Results for 'speech acts'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. Speech Acts: The Contemporary Theoretical Landscape.Daniel W. Harris, Daniel Fogal & Matt Moss - forthcoming - In Daniel Fogal, Matt Moss & Daniel Harris (eds.), New Work on Speech Acts. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    What makes it the case that an utterance constitutes an illocutionary act of a given kind? This is the central question of speech-act theory. Answers to it—i.e., theories of speech acts—have proliferated. Our main goal in this chapter is to clarify the logical space into which these different theories fit. -/- We begin, in Section 1, by dividing theories of speech acts into five families, each distinguished from the others by its account of the key (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language.John R. Searle - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Written in an outstandingly clear and lively style, this 1969 book provokes its readers to rethink issues they may have regarded as long since settled.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   488 citations  
  3. Saying and Doing: Speech Actions, Speech Acts and Related Events.Gruenberg Angela - 2014 - European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):173-199.
    The question which this paper examines is that of the correct scope of the claim that extra-linguistic factors (such as gender and social status) can block the proper workings of natural language. The claim that this is possible has been put forward under the apt label of silencing in the context of Austinian speech act theory. The ‘silencing’ label is apt insofar as when one’s ability to exploit the inherent dynamic of language is ‘blocked’ by one’s gender or social (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Indexicals, Speech Acts and Pornography.Claudia Bianchi - 2008 - Analysis 68 (4):310-316.
    In the last twenty years, recorded messages and written notes have become a significant test and an intriguing puzzle for the semantics of indexical expressions (see Smith 1989, Predelli 1996, 1998a,1998b, 2002, Corazza et al. 2002, Romdenh-Romluc 2002). In particular, the intention-based approach proposed by Stefano Predelli has proven to bear interesting relations to several major questions in philosophy of language. In a recent paper (Saul 2006), Jennifer Saul draws on the literature on indexicals and recorded messages in order to (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  5.  8
    Emotional Speech Acts and the Educational Perlocutions of Speech.Renia Gasparatou - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):319-331.
    Over the past decades, there has been an ongoing debate about whether education should aim at the cultivation of emotional wellbeing of self-esteeming personalities or whether it should prioritise literacy and the cognitive development of students. However, it might be the case that the two are not easily distinguished in educational contexts. In this paper I use J.L. Austin's original work on speech acts to emphasise the interconnection between the cognitive and emotional aspects of our utterances, and illustrate (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6. Three Approaches to the Study of Speech Acts.Maciej Witek - 2013 - Dialogue and Universalism 23 (1):129-141.
    The paper reconstructs and discusses three different approaches to the study of speech acts: (i) the intentionalist approach, according to which most illocutionary acts are to be analysed as utterances made with the Gricean communicative intentions, (ii) the institutionalist approach, which is based on the idea of illocutions as institutional acts constituted by systems of collectively accepted rules, and (iii) the interactionalist approach the main tenet of which is to perform illocutionary acts by making conventional (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  50
    Exclamatives, Degrees and Speech Acts.Jessica Rett - 2011 - Linguistics and Philosophy 34 (5):411-442.
    The goal of this paper is an account of the semantics and pragmatics of exclamation. I focus on two key observations: first, that sentence exclamations like Wow, John bakes delicious desserts! and exclamatives like What delicious desserts John bakes! express that a particular proposition has violated the speaker’s expectations; and second, that exclamatives are semantically restricted in a way that sentence exclamations are not. In my account of these facts, I propose a characterization of illocutionary force of exclamation, a function (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8.  15
    Superlative Quantifiers and Meta-Speech Acts.Ariel Cohen & Manfred Krifka - 2014 - Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (1):41-90.
    Recent research has shown that the superlative quantifiers at least and at most do not have the same type of truth conditions as the comparative quantifiers more than and fewer than. We propose that superlative quantifiers are interpreted at the level of speech acts. We relate them to denegations of speech acts, as in I don’t promise to come, which we analyze as excluding the speech act of a promise to come. Calling such conversational (...) that affect future permissible speech acts “meta-speech acts,” we introduce the meta-speech act of a GRANT of a proposition as a denial to assert the negation of that proposition. Superlative quantifiers are analyzed as quantifiers over GRANTS. Thus, John petted at least three rabbits means that the minimal number n such that the speaker GRANTs the proposition that John petted n rabbits is n = 3. We formalize this interpretation in terms of commitment states and commitment spaces, and show how the truth conditions that are derived from it are partly entailed and partly conversationally implicated. We demonstrate how the theory accounts for a wide variety of distributional phenomena of superlative quantifiers, including the contexts in which they can be embedded. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9.  5
    Words and Deeds: Problems in the Theory of Speech Acts.David Holdcroft - 1978 - Oxford University Press.
    The book presents a theory of illocutionary acts. It argues that the study of speech acts initiatied by Austin complements the truth theoretic approach to speaker meaning. It is shown that there are aspects of speaker meaning which cannot be explained by truth theoretic approaches. Though the nature of a speech act is partially determined by the semantic type of the the sentence uttered the speaker's intention and context of utterance are important also.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  10.  4
    Speech Acts, Attitudes, and Scientific Practice: Can Searle Handle ‘Assuming for the Sake of Hypothesis’?Daniel J. McKaughan - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 20 (1):88-106.
    There are certain illocutionary acts (such as hypothesizing, conjecturing, speculating, guessing, and the like) that, contrary to John Searle’s (1969, 1975, 1979) speech act theory, cannot be correctly classified as assertives. Searle’s sincerity and essential conditions on assertives require, plausibly, that we believe our assertions and that we are committed to their truth. Yet it is a commonly accepted scientific practice to propose and investigate an hypothesis without believing it or being at all committed to its truth. Searle’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  19
    Speech Acts and Arguments.Scott Jacobs - 1989 - Argumentation 3 (4):345-365.
    Speech act theory seems to provide a promising avenue for the analysis of the functional organization of argument. The theory, however, might be taken to suggest that arguments are a homogenous class of speech act with a specifiable illocutionary force and a single set of felicity conditions. This suggestion confuses the analysis of the meaning of speech act verbs with the analysis of the pragmatic structure of actual language use. Suggesting that arguments are conveyed through a homogeneous (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12.  5
    Speech Acts in a Dialogue Game Formalisation of Critical Discussion.Jacky Visser - 2017 - Argumentation 31 (2):245-266.
    In this paper a dialogue game for critical discussion is developed. The dialogue game is a formalisation of the ideal discussion model that is central to the pragma-dialectical theory of argumentation. The formalisation is intended as a preparatory step to facilitate the development of computational tools to support the pragma-dialectical study of argumentation. An important dimension of the pragma-dialectical discussion model is the role played by speech acts. The central issue addressed in this paper is how the (...) act perspective can be accommodated in the formalisation as a dialogue game. The starting point is an existing ‘basic’ dialogue game for critical discussion, in which speech acts are not addressed. The speech act perspective is introduced into the dialogue game by changing the rules that govern the moves that can be made and the commitments that these result in, while the rules for the beginning, for the end, and for the structure of the dialogue game remain unchanged. The revision of the move rules is based on the distribution of speech acts in the pragma-dialectical discussion model. The revision of the commitment rules is based on the felicity conditions that are associated with those speech acts. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  19
    Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language.Robert Mößgen (ed.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    This innovative collection addresses such themes as: the relation between the concept of truth and the success conditions of assertions and kindred speech acts the linguistic devices of expressing the truth of a proposition the relation ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  46
    Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language.Dirk Greimann & Geo Siegwart (eds.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    Whereas the relationship between truth and propositional content has already been intensively investigated, there are only very few studies devoted to the task of illuminating the relationship between truth and illocutionary acts. This book fills that gap. This innovative collection addresses such themes as: the relation between the concept of truth and the success conditions of assertions and kindred speech acts the linguistic devices of expressing the truth of a proposition the relation between predication and truth.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Linguistic Communication and Speech Acts.K. Bach & R. Harnish - 1979 - MIT Press.
  16.  61
    Propositional Structure and Illocutionary Force: A Study of the Contribution of Sentence Meaning to Speech Acts.Jerrold J. Katz - 1977 - Harvester.
    Katz offers such a grammatical account, in which makes it possible for the first time to explain the illocutionary potential of sentences within grammar.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   43 citations  
  17. Voices and Noises in the Theory of Speech Acts.Savas L. Tsohatzidis - 2004 - Pragmatics and Cognition 12 (1):105-151.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Meaning and Speech Acts.Daniel Vanderveken - 1990
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  19.  8
    Words and Deeds. Problems in the Theory of Speech Acts.Graham Bird & David Holdcroft - 1979 - Philosophical Quarterly 29 (116):272.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  98
    Speech Acts, Meaning, and Intentions: Critical Approaches to the Philosophy of John R. Searle.Armin Burkhardt (ed.) - 1990 - W. De Gruyter.
    Introduction The analytical way of thinking has been one of the most fruitful paradigms in this century in philosophy and in different sciences, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. Language and Intentionality: A Critical Examination of John Searle's Later Theory of Speech Acts and Intentionality.Carleton B. Christensen - 1991 - Königshausen & Neumann.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  8
    New Work on Speech Acts.Daniel Fogal, Daniel W. Harris & Matt Moss (eds.) - forthcoming - Oxford University Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Speech Acts, Mind, and Social Reality Discussions with John R. Searle.Günther Grewendorf & Georg Meggle - 2002
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Indirect Speech Acts Revisited.Johan van der Auwera - 1980 - Reproduced by the Indiana University Linguistics Club.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  80
    On the Relationship Between Speech Acts and Psychological States.Seungbae Park - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (3):430-351.
    This paper defends a theory of speech act that I call concurrentism. It consists of the following three theses. 1. We believe, ceteris paribus, that other people’s speech acts concur with their beliefs. 2. Our speech acts, ceteris paribus, concur with our beliefs. 3. When our speech acts deviate from our beliefs, we do not, ceteris paribus, declare the deviations to other people. Concurrentism sheds light on what the hearer believes when he hears (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Ten Conditions on a Theory of Speech Acts.Barry Smith - 1984 - Theoretical Linguistics 11 (3):309-330.
    It is now generally recognized that figures such as Reid, Peirce, and Reinach formulated theories of speech acts avant la lettre of Austin and Searle, in Reid and Reinach’s cases under the heading ‘theory of social acts’. Here we address the question as to what conditions would have to be satisfied for such theories to count as ‘theories of speech acts’ in the now familiar sense.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  29
    Expression and Meaning: Studies in the Theory of Speech Acts.John R. Searle - 1979 - Philosophical Review 91 (3):488-493.
    John Searle's Speech Acts made a highly original contribution to work in the philosophy of language. Expression and Meaning is a direct successor, concerned to develop and refine the account presented in Searle's earlier work, and to extend its application to other modes of discourse such as metaphor, fiction, reference, and indirect speech arts. Searle also presents a rational taxonomy of types of speech acts and explores the relation between the meanings of sentences and the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   72 citations  
  28. Speech Acts, the Handicap Principle and the Expression of Psychological States.Mitchell S. Green - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (2):139-163.
    Abstract: One oft-cited feature of speech acts is their expressive character: Assertion expresses belief, apology regret, promise intention. Yet expression, or at least sincere expression, is as I argue a form of showing: A sincere expression shows whatever is the state that is the sincerity condition of the expressive act. How, then, can a speech act show a speaker's state of thought or feeling? To answer this question I consider three varieties of showing, and argue that only (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  29. Pornography, Speech Acts and Context.Jennifer Saul - 2006 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (2):227–246.
    Catharine MacKinnon has claimed that pornography is the subordination of women. Rae Langton has defended the plausibility and coherence of this claim by drawing on speech act theory. I argue that considering the role of context in speech acts poses serious problems for Langton's defence of MacKinnon. Langton's account can be altered in order to accommodate the role of context. Once this is done, however, her defence of MacKinnon no longer looks so plausible. Finally, I argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  30. Speech Acts.Mitchell Green - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Speech acts are a staple of everyday communicative life, but only became a topic of sustained investigation, at least in the English-speaking world, in the middle of the Twentieth Century.[1] Since that time “speech act theory” has been influential not only within philosophy, but also in linguistics, psychology, legal theory, artificial intelligence, literary theory and many other scholarly disciplines.[2] Recognition of the importance of speech acts has illuminated the ability of language to do other things (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  31. Indirect Speech Acts.Nicholas Asher & Alex Lascarides - 2001 - Synthese 128 (1-2):183 - 228.
    In this paper, we address several puzzles concerning speech acts,particularly indirect speech acts. We show how a formal semantictheory of discourse interpretation can be used to define speech actsand to avoid murky issues concerning the metaphysics of action. Weprovide a formally precise definition of indirect speech acts, includingthe subclass of so-called conventionalized indirect speech acts. Thisanalysis draws heavily on parallels between phenomena at the speechact level and the lexical level. First, we (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  32.  27
    Speech Acts, Categoricity, and the Meanings of Logical Connectives.Ole Thomassen Hjortland - 2014 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 55 (4):445-467.
    In bilateral systems for classical logic, assertion and denial occur as primitive signs on formulas. Such systems lend themselves to an inferentialist story about how truth-conditional content of connectives can be determined by inference rules. In particular, for classical logic there is a bilateral proof system which has a property that Carnap in 1943 called categoricity. We show that categorical systems can be given for any finite many-valued logic using $n$-sided sequent calculus. These systems are understood as a further development (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33.  74
    A Practical Explication of the Knowledge Rule of Informative Speech Acts.Christoph Kelp - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):367-383.
    : This paper defends the knowledge rule of informative speech acts. It is argued that Edward Craig's insightful practical explication of the concept of knowledge can be extended to motivate the knowledge rule. A number of problem cases for the knowledge rule are addressed and accommodated.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  34.  9
    Elements of a Plan‐Based Theory of Speech Acts.Philip R. Cohen & C. Raymond Perrault - 1979 - Cognitive Science 3 (3):177-212.
    This paper explores the truism that people think about what they say. It proposes that, to satisfy their own goals, people often plan their speech acts to affect their listeners' beliefs, goals, and emotional states. Such language use can be modelled by viewing speech acts as operators in a planning system, thus allowing both physical and speech acts to be integrated into plans. Methodological issues of how speech acts should be defined in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  35.  34
    Superlative Quantifiers as Modifiers of Meta-Speech Acts.Ariel Cohen & Manfred Krifka - 2010 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 6 (1):11.
    The superlative quantifiers, at least and at most, are commonly assumed to have the same truth-conditions as the comparative quantifiers more than and fewer than. However, as Geurts & Nouwen have demonstrated, this is wrong, and several theories have been proposed to account for them. In this paper we propose that superlative quantifiers are illocutionary operators; specifically, they modify meta-speech acts.Meta speech-acts are operators that do not express a speech act, but a willingness to make (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36.  67
    Speech Acts: Natural or Normative Kinds? The Case of Assertion.Brian Ball - 2014 - Mind and Language 29 (3):336-350.
    There are two views of the essences of speech acts: according to one view, they are natural kinds; according to the other, they are what I call normative kinds—kinds in the (possibly non-reductive) definition of which some normative term occurs. In this article I show that speech acts can be normative but also natural kinds by deriving Williamson's account of assertion, on which it is an act individuated, and constitutively governed, by a norm (the knowledge rule), (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  13
    Speech Acts, Attitudes, and Scientific Practice: Can Searle Handle "Assuming for the Sake of Hypothesis?".Daniel J. McKaughan - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (1):88-106.
    There are certain illocutionary acts that, contrary to John Searle's speech act theory, cannot be correctly classified as assertives. Searle's sincerity and essential conditions on assertives require, plausibly, that we believe our assertions and that we are committed to their truth. Yet it is a commonly accepted scientific practice to propose and investigate an hypothesis without believing it or being at all committed to its truth. Searle's attempt to accommodate such conjectural acts by claiming that the degree (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38. Speech Acts.Kent Bach - manuscript
    The theory of speech acts is partly taxonomic and partly explanatory. It must systematically classify types of speech acts and the ways in which they can succeed or fail. It must reckon with the fact that the relationship between the words being used and the force of their utterance is often oblique. For example, the sentence 'This is a pig sty' might be used nonliterally to state that a certain room is messy and filthy and, further, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  21
    Promises to Keep: Speech Acts and the Value of Reflective Knowledge.John Turri - 2011 - Logos and Episteme 2 (3):583-590.
    This paper offers a new account of reflective knowledge’s value, building on recent work on the epistemic norms of speech acts. Reflective knowledge is valuable because it licenses us to make guarantees and promises.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40. Embedding Speech Acts.Manfred Krifka - unknown
    Speech acts have sometimes been considered as unembeddable, for principled reasons. In this paper, I argue that speech acts can be embedded under certain circumstances. In particular, I consider denegation and conjunction of speech acts, quantification into speech acts, conditionalization of speech acts, the embedding of speech acts by verbs like say and wonder, speechact-modifying adverbials like frankly, clauses commenting on speech acts, like certain uses of (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  12
    Speech Acts in Literature.J. Miller - 2002 - Stanford University Press.
    This book demonstrates the presence of literature within speech act theory and the utility of speech act theory in reading literary works. Though the founding text of speech act theory, J. L. Austin's _How to Do Things with Words_, repeatedly expels literature from the domain of felicitous speech acts, literature is an indispensable presence within Austin's book. It contains many literary references but also uses as essential tools literary devices of its own: imaginary stories that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  4
    Speech acts and sub-sentential speech.J. Robert Thompson - 2011 - Crítica: Revista Hispanoamericana de Filosofía 43 (129):65-91.
    In this paper, I compile some reasons for resisting Stainton's analysis of sub-sentential speech. My resistance stems from considerations about the intentions and expectations of those who communicate using sub-sentential speech. I challenge Stainton's reasons for thinking that some sub-sentential utterances have the status of full-fledged speech acts and argue that they turn out to be degenerate speech acts. After offering my own analysis of sub-sentential speech, I recommend that by revisiting the divide (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  36
    Speech Acts and Performatives.Jennifer Hornsby - 2008 - In Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
    This article aims to connect Austin's seminal notion of a speech act with developments in philosophy of language over the last forty odd years. It starts by considering how speech acts might be conceived in Austin's general theory. Then it turns to the illocutionary acts with which much philosophical writing on speech acts has been concerned, and finally to the performatives which Austin's own treatment of speech as action took off from.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  13
    On the Arguments for Indirect Speech Acts.Rod Bertolet - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (2):533-540.
    The usual treatment of a dinner table utterance of ‘Can you pass the salt?’ is that it involves an indirect request to pass the salt as well as a direct question about the hearer’s ability to do so: an indirect speech act. These are held to involve two illocutionary forces and two illocutionary acts. Rod Bertolet has raised doubts about whether consideration of such examples warrants the postulation of indirect speech acts and illocutionary forces other than (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  51
    “On Indirect Speech Acts and Linguistic Communication: A Response to Bertolet”.Mary Kate McGowan, Shan Shan Tam & Margaret Hall - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (4):495-513.
    Suppose a diner says, 'Can you pass the salt?' Although her utterance is literally a question (about the physical abilities of the addressee), most would take it as a request (that the addressee pass the salt). In such a case, the request is performed indirectly by way of directly asking a question. Accordingly this utterance is known as an indirect speech act. On the standard account of such speech acts, a single utterance constitutes two distinct speech (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  92
    Word-Sculpture, Speech Acts, and Fictionality.Peter Alward - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):389-399.
    A common approach to drawing boundary between fiction and non-fiction is by appeal to the kinds of speech acts performed by authors of works of the respective categories. Searle, for example, takes fiction to be the product of illocutionary pretense of various kinds on the part of authors and non-fiction to be the product of genuine illocutionary action.1 Currie, in contrast, takes fiction to be the product of sui generis fictional illocutionary action on the part of authors and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  1
    The Poetics of Meaningful Work: An Analogy to Speech Acts.Todd Mei - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Meaningful work refers to the idea that human work is an integral part of the way we think of our lives as going well. The concept is prevalent in sociology and business studies. In philosophy, its discussion tends to revolve around matters of justice and whether the State should take steps to eradicate meaningless work. However, despite the breadth of the recent, general literature, there is little to no discussion about how it is in fact the case that work is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  26
    Telling More Than the Truth: Implicature, Speech Acts, and Ethics in Professional Communication. [REVIEW]Kathryn Riley - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (3):179 - 196.
    Ethicists have long observed that unethical communication may result from texts that contain no overt falsehoods but are nevertheless misleading. Less clear, however, has been the way that context and text work together to create misleading communication. Concepts from linguistics can be used to explain implicature and indirect speech acts, two patterns which, though in themselves not unethical, may allow misinterpretations and, therefore, create potentially unethical communication. Additionally, sociolinguistic theory provides insights into why writers in business and other (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  49. “On Indirect Speech Acts and Linguistic Communication: A Response to Bertolet”1: McGowan, Tam and Hall.Mary Kate Mcgowan - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (4):495-513.
    Suppose a diner says, ‘Can you pass the salt?’ Although her utterance is literally a question, most would take it as a request. In such a case, the request is performed indirectly by way of directly asking a question. Accordingly this utterance is known as an indirect speech act. On the standard account of such speech acts, a single utterance constitutes two distinct speech acts. On this account then, ‘Can you pass the salt?’ is both (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  6
    Speech Acts and Medical Records: The Ontological Nexus.Lowell Vizenor & Barry Smith - 2004 - In Proceedings of the International Joint Meeting EuroMISE.
    Despite the recent advances in information and communication technology that have increased our ability to store and circulate information, the task of ensuring that the right sorts of information gets to the right sorts of people remains. We argue that the many efforts underway to develop efficient means for sharing information across healthcare systems and organizations would benefit from a careful analysis of human action in healthcare organizations. This in turn requires that the management of information and knowledge within healthcare (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000