Results for 'sport'

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Bibliography: Sports in Applied Ethics
  1. Aktuelle Probleme der Sportphilosophie Kongressbericht des Workshop Über Sportphilosophie in Verbindung Mit der 8. Jahrestagung der Philosophic Society for the Study of Sport.Hans Lenk & Philosophic Society for the Study of Sport - 1983
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  2.  75
    Is Competitive Elite Sport Really Morally Corrupt?Rognvaldur Ingthorsson - 2017 - Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research 75 (1):05–14.
    It has been argued that competitive elite sport both (i) reduces the humanity of athletes by turning them into beings whose sole value is determined in relation to others, and (ii) is motivated by a celebration of the genetically superior and humiliation of the weak. This paper argues that while (i) is a morally reproachable attitude to competition, it is not what competitive elite sport revolves around, and that (ii) simply is not the essence of competitive elite (...). Competitive elite sport is an exploration of the physical and mental demands of sport. Finally, the paper explores a number of consequences of the different views of sport with respect to the problem of intersexual women. (shrink)
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  3.  14
    Watching Sport—But Who Is Watching's.Andrew Fisher - 2005 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (2):184-194.
    Imagine you are a cycling fan and are watching Lance Armstrong decimate his rivals in the time trial up L’Alpe d’Huez. However, before the event ends you are called away from the TV. You quickly put a videotape in and press record. You get time to watch the video the next morning and have successfully avoided finding out the result. Are you as excited about watching the video as you were when you sat down to watch the event on TV? (...)
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  4. Memory Before the Game: Switching Perspectives in Imagining and Remembering Sport and Movement.John Sutton - 2012 - Journal of Mental Imagery 36 (1/2):85-95.
    This paper addresses relations between memory and imagery in expert sport in relation to visual or visuospatial perspective. Imagining, remembering, and moving potentially interact via related forms of episodic simulation, whether future- or past-directed. Sometimes I see myself engaged in action: many experts report switching between such external visual perspectives and an internal, 'own-eyes', or field perspective on their past or possible performance. Perspective in retrieval and in imagery may be flexible and multiple. I raise a range of topics (...)
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  5. Rape as Spectator Sport and Creepshot Entertainment: Social Media and the Valorization of Lack of Consent.Kelly Oliver - 2015 - American Studies Journal (10):1-16.
    Lack of consent is valorized within popular culture to the point that sexual assault has become a spectator sport and creepshot entertainment on social media. Indeed, the valorization of nonconsensual sex has reached the extreme where sex with unconscious girls, especially accompanied by photographs as trophies, has become a goal of some boys and men.
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  6. Beyond the Game: Perceptions and Practices of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Professional Sport Industry.Hela Sheth & Kathy M. Babiak - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):433-450.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an area of great interest, yet little is known about how CSR is perceived and practiced in the professional sport industry. This study employs a mixed-methods approach, including a survey, and a qualitative content analysis of responses to open-ended questions, to explore how professional sport executives define CSR, and what priorities teams have regarding their CSR activities. Findings from this study indicate that sport executives placed different emphases on elements of CSR including (...)
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  7.  16
    Enhancement and Cheating: Implications for Policy in Sport.Justin Caouette & Allen Habib - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 523-533.
    There is a widely held view that the rules forbidding the use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) are justified on grounds that utilizing these drugs constitutes cheating . In this chapter we engage with this assumption. Relying on an interpretative approach borrowed from Ronald Dworkin, we offer a novel analysis of cheating, one that makes it out to be a matter of inhibiting the attainment of certain sorts of achievements. These achievements are the important goods at the centre of (...), the telos of sport. We then argue that a given enhancement should be regarded as cheating only when it inhibits or prevents competitors from realizing these important goods. (shrink)
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  8.  58
    The Sport Nexus and Gender Injustice.Ann Travers - 2008 - Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):79-101.
    Male-dominated and sex segregated elite professional and amateur sport1 in North America constitutes a "sport nexus" (Burstyn, 1999; Heywood & Dworkin, 2003) that combines economic and cultural influence to reinforce and perpetuate gender injustice. The sport nexus is an androcentric sex-segregated commercially powerful set of institutions that is highly visible and at the same time almost completely taken for granted to the extent that its anti-democratic impetus goes virtually unnoticed. The sport nexus’s hegemonic role in defining sporting (...)
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  9.  25
    Soll man Doping im Sport unter ärztlicher Kontrolle freigeben?Should doping in sports be permitted under medical supervision?Urban Wiesing - 2010 - Ethik in der Medizin 22 (2):103-115.
    Der Artikel untersucht die Frage, ob es sinnvoll ist, Doping im Sport unter ärztlicher Kontrolle freizugeben. Dazu werden die Auswirkungen einer Freigabe untersucht, die stets nur eine begrenzte Freigabe wäre, allein wegen der Risiken. Die unangenehmen Begleiterscheinungen der Dopingkontrollen würden nicht entfallen. Die Auswirkungen einer Freigabe von Doping im Wettkampfsport wären entweder unsinnig oder aber mit Nachteilen behaftet. Es ist nicht notwendig, die Frage zu klären, was die „Idee des Sportes“ ausmacht und ob sie verändert werden darf. Allein unter (...)
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  10.  60
    In Sport and Social Justice, Is Genetic Enhancement a Game Changer?Lisa S. Parker - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (4):328-346.
    The possibility of genetic enhancement to increase the likelihood of success in sport and life’s prospects raises questions for accounts of sport and theories of justice. These questions obviously include the fairness of such enhancement and its relationship to the goals of sport and demands of justice. Of equal interest, however, is the effect on our understanding of individual effort, merit, and desert of either discovering genetic contributions to components of such effort or recognizing the influence of (...)
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  11.  7
    Inégalité sur la ligne de départ : femmes, origines sociales et conquête du sport.Catherine Louveau - 2006 - Clio 23:119-143.
    Depuis le XIXe siècle et jusqu’à nos jours, l’expansion des activités physiques et sportives s’est accompagnée de différences et d’inégalités sociales. A fortiori parmi l’ensemble des femmes, rarement pensé comme étant un ensemble lui-même divisé et hiérarchisé. S’agissant de l’accès aux loisirs sportifs puis au sport, les rapports au temps et à toutes les formes de travail, les rapports au corps sont particulièrement différenciateurs pour elles. Jusqu’à la moitié du XXe siècle environ, le sport ne concerne, au regard (...)
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  12.  18
    “The Right Thing to Do?” Transformation in South African Sport.Brian Penrose - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):377-392.
    In this paper I attempt to unpack the current public debate on racial transformation in South African sport, particularly with regard to the demographic make-up of its national cricket and rugby sides. I ask whether the alleged moral imperative to undertake such transformation is, in fact, a moral imperative at all. I discuss five possible such imperatives: the need to compensate non-white South Africans for the injustices in sport’s racist history, the imperative to return the make-up of our (...)
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  13.  7
    Enhancement in Sport, and Enhancement Outside Sport.Thomas Douglas - 2007 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
    Sport is one of the first areas in which enhancement has become commonplace. It is also one of the first areas in which the use of enhancement technologies has been heavily regulated. Some have thus seen sport as a testing ground for arguments about whether to permit enhancement. However, I argue that there are fairness-based objections to enhancement in sport that do not apply as strongly in some other areas of human activity. Thus, I claim that there (...)
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  14.  17
    Sport, Make-Believe, and Volatile Attitudes.Nils-Hennes Stear - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (3):275-288.
    The outcomes of sports and competitive games excite intense emotions in many people, even when those same people acknowledge that those outcomes are of trifling importance. I call this incongruity between the judged importance of the outcome and the intense reactions it provokes the Puzzle of Sport. The puzzle can be usefully compared to another puzzle in aesthetics: the Paradox of Fiction, which asks how it is we become emotionally caught up with events and characters we know to be (...)
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  15.  22
    Research Note: Thomas Hobbes - A Page in the History of Sport Philosophy. A Race as a Metaphor.Giuseppe Sorgi - 2008 - Hobbes Studies 21 (1):84-91.
    Analysing race as the metaphor of life - by means of which Thomas Hobbes describes the passions in The Elements of Law, natural and politic - seems to be the right occasion to underline the relationship between the mechanistic idea of human being and sports activity. This approach makes a paradigm come to the surface - where factors such as extreme competition, the pursuit of success at any cost, ineliminable fear of defeat confirm the relevance of the Malmesbury born philosopher's (...)
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  16.  12
    Le Sport Contemporain.Michel Jamet - 2002 - Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 113 (2):233.
    Comment peut-on interpréter l’effacement du thème de la « démocratisation du sport », progressivement remplacé par celui de l’ « individualisation des choix sportifs », dans les analyses du sport en France, au cours des deux dernières décennies ? L’ambition de cet article est d’apporter des éléments de réponses à cette question. La méthode choisie est la mise en perspective d’études empiriques traitant de ces thèmes. La thèse soutenue est que le sport est tiraillé entre deux processus (...)
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  17.  11
    Constructing Gender Incommensurability in Competitive Sport: Sex/Gender Testing and the New Regulations on Female Hyperandrogenism.Marion Müller - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (3):405-431.
    The segregation of the sexes in sport still seems to be regarded as a matter of course. In contrast to other performance classes, e.g., age and weight, which are constructed on the grounds of directly relevant performance features, in the case of gender it is dealt with the merely statistical factor that women on average perform less well than men. And yet unlike weight or age classes, which can be interchanged if the required performances are provided, the segregation between (...)
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  18.  9
    Le Jeu Vidéo Comme Sport En Corée du Sud?Chloé Paberz - 2012 - Hermès: La Revue Cognition, communication, politique 62 (1):, [ p.].
    C’est en Corée du Sud que le sport électronique est né et s’est développé de la façon la plus spectaculaire, contribuant à la visibilité du pays auprès de la communauté internationale des joueurs. Cet article questionne la catégorisation sportive du jeu vidéo en Corée, en esquissant ses dimensions économiques, les circonstances historiques de sa mise en place, et en la confrontant à la pluralité des discours locaux.Electronic sports first emerged in South Korea, where their development has been the most (...)
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  19. Defining Sport: Conceptions and Borderlines.Shawn E. Klein, Chad Carlson, Francisco Javier López Frías, Kevin Schieman, Heather L. Reid, John McClelland, Keith Strudler, Pam R. Sailors, Sarah Teetzel, Charlene Weaving, Chrysostomos Giannoulakis, Lindsay Pursglove, Brian Glenney, Teresa González Aja, Joan Grassbaugh Forry, Brody J. Ruihley, Andrew Billings, Coral Rae & Joey Gawrysiak (eds.) - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines influential conceptions of sport and then analyses the interplay of challenging borderline cases with the standard definitions of sport. It is meant to inspire more thought and debate on just what sport is, how it relates to other activities and human endeavors, and what we can learn about ourselves by studying sport.
     
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  20.  52
    Sport and Art: An Essay in The Hermeneutics of Sport.Andrew Edgar - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):1 - 9.
    (2013). Sport and Art: an Essay in The Hermeneutics of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 1-9. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2013.761879.
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  21.  8
    Strategic Fouling and Sport as Play.J. S. Russell - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):26-39.
    This essay argues that defences of strategic fouling in sport are enriched and supported by better recognizing the role of play in sport. A common characteristic of play is its disengagement from the everyday, in particular its moral disengagement. If sport in its best manifestations is a species of play, then we should expect to find some moral disengagement there. And indeed we do in a variety of ways. Strategic fouling affords a useful example to illustrate and (...)
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  22.  25
    Broad Internalism, Deep Conventions, Moral Entrepreneurs, and Sport.William J. Morgan - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):65-100.
    My argument will proceed as follows. I will first sketch out the broad internalist case for pitching its normative account of sport in the abstract manner that following Dworkin?s lead in the philosophy of law its adherents insist upon. I will next show that the normative deficiencies in social conventions broad internalists uncover are indeed telling but misplaced since they hold only for what David Lewis famously called ?coordinating? conventions. I will then distinguish coordinating conventions from deep ones and (...)
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  23.  19
    Zombie-Like or Superconscious? A Phenomenological and Conceptual Analysis of Consciousness in Elite Sport.Gunnar Breivik - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):85-106.
    According to a view defended by Hubert Dreyfus and others, elite athletes are totally absorbed while they are performing, and they act non-deliberately without any representational or conceptual thinking. By using both conceptual clarification and phenomenological description the article criticizes this view and maintains that various forms of conscious thinking and acting plays an important role before, during and after competitive events. The article describes in phenomenological detail how elite athletes use consciousness in their actions in sport; as planning, (...)
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  24.  37
    Mindless Coping in Competitive Sport: Some Implications and Consequences.Jørgen W. Eriksen - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (1):66 – 86.
    The aim of this paper is to elaborate on the phenomenological approach to expertise as proposed by Dreyfus and Dreyfus and to give an account of the extent to which their approach may contribute to a better understanding of how athletes may use their cognitive capacities during high-level skill execution. Dreyfus and Dreyfus's non-representational view of experience-based expertise implies that, given enough relevant experience, the skill learner, when expert, will respond intuitively to immediate situations with no recourse to deliberate actions (...)
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  25.  6
    Toward a Shallow Interpretivist Model of Sport.Sinclair A. MacRae - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):285-299.
    Deep ethical interpretivism has been the standard view of the nature of sport in the philosophy of sport for the past seventeen years or so. On this account excellence assumes the role of the foundational, ethical goal that justice assumes in Ronald Dworkin’s interpretivist model of law. However, since excellence in sports is not an ethical value, and since it should not be regarded as an ultimate goal, the case for the traditional account fails. It should be replaced (...)
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  26.  7
    High-Level Enactive and Embodied Cognition in Expert Sport Performance.Kevin Krein & Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):370-384.
    Mental representation has long been central to standard accounts of action and cognition generally, and in the context of sport. We argue for an enactive and embodied account that rejects the idea that representation is necessary for cognition, and posit instead that cognition arises, or is enacted, in certain types of interactions between organisms and their environment. More specifically, we argue that enactive theories explain some kinds of high-level cognition, those that underlie some of the best performances in (...) and similar practices, better than representational accounts. Flow and mushin are explained enactively to this end. This results in a mutually beneficial analysis where enactivism offers theoretical and practical advantages as an explanation of high performance in sports, while the latter validates enactivism. (shrink)
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  27.  6
    Why Olympia Matters for Modern Sport.Heather L. Reid - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):159-173.
    From the modern scientific perspective, Olympia is a ruin at the far end of a fading sense of history that represents little more than the origins from which sport has continuously evolved. Quantitative measurements show continued increases in human performance, equipment efficiency and funding. But some question this athletic evolution. We worry about qualitative issues, such as virtue, meaning and beauty. The source of this contrast is a difference in values: Olympic vs. Efficiency values. Such values establish an ethos (...)
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  28.  44
    Is There a Normatively Distinctive Concept of Cheating in Sport (or Anywhere Else)?J. S. Russell - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):1-21.
    This paper argues that for the purposes of any sort of serious discussion about immoral conduct in sport very little is illuminated by claiming that the conduct in question is cheating. In fact, describing some behavior as cheating is typically little more than expressing strong, but thoroughly vague and imprecise, moral disapproval or condemnation of another person or institution about a wide and ill-defined range of improper advantage-seeking behavior. Such expressions of disapproval fail to distinguish cheating from many other (...)
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  29.  27
    Consent and Right Action in Sport.Steven Weimer - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):11-31.
    This paper argues that recent treatments of ethics in sport have accorded too much importance to the promotion and portrayal of a sport?s excellences, and too little to the consent of participants First, I consider and reject a fundamental challenge to the idea that consent should play a central role in determining the morality of action in sport ? namely, Sean McAleer?s argument to the effect that consent is incapable of rendering normally impermissible actions permissible in (...). I then offer a preliminary examination of the proper relation in the moral evaluation of action in sport between considerations of consent and ?internalist? considerations regarding the nature and purpose of sport. Taking as my starting point J.S. Russell?s treatment of this topic, I argue that consent is the more weighty, and in many cases the more fundamental, value and that when it conflicts with internalist considerations, it is consent that takes moral priority. (shrink)
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  30.  27
    Understanding the Background Conditions of Skilled Movement in Sport: A Study of Searle's 'Background Capacities'.Vegard Fusche Moe - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):299 – 324.
    In this paper I take up John Searle's account of ?Background capacities? to render intelligible the presupposed and hidden aspects of the background conditions that enable the performance of skilled movement. The paper begins with a review of Searle's initial account of Background capacities and how this picture can be applied to account for skilled movement in sport. Then an objection to this picture is addressed, claiming that Searle's initial picture might ?overrepresentationalise? background conditions. Moreover, this objection prompts how (...)
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  31.  20
    Toward Sport Reform: Hegemonic Masculinity and Reconceptualizing Competition.Colleen English - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):183-198.
    Hegemonic masculinity, a framework where stereotypically masculine traits are over-emphasized, plays a central role in sport, partly due to an excessive focus on winning. This type of masculinity marginalizes those that do not possess specific traits, including many women and men. I argue sport reform focused on mitigating hypercompetitive attitudes can reduce this harmful and marginalizing hegemonic masculinity in sport. I make this argument first by challenging the dichotomous nature of sport, especially in recognizing that all (...)
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  32.  12
    Searle, Merleau-Ponty, Rizzolatti – Three Perspectives on Intentionality and Action in Sport.Gunnar Breivik - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):199-212.
    Actions in sport are intentional in character. They are directed at and are about something. This understanding of intentional action is common in continental as well as analytic philosophy. In sport philosophy, intentionality has received relatively little attention, but has more recently come on the agenda. In addition to what we can call ‘action intentionality,’ studied by philosophers like Searle, the phenomenological approach forwarded by Merleau-Ponty has opened up for a concept of ‘motor intentionality,’ which means a basic (...)
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  33.  2
    The Role of Skill in Sport.Gunnar Breivik - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (3):222-236.
    Skill is obviously a central part of sports and should therefore be central in sport philosophic studies. My aim in this paper is to try to place skill in a wider context and thus give skill the place it deserves. I will do this by taking up four points. I first try to place the concept of skill in relation to concepts like ability and know how. I argue that ability is something one has as part of a natural (...)
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  34.  9
    Sport as Meaningful Narratives.John Gleaves - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):29-43.
    Though many scholars have made claims as to the nature of sport, this article argues that these claims tend to narrowly focus on modern ideas derived primarily from Western competitive sport. Thus, most notions of sport fail to capture how various historical and non-Western cultures valued sport. In an attempt to provide a broader and more durable description of the nature of sport, this article argues that sports are fundamentally about telling a story about ourselves. (...)
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  35.  57
    The Genius in Art and in Sport: A Contribution to the Investigation of Aesthetics of Sport.Stephen Mumford & Teresa Lacerda - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):182-193.
    This paper contains a consideration of the notion of genius and its significance to the discussion of the aesthetics of sport. We argue that genius can make a positive aes- thetic contribution in both art and sport, just as some have argued that the moral content of a work of art can affect its aesthetic value. A genius is an exceptional inno- vator of successful strategies, where such originality adds aesthetic value. We argue that an original painting can (...)
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  36.  27
    Heather L. Reid, Introduction to the Philosophy of Sport.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (2):279 - 286.
    (2013). Heather L. Reid, Introduction to the Philosophy of Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport: Vol. 40, No. 2, pp. 279-286. doi: 10.1080/00948705.2013.836708.
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  37.  10
    Is There a Normatively Distinctive Concept of Cheating in Sport ?J. S. Russell - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):303-323.
    This paper argues that for the purposes of any sort of serious discussion about immoral conduct in sport very little is illuminated by claiming that the conduct in question is cheating. In fact, describing some behavior as cheating is typically little more than expressing strong, but thoroughly vague and imprecise, moral disapproval or condemnation of another person or institution about a wide and ill-defined range of improper advantage-seeking behavior. Such expressions of disapproval fail to distinguish cheating from many other (...)
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  38.  14
    Embodied Rilkean Sport-Specific Knowledge.Arturo Leyva - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (2):128-143.
    This paper develops and introduces the embodied Rilkean sport-specific knowledge into the current sports knowledge philosophical debate. This idea is based on my interpretation of Mark Rowlands’ Rilkean memory theory. Broadly speaking, Rowlands proposed that an embodied Rilkean memory is memory content that is then ‘woven into the body and its neural infrastructure’ resulting in new bodily or behavioral dispositions. I propose that elite-level sports knowledge may become contentless bodily and/or behavioral dispositions and take the form of embodied Rilkean (...)
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  39.  10
    Deception in Sport: A New Taxonomy of Intra-Lusory Guiles.Adam G. Pfleegor & Danny Roesenberg - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (2):209-231.
    Almost four decades ago, Kathleen Pearson examined deceptive practices in sport using a distinction between strategic and definitional deception. However, the complexity and dynamic nature of sport is not limited to this dual-categorization of deceptive acts and there are other features of deception in sport unaccounted for in Pearson's constructs. By employing Torres’s elucidation of the structure of skills and Suits's concept of the lusory-attitude, a more thorough taxonomy of in-contest sport deception will be presented. Despite (...)
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  40.  44
    An Introduction to the Phenomenological Study of Sport.Irena Martínková & Jim Parry - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (3):185 - 201.
    In the literature related to the study of sport, the idea of phenomenology appears with various meanings. The aim of this paper is to sketch the nature, methods and central concepts of phenomenology, and thereby to distinguish philosophical phenomenology from its empirical applications. We shall begin by providing an overview of what we think phenomenology is and is not, by introducing the following points: we distinguish phenomenology from phenomenalism; the ontological from the ontic; transcendental subjectivity from subjectivity; phenomenology from (...)
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  41.  17
    On Biting in Sport—The Case of Luis Suárez.Irena Martínková & Jim Parry - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (2):214-232.
    So the Uruguayan footballer Luis Suárez has confessed, apologised and given assurances as to future good behaviour, after his 2014 World Cup assault on the Italian defender Chiellini. There were three immediate excuses and mitigations offered, which we dismiss: that it was inconsequential; that it was no different from many other ‘assaults’; and that it was not particularly serious. Our central question has a different focus: what makes biting in sport such a bad thing, especially since it does not (...)
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  42.  22
    Competition, Cooperation, and an Adversarial Model of Sport.Sinclair A. MacRae - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (1):53-67.
    In this paper, I defend a general theory of competition and contrast it with a corresponding general theory of cooperation. I then use this analysis to critique mutualism. Building on the work of Arthur Applbaum and Joseph Heath I develop an alternative adversarial model of competitive sport, one that helps explain and is partly justified by shallow interpretivism, and argue that this model helps shows that the claim that mutualism provides us with the most defensible ethical ideal of (...) is false. By replacing that view with an understanding of sporting adversarial ethics we can appreciate that the ethics of sport are more complex than has been commonly recognized. (shrink)
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  43.  13
    Flow, Skilled Coping, and the Sovereign Subject: Toward an Ethics of Being-with in Sport.Jennifer Hardes & Bryan Hogeveen - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (3):283-294.
    According to Dreyfus and Dreyfus, skilled coping in sport occurs when an athlete reaches an expert level and can execute a sport skill on ‘automatic-pilot’, in a state of ‘flow’. In this paper we reframe phenomenological accounts of sport that try to depict flow-states as part of an athlete’s competency framework. We do so from the point of view of post-structural and post-phenomenological scholars such as Jacques Derrida’s deconstructive work on sovereignty and Jean-Luc Nancy’s ontological vantage of (...)
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  44.  5
    Sledging in Sport—Playful Banter, or Mean-Spirited Insults? A Study of Sledging’s Place in Play.Samuel Duncan - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (2):183-197.
    Sledging, or ‘trash talk’ or ‘chirping’, as it’s known in other parts of the world, has long been part of competitive sport. However, more recent times have seen the issue of sledging, and its place in sport, debated with many athletes, fans and academics arguing that sledging has moved outside the notion of ‘sportsmanship’ and gone beyond light hearted, good natured banter. They argue it is now characterized as hurtful, insulting, offensive and intimidating – a tactic that has (...)
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  45.  27
    Dualisms, Dichotomies and Dead Ends: Limitations of Analytic Thinking About Sport.Scott Kretchmar - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):266 – 280.
    In this essay I attempt to show the limitations of analytic thinking and the kinds of dead ends into which such analyses may lead us in the philosophy of sport. As an alternative, I argue for a philosophy of complementation and compatibility in the face of what appear to be exclusive alternatives. This is a position that is sceptical of bifurcations and other simplified portrayals of reality but does not dismiss them entirely. A philosophy of complementation traffics in the (...)
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  46.  7
    On Phenomenological and Logical Characteristics of Skilled Behaviour in Sport: Cognitive and Motor Intentionality.Vegard Fusche Moe - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (3):251-268.
    In this paper, I discuss phenomenological and logical characteristics of skilled behaviour in sport. The paper comprises two parts. The first describes phenomenological characteristics of skilled behaviour through Timothy Gallwey’s two playing modes and Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s distinction between abstract and concrete movement. The second logical part introduces the concept of intentionality and the distinction Sean Kelly makes between cognitive and motor intentionality. I discuss how this distinction fits the phenomenological characteristics established in the first part of the paper. My (...)
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  47.  38
    Remote Sport: Risk and Self-Knowledge in Wilder Spaces.Leslie A. Howe - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (1):1-16.
    Previous discussions on the value of sport in remote locations have concentrated on 1) environmental and process concerns, with the rejection of competition and goal-directed or use oriented activity, or 2) the value of risk and dangerous sport for self-affirmation. It is argued that the value of risk in remote sport is in self-knowledge rather than self-affirmation and that risk in remote sport, while enhancing certain kinds of experience, is not necessary. The value of remote (...) is in offering the opportunity for experience that enhances the participants’ knowledge both of self and of the environment with which they interact. (shrink)
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  48.  36
    Sport, Nature and Worldmaking.Kevin Krein - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (3):285 – 301.
    Many philosophers of sport maintain that athletics can contribute to our understanding of ourselves and the environments in which we live. It may be relatively easy to offer accounts of how athletes might acquire self-knowledge through sport; however, it is far more difficult to see how sport could add to the general understanding of human individuals, cultural frameworks or the material world. The study of sport as a way of worldmaking is helpful in understanding how (...) can contribute to the pursuit of knowledge in such areas. The position I present is based on arguments made by Gunter Gebauer in his 1993 presidential address to the Philosophic Society for the Study of Sport, 'Sport, theater, and ritual: Three ways of worldmaking', and in my explanation and interpretation of Gebauer's position, I rely heavily on Nelson Goodman's Ways of worldmaking . Gebauer's work is focused on traditional sports, and he argues that such sports create worlds that represent fundamental attitudes and values of the cultures that produce them. I argue that alternative sports are well suited to create new and original worlds that instantiate value systems in opposition to mainstream culture. I argue further that nature sports such as climbing and surfing represent relationships between humans and natural features, and that such sports, as a subcategory of alternative sports, are in a position to create new and original frameworks that can help us to better comprehend our relationships with natural environments. (shrink)
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  49.  88
    Does Sport Have Intrinsic Value?Leon Culbertson - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (3):302 – 320.
    This paper considers the suggestion, central to McFee's (2004) moral laboratory argument, that sport is intrinsically valuable. McFee's position is outlined and critiqued and various interpretations of intrinsic value found in the philosophical literature are considered. In addition, Morgan's (2007) claim that sport is an appropriate final end is considered and partially accepted. The paper draws a number of terminological distinctions and concludes that sport does not have intrinsic value as traditionally conceived, but that this is of (...)
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  50.  11
    Fruits, Apples, and Category Mistakes: On Sport, Games, and Play.Angela J. Schneider - 2001 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 28 (2):151-159.
    (2001). Fruits, Apples, and Category Mistakes: On Sport, Games, and Play. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport: Vol. 28, No. 2, pp. 151-159. doi: 10.1080/00948705.2001.9714610.
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