Results for 'social robots'

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  1. When AI Meets PC: Exploring the Implications of Workplace Social Robots and a Human-Robot Psychological Contract.Sarah Bankins & Paul Formosa - 2019 - European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology 2019.
    The psychological contract refers to the implicit and subjective beliefs regarding a reciprocal exchange agreement, predominantly examined between employees and employers. While contemporary contract research is investigating a wider range of exchanges employees may hold, such as with team members and clients, it remains silent on a rapidly emerging form of workplace relationship: employees’ increasing engagement with technically, socially, and emotionally sophisticated forms of artificially intelligent (AI) technologies. In this paper we examine social robots (also termed humanoid (...)) as likely future psychological contract partners for human employees, given these entities transform notions of workplace technology from being a tool to being an active partner. We first overview the increasing role of robots in the workplace, particularly through the advent of sociable AI, and synthesize the literature on human–robot interaction. We then develop an account of a human-social robot psychological contract and zoom in on the implications of this exchange for the enactment of reciprocity. Given the future focused nature of our work we utilize a thought experiment, a commonly used form of conceptual and mental model reasoning, to expand on our theorizing. We then outline potential implications of human-social robot psychological contracts and offer a range of pathways for future research. (shrink)
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  2. Ethical Considerations Regarding the Use of Social Robots in the Fourth Age.Catrin Misselhorn, Ulrike Pompe & Mog Stapleton - 2013 - Geropsych 26 (2):121-133.
    The debate about the use of robots in the care of older adults has often been dominated by either overly optimistic visions (coming particularly from Japan), in which robots are seamlessly incorporated into society thereby enhancing quality of life for everyone; or by extremely pessimistic scenarios that paint such a future as horrifying. We reject this dichotomy and argue for a more differentiated ethical evaluation of the possibilities and risks involved with the use of social robots. (...)
     
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  3.  54
    Attitudinal Change in Elderly Citizens Toward Social Robots: The Role of Personality Traits and Beliefs About Robot Functionality.Malene F. Damholdt, Marco Nørskov, Ryuji Yamazaki, Raul Hakli, Catharina Vesterager Hansen, Christina Vestergaard & Johanna Seibt - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:1701.
    Attitudes toward robots influence the tendency to accept or reject robotic devices. Thus it is important to investigate whether and how attitudes toward robots can change. In this pilot study we investigate attitudinal changes in elderly citizens toward a tele-operated robot in relation to three parameters: (i) the information provided about robot functionality, (ii) the number of encounters, (iii) personality type. Fourteen elderly residents at a rehabilitation center participated. Pre-encounter attitudes toward robots, anthropomorphic thinking, and personality were (...)
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  4.  2
    The Dilemma of Openness in Social Robots.Felix Tun Han Lo - 2019 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 23 (3):342-365.
    This paper conducts a philosophical inquiry into past empirical research that reveals emotional coupling and category confusion between the human and the social robot. It examines whether emotional coupling and category confusion would increase or diminish the reification of human emotion and the human milieu by examining whether they fulfill the ideal of openness in technology. The important theories of openness, from the respective proposals of open industrial machines by Gérard-Joseph Christian and Karl Marx, to Umberto Eco’s critique of (...)
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  5.  37
    Dynamics of Perceptible Agency: The Case of Social Robots.Maria Brincker - 2016 - Minds and Machines 26 (4):441-466.
    How do we perceive the agency of others? Do the same rules apply when interacting with others who are radically different from ourselves, like other species or robots? We typically perceive other people and animals through their embodied behavior, as they dynamically engage various aspects of their affordance field. In second personal perception we also perceive social or interactional affordances of others. I discuss various aspects of perceptible agency, which might begin to give us some tools to understand (...)
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  6.  9
    Social Behaviours in Dog-Owner Interactions Can Serve as a Model for Designing Social Robots.Tamás Faragó, Ádám Miklósi, Beáta Korcsok, Judit Száraz & Márta Gácsi - 2014 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 15 (2):143-172.
    It is essential for social robots to fit in the human society. In order to facilitate this process we propose to use the family dog’s social behaviour shown towards humans as an inspiration. In this study we explored dogs’ low level social monitoring in dog-human interactions and extracted individually consistent and context dependent behaviours in simple everyday social scenarios. We found that proximity seeking and tail wagging were most individually distinctive in dogs, while activity, orientation (...)
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  7.  8
    Children’s Acceptance of Social Robots.Chiara de Jong, Jochen Peter, Rinaldo Kühne & Alex Barco - 2019 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 20 (3):393-425.
    Social robots progressively enter children’s lives, but little is known about children’s acceptance of social robots and its antecedents. To fill this research gap, this narrative review surveyed 34 articles on child-robot interaction published between 2000 and 2017. We focused on robot, user, and interaction characteristics as potential antecedents of children’s intentional and behavioral social robot acceptance. In general, children readily accept robots. However, we found that social, adaptive robot behavior, children’s sex and (...)
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  8.  30
    Studying Social Robots in Practiced Places.Maja Hojer Bruun, Signe Hanghøj & Cathrine Hasse - 2015 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 19 (2):143-165.
    What is the strength of anthropological fieldwork when we want to understand human technologies? In this article we argue that anthropological fieldwork can be understood as a process of gaining insight into different contextualisations in practiced places that will open up new understandings of technologies in use, e.g., technologies as multistable ontologies. The argument builds on an empirical study of robots at a Danish rehabilitation centre. Ethnographic methods combined with anthropological learning processes open up new way for exploring how (...)
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  9.  2
    Privacy-Centered Design for Social Robots.Tanja Heuer, Ina Schiering & Reinhard Gerndt - 2019 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 20 (3):509-529.
    Social robots as companions play an increasingly important role in our everyday life. However, reaching the full potential of social robots and the interaction between humans and robots requires permanent collection and processing of personal data of users, e.g. video and audio data for image and speech recognition. In order to foster user acceptance, trust and to address legal requirements as the General Data Protection Regulation of the EU, privacy needs to be integrated in the (...)
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  10.  21
    Social Behaviours in Dog-Owner Interactions Can Serve as a Model for Designing Social Robots.Tamás Faragó, Ádám Miklósi, Beáta Korcsok, Judit Száraz & Márta Gácsi - 2014 - Interaction Studies 15 (2):143-172.
    It is essential for social robots to fit in the human society. In order to facilitate this process we propose to use the family dog’s social behaviour shown towards humans as an inspiration. In this study we explored dogs’ low level social monitoring in dog-human interactions and extracted individually consistent and context dependent behaviours in simple everyday social scenarios. We found that proximity seeking and tail wagging were most individually distinctive in dogs, while activity, orientation (...)
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  11.  28
    Humans and Humanoid Social Robots in Communication Contexts.Min-Sun Kim, Jennifer Sur & Li Gong - 2009 - AI and Society 24 (4):317-325.
    As humanoid social robots are developed rapidly in recent years and experimented in social situations, comparing them to humans provides insights into practical as well as philosophical concerns. This study uses the theoretical framework of communication constraints, derived in human–human communication research, to compare whether people apply social-oriented constraints and task-oriented constraints differently to human targets versus humanoid social robot targets. A total of 230 students from the University of Hawaii at Manoa participated in the (...)
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  12.  4
    The Effects of Exposure to Different Social Robots on Attitudes Toward Preferences.Evgenios Vlachos, Elizabeth Jochum & Louis-Philippe Demers - 2016 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 17 (3):390-404.
    We present results of a quasi-experimental study investigating how user preference might change after direct interaction with two different types of robot regarding morphology and affordances: a machine-like that interacts through touch, and a human-like that interacts verbally. The study was performed in an art exhibition setting, where visitors had the opportunity to interact with the robots voluntarily, and were asked to fill out questionnaires before and after the experience. Post interactions, visitors preferred to touch the machine-like “hard” robot (...)
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  13.  81
    Toward Combining Autonomy and Interactivity for Social Robots.Yasser Mohammad & Toyoaki Nishida - 2009 - AI and Society 24 (1):35-49.
    The success of social robots in achieving natural coexistence with humans depends on both their level of autonomy and their interactive abilities. Although a lot of robotic architectures have been suggested and many researchers have focused on human–robot interaction, a robotic architecture that can effectively combine interactivity and autonomy is still unavailable. This paper contributes to the research efforts toward this architecture in the following ways. First a theoretical analysis is provided that leads to the notion of co-evolution (...)
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  14.  1
    Children’s Perceptions of Social Robots: A Study of the Robots Pepper, AV1 and Tessa at Norwegian Research Fairs.Roger Andre Søraa, Pernille Søderholm Nyvoll, Karoline Blix Grønvik & J. Artur Serrano - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-12.
    This article studies perceptual differences of three social robots by elementary school children of ages 6–13 years at research fairs. The autonomous humanoid robot Pepper, an advanced social robot primarily designed as a personal assistant with movement and mobility, is compared to the teleoperated AV1 robot—designed to help elementary school children who cannot attend school to have a telepresence through the robot—and the flowerpot robot Tessa, used in the eWare system as an avatar for a home sensor (...)
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  15.  1
    The Use of Social Robots and the Uncanny Valley Phenomenon.Melinda A. Mende, Martin H. Fischer & Katharina Kühne - 2019 - In Yuefang Zhou & Martin H. Fischer (eds.), Ai Love You : Developments in Human-Robot Intimate Relationships. Springer Verlag.
    Social robots are increasingly used in different areas of society such as public health, elderly care, education, and commerce. They have also been successfully employed in autism spectrum disorders therapy with children. Humans strive to find in them not only assistants but also friends. Although forms and functionalities of such robots vary, there is a strong tendency to anthropomorphize artificial agents, making them look and behave as human as possible and imputing human attributes to them. The more (...)
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  16.  27
    Social Cognition and Social Robots.Shaun Gallagher - 2007 - Pragmatics and Cognition 15 (3):435-453.
    Social robots are robots designed to interact with humans or with each other in ways that approximate human social interaction. It seems clear that one question relevant to the project of designing such robots concerns how humans themselves interact to achieve social understanding. If we turn to psychology, philosophy, or the cognitive sciences in general, we find two models of social cognition vying for dominance under the heading of theory of mind: theory theory (...)
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  17.  4
    Technicist Education: Paving the Way for the Rise of the Social Work Robots?Christine Morley, Phillip Ablett & Kate Stenhouse - 2019 - Critical and Radical Social Work 7 (2):139-154.
    This article seeks to explicate one form of technical rationality (ie the technological development of robotics) in social work education and practice. As advances in robotics evolve, questions are raised about the role of technicist education in reducing social work practice to a set of tasks that are repeatable, formulaic and linear (ie tasks that robots are capable of performing). We conduct a critical synthesis of the literature to explore how these parallel processes potentially create a seamless (...)
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  18. Sociable Robots and the Future of Social Relations: Proceedings of Robo-Philosophy.Johanna Seibt, Raul Hakli & Marco Norskov (eds.) - 2014 - IOS Press.
    The robotics industry is growing rapidly, and to a large extent the development of this market sector is due to the area of social robotics – the production of robots that are designed to enter the space of human social interaction, both physically and semantically. Since social robots present a new type of social agent, they have been aptly classified as a disruptive technology, i.e. the sort of technology which affects the core of our (...)
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  19.  4
    Understanding Emotions and Their Significance Through Social Robots, and Vice Versa.Johanna Seibt & Raffaele Rodogno - 2019 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 23 (3):257-269.
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  20.  9
    Why Collaborative Robots Must Be Social Actors.Kerstin Fischer - 2019 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 23 (3):270-289.
    In this article, I address the question whether or not robots should be social actors and suggest that we do not have much choice but to construe collaborative robots as social actors. Social cues, including emotional displays, serve coordination functions in human interaction and therefore have to be used, even by robots, in order for long-term collaboration to succeed. While robots lack the experiential basis of emotional display, also in human interaction much emotional (...)
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  21.  37
    Social Robots-Emotional Agents: Some Remarks on Naturalizing Man-Machine Interaction.Barbara Becker - 2006 - International Review of Information Ethics 6:37-45.
    The construction of embodied conversational agents - robots as well as avatars - seem to be a new challenge in the field of both cognitive AI and human-computer-interface development. On the one hand, one aims at gaining new insights in the development of cognition and communication by constructing intelligent, physical instantiated artefacts. On the other hand people are driven by the idea, that humanlike mechanical dialog-partners will have a positive effect on human-machine-communication. In this contribution I put for discussion (...)
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  22.  10
    Improving the Modeling of Dog-Owner Interactions for the Design of Social Robots.Monica Nicolescu - 2014 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 15 (2):180-183.
  23.  26
    An Approach for a Social Robot to Understand Human Relationships: Friendship Estimation Through Interaction with Robots.Takayuki Kanda & Hiroshi Ishiguro - 2006 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 7 (3):369-403.
    This paper reports our research efforts on social robots that recognize interpersonal relationships. These investigations are carried out by observing group behaviors while the robot interacts with people. Our humanoid robot interacts with children by speaking and making various gestures. It identifies individual children by using a wireless tag system, which helps to promote interaction such as the robot calling a child by name. Accordingly, the robot is capable of interacting with many children, causing spontaneous group behavior from (...)
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  24.  35
    Social Robots, Fiction, and Sentimentality.Raffaele Rodogno - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (4):257-268.
    I examine the nature of human-robot pet relations that appear to involve genuine affective responses on behalf of humans towards entities, such as robot pets, that, on the face of it, do not seem to be deserving of these responses. Such relations have often been thought to involve a certain degree of sentimentality, the morality of which has in turn been the object of critical attention. In this paper, I dispel the claim that sentimentality is involved in this type of (...)
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  25.  38
    Ethical Values and Social Care Robots for Older People: An International Qualitative Study.Heather Draper & Tom Sorell - 2017 - Ethics and Information Technology 19 (1):49-68.
    Values such as respect for autonomy, safety, enablement, independence, privacy and social connectedness should be reflected in the design of social robots. The same values should affect the process by which robots are introduced into the homes of older people to support independent living. These values may, however, be in tension. We explored what potential users thought about these values, and how the tensions between them could be resolved. With the help of partners in the ACCOMPANY (...)
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  26.  68
    Social Robots: Things or Agents?Morana Alač - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (4):519-535.
  27.  15
    Improving the Modeling of Dog-Owner Interactions for the Design of Social Robots.Monica Nicolescu - 2014 - Interaction Studies 15 (2):180-183.
  28.  3
    Towards a New Scale for Assessing Attitudes Towards Social Robots : The Attitudes Towards Social Robots Scale.Malene Flensborg Damholdt, Christina Vestergaard, Marco Nørskov, Raul Hakli, Stefan Larsen & Johanna Seibt - 2020 - Interaction Studies 21 (1):24-56.
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  29.  7
    Interaction With Social Robots: Improving Gaze Toward Face but Not Necessarily Joint Attention in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.Wei Cao, Wenxu Song, Xinge Li, Sixiao Zheng, Ge Zhang, Yanting Wu, Sailing He, Huilin Zhu & Jiajia Chen - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  30.  6
    Theory of Robot Mind: False Belief Attribution to Social Robots in Children With and Without Autism.Yaoxin Zhang, Wenxu Song, Zhenlin Tan, Yuyin Wang, Cheuk Man Lam, Sio Pan Hoi, Qianhan Xiong, Jiajia Chen & Li Yi - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  31.  7
    Social Robots and Recognition.Marco Nørskov & Sladjana Nørskov - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):5-8.
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  32.  2
    Children’s Acceptance of Social Robots : A Narrative Review of the Research 2000–2017.Chiara de Jong, Jochen Peter, Rinaldo Kühne & Alex Barco - 2019 - Interaction Studies 20 (3):393-425.
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  33.  2
    Social Robots: Boundaries, Potential, Challenges: Marco Nørskov 2016 ISBN-13: 978-1472474308. 244pp. [REVIEW]Migle Laukyte - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (3):273-275.
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  34.  25
    Investigating and Designing Social Robots From a Role-Theoretical Perspective: Response to “Social Interaction with Robots—Three Questions”. In Gesa Lindemann.Martin Meister & Ingo Schulz-Schaeffer - 2016 - AI and Society 31 (4):581-585.
  35.  9
    Social Robots: Boundaries, Potential, Challenges.Migle Laukyte - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (3):273-275.
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  36.  6
    The Effects of Exposure to Different Social Robots on Attitudes Toward Preferences.Vlachos Evgenios, Jochum Elizabeth & Demers Louis-Philippe - 2016 - Latest Issue of Interaction Studies 17 (3):390-404.
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  37. What Social Robots Can and Should Do: Proceedings of Robophilosophy 2016.Johanna Seibt, Marco Nørskov & Søren Schack Andersen (eds.) - 2016 - IOS Press.
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  38.  13
    The Mediator Role of Robot Anxiety on the Relationship Between Social Anxiety and the Attitude Toward Interaction with Robots.Serkan Erebak & Tülay Turgut - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-7.
    Robots that can communicate with people are one of the goals reached by the technology developed for automation in work life. Experts aim to improve the communication skills of these robots further in the near future. Besides, various studies emphasize that people may interact with robots in a similar way as they interact with other people. In line of this idea, this study examines the possible causal chain in which the social anxiety affects the robot anxiety (...)
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  39.  11
    The Mediator Role of Robot Anxiety on the Relationship Between Social Anxiety and the Attitude Toward Interaction with Robots.Serkan Erebak & Tülay Turgut - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-7.
    Robots that can communicate with people are one of the goals reached by the technology developed for automation in work life. Experts aim to improve the communication skills of these robots further in the near future. Besides, various studies emphasize that people may interact with robots in a similar way as they interact with other people. In line of this idea, this study examines the possible causal chain in which the social anxiety affects the robot anxiety (...)
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  40.  44
    Questionnaire-Based Social Research on Opinions of Japanese Visitors for Communication Robots at an Exhibition.Tatsuya Nomura, Takugo Tasaki, Takayuki Kanda, Masahiro Shiomi, Hiroshi Ishiguro & Norihiro Hagita - 2007 - AI and Society 21 (1-2):167-183.
    This paper reports the results of questionnaire-based research conducted at an exhibition of interactive humanoid robots that was held at the Osaka Science Museum, Japan. The aim of this exhibition was to investigate the feasibility of communication robots connected to a ubiquitous sensor network, under the assumption that these robots will be practically used in daily life in the not-so-distant future. More than 90,000 people visited the exhibition. A questionnaire was given to the visitors to explore their (...)
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  41. Robots, Autonomy, and Responsibility.Raul Hakli & Pekka Mäkelä - 2016 - In Johanna Seibt, Marco Nørskov & Søren Schack Andersen (eds.), What Social Robots Can and Should Do: Proceedings of Robophilosophy 2016. Amsterdam, The Netherlands: IOS Press. pp. 145-154.
    We study whether robots can satisfy the conditions for agents fit to be held responsible in a normative sense, with a focus on autonomy and self-control. An analogy between robots and human groups enables us to modify arguments concerning collective responsibility for studying questions of robot responsibility. On the basis of Alfred R. Mele’s history-sensitive account of autonomy and responsibility it can be argued that even if robots were to have all the capacities usually required of moral (...)
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  42. Sympathy for Dolores: Moral Consideration for Robots Based on Virtue and Recognition.Massimiliano L. Cappuccio, Anco Peeters & William McDonald - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):9-31.
    This paper motivates the idea that social robots should be credited as moral patients, building on an argumentative approach that combines virtue ethics and social recognition theory. Our proposal answers the call for a nuanced ethical evaluation of human-robot interaction that does justice to both the robustness of the social responses solicited in humans by robots and the fact that robots are designed to be used as instruments. On the one hand, we acknowledge that (...)
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  43.  16
    Age Differences and Images of Robots: Social Survey in Japan.Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda, Tomohiro Suzuki & Kensuke Kato - 2009 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 10 (3):374-391.
  44.  9
    Child Development Robots: Social Forces, Children’s Perspectives.Gail F. Melson - 2010 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 11 (2):227-232.
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  45.  26
    Toward Some Circuitry of Ethical Robots or an Observational Science of the Genesis of Social Evaluation in the Mind-Like Behavior of Artifacts.W. S. McCulloch - 1956 - Acta Biotheoretica 11 (3-4):147-156.
    Modern knowledge of servo systems and computing machines makes it possible to specify a circuit that can and will induce the rules and winning moves in a game like chess when they are given only ostensibly, that is, by playing against opponents who quit when illegal or losing moves are made. Such circuits enjoy a value social in the sense that it is shared by the players.La connaissance moderne des servomécanismes et des machines à calculer permet de concevoir un (...)
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  46.  13
    Robots As Intentional Agents: Using Neuroscientific Methods to Make Robots Appear More Social.Eva Wiese, Giorgio Metta & Agnieszka Wykowska - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  47.  3
    Why Collaborative Robots Must Be Social Actors in Advance.Kerstin Fischer - forthcoming - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology.
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  48.  26
    Age Differences and Images of Robots: Social Survey in Japan.Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda, Tomohiro Suzuki & Kensuke Kato - 2009 - Interaction Studies 10 (3):374-391.
  49.  23
    Reflections on a Future of Sex with Robots: John Danaher and Neil McArthur : Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2017, 314pp, $40.00HB. [REVIEW]Marcus Arvan - 2019 - Metascience 28 (1):163-166.
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  50.  27
    Child Development Robots: Social Forces, Children's Perspectives.Gail F. Melson - 2010 - Interaction Studies 11 (2):227-232.
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