Aristotle’s analysis and response to democrats’ skepticism of the law that the constitution embodies. Aristotle argues that democrats think law limits license even when the source (...)
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  42.  15
    [Book Review] Between Slavery and Freedom, Philosophy and American Slavery[REVIEW]Howard Mcgary & Bill E. Lawson - 1994 - Ethics 104 (4):898-900.
    Using the writings of slaves and former slaves, as well as commentaries on slavery, Between Slavery and Freedom explores the American slave experience to gain a better understanding of six moral and political concepts—oppression, paternalism, resistance, political obligation, citizenship, and forgiveness. The authors use analytical philosophy as well as other disciplines to gain insight into the thinking of a group of people prevented from participating in the social/political discourse of their times. Between Slavery and Freedom rejects the (...)
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  43.  68
    Locke on Slavery and Inalienable Rights.Jennifer Welchman - 1995 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):67 - 81.
    Some have argued that Locke's failure to condemn contemporary slavery is best viewed as a personal moral lapse which does not reflect on his political theory. I argue to the contrary.
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  44.  44
    Slavery in Capitalism.Philip McMichael - 1991 - Theory and Society 20 (3):321-349.
  45. Mary Astell on Marriage and Lockean Slavery.Jacqueline Broad - 2014 - History of Political Thought 35 (4):717–38.
    In the 1706 third edition of her Reflections upon Marriage, Mary Astell alludes to John Locke’s definition of slavery in her descriptions of marriage. She describes the state of married women as being ‘subject to the inconstant, uncertain, unknown, Arbitrary Will of another Man’ (Locke, Two Treatises, II.22). Recent scholars maintain that Astell does not seriously regard marriage as a form of slavery in the Lockean sense. In this paper, I defend the contrary position: I argue that Astell (...)
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  46.  18
    Stoicism, Slavery, and Law Grotian Jurisprudence and Its Reception.John W. Cairns - 2001 - Grotiana 22 (1):197-231.
  47.  38
    Sex as Slavery? Understanding Private Wrongs.Alison Brysk - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (3):259-270.
    The era of globalization has been accompanied by an increased awareness of private wrongs as well as acceleration of many forms of cross-border labor exploitation. The essay explores how refined distinctions between forced and free sex work could improve anti-trafficking policies. It addresses the understudied linkages between other forms of migration and sexual exploitation and suggests a triage approach to all forms of labor exploitation—based on harms rather than type of labor or victim. A better understanding of freedom, sex, and (...)
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  48. Mill, Paternalism, and Slavery.John D. Hodson - 1980 - Analysis 41 (1):60 - 62.
  49. The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution: 1770-1823.David Brion Davis - 1976 - Science and Society 40 (4):498-501.
  50. An Explanation of the Injustice of Slavery.Simon Roberts-Thomson - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (2):69-82.
    The institution of slavery is an unjust institution. The aim of this paper is to provide an explanation of why it is unjust. I argue that slavery is unjust because it makes it impossible for slaves to realise both their interest in self-respect and their interest in being at home in the world. Furthermore, I argue that this explanation of the injustice of slavery also provides us with an argument for political equality.
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