Results for 'species'

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  1. What is not?,“.What is A. Species - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (2):262-277.
     
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  2.  55
    On the origin of species.Charles Darwin - 1964 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Gillian Beer.
    The present edition provides a detailed and accessible discussion ofhis theories and adds an account of the immediate responses to the book on publication.
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  3. The evolutionary species concept reconsidered.E. O. Wiley - 1978 - Systematic Zoology 27:17-26.
  4.  33
    The Biopolitical Imaginary of Species-being.Michael Dillon & Luis Lobo-Guerrero - 2009 - Theory, Culture and Society 26 (1):1-23.
    This article revises Foucault's account of biopolitics in the light of the impact of the molecular and digital revolutions on `the politics of life itself'. The confluence of the molecular and digital revolutions informationalizes life, providing an account of what it is to be a living thing in terms of complex adaptive and continuously emergent, informationally constituted, systems. Also revisiting Foucault's The Order of Things and its interrogation of the modern analytics of finitude, the article argues that our contemporary politics (...)
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  5. The cladistic solution to the species problem.Mark Ridley - 1989 - Biology and Philosophy 4 (1):1-16.
    The correct explanation of why species, in evolutionary theory, are individuals and not classes is the cladistic species concept. The cladistic species concept defines species as the group of organisms between two speciation events, or between one speciation event and one extinction event, or (for living species) that are descended from a speciation event. It is a theoretical concept, and therefore has the virtue of distinguishing clearly the theoretical nature of species from the practical (...)
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  6.  60
    The ontological status of species: Scientific progress and philosophical terminology.Ernst Mayr - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (2):145-66.
  7.  98
    The Mystery of the Triceratops’s Mother: How to be a Realist About the Species Category.Adrian Mitchell Currie - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (4):795-816.
    Can we be realists about a general category but pluralists about concepts relating to that category? I argue that paleobiological methods of delineating species are not affected by differing species concepts, and that this underwrites an argument that species concept pluralists should be species category realists. First, the criteria by which paleobiologists delineate species are ‘indifferent’ to the species category. That is, their method for identifying species applies equally to any species concept. (...)
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  8.  31
    Origin of the species and genus concepts: An anthropological perspective.Scott Atran - 1987 - Journal of the History of Biology 20 (2):195-279.
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  9. Phylogenetic systematics and the species problem.Kevin De Queiroz & Michael J. Donoghue - 1988 - Cladistics 4:317-38.
  10.  75
    Secondary emotions in non-primate species? Behavioural reports and subjective claims by animal owners.Paul H. Morris, Christine Doe & Emma Godsell - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (1):3-20.
    A defining characteristic of primary emotions is that they occur in wide variety of species. Secondary emotions are thought to be restricted to humans and other primates. We report evidence from two studies investigating claims of primary and secondary emotions in non-primate species. Study 1. We surveyed 907 owners about emotions that they had observed in their animal. Participants reported primary emotions more frequently than secondary emotions and self-conscious emotions more frequently than self-conscious evaluative emotions. Jealousy was reported (...)
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  11.  16
    Charles Darwin’s Beagle Voyage, Fossil Vertebrate Succession, and “The Gradual Birth & Death of Species”.Paul D. Brinkman - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):363-399.
    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he (...)
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  12. A critique of the species concept in biology.T. Dobzhansky - 2014 - In Francisco José Ayala & John C. Avise (eds.), Essential readings in evolutionary biology. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  13.  40
    What is a virus species? Radical pluralism in viral taxonomy.Gregory J. Morgan - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 59:64-70.
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  14.  74
    Is Genus to Species as Matter to Form? Aristotle and Taxonomy.Marjorie Grene - 1974 - Synthese 28 (1):51 - 69.
  15. Why Peirce matters : the symbol in Deacon’s symbolic species.Tanya De Villiers - 2007 - Language Sciences 29 (1):88-101.
    In ‘‘Why brains matter: an integrational perspective on The Symbolic Species’’ Cowley (2002) [Language Sciences 24, 73–95] suggests that Deacon pictures brains as being able to process words qua tokens, which he identifies as the theory’s Achilles’ heel. He goes on to argue that Deacon’s thesis on the co-evolution of language and mind would benefit from an integrational approach. This paper argues that Cowley’s criticism relies on an invalid understanding of Deacon’s use the concept of ‘‘symbolic reference’’, which he (...)
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  16.  73
    Posthuman Ethics with Cary Wolfe and Karen Barad: Animal Compassion as Trans-Species Entanglement.Florence Chiew - 2014 - Theory, Culture and Society 31 (4):51-69.
    Although critiques of humanism are not new, the currency of posthumanist discourse on the nonhuman – the animal, the environment, or the object – suggests rising concerns about humanity’s place in the ecological order. This article interrogates Cary Wolfe's posthumanist framework as he approaches the questions of activism and agency in the context of animal ethics and disability politics. By drawing attention to the contradictions in his own commitments to rethinking human exceptionalism, I examine how Wolfe's appeal for a more (...)
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  17.  9
    Intrinsic value and species-specific behaviour1.Ruud van den Bos - 1999 - In Marcel Dol (ed.), Recognizing the intrinsic value of animals: beyond animal welfare. Assen, The Netherlands: Van Gorcum.
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  18.  41
    Genres as Species and Spaces: Literary and Rhetorical Genre in The Anatomy of Melancholy.Susan Wells - 2014 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 47 (2):113-136.
    Literary genre theory and rhetorical genre theory have stopped speaking to each other. Outside the lively trading station named Bakhtin, exchanges between the two fields are rare. Even though literary scholarship has turned from questions of genre identification to broader examinations of relations among genres, and rhetorical genre theory has focused not only on the social functioning of genres but also on their identifying features, each critical practice is cut off from the resources of the other. It is possible to (...)
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  19.  9
    Quantifying Aristotelian essences: On some fourteenth-century applications of limit decision problems to the perfection of species.Sylvain Roudaut - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-24.
    This paper explores a specific problem within an important philosophical genre of the fourteenth century: the debates over the perfection of species. It investigates how the problem of defining limits for continuous magnitudes – a problem typical of Aristotelian physics – was integrated into these debates at the levels of genera, species, and individuals as these entities began to be conceptualized in quantitative terms. After explaining the emergence of this problem within fourteenth-century metaphysics, the paper examines the contributions (...)
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  20.  17
    Another place, another timer: Marine species and the rhythms of life.Kristin Tessmar-Raible, Florian Raible & Enrique Arboleda - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (3):165-172.
    The marine ecosystem is governed by a multitude of environmental cycles, all of which are linked to the periodical recurrence of the sun or the moon. In accordance with these cycles, marine species exhibit a variety of biological rhythms, ranging from circadian and circatidal rhythms to circalunar and seasonal rhythms. However, our current molecular understanding of biological rhythms and clocks is largely restricted to solar‐controlled circadian and seasonal rhythms in land model species. Here, we discuss the first molecular (...)
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  21.  20
    Was Darwin Really a Species Nominalist?David N. Stamos - 1996 - Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):127 - 144.
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  22.  8
    Cultural and Species Differences in Gazing Patterns for Marked and Decorated Objects: A Comparative Eye-Tracking Study.Cordelia Mühlenbeck, Thomas Jacobsen, Carla Pritsch & Katja Liebal - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  23.  19
    The ontology of “intelligent species”.Philip Clayton - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):75-76.
  24.  22
    Some undescribed genera and species of south african rhynchota.W. L. Distant - 1905 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 16 (1):413-418.
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  25.  6
    Homo Sapiens, a Problematic Species: An Essay in Philosophical Anthropology.Mia Gosselin - 2014 - Lanham, Md.: Upa.
    This book evaluates the Western conception of man. After having examined primitive thought in which Nature comprises everything that exists, including man, the author explains why in Western thought man is usually not only different from Nature, but opposed to it, which may have grave consequences to Nature’s fate.
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  26.  24
    Caribbean Male: An Endangered Species?Keisha Lindsay - 2002 - In Patricia Mohammed (ed.), Gendered realities: essays in Caribbean feminist thought. Mona, Jamaica: Centre for Gender and Development Studies. pp. 56--82.
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  27.  5
    Catalogue of species of Ephemeropteras moderate for Panama (Insecta).I. G. Luna - 1989 - Scientia 4.
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  28. Julius Caesar Scaliger on Plants, Species, and the Ordained Power of God.Andreas Blank - 2012 - Science in Context 25 (4):503-523.
    ArgumentThe sixteenth-century physician and philosopher Julius Caesar Scaliger suggests that in particular cases plants can come into being that belong to a plant species that did not exist before. At the same time, he holds that God could not have created a more perfect world. However, does the occurrence of new species not imply that the world was not the best possible world from the beginning? In this article, I explore a set of metaphysical ideas that could provide (...)
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  29.  40
    The composite species concept: a rigorous basis for cladistic practice.D. J. Kornet & James W. McAllister - 2005 - In Thomas A. C. Reydon & Lia Hemerik (eds.), Current Themes in Theoretical Biology : A Dutch Perspective. Springer. pp. 95--127.
  30.  39
    The Species Problem: A Philosophical Analysis.Richard A. Richards - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    There is long-standing disagreement among systematists about how to divide biodiversity into species. Over twenty different species concepts are used to group organisms, according to criteria as diverse as morphological or molecular similarity, interbreeding and genealogical relationships. This, combined with the implications of evolutionary biology, raises the worry that either there is no single kind of species, or that species are not real. This book surveys the history of thinking about species from Aristotle to modern (...)
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  31. Patriarchy's Language; Naming our Species.Louise Goueffic - manuscript
    Paper 1 The argument is made that the names made to be used by our species as its identity fall short of being a theory. Up to the present it was assumed that the names were based on a theory. No one questioned this situation before.
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  32.  56
    MATTHEW H. SLATER Are Species Real? An Essay on the Metaphysics of Species.Thomas A. C. Reydon - 2015 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66 (4):1029-1033.
  33.  61
    Where's the species? Comments on the phylogenetic species concepts.Marc Ereshefsky - 1989 - Biology and Philosophy 4 (1):89-96.
  34.  35
    Many Hurdles for the Translation of Species Preservation Research: Comment on “Ethics of Species Research and Preservation” by Rob Irvine.Nancy Sturman - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):531-532.
  35.  3
    And another thing... The species bibliotheca nationalis: its extraordinary origin, lifestyle and habits.Maurice B. Line - 1992 - Logos 3 (2):104-105.
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  36.  43
    Genome analyses substantiate male mutation bias in many species.Melissa A. Wilson Sayres & Kateryna D. Makova - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (12):938-945.
    In many species the mutation rate is higher in males than in females, a phenomenon denoted as male mutation bias. This is often observed in animals where males produce many more sperm than females produce eggs, and is thought to result from differences in the number of replication‐associated mutations accumulated in each sex. Thus, studies of male mutation bias have the capacity to reveal information about the replication‐dependent or replication‐independent nature of different mutations. The availability of whole genome sequences (...)
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  37. Affect Attunement in the Caregiver-Infant Relationship and Across Species: Expanding the Ethical Scope of Eros.Cynthia Willett - 2012 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 2 (2):111-130.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Affect Attunement in the Caregiver-Infant Relationship and Across SpeciesExpanding the Ethical Scope of ErosCynthia WillettCompelling glimpses into the ethical capacities of our animal kin reveal new possibilities for ethical relationships encompassing humans with other animal species. Consider the remarkable report of a female bonobo in a British zoo who assists a bird found in her cage by retrieving the fallen bird, and spreading its wings so that this (...)
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  38. Water and Wing Give Wonder: Cross-Species Cosmopolitanism.Cynthia Willett - 2013 - PhaenEx 8 (2):185-208.
    Any interspecies ethics could do well to flip the claim of human exceptionalism several times on its head. Before entertaining a claim to re-naturalize human beings (with the risk of a reductive model of biology), the remarkable communicative, cultural, and cognitive skills of other creatures deserve more investigation. The usual line-up of metaphysical suspects for shoring up human superiority—impartial reason, moral or spiritual freedom, and self-awareness—have been used to gravely overstate our human capacities while obscuring genuinely mind-bending powers that cross (...)
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  39.  20
    Chapter Seven. Species and the Tree of Life.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2013 - In Philosophy of Biology. Princeton: Princeton University Press. pp. 100-119.
  40.  17
    The Origin of Species. Charles Darwin, Morse Peckham.Melville H. Hatch - 1960 - Isis 51 (2):211-212.
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  41.  95
    An ontogenetic-ecological conception of species: A new approach to an old idea.Catherine Kendig - 2010 - EPSA09: 2nd Conference of the European Philosophy of Science Association. Online at PhilSci Archive.
    This paper outlines an alternative perspective on species that avoids some of the underlying assumptions held by the BSC and other gene-centred species concepts. It begins with a characterisation of the species problem and some of the assumptions underpinning conceptions of species. In particular, the underlying bias of some conceptions (such as the BSC) to focus exclusively on the adult stage of the life cycle in articulating what a species is.
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  42. Domesticating Bodies : Race, Species, Sex and Citizenship.Claire Rasmussen - 2016 - In Judith Grant & Vincent Jungkunz (eds.), Political theory and the animal/human relationship. Albany: State University of New York Press.
     
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  43.  9
    The Species Problem: Biological Species, Ontology, and the Metaphysics of Biology.David N. Stamos - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    Stamos squarely confronts the problem of determining what a biological species is, whether species are real, and the nature of their reality. He critically considers the evolution of the major contemporary views of species and also offers his own solution to the species problem.
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  44. Wild Animals and Other Pets Kept in Costa Rican Households: Incidence, Species and Numbers.Carlos Drews - 2001 - Society and Animals 9 (2):107-126.
    A nationwide survey that included personal interviews in 1,021 households studied the incidence, species, and numbers of nonhuman animals kept in Costa Rican households. A total of 71% of households keep animals.The proportion of households keeping dogs is 3.6 higher than the proportion of households keeping cats . In addition to the usual domestic or companion animals kept in 66% of the households, 24% of households keep wild species as pets. Although parrots are the bulk of wild (...) kept as pets, there is vast species diversity, including other birds, reptiles, mammals, amphibians, fishes, and invertebrates - typically caught in their natural habitat to satisfy the pet market. The extraction from the wild and the keeping of such animals is by-and-large illegal and often involves endangered species. Costa Ricans, in a conservative estimate, keep about 151,288 parrots as pets. More than half the respondents have kept a psittacid at some point in their lives. Pet keeping is a common practice in Costa Rican society, and its incidence is high by international standards. (shrink)
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  45.  24
    The Tec family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases: mammalian Btk, Bmx, Itk, Tec, Txk and homologs in other species.C. I. Edvard Smith, Tahmina C. Islam, Pekka T. Mattsson, Abdalla J. Mohamed, Beston F. Nore & Mauno Vihinen - 2001 - Bioessays 23 (5):436-446.
    Cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are enzymes involved in transducing a vast number of signals in metazoans. The importance of the Tec family of kinases was immediately recognized when, in 1993, mutations in the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) were reported to cause the human disease X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA).(1,2) Since then, additional kinases belonging to this family have been isolated, and the availability of full genome sequences allows identification of all members in selected species enabling phylogenetic considerations. Tec kinases (...)
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  46.  60
    Machine intelligence and the long-term future of the human species.Tom Stonier - 1988 - AI and Society 2 (2):133-139.
    Intelligence is not a property unique to the human brain; rather it represents a spectrum of phenomena. An understanding of the evolution of intelligence makes it clear that the evolution of machine intelligence has no theoretical limits — unlike the evolution of the human brain. Machine intelligence will outpace human intelligence and very likely will do so during the lifetime of our children. The mix of advanced machine intelligence with human individual and communal intelligence will create an evolutionary discontinuity as (...)
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  47.  51
    Duns Scotus on the Semantic Content of Cognitive Acts and Species.Richard Cross - 2010 - Quaestio 10:135-154.
    Scotus holds that dispositional and occurrent cognitions are qualities that inhere in the soul. These qualities have semantic or conceptual content. I show that such content is nothing in any sense real, and that this content consists either in the relevant quality’s being measured by an extramental object, or in its being such that it would be measured by such an object in the case that there were such an object. The measurement relation, in the case of an intelligible (...), is secured by the species’s internal structure; in the case of an act of cognition, it is secured either by some sort of relation to a species, or by a relation to an external object. (shrink)
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  48.  18
    Shy and Ticklish Truths as Species of Scientific and Artistic Perception.Nigel Rapport - 2012 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 12 (sup2):1-9.
    To evidence the human condition must be to provide an account of the manifold modalities of experience: ‘Evidence’ must include different kinds of humanly experienced truths. However, the question is how does one extend the way in which the ‘evidential’ is broadly understood so that it encompasses the range of ways and kinds of knowing as practised in people’s everyday lives and as pertaining to those lives. Borrowing phrasing from Nietzsche, this article focuses in particular on species of human (...)
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  49. Do circumstances give species?Steven J. Jensen - 2006 - The Thomist 70 (1):1-26.
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  50. The origin of species, 1876.Charles Darwin - 1988 - Washington Square, N.Y.: New York University Press.
    Are they needed? To be sure. The Darwinian industry, industrious though it is, has failed to provide texts of more than a handful of Darwin's books. If you want to know what Darwin said about barnacles (still an essential reference to cirripedists, apart from any historical importance) you are forced to search shelves, or wait while someone does it for you; some have been in print for a century; various reprints have appeared and since vanished." -Eric Korn,Times Literary Supplement Charles (...)
     
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